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Archive for Jul, 2017

Saturday, 15 July 2017

The WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County present:

Somehow, probably because of not reading the description thoroughly, we completely missed finding the greenhouses.

by the parking lot, one of several garden boats (Allan’s photo)

the plant sale in its last hour (Allan’s photo)

We were able to get a free spider plant, something that Devery had been looking for.

Allan’s photo

on the deck overlooking the river (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

view of North River (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo with houseboats in distance (that belong to this property, or at least the moorage does)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

another garden boat (Allan’s photo)

and another (peonies, as I recall)

inside a small fenced garden

I could use a sign like this for after my lilies bloom.

walking down to the river…

…to take this picture.

Allan has boated past the North River Resort and had blogged out about here, so it was especially interesting to him to see it from onshore.  The whole 83 acre place is for sale, with a video overview available here.

Old Downtown, Raymond

a riverside drive back to Raymond

After the scenic drive back to the town of Raymond, we took a detour to the old downtown to see what sort of landscaping or containers it might feature.

a lavender trimmed grocery store

a long concrete planter with butterfly decorations, just watered

from the back

three attractive containers by a gallery

I liked the downtown banners (one of several bird themed ones)

I’d like to have seen that movie; it played the following evening on the Peninsula, way up in Surfside.  Unfortunately, it was the evening that the Ilwaco planters must, without a doubt, be watered.

another planter, also just watered

Dennis Company’s main store had floriferous planters outside.

with sunflowers

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Well done, Dennis Co!

As we drove toward home, we cruised by a garden in South Bend where an old friend and great gardener lives.  Next post!

 

 

 

 

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The WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County present:

tour

 

Next to the fourth garden, we parked by a field of farm equipment, some new and some old.

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Allan’s photo

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promise of a garden up ahead

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entry to the front garden

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Trapeoleum speciosum on the trellis (Allan’s photo)

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the ornamental front garden

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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campanulas (Allan’s photo)

Coming around to the back garden, the focus changes to food production.

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tomatoes against the south side of the house

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a chicken coop in the background

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traffic jam at the door

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plump and pretty hens

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a raised bed edged with growing bags (Allan’s photo)

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in the greenhouse (Allan’s photo)

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farmland and cattle beyond

If I had to feed myself out of my garden, I might be eating chickweed, sheep sorrel, and some potatoes and a few berries, with some tomatoes from the greenhouse in late summer.  The intensive growing method in this garden made me ponder what I could do with the future kitchen garden space that I envision between our fence and Devery’s driveway.

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This could protect the plants from deer.

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carrots

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beans

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I overheard that these were sweet Walla Walla onions.

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lettuce (Allan’s photo)

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grapevines on the left

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berries and peaches

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roses, honeysuckle, blueberries (Allan’s photo)

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kitchen gardener extraordinaire, Tim

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gunnera by the back deck

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ready for alfresco meals from the garden

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on the deck (Allan’s photo)

Because this was not an ornamental plant collector’s garden, I was surprised to see a Melianthus major as we departed.

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A tour host was surprised that I recognized it; I said “There are six people touring behind me who will also know what it is.”  (Melissa, Dave, Ann, Evan, Pam, and Teresa!)

We had only one more tour garden to see, this one ten miles northwest of Raymond, and I was hoping to at least spy around the edges of two interesting private gardens on the way home.

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All of the gardens we toured today were in bucolic country side, making for a pleasant drive between each.

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We soon reached the third garden of the day.

The WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County present:

tour

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The entry drive is a bridge over a river.

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approaching the one acre man made pond

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Allan’s photo

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Only Ann got a good photo showing the pleasing design of a spit of land going out into the pond.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo (coming round the pond the other way)

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a sign warning of roots above the grass

Just as I was navigating that maze of roots, I met up with blog readers Deborah and her sisters from up north!  They had driven down from the tour, a longer drive than ours, and were doing the tour in the opposite order; I hope they enjoyed it as much as we did.  They still had the glorious Willapa riverside garden in store.  They asked where Allan was.  He had parked the van in a provided parking area across the river and was coming round the pond in the other direction.

It always amazes me to hear that people read this blog over their morning coffee.  I tend to actually forget that!  As I told them, while they are reading, I am probably still sleeping.  Deborah is one of my favourite kinds of readers, because she makes comments, as well.

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Allan coming around the other side of the pond

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Glen’s house

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Note how there is not a glimpse of underlying liner in this dry river bed.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Prunus serrula (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

Right about here is where I finally met Terri, tour organizer.  We had been emailing back and forth for a month and have a lot in common in garden interests.  Allan and I will be visiting her garden near Westport sometime in August and are very much looking forward to that.

