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Saturday, 13 September, 2014

Cannon Beach Cottage Tour

a benefit for the Cannon Beach History Center

We had a long walk to the next cottage.  As always in Cannon Beach, charming sights abounded.

a wee cottage with a garden full of potential

a wee cottage with a garden full of potential

The walking route took us along the narrow shouldered lane uphill on Hemlock Street.  Now me, hobbling with my cane and with cars going by and a drop off on one side, was probably the only one in the world acrophobic and car phobic enough to be scared.

map

I really was quite toe curlingly anxious.

I really was quite toe curlingly anxious.

However, I survived the walk both ways.  Allan was with me on the way back and told me quite comfortingly that if I fell down the slope it would be into brambles and not all the way down. It was quite, quite a long and uphill and downdale walk and I was glad I had brought my cane.

the first view of Haystack Rock

the first view of Haystack Rock

and a clearer view as the walk progressed

and a clearer view as the walk progressed

Allan says "I stayed above the highway on a 'shortcut' with this double decked house facing Haystack rock...

Allan says “I stayed above the highway on a ‘shortcut’ with this double decked house facing Haystack rock…”

"and a flowering hedge below" (looks like Escallonia to me)

“and a flowering hedge below” (looks like Escallonia to me)

"and standing stones south of the main rock" (The Needles)

“and standing stones south of the main rock” (The Needles)

"and a house of river rock (& a few plants)"

“and a house of river rock (& a few plants)”

I was walking alone as Allan left the previous house after me, and as I finally neared the destination, older folks leaving the property said to me, “It’s worth it!”  I realized that with my cane, I am now bonded to the older folks.  I guess I am one of them!  They were so right, the destination was well worth the long, hilly walk in both directions.

West-Bouvy Cabin

from the programme:  Originally built in 1913 for Oregon governor Oswald West, this is one of the most historic homes on the tour.  The property sits on a basaltic precipice with a breathtaking view of the ocean.  The rectangular, one story Adirondack style log cabin is 40 by 48 feet and sits 80 feet above sea level.  The Wests sold their retreat in 1926, where it was sold to a Dr Harry Bouvy and his wife Gladys in 1936 and later passed down to their descendants.  In late May of 1991, the homeowners had made plans with the Oregon State Preservation Office to nominate the home on the National Register of Historic Places.  It wasn’t until May 30, 1991, a 16-year old arsonist set the home ablaze and 55 years of family history had gone up in smoke.  Following the fire, the home was reconstructed in its exact location.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

seesaw on north lawn

seesaw on north lawn

As you can see, the home has a second story; I’m not sure if that was added later.

view from north lawn

view from north lawn

I stood in the queue on the west side porch having a delightful chat with the docent.  He said interior photos were just fine, and so did the owner, who was inside.  We were even allowed to wear our shoes in the house despite the very fine wood floors.  The docent told me that the house had been recreated by sifting through the ashes to find the original footprint, and also had been recreated from photographs.  (I did not think to ask if the second story was original or added later.)

The name of the young arsonist is a mystery; because of his age, the records were sealed.  I can only wonder why? why? why?  I found this good article about the rebuilding (although when I look at it, the colours are very odd and hard to read).  Here is another, and easier to read, article.

Allan's photo of me chatting with the docent.

Allan’s photo of me chatting with the docent.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

dining

massive stone fireplace

massive stone fireplace

fireplace

many spots for reading

many spots for reading

logs

 

nooks

south window view with an old original building

south window view with an old original building

telescope

china cabinet

china cabinet

kichen

kitchen

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

kitchen

The red counters remind me of my grandma's kitchen

The red counters remind me of my grandma’s kitchen

log cabin knife rack

log cabin knife rack

pantry

old fashioned pantry

log construction

log construction

back to the living room

back to the living room

Allan went upstairs

Allan went upstairs

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

reading nook, Allan's photo

reading nook, Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

IMG_0917

Allan's photo of historic photos

Allan’s photo of historic photos

the upstairs view

the upstairs view (Allan’s photo)

upstairs view (Allan's photo)

upstairs view (Allan’s photo)

snoozy spots

snoozy spots (Allan’s photo)

woodwork detail, Allan's photo

woodwork detail, Allan’s photo

on the expansive west veranda

on the expansive west veranda

view to Haystack Rock

view to Haystack Rock

The Needles

The Needles

sw

SW corner of the veranda

SW corner of the veranda

the original woodshed

the original woodshed

a green roof

a green roof; the bank would have been spangled with white ox-eye daisy earlier in the year.

spent daisy heads

spent daisy heads

south side of house

south side of house

path to beach, Allan's photo

path to beach, Allan’s photo

cabin from below (Allan's photo)

cabin from below (Allan’s photo)

behind the house, the old well house

behind the house, the old well house

inside the well house...

inside the well house…

...the old well.

