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Archive for the ‘container gardens’ Category

Sunday, 3 Sept 2017

As we passed through the town of Castle Rock on our way to Evan Bean’s garden, I remembered childhood camping trips for two weeks each summer at the Toutle River, a beautiful campground that got washed away when Mt St Helens erupted in 1980.

 After our garden visit, we returned to Castle Rock and stopped to admire the public gardens.  I was pleased to find a Facebook page for the volunteer (!!!) group that does these gardens.  And, oh, LOOK! They have an annual garden tour (which we have, tragically, missed).

 Next year!

The first garden runs along the parking lot and street of the Riverfront Trail.  Allan went up onto the trail and got photos of the river.

I think this might presage a boating trip.

One of them waved.

The bank below the trail is newly planted.

Allan’s photo

how it gets watered (Allan’s photo)

This looks like the work truck.

Gateway Park

It was 96 degrees as we walked through the garden.

We had driven up that curved road heading to Evan’s garden.

I noted that somebody does hose watering.

roses and hydrangeas

This park runs for several blocks along a one way street going into town from the north.

Feast your eyes on the hanging baskets!  The park shows to the left in this photo.

I realized that each pole has a round banner which appear to be made by locals.  Let’s look at the baskets along this street and then get back to the park.

The baskets have gold sweet potato vine and at the top, some pink gaura making a spray of flowers.

Many hands make light work.

Now for our walk through this most amazing park.  I think that despite what the map below says it is called Gateway Park.

It’s long and narrow, between Huntington Avenue and Front Street.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

around the base of a tree (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

One plant source is Tsugawa. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo, looking down from the road

Is this really all hose watered by volunteers?! (Allan’s photo)

white gaura (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

We’ve walked south, and now we are walking back north.

On the way through town earlier in the day, my first hint of the great garden spirit here was a glimpse of the city hall garden, so we went looking for it.  On the way, we came upon what seems to be the same commercial street and stopped to admire its planters and baskets.

Castle Rock Blooms banner

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

dangling sweet potato vine (I think that is what it is)

painted rock (Allan’s photo)

 

It was 4:30 PM and we were the only pedestrians.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

sidewalk garden beds

We found City Hall a couple of blocks away.  It had been a great benefit of my freeway avoidance that we had glimpsed its garden on our route earlier in the day.

Allan’s photo

pink gaura, also used in the baskets

Digital cameras are weird. And WOW, what a garden.

The only other person we saw was a man across the street waiting at a table and holding a bouquet. There is a story there.

waterfall rock

Water rill goes under the entry walk.

seems like they get a lot of donations…

Allan’s photo

I was well and truly astonished by Castle Rock.

Here are a few bonus photos from our drive while looking for city hall:

On the way home:

The part of highway 4 (Ocean Beach Highway) between Longview and Cathlamet scares me, but what’s new….I’m no fun on the driving part of a road trip.

The 99 degree temperature as we passed through Longview dropped to 79 as we got closer to the beach.

In Naselle, we paused for a look at the big garden by the library.

They were having a party.

and the garden across the street….

with its big rooster.

I’m kind of in love with Castle Rock now, and I fantasized about moving in retirement to join that group of volunteers….if only it were not so hot there!  Here’s an upcoming event that you might want to attend.

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Thursday, 17 August 2017

The workday began with optimism that we could get everything done in order to get Friday off to relax and to blog about Tuesday’s day trip.  The pressure was low; if the work spilled over on to Friday, that would not be a problem.

First thing: Delivering flowers to Don Nisbett Gallery, for Jenna to take to their guest condo, in which she is hosting a bevy of mermaids over the weekend.

Long Beach

I often remember the deadheading of the welcome sign just as we are about to drive past it.

deadheading cosmos

Allan looked over the top of the sign for this one.

front side.

back side with Allan trimming the tatty Geranium ‘Orion’, which will be replaced with Rozanne (like the one at right) this fall.

I had intended to water the Long Beach planters first and then see how much time was left for the beach approach garden.  Then, in order to dump our debris while the city works lot is open (to save having to wrestle with the big gate), I decided we should weed the beach approach and its planters first.  Kite Festival starts Monday so we want it to look good.

Someone had left this rock in a planter.

This week, someone had added a plant to the Lisa Bonney memorial planter instead of taking plants away.

This pansy is new. Thank you.

I got to pet three lovely bassets.