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view from the porch

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view from the porch

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view from the porch

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Allan’s photo

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on the porch

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before photos

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before photo

Notes about the garden:

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hose watering! (Allan’s photo)

Neither Allan nor I got a photo that got across the vastness of this property that had been transformed into an arboretum.  Ann did:

landscape

photo by Ann Amato-Zorich

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sighted as we stroll back to the exit

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Another huge parklike expanse was to our left on the road side of the bridge.

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Allan’s photo

We did not walk into that meadow because of my ill timed sore foot.  Now, looking at this photo, I wish I had made the effort.

 As we walked to our van to depart, we encountered Teresa from the Planter Box.  It seemed that our timing was off from that of all the other peninsulites.  She told us that she had heard that garden four had a great vegetable garden.  That was our next destination.

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chatting with Teresa, then on to the next garden

 

 

 

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Saturday, 15 July 2017

The WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County present:

Garden Two: “Colorful and Creative”

Every garden tour has one garden that becomes my favourite.  Gina and Jeff’s garden is one that could be my favourite of many tours.

I was thrilled just by looking at it across the street!

Before we crossed the road, we encountered Wendy and Bill, whose garden had been my favourite on last year’s tour.  Since then, I’d learned that for many years they owned the boat Aallotar which I often see at the Port of Ilwaco.  I longed for Aallotar stories but garden touring won out for everyone.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

closer

 

closer

walk to the front porch

Allan’s photo

wooden window box looks like copper

We finally made it to the check in table!  We could already hear the sound of the river and realized that the garden, while huge, is long and narrow because the river is just past the house and down a steep drop off.

The river sounded wonderful.

a double sort of curb holding the edge of the garden; that lawn is far below

The drop off at the edge of the garden is steep and dramatic.

Allan’s photo

garden creator Gina’s friendly little dog (Allan’s photo)

This cat was also getting attention. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

I felt faint just looking at this path between the house and the edge. Folks with a good head for heights breezed along it.

Allan’s photo

Gina must have a great head for heights; she had picked every bad leaf off of the statuesque hollyhocks.

Allan’s photo

hollyhocks below the edge

I decided to explore the garden that stretched expansively from the other side of the garage.

back wall of garage

Allan’s photo

This was to cover up some sort of unattractive utilitarian thing. (Allan’s photo)

The long, narrow garden lay on both sides of the house between the road and the drop off to the river.  We began with the longest area, to the left of the house.

a sit spot (Allan’s photo)

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on the side of the garage

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detail

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looking down the expansive lawn

Because this garden is a work in progress, I have a feeling that eventually all of these beds will be as full as the ones right around the house.

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looking back

Squash and big healthy tomatoes grew in the roadside bed.  Someone commented about the fertile farmland valley silt in this area.

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Allan’s photo

One of the folks strolling toward me said (because of my knee brace, cane, and sore heel related limp), “Nothing stops you from garden touring, does it?!”

The garden beds on the river side go right up to the cliff edge.

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right on the edge….I wondered if eventually these trees would go.

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I would have to crawl on my belly to weed up to that edge!

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Allan’s photo

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plants clinging to the very edge of the steep drop off!

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Allan’s photo

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looking down (Allan’s photo)

I tip my gardener’s cap to the bold gardener who weeds along that curving edge.

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Most of the beds are more safely inland.

We turned back and walked toward the house.

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garden tour guests enjoying a sit spot

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peach tree near the garage

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a perfect rose

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I am now thinking about how this garden does not seem bothered by deer.

When Ann (Spiffy Seeds, The Amateur Bot-ann-ist) toured this garden just after we did, she especially noticed the burned tree (which went right over my head).

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photo by Ann Amato-Zorich, who says “Burned tree. Nature’s own shou sugi ban.”

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rustic woodsy planter

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from another angle

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and another….an idea I am going to emulate.

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Allan’s photo

To reach the other side of the garden, I went along the front of the house.

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Brick front porch wrapped front and right side of the house.

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front garden

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looking out from the porch

On the right side of the entry porch, the brick porch narrowed and became L shaped.  Its decor was so fascinating that I could have spent an hour there.

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This area had a concrete floor and a high roof with a chandelier and a skylight.

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story of my life!

I could almost weep with delight over all of these artful vignettes.

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Just off the porch was a waterfall pond.

