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Archive for Sep, 2013

September 19, 2012

Oh, I am so hard to please about the weather.  Today was too darn hot.  Tomorrow a big rain storm is supposed to come, and then a rain and wind storm on Sunday.  I resolved not to complain that I was sweltering today because a cold and windy summer day is far worse.  But…it was hot.  All of  74.8 degrees F.

As we got ready to go to work, I noticed a good example of Cosmos ‘Seashells’ in the garden.  I couldn’t get much of it (my favourite cosmos cultivar) this year so wanted some good photos.  A friend of mine decided he just had to be in the photo shoot.

Cosmos 'Seashells'

Cosmos ‘Seashells’

cos

cos cos

Smokey has on his BirdsBeSafe collar.  He usually does not look this sinister.

Cosmos 'Seashells'

Cosmos ‘Seashells’

We did our usual compost buckert switch stop at Olde Towne…where more out of town bicycle tourists were enjoying the great ambience.

Olde Towne Café

Olde Towne Café

And then went to Seaview to have a look at a couple of landscaping needs at the Sou’wester Lodge.  Oh what memories it brought back to be there because for my first year on the Peninsula, that is where I lived.

Sou'wester in snow, Dec. '92

Sou’wester in snow, Dec. ’92

Now under new ownership, The Sou’wester has a plants for sale area by the front door.

plants

To the north of the front door, the garden I planted years ago has turned to an area of large shrubs and trees.

part of my old garden

part of my old garden

In the almost twenty years since I left there, many of the garden beds around the cabins have turned back to plain lawn, as one would expect, but some plants remain including the rose Felicité et Perpetué.   I did not take as many pictures as I should have because of having an interesting time talking with new owner Thandi Rosenbaum.

I had not been back into the big historic lodge since President’s Day weekend of 1994. It was wonderful to be there again and brought back memories good and bad, but all worth having.

I had forgotten much, like what the fireplace looked like, even though I must have cleaned the hearth many times.

I had forgotten much, like what the fireplace looked like, even though I must have cleaned the hearth many times.

We looked at the four nightly rental apartments on the second floor of the lodge.  The “honeymoon suite” has a different lace curtain hanging over the sleeping nook but has the same magical feeling.

On the second floor.

Lacy sleeping area…On the second floor.

The Sou’wester is known for its vintage trailer accommodations and Thandi has  commissioned some trailer art.

trailer paintings in apartment three

trailer paintings in apartment three

I have always loved the way the light falls through the windows of the lodge.

probably in apartment two

probably in apartment two

I think two is the one with the lacy bed…one the one with a red rug…and three and four the two west facing ones.  It has been a long time!

This window of number four faces the second story porch.

This window of number four faces the second story porch.

I took this photo from the same window in 1992.

I took this photo from the same window in December 1992.

I love the postcards over the bed in one of the apartments.

postcard art

postcard art

The view from apartment four made me think about how now I would know better than to plant that beech under the power lines.  I NOW remember that I thought it was going to be a short, weeping tree.  I got it from Hall Gardens, a wonderful home nursery that existed near Nahcotta way back then (and later became the private home called Gypsy Pond).

view with a potentially too large tree

view with a potentially too large tree (planted by me in 1993)

Amy, the housekeeper who has worked there for many more years than I did and who also sells plants there, asked me if I could identify two shrubs out by J Place.  One we thought must be an Osmanthus.  The other…I can almost remember.  I got it from Heronswood mail order, probably.  Thandi stands next to it for size:

She's 5'2".

She’s 5’2″.

Here’s a close up of the leaves…not very good because it was such a hot sunny day.

mystery shrub

mystery shrub

leaves

leaves…what is???

We looked inside the amazing two story trailer called The African Queen, of which I had fond memories just because I liked it.  When Amy spoke of not loving to clean it, I do remember it was a challenge with all its nooks.  I also learned that in later years the previous owners of the lodge, cabins and trailers, for whom I had worked, had the staff (staff? before, it was just me!) just put sheets and bedding in the trailers and not make up the beds.  I had to make every bed, and..with eighteen or so apartments, cabins and trailers, there were…oh I don’t even want to remember.  The trailers were, of course, the hardest, being built in tightly.

While we looked at the interesting vintage RV, Thandi and her friend Alex pulled Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’, after we told them it could be pulled and not just cut back.

next to the African Queen

next to the African Queen

I used to have African Queen Oriental lilies and an African Queen Buddliea planted by The African Queen…I had forgotten the latter even existed till Amy reminded me.  (It is still there, planted long before Buddleias made the invasive list….)

I said the volunteer tree should be cut down so the trailer mural shows!

The mural on the Disoriented Express still shows up well.

The Disoriented Express

The Disoriented Express

I told Thandi, looking at the remains of my old garden and at the shrubs which would look so much better deadwooded, that I could imagine, if I lived in walking distance, coming over just for the fun of bringing some of it back.  She offered to have me chauffeured from Ilwaco.  Hmm.

one of my Sou'wester garden beds in 1993

one of my Sou’wester garden beds in 1993

Through making this garden I met Maxine…and her daughter Jo…and my gardening career started so it was worthwhile.

We passed this year’s possible landscaping job at Sou’wester on to our friend Ed Strange who has a young(er) helper who might feel more inclined that we do to tear out an overgrown garden bed.  Then we can help plant it with something better than Siberian iris and the blah running yellow kind of Hypericum.