…the old well.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

back porch

back porch

tiny back garden

tiny back garden

north side

north side

As we made the long walk back to the next cottage, I told older folks who were walking toward me and looking rather hot and tired in the 84 degree weather, “It’s worth it.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday, 13 September 2014

Cannon Beach Cottage and Garden Tour

a benefit for the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum

We walked to the next set of cottages along a woodsy street with newer homes.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo: "This area was woods not too long ago."

Allan’s photo: “This area was woods not too long ago.”

down a woodsy street

down a woodsy street

Chinook House

from the programme:  John Klein built the Chinook House in 1995 on post and piers.  This house was the first home he built in the south end of Cannon Beach.  The inspiration and vision behind a the remodel [in 1998] was peaceful quietude, and all the materials used to remodel the home were green products.

chinook

Allan's photo:  He thought I should see this pillow as it looks just like my late and much missed kitty, Dumbles.

Allan’s photo: He thought I should see this pillow as it looks just like my late and much missed kitty, Dumbles.

Dolphin House

from the programme: John Klein, who built 24 other homes in this area, built this home in 1996 on stilts.  Before 1996, most of this area was undeveloped with talk of developing land on the wetlands.  The current homeowner purchased the home 13 years ago and has done several upgrades to the home by adding a detached shed and a gas stove and gas water heater to winterize the home.

third

I always like a boardwalk

I always like a boardwalk

looking back to the street

looking back to the street

view of Chinook house next door

view of Chinook house next door

on the porch

on the porch

deck with wetlands view

deck with wetlands view

a corner full of light

a corner full of light

Haystack Roost

from the programme:  This cedar-shingled, white trimmed charmer was built in 2001, and is a classic example of Cannon Beach bungalow architecture.  The inside of this regal roost exudes classic country with red, white and blue all over.  The centerpiece of Haystack Roost is its gorgeous country kitchen and river rock fireplace.  Keep an eye out for whimsical, farm-inspired decor, plus framed photos depicting classic beach scenes from scenic lighthouses to bathing costumes of old.

Haystack Roost looks like a real old time cottage.

Haystack Roost looks like a real old time cottage.

The grounds are left natural and woodsy.

The grounds are left natural and woodsy.

stump

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I was glad to see this sign on any house as it meant I could take some photos.

front porch

I was glad at any cottage to see the vacation rental sign as it meant the museum volunteer host would say it was ok to take photos.

Beadboard makes the home look so old fashioned.

Beadboard makes the home look so old fashioned.

that old beachy kitchen feeling

that old beachy kitchen feeling

The fireplace is the same style as in many old Cannon Beach cottages.

The fireplace is the same style as in many old Cannon Beach cottages.

painting

in the living room

naptime

naptime

barrow

dresser

dresser top

down the hallway

down the hallway, with more delightful beadboard

bedroom

side wall

side wall

picnic

Allan had walked back to the van to get his second camera, as he had forgotten a back up battery for the first.  He found me waiting on the porch of the Haystack Roost.

haystack

Allan was put in a queue and was anxious about falling behind, I guess, as he did not go into this house so didn’t take a photo to show me the upstairs.  I am sure it was cute and I bet it had beadboard.

Oh, here it is in a screen shot from the rental site for this cottage; you can click through a slide show with some enticing full views of the living room and country kitchen.  I would most certainly love to stay here.  It’s on that quiet, woodsy street far from the bustling tourism of downtown.

here

Fernwood House

from the programme:  Mike Capper, a local contracter, had the vision to build this custom-built cabin for his family in 1975.  This home is uniquely charming and rustic with the array of found and natural materials that are sprinkled throughout the house.  As you go through the home, you’ll notice that it’s built around around telephone poles.  This cottage was also featured on an episode of HGTV’s Beachfront Bargain Hunt that aired earlier this year.  This is one of the most original of all the cottages on the tour and is a must-see.

the queue

the queue

I was daunted by the queue on the narrow stairs, as I knew that to get down I would have to go sideways and there was not not enough room, so I decided to walk on to the next house which I could tell was quite a ways away.  Allan went in, as he would easily be able to catch up with me.  No one objected to his taking photos, so he did take a few.  At the end of the tour, with half an hour left, I wanted to see it so (by then quite, quite gimpy), so we walked back from the museum and I did make it up the stairs.  Unfortunately, I was stopped after one photograph so am posting no interior photos (not even Allan’s).  Too bad, as it was quite an unsual house.  However, you can see photos on the real estate sales site (20 of the interior), at least for now until it sells, and if you can find the episode of Beach Front Bargain Hunt that featured this cottage, you can vicariously tour the whole thing for $1.99.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

He tells me there was a rocking chair inside that window that he named to himself “the chair of terror” as it had windows on one side and the stairwell drop on the other.

Allan's photo: back porch

Allan’s photo: back porch

Allan's photo, back porch

Allan’s photo, back porch

Next, my favourite cottage on the tour, after a long walk.