Later, we saw in town a license plate that read AGLBST.  It came to me that it meant Agility Basset, i.e. dogs who compete in agility courses.  I bet those bassets belonged to that car.  If you want to watch an unusual breed of dog compete in agility, have a look at this video featuring my cousin’s St Bernard.  I imagine bassets would also be endearing to watch.

Our friend John and his darling dog, Tippi, stopped to visit.

Someone had helped themselves to one of my circle of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’.

rather a large amount of trash, neatly boxed.

note to self: just remove these old bearded iris from this planter in fall. Planted by a volunteer years ago, they do not do well.

I’m pleased there will still be rugosa roses blooming during Kite Festival.

We then weeded and deadheaded Veterans Field.

Allan also weeded the little park behind Lewis and Clark Square, which is heavy on crocosmias, including the small red ones to the left.

Because a biggish event, Jazz and Oysters, will be at Vet Field this weekend, I suddenly got the notion to apply mulch to the corner garden in order to fluff it up.  We were shockingly short on buckets. They have made their way from the work trailer into the garden at home.  Fortunately, I was able to find a stack of buckets at city works to borrow.

adding mulch at Veterans Field

We then took another buckets-load of mulch out to a couple of low areas on the beach approach garden.

second load of assorted scavenged buckets (Allan’s photo)

The beach approach now looks relatively spiffing for Kite Festival.

Done with mulching at the beach approach, too tired to go back for an after photo.

It was close to four o clock when we started watering the main street planters.  We skipped watering the street trees this week because of last Saturday’s rain.  We might regret that.

My walkabout photos:

Gladiolus papilio and still blooming pink oenothera

a couple of gladiolus, saved from volunteer days in the planter we re-did this spring.

I don’t really liked the regular old glads in a planter because they look clunky when deadheaded.  There are some in the Ilwaco planters that someone else must have put in, because I didn’t.

Allan’s walkabout photos:

Fuchsia, probably Golden Gate

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and cosmos

Salvia viridis (painted sage)

Just when I felt everything was going swimmingly and we’d have no problem getting Ilwaco watered as well, I remembered that we had to water the seven planters along the Sid Snyder Drive beach approach.  We split up to each water, me the east end and Allan the west end.

on Sid Snyder approach

AND we had better check up on the Kite Museum because…Kite Festival is coming.  (How could I almost have forgotten that after that kite festival painted rock?)

My heel was plaguing me as I dragged myself and my sore foot over there from my last planter.

World Kite Museum

Our new planters look good. Note the little blue painted rock.

penstemon has gone a bit flopsy

I just need those plants to stay perfectly beautiful for ten more days!

By now, it was after six.  Allan rejoined me and said he had the energy still to water the Ilwaco street trees and planters.  In order to get Friday off, I was determined to match that energy and get the boatyard watered and at least slightly deadheaded and weeded.

Ilwaco

Allan untangled and set up our long hose for me.  I was feeling punchy, my dogs were barking, and I was utterly determined to get this done.

watering south of the gate

boatyard work (Allan’s photo)

By the time I had the south stretch of garden watered, a breeze had come up and I wished I had my sweatshirt.  I could see Allan at the very far end of the block with his water truck.  It was simply too far to go.

Allan is way down at the end of the chain link fence.

Things took a turn for the better when I found two hoses hooked up on the inside of the fence halfway and two thirds of the way down…and they were just lying ready for me instead of being hoisted up with the nozzle end going into a boat.

This broken down patched old hose was a beautiful sight to me…

As was the hose at the far end.

I was so happy about the hoses that I swear my heel hurt less. I also realized that all day while working, in the back of my mind this chant was running over and over: No Trump, No KKK, No Fascist USA.  Clearly the news is always weighing on my thoughts.

viewing the garden from the inside, sweet pea success

It is frustrating to see deadheads from inside of the fence.

note to self: divide and make maybe two more clumps of this vigorous perennial sunflower (some sort of helianthus)

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ on both sides of the fence. I cut it back hard in early spring.

From whence did this boatyard buddleia volunteer blow in?  It’s a noxious weed.  I had mercy.

a boat with bikes on board

I had time to go to the outside of the fence and get some of the deadheads I had seen.

looking south

It was getting dark-ish when I found a broken bottle in the garden.  This photo below is to remind me of where it was, because I know there is still sharp glass there.

Note to self: Be careful next time.

Parts of the garden look bad with scrimmy horsetail no longer hidden by annual poppies.  I did not have time to deal with all of it.

a particularly sad spot

Other parts made me happy with beauty and interest.