After all this goofing off, we went up to Long Beach to deadhead.  With rain predicted, we skipped watering the planters.  The soil was damp, yet the plants looked a little thirsty….but a good rain will be effective because of the already wet soil in the planters.

painted sage still looking grand

painted sage still looking grand

It better HAD rain or we will have to go back and water!

painted sage and cosmos

painted sage and cosmos

Oh, big news….I know the names now of the three cultivars of painted sage (Salvia viridis, sometimes called horminum):  Marble Arch White, Blue, and Pink…looked at the seed packets at The Planters Box for a friend who needed the information.

Every year, when I see the dahlias in a couple of the planters, I think I simply must plant more “patio” dahlias.

fabulous dahlias

fabulous dahlias

Maybe in 2014 I will remember to do so.  They come back every year and bloom like crazy.

Speaking of crazy, check out the nasturtium…this one gets extra liquid fertilizer when the city crew waters the hanging basket overhead.

in front of Home at the Beach

in front of Home at the Beach

trailing into the street!

trailing into the street!

by the door of the Wooden Horse gift shop, very beachy

by the door of the Wooden Horse gift shop, very beachy

We next went to the Anchorage Cottages.  I intended to do nothing but quickly deadhead the containers, as we had done a lot of pruning there on Monday.  Somehow, more pruning ensued today.  Manager Beth asked if we could limb up a tree so she could get to the outside of the office window.

done, and looks great although I forgot before pics!

done, and looks great although I forgot before pics!

The volunteer hebe that was under a low limb is getting sun for the first time!

We also pruned the Ceanothus so that the number one shows really well at last.

Ceanothus, pruned

Ceanothus, pruned

During the course of getting tools in and out, I photographed our rake in the back of the van.

Yesterday, I told Allan this rake makes us look poor.

Yesterday, I told Allan this rake makes us look poor.

We like the style very much and cannot seem to find a new one like it.

After The Anchorage, we deadheaded cosmos and weeded at the Boreas Inn.

Boreas Inn, west garden, with the sun cooling off a bit at last.

Boreas Inn, west garden, with the sun cooling off a bit at last.

The only Lobelia tupa that bloomed for me this year still looks magnificent even as it goes to seed.

The Boreas tupa....

The Boreas tupa….

a garden doodad backed with Phormium

a garden doodad backed with Phormium

If the Lobelia tupa is blooming here because it is happy next to the Phormium, we have a problem…because I like to get rid of Phormiums now whenever I can!

Boreas, looking east

Boreas, looking east

Allan remembered that we had to deadhead the Long Beach welcome sign; I might have forgotten.

back side of welcome sign with Acidanthera

back side of welcome sign with Acidanthera

Six Agyranthemum Butterflies later, we departed to water again at Crank’s Roost.

Crank's, view from the back porch

Crank’s, view from the back porch

Finally, in the last hour of daylight, we filled water buckets at the boatyard and Allan watered the Ilwaco planters while I groomed them.

Ilwaco boatyard

Ilwaco boatyard

I happened to see Thandi and Alex from the Sou’wester again as I deadheaded near the Ilwaco Antique Gallery.  After another pleasant conversation they went off to walk along the port and watch the moonrise.  While I did the last few planters, I suddenly had this vision of living in an old trailer at the Sou’wester again and bringing back my old gardens.  In an alternative universe, that would be fantastic.  In this one, I guess I can’t go back!

Allan and I dropped off the trailer at home as the sun set….

looking west on Lake Street

looking west on Lake Street

We had a choice between making a fire in the back yard fire pit before the rains come and get our alder wood all wet…or going to see the harvest moon rise at the port.  It would be too hard to set up a campfire at the last minute in the twilight, so the port moonrise won.

harvest moon

harvest moon

moon

The sky seemed to get lighter as the big moon rose.

moon

 

moonlight path

moonlight path

Allan’s photos:

moon

Allan did the best job of getting the moon's face.  (We both have dinky cameras.)

Allan did the best job of getting the moon’s face. (We both have dinky cameras.)

higher

higher

and higher still

over the tidal flat

over the tidal flat

moonlight on the water

moonlight on the water between the port and Stringtown Road

And then, home….to pick some eggplants, as the edible harvest continues.

another little harvest

another little harvest

These are the first eggplants I have ever grown.  I hope they were picked at the right stage.  Allan has prepared them according to Joy of Cooking while I wrote this, and now it is time to eat them.!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday, September 18

I was so sure that autumnal weather had arrived that we took with us three Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’, thinking we would have nice cool weather in which to plant them.  Pounding rain on the roof and outside the window last night had been a soothing prelude to sleep.  In the morning, Allan heard rain and turned his alarm off, thinking we could sleep in.  Then the bright sun came in the windows.

By the time we got to Klipsan Beach Cottages to start working, the weather was back to a hot summer day, so the Ilex just went for a ride and came back home again.

They got taken for a ride.

They got taken for a ride.

The sky was so blue.  At KBC, behind one particular tree, I often notice the sky looking bluer than anywhere else.

the bluest spot

the bluest spot

This reminds me of being a child, in a hammock, in a garden belonging to a friend of my grandmother’s, looking up at the sky and thinking I was right under the center of it.  Surrounded by a garden, that was one of the moments when I fell in love with gardening and wanted to create such a paradise for myself.

looking up at the blue spot

looking up at the blue spot

The rest of the sky was cloudless but just not as blue!

Hydrangea 'Izu No Hana'...speaking of blue...