Saturday, 13 September

Cannon Beach Cottage and Garden Tour

a benefit for Cannon Beach History Center and Museum

We walked from the Cannon Beach History Center two blocks to the first cottage, and of course, in Cannon Beach, saw delightful sights along the way.

sunflowers on a fence like my grandma's back alley fence

sunflowers on a fence like my grandma’s back alley fence

roses on a split rail fence

roses on a split rail fence

O’Brian Cottage

from the programme:  This lovely country cottage was built in 1954 and was purchased by the current owners in 2007.  If your wish is to experience true beach living charm, then you will find it here.  This home boasts of its love for family and friends, and was originally the Cannon Beach Bible Church pastor’s home, as there are steps in the back yard that lead to the church.  Be on the lookout for framed posters of Cannon Beach events throughout the years as well as a secret loft made especially for kids.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

sign

door

We were given permission to take photos by the very nice dad of the museum director!

We were given permission to take photos by the very nice dad of the museum director!

table

 

table

kitchen

window

windows are my favourite thing to photograph inside the cottages

flowers

skylight

and little cottagey details

and little cottagey details

Blue and white with soft yellow is such a classic cottage combo.

Blue and white with soft yellow is such a classic cottage combo.

guest

dreamytime

dreamytime

the tiniest stove

the tiniest stove

screened window view of back yard fire circle

screened window view of back yard fire circle

time to fish

time to fish

details

the definitive Cannon Beach Cottages book

the definitive Cannon Beach Cottages book

stones

Due to my decrepitude, only Allan went upstairs in any of the cottages, so upstairs photos are all his.

pictures in the stairwell

pictures in the stairwell

sandcastles

IMG_0843

I love attics as my bedroom as a youth was an attic one.

I love attics as my bedroom as a youth was an attic one.

loft

childhood magic!

childhood magic!

birdhouse

interlude

on the two block walk to the next cottage:

a modern home in the trees

a modern home in the trees (Allan’s photo)

sunroom (Allan's photo)

sunroom (Allan’s photo)

cannas

cannas at the Bible Church (Allan’s photo)

church that is associated with the first cottage

church that is associated with the first cottage (Allan’s photo)

Saturday, 13 September 2014

We spent a very few minutes before going “overseas” on a visit to the Ilwaco Saturday Market, as I still feel responsible for getting some weekly photos for Discover Ilwaco.  Allan went up on the port office balcony and happened to capture the moment when I encountered our good friend Kathleen.

IMG_0824

We were both in blue.

IMG_0828

a brief market stroll

a brief market stroll

I wanted some Swedish traveling cake from Pink Poppy Bakery; unfortunately, I happened upon the very few minutes that Madeline was away from her booth, and I was anxious to get on the way to Cannon Beach.

Howerton Way garden on the walk back to the van

Howerton Way garden on the walk back to the van

While stopped on the Astoria bridge because of construction, we got to enjoy the view.

looking west

looking west

lots of little boats out fishing

lots of little boats out fishing

tiny boats in the vast Columbia River

tiny boats in the vast Columbia River

boats

Part of my hurry to get going from the market had been that I wanted time to stop at 7 Dees garden center south of Seaside.

7

7Dees

The plants need much water in this heat (84 degrees and rising).

The plants need much water in this heat.

Very cool tree, Azara microphylla, for sale.

Very cool tree, Azara microphylla, for sale.

an unusual arbour

an unusual arbour

arbour

detail

detail

This gorgeous brugmansia was tempting, but would have had to sit in a hot car all day and then been babied through the winter.

This gorgeous brugmansia was tempting, but would have had to sit in a hot car all day and then been babied through the winter.

Allan's photo:  Ready to plant wall art with wood surrounds and screened.

Allan’s photo: Ready to plant wall art with wood surrounds and screened.

Lots of chrysanthemum blooms just coming on

Lots of chrysanthemum blooms just coming on

The plant for which I was on a mission was plain, simple, rustic Rudbeckia (black eyed Susan).  I only had ten minutes to shop and keep on schedule and I did not see any…except in the display garden.

display

On we went to Cannon Beach.

84 and rising!

heading south…84 and rising!

When we got to the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum, we had about half an hour to wait before tour maps would be available.  It was better to be there early; we had left early as one never knows how long one might have to wait for construction on the Astoria Megler bridge.

Cannon Beach History Center and Museum, photo from Cannon Beach Visitors Center.

Cannon Beach History Center and Museum, photo from Cannon Beach Visitors Center.

Filled with eager anticipation, as I look forward to the cottage tour all summer, w e walked half a block to look at one of the cottages that would be on the tour later.  (Actually, just the garden on this one was open.)

a vacation rental with pretty garden

a vacation rental with pretty garden

I saw that the same sign of rules was up as last year.

sign

I find it just shocking that anyone would open cabinets or drawers inside a tour home.  What a shame.  Or smoke…or use the restroom…or pick, remove, or alter flowers!  Goodness gracious.  Human nature astonishes me sometimes.  Adults should behave themselves better.