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Going around the corner of the house, we found another tiny shady pool.

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Allan’s photo

Around the corner at the back of the house, we passed through an arbour to a greenhouse.

We failed to step back and get a long shot.  Ann kindly provided us with this:

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photo by Ann Amato-Zorich

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sink fountain

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Allan’s photo

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in the greenhouse

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We recently saw someone making a cool light fixture like this on a tiny house show.

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in the greenhouse

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in the greenhouse

Near the greenhouse, steps and a path go down to the river level.

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looking down

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plantings on the upper bank (Allan’s photo)

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from the path going down; garden creator Gina in view (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

We learned later that the rock retaining wall was new this past year, and Gina has begun planting it up.

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Allan’s photo

I was still up on the top level by the greenhouse.

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the back porch and sunroom

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the other side of the path I couldn’t do!

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Looking down again, I could see a great temptation for reaching the river level:

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The kitty was there!

Someone told me that an easy access driveway was available at the other end of the garden.  I made my way in that direction.

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by the greenhouse, a basket ready for berries

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past the greenhouse

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looking back at the house and L shaped porch

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an easy road, with a greeter

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kitty welcoming Allan to the river road

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Allan’s photo

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along the river bank

I learned later that the river causes much destruction along this bank during a stormy winter.  The lawn survives!

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looking up the newly cleared area to the greenhouse

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The river made a beautiful sound.

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Allan’s photo

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new rock wall with tour guest for scale

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Look at the edge on that lawn.  Allan noticed that all the bare ground was weed free and carefully raked.

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the river bank, which likely gets flooded in rainy winters

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the sound of water always in the background

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the path down from below

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Allan’s photo

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We made our way back up the easy road to the top and appreciated the garden for awhile longer.

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a natural hose hanger

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Look who we met arriving just as we were leaving!

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Dave, Melissa, Todd, Pam (downtown Seaside gardener)

They would be one garden behind us all the way.  Ann and Evan arrived just after this photo was taken. We should have just slowed down and toured with them, because they would notice things that we had missed.  I am always afraid of running out of time, so on we went to the next garden.

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I’m thinking how much I loved this garden and that I did not want to leave.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 15 July 2017

The WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County present:

tour

A focus of the Master Gardener tour is very personal gardens that are designed and maintained by their owners.

Garden One: “Shades of Paris”

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Like all of the gardens on this tour, this one was located by a quiet country road.

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impeccably maintained

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tour guests checking in (Allan’s photo)

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I was well chuffed to be there.

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flowers in patterns

There were lots of zinnias and dahlias that would be in bloom not long from now.  If I lived closer than an hour away, I would be trying to get a peek when the bed above is in full bloom.

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Red white and blue in this place could evoke the French flag.

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pasture just beyond the garden

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People were walking back across the pasture from a nature path, possibly for nearby Fuss Creek.

I missed this opportunity and another, in the third garden, to explore further, because I was having an extra problem today of having a sore foot!

To my left was a fenced kitchen and flower garden.

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berries and roses

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I continued to be impressed by the complete lack of weeds.

 

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This fence was possibly designed to keep out more critters than just deer.

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Guests were invited to snack on the berries.  (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

We turned our attention to the large patio at the side of the house.

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I felt this might remind the owners of the tradition of dining outdoors in France.

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waterfall pond

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Allan pointed out that the black and white photo in the program got a better overview of the pond than either of us did.

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Between garden and pasture, a wide maintenance path would make wheelbarrowing easy.

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looking back at the house

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fire circle between pond and pasture

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Allan’s photo

Neither Allan nor I got as good a photo of the fire circle as did our friend Ann (Spiffy Seeds, The Amateur Bot-ann-ist) who was touring just behind us.

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photo by Ann Amato-Zorich: “my dream s’mores making fire pit”

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view over the pond from the fire circle

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beyond the garden

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hot tub

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to the next level

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The red tape was a warning where steps went down.

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a sit spot outside a fenced garden and more zinnias that will be colourful soon

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Allan’s photo

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fenced kitchen gardens with berries

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Allan’s photo

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between the house and the fenced berry patch

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Allan’s photo

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looking back as I walk around the house

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Salix integra ‘Hakuro-nishiki’ (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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zinnias, a big porch, quilt display

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I wish I had asked who was the quilter.

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leaving the colourful and impeccably maintained garden

 

 

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Friday, 15 July 2017

I had done something unpleasant to my right heel toward the end of yesterday’s work day; it even kept me awake for awhile during the night.  Why??? Just before a weekend of touring gardens!  However, on Friday I wanted to do some more weeding because some informal touring of our garden was sure to take place.