Hydrangea ‘Izu No Hana’…speaking of blue…

Denny’s high school reunion group is coming this weekend, a tradition started a few years ago when they surprised him with Mary’s help.  He attended a small high school and had not been able to attend their reunions because of his work managing KBC, so now they come to him.

We looked for ways to make the garden look extra good at this time of year and I hit upon putting a sharp edge on Mary’s border, the one we made her for a birthday present several years back.

before

before

after

after

Garden writer Anne Wareham wrote in The Bad Tempered Gardener about how much she dislikes crisp edges between grass and a garden bed.  I don’t think she would like any of my gardens much, but I do like hers.

Schizostylis at KBC

Schizostylis at KBC

Mary's favourite rose, Jude the Obscure, against the blue, blue sky

Mary’s favourite rose, Jude the Obscure, against the blue, blue sky

another excellent rose, whose name I wish I knew...

another excellent rose, whose name I wish I knew…

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’ is blooming up high over the greenhouse.  Every year it amuses me all to bits with its little coreopsis flowers so high up in the air.

Coreopsis 'Flower Tower' way up there

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’ way up there

Last week, apparently I did a lousy job of trimming the Strobilanthes atropurpureus and left little stubs.

If I did this, for shame...

If I did this, for shame…

better...

better…

We checked on the garden at Oman Builders Supply and trimmed a few deadheads off the Eryisimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ and I failed to photograph the gaps that still bothers me where someone stole the Eryngium plants  in full bloom earlier this year.

At Wiegardt Gallery, I was struck as usual by how good the ornamental grasses look in the lawn.

This miscanthus has such a nice flowing shape.

This miscanthus has such a nice flowing shape.

the gallery from the street through Stipa gigantea

the gallery from the street through Stipa gigantea

and over the top of Miscanthus

and over the top of Miscanthus

looking west to the gallery sign

looking west to the gallery sign

Also am very fond of this Sanguisorba.

Also am very fond of this Sanguisorba.

Even though it was hard to photograph in the bright and rather uncomfortably hot sun, the bad aster that escaped my pulling now looks nice with the Schizostylis in bloom.

late bloomers

late bloomers

As soon as the aster is done, I’ll be trying to pull it all out again but will for sure miss a few pink roots.

Three hours at Andersen’s RV Park ended the work day.  My mind boggles with the endless deadheading of Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’.  A little jingle runs through my head as I cut about 25 deadheads each off of 20 large plants:  I’m so very very very very tired of it all, so very very tired of it all.  Where this ditty came from I have no idea, but I find myself humming it every autumn in that awkward couple of weeks before real fall project season revives my interest.

The RV park was full with lots of happy people walking cute dogs.  That helped get me through the two hours of deadheading (cosmos and sweet peas, too); the hour of weeding was not so bad.  We were pleased to see longtime staffers Ruth and Bob back for a couple of weeks.  (Hi, Ruth!!)

andersen's

Andersen’s west side, now devoid of poppy flowers

Again, the asters that I failed to eradicate now look wonderful.   By pulling as many as I can in the spring and early summer, we seem to end up with the perfect amount in the fall.

wild blue aster

wild blue aster looking like deliberate bouquets

I bet if I planted a nice clumping aster like ‘Harrington’s Pink’, the roving deer would eat it.

Andersen’s owner Lorna says the Schizostylis makes her very happy in the fall.

Schizostylis

Schizostylis at Andersen’s

I heard a tip once in a seminar by Dan Hinkley:  That this plant will not run all over the place if it is in a damp spot.  He said that if it is running rampant, it’s looking for water.  This nice clump is well watered and is behaving itself.  In South Africa, it grows on river banks.  Wikipedia informs me it is called Hesperantha now.  When did that happen??

Because the days are shorter, we were home before seven.  I find that to be absolute bliss.  I still had time to pick a bowl of tasty small tomatoes from the greenhouse, and Allan mowed the lawn.  It seemed to me he was mowing in the dark, but he said he could follow the mower’s tire tracks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Monday, September 16, 2013

I was so sure that we were going to get a rain day off that I was completely flummoxed when Monday was nice enough for working.  (We do work in rain, but if we don’t have to, we don’t!)   At first I could not even figure out where to go, but then I remembered a pruning project at The Anchorage Cottages.

I forgot to take a before...so here is a during.

I forgot to take a before…so here is a during.

I pruned the Viburnum in the center courtyard with a bit of pruning of the Ceanothus as well.  I actually picked up a handful of old leaves from under the Viburnum to see if the annoying odor that comes from the Viburnum when wet emanates from the old leaves.  NOPE.  Just from the plant in general, apparently!

after

after

Allan’s project was to tackle the sweet woodruff in a shady north wall border.

before and after

before and after

All summer long a broken paver in this area has bugged me.  A sudden tiny brainstorm occurred today:

install the paver as a half circle!  leaving off the broken piece.

install the paver as a half circle! leaving off the broken piece.

Allan put the river rock in there and it helps make it look nicer.

I am not against all groundcovers, just certain ones (sweet woodruff and the horrible aegepodium, to name two.)  On the other side the north wall garden, I quite like the big patches of Geranium macrorrhizum.

a good groundcover, in my opinion

a good groundcover, in my opinion

By the office, Allan removed several clumps of Stella D’Oro daylilies.  I’ve gone off them, too!  Poor plants…

will put in something much better

will put in something much better

Next project here will be to mulch with cow fiber, which must be done on a Monday just to be sure any stink is gone by the weekend.   I don’t think cow fiber has any bad odor but someone might be able to smell faint eau de poo.