I must address the no photography rule so that readers will know we are not scofflaws.  Before the tour, I messaged with the executive director museum about whether or not it would be ok to ask to take photos and she said she did not think anyone would mind.  We asked at each place, at least at the ones where we wanted to take photos of darling cottage details.  Because most of the historic cottages this time were vacation rentals, there are already photos of their interiors on the Cannon Beach Vacation Rental website, and two of them were for sale with lots of interior photos up on real estate sites.

What I long for, as someone with a bad memory, is for the rule to be changed to something like “no photography allowed in some houses; check for sign”.  I have not worked very hard on that wording.  I had a good conversation about it with the docent for the amazing home overlooking Haystack Rock, whose owner was there and was completely open to people taking photos.  The ever so pleasant and jolly docent said he did not think any owners minded photos being taken.  I said that some must, or the rule would not be in place.  We agreed that a great solution would be to have a sign on the doors of houses where the owners do object, saying “No photography in this home, please.”  It would save the embarrassment of someone like me with social anxiety having to ask…and it would be nice for the other guests, as well.  I saw many people with fancy cameras around their necks who may not have known that they could ask, and  one woman mournfully said to me upon hearing me being given permission, “My husband would have come if he had known he could take photos at some of the houses.”

The charming docent who said he thought none of the owners minded and who liked my individual sign idea said he would talk to the director; I said “Oh, dear, she will know it is that obnoxious woman from Ilwaco again” and he laughed and said he would be sure to say that it was the idea of the obnoxious woman from Ilwaco.   The tour certainly does not need to accommodate my wishes to succeed, as it is a sellout every year.  Allan kindly pointed out that they would not miss me if I stopped going.

You might wonder why it is so important to me.  Well, I have such intensely great memories of the cottage tours of 2007 and 2010, and I can guarantee I would not remember them at all were it not for the photos, which I have looked at often and with such pleasure.  I know that we went on the tour in 2008, and took photos, but for some reason I have lost them, and I have absolutely NO memory of that tour.  (We missed it in 2009 due to my mom being ill and me forgetting that the tour was in September and not October.)  (It certainly does sound like I have a bad memory.)

I love to be able to share photos of cottage details with blog readers (all three of them) back east, in the UK, and in Australia. The light coming in through a beach view window and falling upon a vase of flowers would be just torment to not be able to photograph and share.  These details do not reveal anything that could be used in a damaging way, even if I exert my direst imagination to try to figure out how that could happen.

I googled around about home tours and found that the no photography rule is common for home tours in the cities.  I wonder how tour goers feel about that?  I assume folks go on such tours to gather ideas for their own homes.  How can they remember the look of a certain kitchen cupboard or woodwork trim without a photo?  And yet I can understand why big fancy houses (which I would not want to tour anyway, and that’s not just sour grapes) would want to protect their STUFF.  Little cottages usually don’t have big fancy stuff and the sorts of things that I love and want to remember are seashells hanging in a window, a vase of flowers on a table, old dishes on a worn pantry shelf.

Here are some examples of treasured memories from past tours (memories only because of the photos):

old fashioned fireplace surround

old fashioned fireplace surround

p1080649

window

window

picture-632

photos

rustic headboard

rustic headboard

Oh how I wish I could get a special press pass that allows me to take just details like the above!

If there were a “cottaged-up double wide home tour”, would I let people take photos inside?  Why yes, I most certainly would.

So we asked at each cottage, and were given permission for the photos that follow.  We only wanted photos at the old and/or quirky cottages.  Ironically, at one house Allan was allowed to take photos but when I went back later (and the docent shift had perhaps changed), I was told no photos, possibly by a different docent who did not know that the rules could be bent.  I am still pondering about that one, as not only has it been featured on HGTV but it has 20 interior shots online at a realtor’s site (and Allan’s photos are so very much better!).  Oh, well!

Enjoy!

 

 

Friday, 12 September 2014

Larry and Robert’s Garden

Just five doors down is where we began the hot dry day by watering, weeding and deadheading. We maintain this garden so regularly that the weeding is minimal.

What I feel would make it just perfect is if it had a fence across the property on the west side, with an entry arbour; it already has a wisteria in place to grow on it.

From corner of house to west side of garden, fence with gate would be perfect.  It could be tall with the wisteria growing on it.

From corner of house to west side of garden, fence with gate would be perfect. It could be tall with the wisteria growing on it. I have no idea why wisteria in lower right corner is there with nothing to grow on.

Such a fence would prevent the deer from browsing this newly cleaned up bed.

Such a fence would prevent the deer from browsing this newly cleaned up bed.

Deer have been walking in from the front of the house and eating the Fuchsias...

Deer have been walking in from the front of the house and nibbling the Fuchsias…

..and the roses.

..and the roses.

Right where Allan is standing is where the fence could go...

Right where Allan is standing is where the fence could go…

The east side of the house, planted with deer resistant plants.