Before I began, we hosted the first garden tour of our three day weekend; Dan from the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum came by.

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Like most people, he had assumed the front garden was all there was, and had no idea the lot goes over 200 feet back to the meander line.

After walking all round the garden and talking about the history of how it used to be waterfront before the port expanded by filling and building two blocks south, I embarked upon my plan of thorough weeding.

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weeded the new-ish bogsy wood hillock garden, in the area that was once riverfront beach.

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then managed to snake enough hose to get a sprinkler set up out there

I forgot after awhile to try to take it easy and instead succumbed to the sudden impulse of a rather intense project: Digging huge flopsy clumps of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ out of what used to be a debris pile, to make room for more variety.

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after: lots fewer sedums, lots more room for what is there to grow and breathe.

All afternoon I worked on this, forgetting to wear my knee brace because all I had intended to do was the easy task of pulling dwarf fireweed.  This was not the wisest lead up to a garden tour weekend.

I planted four ladies in waiting, including Chelone obliqua ‘Tiny Tortuga’ and Tricyrtis formosana ‘Samurai’, all acquired at the Basket Case Greenhouse.

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Tricyrtis formosana ‘Samurai’

In the late afternoon, Devery came from next door to pick some strawberries.  I had finished my projects and was able to sit with her on the patio for a spell.

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Devery on the good ship Ann Lovejoy, sailing into Strawberry Land.

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a good harvest

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on the patio: succulents in an old hibachi (Allan’s photo)

At 7, Allan and I joined seven friends for a gardener’s dinner at the Cove Restaurant: Dave and Melissa (Sea Star Gardening), Todd Wiegardt (Willapa Gardening), Debbie Teashon (rainyside.com and author of Gardening for the Homebrewer), Jeanne (Portland gardener), Ann Amato-Zorich (Spiffy Seeds and the Amateur Bot-ann-ist), and Evan Bean (former co worker with Todd at Plant Delights, now with plantlust.com).  Much plant talk ensued.

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in the foyer (Allan’s photo)

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Ann appreciating (Allan’s photo)

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Ann, looking droll, and Evan (Allan’s photo)

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Ann’s fish and no chips

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Todd, me, Debbie (photographing Allan), Melissa (hidden), Dave, Jeanne, Ann, Evan

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plant thoughts with Evan and Todd

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The kitchen produced a special dessert of 9 small portions of strawberry rhubarb cake.

Saturday, 15 July 2017

We were up oh so early for us, although not as early as we would have if Patti J had come with us as we had all sort of planned.  (She was having company and could not take such a long day away after all.)  By 9:15, Allan and I were on the road to Menlo, Washington, to attend the Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County garden tour.  It moves around each year.  Last year’s tour in Aberdeen was one of the best I’d seen, and I had been counting the weeks and days till this one.  Knee brace, cane, and the fluffiest of fluffy socks for my sore heel would get me through the day of walking.  A bandaid on my right trigger finger would (mostly) keep me from going ouch each time I took a photo (because a thin rugosa rose thorn was sitting in my finger just in the spot where I click on the camera).

Because we left 15 minutes later than I had hoped, we took the dreaded (just by me) Willapa Curves rather than the less harrowing (to me) longer route through Naselle.

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Low tide, scenic view, and ultra squiggly narrow road

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Possibly to most people, it does not seem extra narrow.

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At least going north, we are on the inside!

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So many curves

After ten minutes of that, I was relieved to be on the straight, long road through woods to South Bend and Raymond and on to the much anticipated garden tour.

Join us for the next batch of posts for the Menlo tour, followed by a bonus tour of a South Bend secret garden, and then a Sunday of touring six gardens with friends on the Long Beach Peninsula.

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13 July: the usual watering plus

Thursday, 13 July 2017

Allan told me the rain barrels were partially full.  I asked if there was a puddle in the street and he said no, so I figured that the barrels must just be fuller because I had run a back and forth sprinkler that puts some water into the gutters.  Imagine my thrill when I found that ALL the barrels had more water, and that there WAS a puddle in the street.  We had had blessed rain!

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a full barrel that was empty yesterday

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the official rain gauge

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a refreshed garden

However, none of that meant we could skip watering.  Rain water is rarely strong enough to get down inside the planters.

At the post office:

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Asiatic lilies

I planted the Korean Agastache that Roxanne gave me yesterday.  She grew them from seed.