We dropped the debris at Peninsula Landscape Supply.  Their U-Pick Dahlia garden has some lovely blooms.

dahlias and oyster shells

dahlias and oyster shells

To fill out the day, I remembered the beach strawberry removal project at the courtyard garden beds at Golden Sands Assisted Living.

Now that the sprinklers are working, we can really begin to address the weeding.  The strawberries can stay outside the landscape timbers.  Inside, they get up in the business of the other plants and have to go away.

progress in SW quadrant

progress in SW quadrant

horrible NW quadrant weeding must wait till next week as we ran out of daylight.

horrible NW quadrant weeding must wait till next week as we ran out of daylight.

Throughout the beds we have to rogue out all the tiny little scabiosa seedlings or they will take over.

haze of self sown seedlings

haze of self sown seedlings

One more session of weeding and maybe we will be ready for more mulch at Golden Sands!

I am pleased to report that outside the quadrants, the roses that were so dry and unhappy are leafing out and blooming thanks to the repaired sprinkler system (fixed by Raymond Millner from The Planter Box).

a much happier rose

a much happier rose

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

We had another slow start due to weather but at least I knew where we were going.   The first job was Mayor Mike’s  weeding.

Schizostylis at Mike's garden

Schizostylis at Mike’s garden

Next, a compost bucket switch at Olde Towne Trading Post Café where an old birdhouse awaits the right buyer.

very nice

very nice

Some gardens down at the Port got weeded next.  I am very pleased with how well these are holding up and how relatively low maintenance they have proved to be.

Port office, south side

Port office, south side

Such a beautiful view we see when we turn from the garden and look at the water.

beautiful clouds over the marina

beautiful clouds over the marina

We deadheaded at The Depot Restaurant and then nipped round the corner and did a little work at Crank’s Roost.   I know, I said we had made our last visit there, and made a big dramatic goodbye post, and then another goodbye post, but it still needs the occasional deadheading!   When the new owners totally take over, we will be done.  (Nothing against them, but we are sentimental about liking the previous/current owner and we can’t imagine the job without her!)  It is very possible the new owners will do their own gardening.

Crank's Roost daisies, before..

Crank’s Roost daisies, before..

and after deadheading

and after deadheading

For some reason, this cute Crank’s Roost chair looks like a little fairy chair, but I am sure it is full sized!  Or is it?

a sit spot

a sit spot

After Crank’s we went to the Ilwaco boatyard to work till sunset.  The one long section, south of the gate, that we had not finished the other day looked good until one got close up and saw all the pesky creeping sorrel.

creeping sorrel

creeping sorrel at ground level…  the leaves taste like lemon!

While we were working, I saw a man walking up the block toward us stopping to photograph many plants.  He introduced himself as a visitor from a town near Purdy, here to go fishing, a gardener and former chef.  We had an enjoyable conversation about plants and I hope he will find this blog and send us a Facebook friend request.

boatyard garden, end of day

boatyard garden, end of day

Working late has its benefits as we got to see a moonrise and some glowing pre-sunset clouds.

moonrise over Jessie's Fish Co

moonrise over Jessie’s Fish Co

clouds over Baker Bay

clouds over Baker Bay

and more glowing clouds over the boatyard

and more glowing clouds over the boatyard

It promised to be quite a sunset, but we were tired so went home, went indoors, and I have to admit I forgot to even look out the window later to see the pinkest time of the sky!

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After the Cannon Beach Cottage Tour, we stopped on our way home at Back Alley Gardens and The Natural Nook.  Although it was past closing time, we got to peruse the new plant purchases and autumn displays in this delightful collectors nursery located in Gearhart, Oregon.

It must be (almost) autumn!

It must be (almost) autumn!

plant tables

plant tables

pretty little faces of autumn

pretty little faces of autumn

more cool plants from Xera

more cool plants from Xera

It definitely saved me money that the cash register was closed out because…just look at that little hot pink flower!   They also had some Salvia clevelandii ‘Aromas’…at least that is what I called it back when I had a late blooming sage with intensely fragrant leaves.

a planted potbelly stove

a planted potbelly stove

love the way these have decided to grow on the edge of the plant display table

love the way these have decided to grow on the edge of the plant display table

garden art

garden art

We had a pleasant visit and some good plant talk and stories of public gardening and then Allan and I were on our way.  Crossing the Astoria Megler bridge, a construction stop let us get a great view of the ships.

looking east from the bridge

looking east from the bridge

ship and Astoria

ship and Astoria

stairs at the highest part of the bridge!

stairs at the highest part of the bridge!

Looking northwest, we saw the Peninsula had become almost invisible because of a heavy bank of fog and clouds.  I hoped for a rainy Sunday so I could spend the day blogging about the cottage tour.

toward home

toward home

north on the four mile bridge

north on the four mile bridge

And the rainy day that I wanted is exactly what I got!

I took exactly one photo on Sunday the 15th of the rain out my south window.  I was able to write all day and avoid falling days behind again while posting about the cottage tour.

Sunday rain

Sunday rain; love the big pink cosmos in the garden boat

If I am lucky, Monday will be rainy as well and instead of blogging I just might catch up on paperwork.