The east side of the house, planted with deer resistant plants.

the corner that gets way more sun that I thought it would...

the corner that gets way more sun that I thought it would…

I am going to move a few plants from here over to the shadier beds this fall.

The Verbena bonariensis in the boat amuses me by being tall and vertical where a sail mast would be, even if no one else notices.

The Verbena bonariensis in the boat amuses me by being tall and vertical where a sail mast would be, even if no one else notices.

Long Beach

By watering the Long Beach planters today, we hope that they will last till next Wednesday. If they can wait for watering till then, Allan won’t have to water them from Thursday to Sunday when I have gone with a dear friend on a four day trip to the Sylvia Beach Hotel.

planter in front of the smokeshop with 'Star Cluster' Coreopsis.

planter in front of the smoke shop with Coreopsis ‘Star Cluster’.

one of my favourite planters...and across from it, one that we plan to redo this fall.

one of my favourite planters…and across from it, one that we plan to redo this fall.

another angle

another angle

note to self: more patio dahlias next year

note to self: more patio dahlias in the planters next year

Basket Case Greenhouse baskets on the Long Beach gazebo

Basket Case Greenhouse baskets on the Long Beach gazebo

I noticed for the first time that Mexigo has corn planted in their half barrel.

I noticed for the first time that Mexigo has corn planted in their half barrel.

Just north of Mexigo and Scoopers Ice Cream is another problem planter; not only is it windswept, for some reason it is one of our most vandalized planters. It’s planted with two full sized escallonias and is infested with red clover amid the creeping succulents that are the only thing that thrives here.

little sempervivums all infested with clover...what a pain.

little sempervivums all infested with clover…what a pain.

I’ve managed this year to get a lavender and a santolina to grow here without being yanked out by someone, so perhaps whoever used to bother this planter so much has moved on.

The planters at the west end of the Bolstadt beach approach that we redid last fall look good even with very little water. Once a week, we are told, the city crew mists them with their water pump trailer.

not too bad for almost total neglect

not too bad for almost total neglect

Ilwaco

We were hustling because we had an early dinner engagement. Ilwaco would neatly fill up the rest of our workday. While Allan watered the planters, I checked on them closely for the first time in a couple of months. He has been doing a fantastic job on his own and I found very few, tiny weeds.

This planter in almost full shade on Spruce Street is doing remarkably well.

This planter in almost full shade on Spruce Street is doing remarkably well.

bright sun made the nasturtiums glow at First and Main.

bright sun made the nasturtiums glow at First and Main. The lotus vine is less rampant in the sun than in the shade, perhaps because the shady planter stays more moist.

same planter, backdrop of Don's Portside Café

same planter, backdrop of Don’s Portside Café

kitty corner: yellows and oranges to tone with the café

kitty corner: yellows and oranges to tone with the café

Because the planter by the Portside Café has a clogged drainage hole, it stays moist. We will have to dig it out this fall if we want to have any bulbs in it. For the summer, I took advantage of the problem by planting mimulus there.

mimulus

mimulus

more mimulus; it was a mixed batch so we could not make it all yellow.

more mimulus; it was a mixed batch so we could not make it all yellow.

Down on First and Eagle, the planter that got all its plants torn out (and then we discovered it in enough time to replant them) has sort of recovered.

The nasturtium grew again but not floriferously.

The nasturtium grew again but not floriferously.

Sunflowers grow on the south wall of the house next to that planter.

Sunflowers grow on the south wall of the house next to that planter.

Just across the street from that house is the boatyard's north fence.

Just across the street from that house is the boatyard’s north fence.

Steve was up working on his mast.  He told me he often forgets to take some tool or other up with him.

Steve was up working on his mast. He told me he often forgets to take some tool or other up with him.

I weeded the garden along the east fence of the boatyard and still had time to water it again, which I felt it sorely needed due to the heat.

boatyard garden; we water from inside of the fence.

boatyard garden; we water from inside of the fence.

Because Allan needs an hour and forty five minutes to water the Ilwaco planters with the pump trailer, I had plenty of time. I realized I could even do some weeding along the inside by pulling weeds away from the fence.

pulling grass clumps and horsetail and bindweed away from the inside

pulling grass clumps and horsetail and bindweed away from the inside

I met a new boatyard dog who condescended to be briefly petted.

I met a new boatyard dog who condescended to be briefly petted.

A mast was being raised by a crane.

A mast was being raised by a crane.

And I chatted with a woman who has two boat cats on her boat.

And I chatted with a woman who has two boat cats on her boat.

We actually ended up with fifteen minutes of turn around time at home before doing to dinner. Usually we have a later dinner; tonight, we were dining at the unusual hour of 5:30 PM at the Depot Restaurant.