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Agastache rugosa

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post office planter (Allan’s photo)

Long Beach

We began with a check up on the welcome sign.

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Geranium ‘Orion’ and Geranium ‘Rozanne’

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Orion has an empty green middle…

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Rozanne has flowers all over herself!

Plus Orion needs deadheading and Rozanne does not.  Rozanne wins!

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Rozanne and a fan (Allan’s photo)

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 Agastache ‘Summer Glow’ is just not putting on much of a show. (Barely visible in the center of this photo)

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Allan weeding

Before watering, we weeded and clipped the south parking lot berm.

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Rugosa roses got clipped back from hanging over the edge.

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Allan’s photo (with a bucket that got full of garbage. No diapers this time, yay.)

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Allan’s photo, before

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Allan’s photo, after

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making a mess

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another view, after clipping (with one errant leaf!)

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an attractive plant hodge podge

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Rosa glauca (rubrifolia) doing well, witn Stipa gigantea

The soil was faintly damp.  I am sure the three berms appreciated the rain, as they get no supplemental water.

We tidied up the horsetail-infested corner bed at Veterans Field.

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The usual meadow look seems to happen for me everywhere…

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It is red white and blue 😉

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Brodiaea laxa ‘Silver Queen’ and lambs ears

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red monarda

After dumping our load of debris, we drove out to the end of the Bolstad approach to check up on Sandsations progress.

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just the beginning

Then came the watering and, this time, fertilizing of the Long Beach downtown planters.

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My favourite one from last year is finally filling in.  One side lacks the golden fuchsia (it is there but tiny).  Look, very little wind today!

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Agastache, cosmos, and some nice looking painted sage

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Police station planter.  Some trashed Rozanne again!

I made a police report!  Not exactly.  I just went in and kvetched.  It is quite possible this planter is getting targeted repeatedly BECAUSE it is in front of the police station.

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It took a long time to tease out the dead parts.

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Got even more dead stuff than this photo shows…plus the Rozanne on the other side of the planter was also hit, although not as bad.

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next planter down; Todd keeps telling me the name of this plant and I keep forgetting it.

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speaking of names I have forgotten…this Phygelius with dark leaves…

Allan’s photos while watering:

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birdsfoot trefoil in a planter

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With the downtown planters, we weeded in Fifth Street Park.  A group of young women told me that they thought the flowers looked like “fairy flowers”.  They were especially pleased when I told them the Dierama is called “Angel’s Fishing Rod”.

 

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Dierama, right side

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Sanguisorba may also have seemed like a fairy plant…

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especially the feather pink one (right)

We get a lot of much appreciated compliments about the planters being beautiful.  I especially liked the observation about fairy flowers.

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By the restroom with Rose ‘Super Dorothy’, lady’s mantle still going strong, and a Basket Case Greenhouse basket

We watered the Sid Snyder beach approach planters at the end of our Long Beach time.

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a whole field of birdsfoot trefoil

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Allan bucket watered the end planter, the one where the water does not work. The plants, with the cute little “This is my home” (and so on) tags, are still not stolen.

World Kite Museum

Ed had driven by and told us his project at the kite museum was done, so we had a look and were impressed.

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Tatty hebe hedges replaced with river rock

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much improved

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how it used to be

Ilwaco

I walked the planter route, checking them all in a more time consuming way than Allan has time for when watering (which he did, starting in the other direction).

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I still recall someone making me mighty mad by telling me, while deep in his cups (meaning drunk), that the planters don’t make any difference to Ilwaco and that no one even notices them because the town itself is shabby.  I strongly disagree (and I love my town, too).

I had time, while Allan continued watering, to water almost all of the boatyard garden and accomplish some weeding.  I say almost all because one end had its hose access curtailed by the hose running up into a boat.  I decided last night’s rain would have to do for that part.

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Someone has been picking flowers off the globe thistle, as usual…

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…despite its close proximity to a do not pick sign.

I want the sign right OVER the blue globe thistle, just for proper outrage when it gets picked.

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strong evening shadows

Toward the end, I realized it was a darn good thing I was weeding.  Clamshell Railroad Days will be on Saturday and Sunday at Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum, and folks will for sure be taking the driving tour.

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one of many railroad history signs from Ilwaco to Nahcotta

Around 8 PM, I found a message from Jenna requesting a bouquet for something special.  I picked it at home, Allan delivered it, and it looked like this.

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Allan’s photo

We now have a three day weekend with some weeding time at home (Friday, for me) and some exciting garden tour plans.

 

 

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