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September 14, 2013

By the time we left the Hutchins house, it was 4:15 and we still had three cottages and one historic hotel left to tour.  Obviously, we couldn’t make it to all of them.  By the time we had walked to the next one, it was 4:25.

a driftwood fence on our way

a driftwood fence on our way

The next house seemed large and a peek inside said to me that it was modern (remodeled in 2008), although the program said it had been built on the footprint of the original cottage.  I was particularly interested in seeing the final tour stop that had been built with two cottages on one lot, so we walked on from the modern one.

on the way, a house with a tower

on the way, a house with a tower

and a big natural yard with a hammock

and a big natural yard with a hammock

I would rather tour a tiny home that a large one...

I would rather tour a tiny home that a large one…

I found the shape of this one to be interesting.

I found the shape of this one to be interesting.

We got to the second to last house and had a quick look because it was on the way to our parking spot.

house

house

I took a peek inside while Allan took some photos of the garden.

garden

garden

garden

a peek inside

a peek inside

By now it was 4:40.   There was no way we would make it to that last cottage, the one intriguingly described as “new construction designed to blend with vintage cottages….a duplex designed to resemble two different homes on one lot.  There are many examples in Cannon Beach of two homes built on one lot as families grew in earlier years of Cannon Beach and this fact was used to get the city design review board to approve this concept.  Characteristics of cottages found in previous cottage tours were used and can be found throughout the home.”  The last sentence particularly intrigued me and I wanted to see if I recognized any of those characteristics, but it was not to be because we would have to drive there and find a parking spot, by which time it would be after five.

(Update: As it happens, that duplex (“Inga’s Cottage”) was on the 2017 tour and we did get to see it.)

We decided instead to have a look at the historic Cannon Beach Hotel that featured on the tour and walked the four blocks to see it.

along the way, a mossy arch

along the way, a mossy arch

arch and fence with hydrangeas

arch and fence with hydrangeas

This planting of geraniums catches my eye every time the tour is on the east side!

This planting of geraniums catches my eye every time the tour is on the east side!

Allan was impressed with this banana tree along the way.

Allan was impressed with this banana tree along the way.

Cannon Beach Hotel

Cannon Beach Hotel

The program describes the hotel as having been “constructed in 1914 as the Ecola Rooms, but was commonly referred to as the Becker Building.  It was once a boarding house and restaurant for Van Fleet Logging Company employees.  Van Fleet logged from here all the way to Tillamook County from 1938 to 1964.  The Cannon Beach Hotel was admitted to the historic walking tour (year round tours) in 1997.”    By the time we were across the street from the hotel, we realized we could return to see it any time and that we would rather stop at Back Alley Gardens on the way home than enter the hotel on a busy Saturday evening…so we turned back to our parking spot.  Of course, there was more to see along the way.

plants on the west side of a shop

plants on the west side of a shop

Ivy is a noxious weed indeed...

Ivy is a noxious weed indeed…

but here it was clipped into outdoor windows.

but here it was clipped into outdoor windows.

That ivy reminds me of the shape of the famous clipped hornbeam hedge at Heronswood.

a cute little cottage on the way to the van

a cute little cottage on the way to the van

bamboo cottage

bamboo cottage

cottage

an interesting modern shape

an interesting modern shape

closer

I called Back Alley Gardens, thinking they might be open til five thirty and Pam said they had just closed but we should come by for a visit anyway.   So off we went, with no Cannon Beach lingering, to our favourite north coast collectors’ nursery.

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September 14, 2013

The Cannon Beach Cottage Tour is a fundraiser for the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum.

Hutchins House

from the program:  Built in 1935 by Bernice and Douglas Greer from Portland.  The cottage represents the Laurel Street neighbourhood’s classic beach style.  It has two floors with dormer windows and interior wood paneling.  It is likely that the building contractor was J.H. Dakin, who built and maintained most of the homes in this neighbourhood.  Dakin was a British citizen who settled in Cannon Beach along with many of his fellow countrymen.

I was pleased to recognize the Hutchins house right away as one that I’d seen the first year Allan and I had discovered the Cottage Tour.   Every time we had walked by since then, I had pointed it out and said “I’ve been in THAT one!”

Hutchins House

Hutchins House

north windows

north windows

adorable storage shed on east side of house

adorable storage shed on east side of house by “Bobby the Builder”

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

One of my strongest memories of touring the house years before was the east side deck that is accessed from the upstairs bedroom windows.

looking up at the east side deck

looking up at the east side deck

window boxes

window boxes on the east wall

back door on east side of house

back door on east side of house

The front porch is on the north side of the house and has comfy old chairs.

chairs on the front porch

chairs on the front porch

cottage sign

cottage sign

That sign says 1924 so it might be telling us the cottage is older than the program says it is!

chairs on the west end of the porch

chairs on the west end of the porch

western view from the porch

western view from the porch

peeking in the window at the northwest corner

peeking in the window at the northwest corner

Inside the cottage feels like home even though it is a vacation rental.

the kitchen

the kitchen

kitchen shelves

kitchen shelves

dining room

dining room

I seem to lack photos of the living room but you can see some on the house website.