Depot Restaurant

By picking an earlier hour, we had gotten the Chef’s Table at the Depot for Kathleen’s two-weeks-early birthday dinner. Chef Michael, from the open kitchen window, served us a special plate of bread and an upscale bleu cheese.

cheese

Then began the birthday feasting:

Carne Asada appetizer

Carne Asada Negro: Sautéed tender chunks of marinated, grass fed, hormone free Rib Eye on Cumin Scented Black Beans topped with mild Mama Lil’s Goat Horn Peppers and Cilantro with Fried Tortilla Chips

Thai calamari appetizer

Thai Calamari: Fried wild sustainable Calamari tossed in Thai Peanut Cilantro Sauce on fresh Spinach and Napa Cabbage mix topped with Crispy Won Tons

for Kathleen: Southern Comfort Pork with enough for tomorrow's dinner, as well

for Kathleen: Southern Comfort Pork: Braised Pork Shoulder in Southern Comfort Bar BQ Sauce on Yam Mashers seasoned with Brown Sugar surrounded by Jalapeño Creamed Corn topped with Green Onion, Maple and Bacon Salsa (enough to provide tomorrow’s dinner, as well)

for me: spicy prawns

for me: Bangkok Prawns: Sweet Lime Chile Glazed Fried Prawns on Rice Noodle Sesame Seaweed Salad topped with Crispy Fried Chinese Noodles

for Allan: Parmesan Artichoke Risotto: Vegetarian Risotto with Artichoke Flowerets, Imported Parmesan Cheese and topped with Micro Greek Salad

for Allan: Parmesan Artichoke Risotto: Vegetarian Risotto with Artichoke Flowerets, Imported
Parmesan Cheese and topped with Micro Greek Salad

lemon bundt cake with blackberry puree backed with flourless chocolate cake

lemon bundt cake with blackberry puree backed with flourless chocolate torte

sorbet

sorbet

After such a scrumptious feast, we still had more talking to do so we moved to a table on the deck for another hour or more. It was an unusual angle to me to see the hops vines from the inside of the deck; I decided it was truly a stroke of genius to have planted them against the lattice.

The other side is the garden we deadhead and water.

The other side is the garden we deadhead and water.

They look quite wonderful draping overhead.

They look quite wonderful draping overhead…

and dangling down

and dangling down

and they looked even more romantic when darkness fell.

and they looked even more romantic when darkness fell.

It seems we lead a life of luxury with constant dining out; tomorrow would be another such dinner. We’ll make up for it this winter by being frugal (I hope!)

 

 

Thursday, 11 September 2014

Yesterday, we had lots of butterflies on Sedum ‘Autumn Joy'; today, we had much deadheading of Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ (getting tiresome!).

Just before going to work, I got neighbour dog Rudder to walk over to me for a good scritchy scratch.

Rudder

Rudder

He got just as much as he wanted, and then walked away with great dignity to lie down again.

next door

next door

We took enough time to water our volunteer garden at the post office; in full sun, it gets terribly dry.

We took enough time to water our volunteer garden at the post office; in full sun, it gets terribly dry.

The Depot Restaurant

We gave the cosmos a good deadheading and some water to supplement the sprinkler system. There is only one Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ to deadhead there.

It's to the far right in the half barrel.

It’s to the far right in the half barrel (behind the sideways railroad history sign).

I never tire of deadheading the cosmos.  Perhaps that is because they are just the right height.

I never tire of deadheading the cosmos. Perhaps that is because they are just the right height.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Long Beach Welcome Sign

The welcome sign, on the other hand, has about 12 Butterflies. I thought the Cosmos ‘Happy Ring’ were going to be shorter; the Butterflies are partially hidden behind them (so I slacked off a bit on the grooming, I must admit).

welcome sign front and back

welcome sign front and back

the front with Cosmos 'Happy Ring', Geranium 'Rozanne' (hope it will be bigger next year), and Bidens.

the front with Cosmos ‘Happy Ring’, Geranium ‘Rozanne’ (hope it will be bigger next year), and Bidens.

Red Barn Arena

Up Sandridge Road to the Red Barn and Diane’s garden…

An awfully cute truck was parked at the Red Barn, where we deadheaded four half barrels of Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’.

I think it was from Idaho.

hood

I have a feeling that is the truck's name.

I have a feeling that is the truck’s name.

If I had the ability, our van would look something like that (except it would be called Cosmos).

We had an audience near the side door of the barn.

half barrel with Cosmos 'Sonata' and Agyranthemum 'Butterfly'

half barrel with Cosmos ‘Sonata’ and Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’

horse

crab pots stacked near the barn awaiting the winter season

crab pots stacked near the barn awaiting the winter season

Diane’s garden

Next door to the Red Barn by Diane’s house, Misty was snoozing but woke up for a belly rub.

misty

my good friend Misty

 

the roadside garden

the roadside garden with cosmos, Stipa gigantea, Perovskia (Russian sage)

Andersen’s RV Park

Over Cranberry Road to Pacific Highway and Andersen’s RV Park…

the sunwashed west side former poppy garden now full of blue beach asters

the sunwashed west side former poppy garden now full of blue beach asters

The park was filling up with an RV club or two. We weeded, deadheaded cosmos and deadheaded something like twenty Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’.

six half barrels

six half barrels (three each side) on the drive to the RV spaces

Tigridia (Mexican shell flower) in the Payson Hall clubhouse planters

Tigridia (Mexican shell flower) in the Payson Hall clubhouse planters. (The dark blue is painted sage.)