I must stick more cuttings of the artemisia in the ground this fall. I do love it so.

This was my favourite spot today.

cosmos, looking lush but not many blooms yet

I keep thinking that when the last summer art walks roll around  (September 1), I should put up a sign at the boatyard reading “Gardening is the Slowest of the Performing Arts.”  I doubt I will have the energy to make that happen.

Meanwhile, Allan had the planters done.

watering planters till sunset

the one remaining big Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

Someone had sat on and smashed flat part of this planter.

Allan rejoined me just as it was almost too dark to see.  When he parked the water trailer at home, he found this hitchhiker.

My damnable right heel was plaguing me severely for the rest of the evening.  I wondered if it makes any sense at all to push so hard on a ten hour day just to get an extra day off.  And yet I do love a three day weekend.

Lest you feel achy with sympathy, I can report as I write this that I  experienced almost no foot pain on the two days off that followed, during which I only did some light watering at home, a tiny bit of planting, and a lot of news reading and blogging.  Allan’s much more interesting Saturday boat excursion will be tomorrow’s post.

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 15 August 2017

Since early summer, I had been corresponding with Terri, the organizer of the Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County garden tour, ever since contacting her to confirm the date of their 2017 tour.  She had invited us to come visit her garden sometime this summer.  When she sent me these photos in late June, I knew I just had to go there.

Terri’s photo

Terri’s photo

Terri’s photo

Today Allan and I got up early and drove two hours to the garden.  The property is named for Cynthia Markham who first claimed it in the mid 19th century.  Long before that, these shoreline acres were probably walked by the members of the Shoalwater Bay tribe.

As we approached, down a long dead end road, I exclaimed in joy.

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I knew right away, from my first sight of the garden bed lit by sunshine at the end of the road, that we were in for something special.

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to our left along the driveway

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looking back along the driveway

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The old tubs used to be used for horse watering troughs.

Two horses grazed over the fence by where we parked.  We soon learned that they are named Woody and Gus after characters in Lonesome Dove.  The white horse, Woody, is 35 years old and Gus is about 26.

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Allan’s photo

We were greeted by Ilsa, a 15 month old recently adopted rescue dog who soon became my new dear friend.  She used to be a city dog and now lives in paradise.

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Ilsa turning back at the sound of Terri’s voice.  This is the entry garden that I had seen from far up the road.

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Ilsa and her tennis ball (Allan’s photo).  To the left of the driveway is a vast field of blueberries.

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a stand of persicaria backed with phlox

Terri welcomed us and we walked slowly up toward the house, admiring the long driveway garden at every step along the way.

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to our right

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To our left. Teucrium hyrcanicum “Purple Tails’. I thought it was a salvia.  Must have!

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that face! 🙂

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to our left: Verbena bonariensis and phlox

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to our right: I was amazed to learn that this huge plant is a persicaria, Persicaria polymorpha, which I must acquire.

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to our right, smokebush smoking

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Look closely and you will see that the top of the stump is planted with teucrium.

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In this area and elsewhere, several enormous trees came down in the Great Coastal Gale of 2007.  Although she and Bill had owned the property by then for many years and had cleared the rhododendron forest from being completely overgrown by bindweed and more, and had grown  vegetables, it was not till after the gale that Terri focused on creating the ornamental garden.

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To our right: We are still walking up the driveway!

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to our left

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Ilsa got ahead of us.

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Ilsa by the pond

Waldo Pond got its name from “Where’s Waldo?”, as in looking for the frogs on the lily pads.  We only saw one today.  Terri says they hop off into the garden during the day.

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by Waldo Pond

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Some water has evaporated over our dry summer.

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Just past the pond is the house and garage.

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garage wall

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We met Terri’s spouse, Bill, and went up onto the deck where a group of chairs sat around a fireplace.

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The loon is a recurring symbol here.

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(taken later in the day)

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I was so focused on the deck’s ambience and on the bay view that it took me till I looked at my photos to see the second story skybridge going between the house and the garage.

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On the deck overlooking Grays Harbor.

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The wide deck goes all the way around the house.

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outside the kitchen window

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Allan’s photo

After walking all around the deck, Terri and Allan and I embarked upon a tour of the winding paths through the garden along the north side of the driveway.

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The paths strayed hither and yon, opening up into small clearing and vignettes.