From upstairs, the beach is this close!

view from upstairs west window

view from upstairs west window

slightly telephoto view

slightly telephoto view

The upstairs has three bedrooms.

bedroom with attic roof

bedroom with attic roof

Access to the deck is through the window past the bed.

window

window

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

another window to the deck

another window to the deck

deck on east side of attic

deck on east side of attic

another attic bedroom

another attic bedroom

detail photo by Allan

detail photo by Allan

and another window to the deck

another bed

west window with beach view

west window with beach view

I could sleep in the salty air in any of these comfy looking beds.

attic sleep spot with south window

attic sleep spot with south window, Allan’s photo

Back downstairs:

a green window view

a green window view

Haystack Rock

Haystack Rock

the back door

the back door

as we leave Hutchins House

as we leave Hutchins House

By now it was 4:15 and we had three more cottages and an old hotel to see, and the tour ended at five.

the beach, just steps from the Hutchins house

the beach, just steps from the Hutchins house

We turned east toward our parking space and two more east side cottages.

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September 14, 2013

The Cannon Beach Cottage Tour is a fundraiser for the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum.

interlude between cottages

Walking to the next tour cottage, I saw an attractive trellis over two windows.

trellis

trellis

As we walked from the wonderful cottage inhabited by collectors toward the next one, we passed an artist’s cottage where the owner was beckoning people to come in.

an artist's cottage

an artist’s cottage

He may have been greeting particular friends, but I wish I had asked if he was showing his cottage.

The docent at the next little cottage told us no interior photos were allowed, so we refrained.

no interior photos allowed

no interior photos allowed

Even though photos on the fence showed the inside!

Even though photos on the fence showed the inside!

Next door to the no-photos cottage, I liked the way windows were used for wind protection.

windows atop fence, at left, for a windbreak

windows atop fence, at left, for a windbreak on this beachfront home

Just steps away was the foredune and then the beach.

beach path

beach path

looking south, the famous Haystack Rock

looking south, the famous Haystack Rock

looking north

looking north

Rugosa roses in a beachfront garden

Rugosa roses in a beachfront garden

a garden right on the beach

a garden right on the beach

a garden on the next east-west street

a garden on the next east-west street

Allan's photo of a sign along the way

Allan’s photo of a sign along the way

Priddy Cottage

The next cottage on the tour was on last year’s tour as well.  Because this year’s was the Tenth Annual tour, some favourites from the past were being reprised.

from the program:  This cottage is the perfect amalgamation of the archetypical Cannon Beach Cottage and custom artistry.  The cottage is a fusion of artistic craftsmanship belonging to the homeowner’s various friends.  The custom details range from unique glasswork to fine metalworking.  These special additions make this home a pleasure to tour.  The Clatsop County Record dates this home to 1924.  It was originally constructed of found material, a common trait of the first Cannon Beach settlers — using driftwood, the almighty Spruce, shells, and more.  The metal has been designed and created by Darryl Nelson, a third generation Timberline blacksmith, who will be present in the home to answer questions about his work.

Priddy Cottage

Priddy Cottage

Allan photographed the top of the metal gate.

Allan photographed the top of the metal gate.

detail of front gate

and the front gate detail

gate

front gate and metal arbour

the inside top of the arbour

the inside top of the arbour

birdbath inside the front gate

birdbath inside the front gate

I walked around the outside first.

window box

south side window box

east side windowboxes

east side windowboxes

bright garage doors

bright garage (guest house) doors

entering the back yard

entering the back yard

lupines

lupines

a sweet friendly dog

a sweet friendly dog

Hydrangea aspera

Hydrangea aspera

I still want one of these hydrangeas.

garden bench

garden bench

back of house, with me coming out of guest house (left)

back of house, with me coming out of guest house (left)

Allan's photo of the outdoor fire

the outdoor fire

I love the guest house to the side of the back garden.

inside the guest house, Allan's photo

inside the guest house, Allan’s photo

inside

guesthouse, Allan's photo

guesthouse, Allan’s photo

guesthouse bouquet

guesthouse bouquet

I went in the back door of the house….

bouquet

bouquet

If you want a good tour of house the house and its decor fit together, check out last year’s post.

another bouquet

another bouquet

Some details:

ceiling lights

ceiling lights

Allan's photo of shelving detail

Allan’s photo of shelving detail

window and sunlight

window and sunlight

It is an extraordinary cottage.

back outside, west window boxes

back outside, west window boxes

Another Interlude

By now it was 3:50 PM and we still had four more cottages and a historic hotel to see and only one hour and ten minutes left of tour time!  (The tour organizer tells me that next year they will return to having more like nine cottages to see:  This was a tenth year anniversary extravaganza.)

Our walk to the next cottage took us to downhill to the very south end of downtown Cannon Beach.  This curvacious walkway caught my eye.

curved walkway and shady courtyard

curved walkway and shady courtyard

I realized that this was the back side of one of my favourite clusters of buildings.

east side

east side

The east side has an entry to an art gallery which I should go into sometime just to see the inside of the building.

north side of the interesting building

north side of the interesting building

Just to the west of it sits my favourite outbuildings ever.

like a fairy tale cottage

like a fairy tale cottage

Allan took this photo of a cedar detail.

Allan took this photo of a cedar detail.

Just uphill from the tiny fairy tale outbuilding is another house that always makes me stop and look.

I love the green and brown...

I love the green and brown…

and the tower

and the tower

Next, we visit a cottage that I fell in love with in 2007, the year I discovered the Cannon Beach Cottage Tour.

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September 14, 2013

The Cannon Beach Cottage Tour is a fundraiser for the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum.  (Be sure to click on that link; the home page has a neat effect with old postcards.)