One Airstream was parked down by the garden shed in the solitary spot that gives the park guest a private garden setting of their own.

an Airstream by the garden shed

an Airstream by the garden shed

It was 79 degrees, much too hot for our comfort, as we headed south toward Long Beach and Ilwaco.

It was 79 degrees, much too hot for our comfort, as we headed south toward Long Beach and Ilwaco.

We made a quick stop at home where I saw that my young Rosa pteracantha, newly planted in the front garden, is indeed in a good spot to have its thorns backlit by afternoon sun.

Rosa pteracantha (winged rose)

Rosa pteracantha (winged rose)

Port of Ilwaco

Due to the prolonged warm dry spell, I watered the Ilwaco boatyard while Allan did some watering of the Howerton Way garden beds at the Port.

I like the way the boatyard garden is being allowed to jump behind the fence a bit without the boatyard crew resorting to Round Up.

I think the escapees look great.

I think the escapees look great.

California poppies behind the fence by the sanican.

California poppies behind the fence by the sanican.

The boatyard watering is done with hoses hooked up to various faucets behind the fence, so I can only look at the garden, not weed it.

Behind the fence is a line of electrical and water hook ups for boats being worked on.

Behind the fence is a line of electrical and water hook ups for boats being worked on.

It's interesting to see the boats come and go, and most of the boat people express appreciation for the garden.

It’s interesting to see the boats come and go, and most of the boat people express appreciation for the garden.

I hadn't seen Chaos from Alaska before.

I hadn’t seen Chaos from Alaska before.

chaos

chaos2

The Mystique has been here all summer, as its owner fixes it up for a long winter sail to southern climes.

Mystique

Mystique

Steve's dog barks all the way to getting petted.

Steve’s dog, Aleutia, barks all the way to getting petted. I like her very much.

Our local paper had an excellent article recently about the stories behind some of these summer’s boats, including Steve’s.

“Steve Van Ronk is working on the masts of 41-foot sailing boat, Mystique.

“I’m a single guy with a dog, why not sell my house and sail around the world?” said Van Ronk, an artist and committed world traveler.

He hopes to have the masts finished and a crew in place so he can sail down the coast and spent the winter in Mexico — and figure out the rest when he reaches Panama.

Aleutia, Van Ronk’s certified wilderness search and rescue dog, will join him.” (writer Katie Wilson)

I could see enough weeds from behind the fence to decide to put some weeding of the boatyard on tomorrow’s agenda if we have time.

the garden side of the boatyard fence

the garden side of the boatyard fence

Meanwhile:

Allan's photo: leftovers in the gardens from Slow Drag at the Port

Allan’s photo: leftovers in the gardens from Slow Drag at the Port

Allan's photo, west end of Howerton Way

Allan’s photo, west end of Howerton Way

When he joined me back the boatyard, I asked him to cut down some big annual strawflower-something at the end (a plant given us to try out by The Planter Box).

before

before

after!

after! They had been thriving in such a narrow, dry spot (and had been pretty with yellowy amber flowers earlier in the season)

Before we had our traditional Thursday night dinner treat, we checked on the garden by the Port Office, with this view.

the marina

the marina

port office garden

port office garden

You can tell the difference between the port hanging baskets and Don’s Nisbett’s at his art gallery right next door. All were from The Basket Case Greenhouse at about the same time.

Don Nisbett Art Gallery

Don Nisbett Art Gallery

Don babies his with lavishings of water and miracle gro. Nancy at the port says she is going to get him to take care of the office baskets, too…but if the office baskets hang this low, they will smother my garden! What a dilemma.

Dinner at the Cove

Parking Lot Cat was too interested in this vehicle's bumper to greet us.

Parking Lot Cat was too interested in this vehicle’s bumper to greet us.

PLC

PLC

We joined Steve and John of the bayside garden and their funny and endearing neighbour, Ron (whose garden was part of the old Clarke Nursery and was also on the recent garden tour) at the Cove Restaurant for fish taco Thursday. Ron is a golfer and it was clear that he was a favourite of the restaurant staff.

Steve and John just know they are going to be blog fodder.

Steve and John just know they are going to be blog fodder.

At the table right next to us sat our friends Don Nisbett and Jenna (Queen La De Da) and their son Joe.

At the table right next to us sat our friends Don Nisbett and Jenna (Queen La De Da) and their son Joe (posing as blog fodder).

tonight's menu

tonight’s menu

Steve and John had delicious, cool Caesar salads…the best anywhere, they say. I had no idea till tonight that one can get them served with anchovies! Next time…

caesar salad and a nice glass of white wine

caesar salad and a nice glass of white wine

fried artichokes with cajun dipping sauce

fried artichokes with creole dipping sauce

Allan's strawberry salad

Allan’s strawberry salad

Allan was the only one who actually ordered a $2 fish taco.  They are tasty.