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corylopsis leaves catching the sun

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Hydrangea and fuchsia magellanica

Terri and I had already figured out, through her reading of this blog and through email correspondence, that we share similar taste in plants.

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As you can see, Ilsa accompanied us through the garden.

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lacecap hydrangea

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Hydrangea aspera

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Hydrangea aspera

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textural Corylopsis leaves

A clearing revealed Terri’s latest project in progress, made from broken concrete.

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Hydrangea paniculata

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gorgeous

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Some garden art found at Pier 1

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Lamprocapnos scandens

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Lespedeza thunbergii (Bushclover)

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Cotinus (Smokebush)

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We walked down a slope on a paths that was easy, with non slippery mulch and nice wide steps.

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To the north is the alder wood.  You can just see the top of Terri’s head!

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I think this is Arundo donax variegata.

Terri is going off of big grasses that flop all over the place.  The one above is well behaved.

A long river of Geranium ‘Rozanne’ spills down the hill, about fifty of them, planted ten years ago. By this late in the summer, some of the crocosmia has flopped over the river of blue; Terri said she is planning to thin the crocosmia for that reason.

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with a scrim of Miscanthus ‘Morning Light’

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Allan’s photo

Below the Rozanne River lies the alder wood, also part of the property and also with paths.  We did not go into the woods because Ilsa is a newly adopted dog, and Terri does not want her to learn about those paths until she is sure to return home.

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to the west, the contained (by a concrete ditch, I think) bamboo grove (Allan’s photo)

Looking to the east, we could see Woody grazing in the pasture.

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Allan’s photo

As we climbed the hill again, I admired a low wall that I had walked right by before.

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made from a natural looking manufactured block, much better looking than “cottage” blocks.

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a sit spot

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colour and texture

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persicaria

When Terri and Bill’s children were young and they had first acquired the farm and were just spending weekends there from Seattle, they got rid of the television and have used the satellite dish as a planter ever since.  It conceals the access to the septic tank.

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approaching the house again

Their grandson loves the winding secret paths.  I was thinking how amazing it must be for children to visit there, something they will remember for a lifetime.

We took a short break for glasses of water in the kitchen.

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the old farmhouse kitchen ceiling (Allan’s photo)

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kitchen window (Allan’s photo)

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Allan noticed this interesting chair! Bill pointed out they were a north wind motif.

Refreshed, we embarked upon a walk toward the beach.  On the way, we admired more garden beauty.

To the south of the driveway is an enormous field of blueberries, transplanted from a farm and now a sanctuary for birds.

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next to the driveway fence

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Terri’s newest garden bed is a collection of pollinator friendly plants.

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echinaceas and more

Because the garden is not deer fenced, Terri has found an interesting way to repel deer.  She soaks tennis balls in deer repellent (heavy on the eggs!) and puts them on stakes around the garden.

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However, do you see Ilsa in the background?  She loves tennis balls and goes after the stinky staked ones.

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This open air pavilion is where an old forge used to stand, evidenced by piles of ashes found downhill.  I think it incorporates some of the forge building or an old carriage house.

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Allan’s photo

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the pavilion

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loon carving

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Bill and I

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looking east at the blueberry field from where the beach trail begins.

The many photos from our walk on the beach will be a bonus post, tonight.

Ilsa took a short nap upon our return from the beach. (Allan’s photo)

When we returned, Bill made us delicious burgers for lunch.  He called them smash burgers, made from a ball instead of a patty and smashed under a weight so that they are crispy on both sides.  That, and a salad made with avocado and endive that was eaten too eagerly to be photographed, went down a treat.

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quite honestly the best burger I’ve ever had

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Ilsa sits nobly by while we dine at a picnic table.

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our view toward Waldo pond

As I gazed from the picnic table to the pond, one small conifer shone like a golden torch.  It is not as evident in the photo as it was to my eyes.  You can see it next to an orb toward the left, above; it is Thuja platycladus ‘Weedom’.

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peach and apple cobbler for dessert

Soon after we had arrived, we had learned (to my vast relief!) that Bill and Terri share our thoughts about current events. That made for sympatico lunchtime conversation, which is a great comfort these days.

After lingering over our meal, we took a walk down the driveway to see the horses before saying goodbye.