A Collectors’ Cottage

I decided to call it that for reasons you will soon understand.

from the program:  This home is considered one of the oldest beach houses still standing in the Presidential District.  The county records indicate that it was built in 1913, but an archeological excavation discovered foundations posts dating to the 1890s.  Sylvester White built this home in approximately 1913.  White may have built over a previous foundation left by homesteaders, early campers, or the Tillamook Indians who lived here for centuries.

We now come to my favourite cottage of the tour, one that is hidden behind wind gnarled shore pines.

Allan's photo, from the street

Allan’s photo, from the street

hidden behind the pines

hidden behind the pines

The caution tape was just to direct people to use a side entrance to the yard rather than squeeze into the path through the trees.

Two old cannons flank the front entry.

to the right

to the right

and to the left

and to the left

We heard the owner tell someone that the cannons, found on the beach, from which the town gets its name, were smaller than these.

We came around to the side of the front porch.

porch

looking west.  The path to the beach is half a block away.

looking west. The path to the beach is half a block away.

at east end of front porch

at east end of front porch

table

old porch bench

old porch bench

front garden

front garden

from the porch

from the porch

looking south from inside the front door

looking south from inside the front door

I knew right away that we were in a home of people who like to collect interesting and historic things and we were so pleased that the owners allowed photographs.

in the front room

in the front room

two tables in the front room

two tables in the front room

a rustic fireplace

a rustic fireplace

old fashioned fireplace surround

old fashioned fireplace surround

imagining a cozy winter day here...

imagining a cozy winter day here…

a face in the fire

a face in the fire

wainscoting

wainscoting

a comfy couch

a comfy couch

an old cabinet

an old cabinet

Antique appreciators were having wonderful conversations with the owners…about shops, auctions, and collecting old pieces.  The owners recommended a place called Cannon Beach Treasure Co.

beach

How I would love to spend a grey winter day (or a lifetime) here on beach time.

How I would love to spend a grey winter day (or a lifetime) here on beach time.

in the front room

Here is a cottage where I will have no trouble getting a feeling for what the owners like!

lamp

In the lower right of the photo above, you can see a copy of Terence O’Donnell’s  A Place by The Sea.  I must read the book (which I own) again.  It is excellent.  Terrence owned Crank’s Roost, the Seaview cottage whose garden we maintained for its subsequent owner until it was recently sold.

another good sit spot

another good sit spot

more cool stuff

more cool stuff

a work space

a work space

collections

collections

beachy bathers

beachy bathers

Thank goodness I was able to take photos here, because I would have been able to remember so few of these treasures.

beach art

beach art

an old door

an old door

The downstairs had one of those floor plans where one walks from room to room in a circle around the enclosed staircase to the upstairs.

the kitchen

the kitchen

an old stove sat next to a modern one.

an old stove sat next to a modern one.

in the kitchen

in the kitchen

art

stuff

In the kitchen, I met the woman of the house.  She told me something grand:  She and her partner both like to collect things, AND they like the same things so there are no disagreements about what they acquire.  I admired the calico dishes in the kitchen and she said she particularly liked the shape of the shallow bowls.

Blue Calico

Blue Calico

kitchen detail, photo by Allan

kitchen detail, photo by Allan

vintage kitchen door

vintage kitchen door
in the mud room (by back door)

in the mud room (by back door)

a bottle of little shells

a bottle of little shells

mudroom

mudroom (or pantry)

clothes rack on the mud room ceiling

clothes rack on the mud room ceiling

Dutch door to the back yard

Dutch door to the back yard

view into back yard

view into back yard

boardwalk to outbuilding

boardwalk from back door to outbuilding

Back in the kitchen,  I admired the windowpane photo display behind a door to the stairway.

stairs

Because I make it back down stairs very slowly, I only go upstairs in houses where I know I’ll see idiosyncratic and interesting rooms.  This house definitely qualified, especially after Allan came down the stairs saying there was a wardrobe right out of Narnia.

one of the upstairs bedrooms

one of the upstairs bedrooms

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

The mirrored dresser is extraordinary.

a gorgeous mirrored dresser

little closet doors

little closet door

upstairs bedroom

upstairs bedroom

The other bedroom had a very high and fluffy looking bed.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

another bedroom with a tall bed

another bedroom with a tall bed

bed

wardrobe

wardrobe

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I told Allan that wardrobe could not go to Narnia because this is clearly a USA wardrobe so not as magical.

headboard detail, Allan's photo

headboard detail, Allan’s photo

upstairs

upstairs

stairs going down

stairs going down

On the right side as we look down, we were told that old art projects from hippie days were on display, showing how long the family has inhabited this wonderful old house.

I certainly did not want to leave this one.  iPhoto tells me we were there from 3:00 til 3:16; the tour was due to end at 5:00 and we still had seven more places to see (and we had already skipped one, the Sea Sprite Motel in Tolovana Park).

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September 14, 2013

The Cannon Beach Cottage Tour is a fundraiser for The Cannon Beach History Center and Museum.

On the walk from the Surf Shack to our next cottage, we crossed the main road into the Presidential blocks on the west side, just northwest of downtown.   On the way, as always happens in Cannon Beach, we saw lovely places to photograph.

a little grey cottage

a little grey cottage

"Bonnie Nook"

“Bonnie Nook”

You can read the history of Bonnie Nook here.  It is one of the oldest houses still standing in Cannon Beach.   I find it interesting that some of the older cottages are on the east side instead of in the blocks closest to the beach.  I wonder if beachfront property was much more expensive even then?

cottage with hydrangea

cottage with hydrangea

Any one of these tiny places would be fascinating to tour!