Allan was the only one who actually ordered a $2 fish taco. They are tasty.

John braised the lemony broth bathing the steamer clams.

John braised the lemony broth bathing the steamer clams.

I can't seem to break away from ordering the ahi tuna.

I can’t seem to break away from ordering the ahi tuna.

A slice of peach pie was Allan's reason for just getting one fish taco and a salad.

A slice of peach pie was Allan’s reason for just getting one fish taco and a salad.

There was much talk about gardening and plants, of course. Steve has started to read the Tootlepedal blog daily, and showed us a photo that he particularly admired.

After dinner, we examined the new art show, painting by a retired Fish and Wildlife employee named David Shipley. I think it was safe for him to give up his day job to paint.

Ron very much liked this painting.

Ron very much liked this painting.

I found the geese remarkably realistic.

I found the geese remarkably realistic.

We were all among the last to leave the restaurant after dark, which is what always seems to happen when we dine with friends there.

 

 

Wednesday, 10 September 2014

Today we did the shortened version of our Peninsula garden circuit. It’s the season when not every garden needs to be checked weekly; we skipped Marilyn’s as her daughter is great at watering and we had done a good deadheading the previous week.

On the way north, we used that work time to have a good natter with Kathleen in her new vacation and weekend cottage.

Its green trim and porch rails are getting painted.

Its green trim and porch rails are getting painted.

What a cute place it is, in an old row cottage complex that used to be known as the Shady Dell.

Like Garden Tour Nancy, Kathleen is a bit camera shy sometimes. Then, some work (but not much) for the rest of the day .

Golden Sands Assisted Living

A couple of years ago, I planted some free Stella D’Oro daylilies in the areas outside the four quadrant gardens. Such a boring plant! Today, they met an implacable fate.

Allan and his pick removing Stella.

Allan and his pick removing Stella.

That particular area is infested with horsetail and it will be easier to be able to just weedeat it without the day lilies there putting on their feeble show.

My mom's old garden, the NE quadrant, is the best looking right now.  It will benefit from rudbeckias next year.

My mom’s old garden, the NE quadrant, is the best looking right now. It will benefit from rudbeckias next year.

Monarch butterflies in the garden there liked the Sedum 'Autumn Joy' better than anything.

Monarch butterflies in the garden liked the Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ better than anything.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

Note: Kathleen says those are not Monarchs. So what are they?

At KBC, the usual look in the east gate of the fenced garden.

At KBC, the usual look in the east gate of the fenced garden.

fall crocus in bloom to the right just inside the gate

fall crocus in bloom to the right just inside the gate

Coreopsis 'Flower Tower' with its crazy tall yellow coreopsis flowers

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’ with its crazy tall yellow coreopsis flowers

I can’t figure out how such an enormously tall Coreopsis even came to exist.

Here, too, were butterflies on the Autumn Joy.

Here, too, were butterflies on the Autumn Joy.

butterfly3

2butterfly

Everybody loves Autumn Joy.

Everybody loves Autumn Joy.

bees

KBC housekeeper and garden helper Josephina was weeding up by the cottages. Some of the hydrangeas were so top heavy that they are hanging down where people need to park, so she got a good bouquet out of those.

I think they are just at the stage where they will dry well.

I think they are just at the stage where they will dry well.

We worked hard at getting annoying little creeping red clover out of the gravel paths in the garden.

Wiegardt Gallery

the side door to the framing room/office

the side door to the framing room/office

more colchicums (fall crocus)

more colchicums (fall crocus)

For Steve and John:  a drift of rhododendron leaves with silver indumentum

For Steve and John: a drift of rhododendron leaves with silver indumentum

At Wiegardt Gallery, more butterflies on more Sedum 'Autumn Joy'

At Wiegardt Gallery, more butterflies on more Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’

This week I remembered to check on the Eucomis: still there!

This week I remembered to check on the Eucomis: still there!

The star of the Wiegardt Gallery garden right now is the ornamental grass garden out by the sidewalk.

looking south from the gallery entrance

looking south from the gallery entrance

grasses2

grasses3

the flowers of my favourite: Stipa gigantea

the flowers of my favourite: Stipa gigantea

inside the gallery, front bay window

inside the gallery, front bay window

Cards are a way to get a small piece of Eric's art.

Cards are a way to get a small piece of Eric’s art.

It’s a slow time of year in the gardens except for keeping plants watered and deadheaded to extend the autumn show. It’s too warm and dry to rearrange any plants except for at home when I can keep a very close eye on them. We’d skived off for too long in the morning to fit Andersen’s RV Park into the late afternoon, and as the Ilwaco planters needed watering (by Allan and the water pump trailer), I ended up at home unusually early doing some watering there. All is very dry except back by the bogsy woods where the water table is wonderfully high.

 

 

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