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Some flowers on the way:

Verbena bonariensus

Persicaria (Allan’s photo)

Phlox (Allan’s photo)

The glorious Teucrium ‘Purple Tails’ again. Terri says it holds its colour for a long time. (Allan’s photo)

Buddleia (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Barn wall (Allan’s photo)

Terri and Gus

Gus enjoying carrots

Here comes Woody. (Allan’s photo)

Woody is mostly blind. Terri tossed down some carrots for him but Gus got them first.

Woody moved away. (Allan’s photos)

Later that night, Woody got apple peels to make up for it.

As we got into our van to leave, I noticed one more cool little tree.

Allan’s photo

It is Staphylea pinnata (European Bladdernut), one that is new to me.

We drove off from an idyllic, perfect visit with seedpods on the dashboard.


If you are smitten with this garden, you’ll have a chance to see it next July on the Grays Harbor Master Gardener tour. It is a garden I will be revisiting in my mind many times and will find well worth the drive to visit in another season.

Tonight’s bonus post: Our midday walk on the beach below the garden.

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Saturday, 12 August 2017

Astoria Garden Tour:

a benefit for the Lower Columbia Preservation Society

garden five: Lower Columbia Clinic

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I have noticed this garden before when its Crambe cordifolia was in bloom—a plant I have been unable to grow since leaving my Seattle garden because here, the slugs and snails always get it.  So I have Crambe envy.

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Allan’s photo

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Lower Columbia Clinic curbside garden

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a bit closer

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I used to have that lavish Buddleia in my old garden behind the boatyard.  I’m sure it is still there, growing by the sidewalk; I must go back this fall and get a cutting.

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Pretty sure it is the same one I got from Heronswood once upon a time.

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Here comes Pam!

There was much discussion, once Pam arrived, about the identity of this plant (below).  Osmanthus? We think Steve and John of the Bayside Garden have one.

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Below is the Crambe cordifolia which fills me with envy.

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Earlier, it would have been a cloud of white.

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And it is spreading.

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looking down the sidewalk

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roses

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rose hips

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bamboo supports keeping the sidewalk clear

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looking up from the parking lot

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Allan’s photo

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a sit spot by the clinic parking lot

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south side of parking lot

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by the front porch

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window box (and me)

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window box decorated with poppy seed pods stuck in

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pot decorated with elephant garlic, blue globe thistle and cardoon ( I think) stuck in

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The windrows, as Jessica calls them, of composting debris are held up by bamboo poles.

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composting

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from below (Allan’s photo)

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more Crambe cordifolia envy

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that buddleia again

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Allan’s photo

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curbside

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apples

I enjoyed taking a close look at this garden which I had admired in passing in years past.

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Sunday, 16 July 2017

After we had toured The Oysterville Garden, Lorna and Gail and Debbie (who had seen our next garden on yesterday’s local tour) went on their respective ways.  Dave, Melissa, Ann, Evan, Allan and I drove a few blocks north to Steve and Martie’s garden.  I’ve never met Steve and Martie although, before they moved to Oysterville, Allan and I worked on a garden just south of theirs, a garden that Dave and Melissa do now.  Dave and Mel (Sea Star Gardening) also helped ready Marty and Steve’s garden for the tour, and the creator of the fabulous Oysterville garden down the street has had some influence here.  You can read about Martie’s design work here.  And here.  And here.  And you can read about her Oysterville home, whose garden we are about to visit, here.

Martie designs plant decor for clients including the Ace Hotel in Portland.

historic Captain Stream House (Allan’s photo)

Captain Stream House (Allan’s photo). Much of Oysterville has lichened picket fences like this one.

front garden (Allan’s photo)

Ann (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

That’s one of my favourites, Verbena bonariensis, to the right.

a handsome stand of eupatorium (Joe Pye Weed)

orchids (Allan’s photo)

From the back deck.

A few days later, I happened to be at The Planter Box garden center when Teresa got a phone call asking what plant had been in the container above.  It’s sarracenia.

productive kitchen garden on both sides of the walkway

stone sink on the north side of the deck

closely mown croquet lawn on the south side

south of the garden (a guest house, I think)

coming around to the front garden again

now viewing the front garden from the entry driveway again, with Ann and Evan still lingering.

You can see more of this garden on Instagram at Oysterville Life.

We will now go on to tour two gardens of friends, and because we’ll be just with friends, I am going to share some garden tour thoughts.

 

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Saturday, 15 July 2017

The WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County present:

Somehow, probably because of not reading the description thoroughly, we completely missed finding the greenhouses.

by the parking lot, one of several garden boats (Allan’s photo)

the plant sale in its last hour (Allan’s photo)

We were able to get a free spider plant, something that Devery had been looking for.