Hopper’s House Historic Cottage

from the program:  This home was built in 1916 by Sylvester White.  Mr. White also constructed several other homes on Van Buren (one located directly across the street).  This house was originally built for the Morton and Elsie Alger family, cousins of White’s wife.  Mr. White also built the house next door, but that was torn down many years ago.

Hopper’s House is a vacation rental and yet had the feeling of a home, which is assuredly why it has such good reviews.  I wonder if there are bunnies around?  They seem to abound in the Tolovana Park neighbourhood to the south of Cannon Beach.

Hopper's House

Hopper’s House

You can see the ocean right at the end of the block.

Hopper's House from across the street

Hopper’s House from across the street

an expansive front porch

an expansive front porch

house number tiles

house number tiles

The porch had a dreamy seat at the west end.

What a lovely place to sit at the west end of the porch.

What a lovely place to sit at the west end of the porch.

The river rock fireplace is typical and iconic Cannon Beach cottage style.

the fireplace

the fireplace with wooden mantel

The kitchen retains an old fashioned feeling.

The kitchen retains an old fashioned feeling.

I remember that at the lecture that preceded the tour, Jill Grady said that one of the Cannon Beach builders was short and all his kitchens were built for someone short.  My Craftman bungalow kitchen in Seattle was that way and when I had a short friend visit, she said it was the most comfortable kitchen she had ever cooked in.

old fashioned bathroom sink

old fashioned bathroom sink

shower and towel cabinet

shower and towel cabinet

I so much like that the old features of the cottage have been retained.  I would not want to stay at an overly modernized beach cottage.

looking from the kitchen to a dining nook at the SW corner of the cottage.

looking from the kitchen to a dining nook at the SW corner of the cottage.

Note the gleaming white board ceiling.

living room window

living room window with a glimpse of the fireplace exterior

Stepping out onto a back porch, one can get a good look at the impressive stone chimney on the west wall of the cottage.

the stone chimney

the stone chimney

the back porch

the back porch

Back inside, I saw a guest book on a side table.  Oh, how I love guest books at lodgings.  I would like to have sat down and read the whole thing.

guest book

guest book

the downstairs bedroom

the downstairs bedroom

The hosts understand the importance of a reading lamp.

The hosts understand the importance of a reading lamp.

I like to read reviews of local hotels, and I have noticed that one thing that is very much noticed by guests is the absence of bedside reading lamps.  Here, this detail has not been overlooked.

bedroom window

bedroom window

I did not go upstairs in this cottage, so the upstairs photos are all from Allan.

the stairs

the stairs

a sign

a sign

upstairs window

upstairs bathroom windows

another old fashioned sink

another old fashioned sink

bedroom

bedroom

One would sleep so well in the salt air.

One would sleep so well in the salt air.

The next cottage was right across the street and would prove to be my favourite of the tour.

Next door to Hopper's, another comfy porch.

Next door to Hopper’s, another comfy big beachy porch.

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September 14, 2013

The Cannon Beach Cottage Tour is a fundraiser for the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum.

The Surf Shack

from the program:  This is the original site of Cannon Beach pioneer Barry McKay’s log cabin.  The log home burned in 1911 and this sweet beach retreat replaced it in 1955.  Next door the Mckay’s owned and rented out “Honeysuckle Lodge’, a romantic honeymoon cottage.  Don’t miss this owner’s collection of turn-of-the-century sand pails.

The Surf Shack is on the east side of town near Cathy’s Cottage.

the entrance from the street

the entrance from the street


Allan got a photo of the name!

Allan got a photo of the name!


Allan noticed this bird house that got past me!

Allan noticed this bird house that got past me!


inside the arch, a garden shed

inside the arch, a garden shed


in the front yard

in the front yard

inside the arch

A vine tangles atop a cottage window on this home that was built the year I was born.

a low swale of ferns going up the west side of the cottage

a low swale of ferns going up the west side of the cottage

As I looked back at the entry arch from the front porch, a tour goer came through and said “I always expect something to happen, to be transformed when I come through the arbor.”  I imagine she was thinking of stepping into another world like in a children’s fantasy novel.

looking back at the entry arbour

looking back at the entry arbour


view from the front porch

view from the front porch

Oh, how I loved this cottage and I am so grateful that the owner was allowing photos because I never would have been able to remember all the great things inside!

the main living area

the main living area

In the above photo, you can just see, at the top, the backside of this sign:

surf

 

what a ceiling!

what a ceiling!

The ceiling is similar to the one I remember well (from photographs on a previous tour) in the Moon Shell Cottage.

the open kitchen

the open kitchen

kitchenI love the golden glow of the walls.

kitchen

kitchen

On the counter next to the stove sits the sand pail collection.

sand pails

sand pails

book

a cosy nook off the kitchen

a cosy nook off the kitchen


driftwood fish

driftwood fish

The bedrooms in the cottage were surprisingly large and one had the wonderful light feel of having been made from a sleeping porch.
classically beachy blue and white stripes

classically beachy blue and white stripes

I think the size of the bedrooms is because the cottage was built in ’55; earlier cottages have smaller rooms.

bedroom window with green rustling view of bamboo

bedroom window with green rustling view of bamboo


beach art on the walls

beach art on the walls

The Surf Shack felt fun, warm, and relaxing and I hated to leave without examining more details but we still had many cottages to see!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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