Allan’s photo

on the deck overlooking the river (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

view of North River (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo with houseboats in distance (that belong to this property, or at least the moorage does)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

another garden boat (Allan’s photo)

and another (peonies, as I recall)

inside a small fenced garden

I could use a sign like this for after my lilies bloom.

walking down to the river…

…to take this picture.

Allan has boated past the North River Resort and had blogged out about here, so it was especially interesting to him to see it from onshore.  The whole 83 acre place is for sale, with a video overview available here.

Old Downtown, Raymond

a riverside drive back to Raymond

After the scenic drive back to the town of Raymond, we took a detour to the old downtown to see what sort of landscaping or containers it might feature.

a lavender trimmed grocery store

a long concrete planter with butterfly decorations, just watered

from the back

three attractive containers by a gallery

I liked the downtown banners (one of several bird themed ones)

I’d like to have seen that movie; it played the following evening on the Peninsula, way up in Surfside.  Unfortunately, it was the evening that the Ilwaco planters must, without a doubt, be watered.

another planter, also just watered

Dennis Company’s main store had floriferous planters outside.

with sunflowers

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Well done, Dennis Co!

As we drove toward home, we cruised by a garden in South Bend where an old friend and great gardener lives.  Next post!

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, 6 July 2017

It was just an ordinary watering day.

On the way out of town, I saw something that displeased me.

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bike parked in a tree garden (Allan’s photo)

No one in the adjacent business knew whose bike it was.  😦  It’s a garden, not a bike rack.

Long Beach

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Long Beach welcome sign

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We gave the welcome sign some fertilizer.  It is heavy on blue with Geraniums ‘Rozanne’ and ‘Orion’.

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Agastache ‘Summer Glow’ does not provide the big show that we used to get from Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’.  I have regrets.

We saw our friend Ed Strange (Strange Landscaping) and crew working on the garden at Subway and stopped for a chat and a pet for Jackson.

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My good friend Jackson and me

Allan and I watered the 37 downtown planters; he walked south and I walked north.

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This Geranium ‘Rozanne’ looked wilted.  Had I forgotten to water it last time?

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Nope…someone had pulled out a bunch of stems and just left them in the plant (twice this many once I was done teasing all the broken ones out).

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Brodiaea ‘Queen Fabiola’

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Queen Fabiola and Rozanne

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Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ finally blooming.  It was WINDY.

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delicately delicious white alpine strawberries in a planter…the shopkeeper gets to snack on them because people don’t think they are ripe yet.

Allan’s Long Beach watering photos:

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Rozanne, cosmos, California poppies

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Geranium ‘Rozanne’, Brodiaea ‘Queen Fabiola’, and the not showy enough painted sage with just a tuft of pink bracts at the top.

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Why is the painted sage not coloring as much along the stem this year? (or last year)

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white painted sage, also not showy…

painted sage

compare to these from pre-2016 with more colour from bracts

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elephant garlic losing its little hat

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lots of people by Hungry Harbor and Sweet Phee’s

We got done with our watering in time for the luxury of a sit down break at Abbracci Coffee Bar.

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leaving our weeding buckets and hoses outside

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Pink Poppy Bakery’s “Dad Tested Chocolate Chip Cookies”

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my favourite of the new paintings by Brad Carlson

Revived, we weeded Veterans Field and Fifth Street Park.

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Fifth Street Park (Allan’s photo)

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I clipped back this big Miscanthus to show off lilies that are planted too close and must be moved this fall.

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Allan’s photo

We watered the seven Sid Snyder beach approach planters.

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I should bring two Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ to replace the plants that got stolen from either side of the lamp post, and plant them with plaintive “I want to live here!” tags.  It’s been so long I can’t remember what was stolen.  Eryngiums, I think.

We met this little rescue dog named Molly.  Her person told us that Molly had been thrown out of a car in a bag.  Thank goodness she was rescued and now has a great life.

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Molly (Allan’s photos)

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Echinops (blue globe thistle) in the planter by Worldmark resort. (Allan’s photo)

Allan carried big jugs of water to the westernmost planter, whose water does not work and whose new plants are still there.

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New gazanias are a bit distressed, must remember to water this planter twice next week.

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I would have trimmed off the wilted foliage. Maybe Allan did after taking this photo.

On the way to Ilwaco, we went around the block for a closer look at the planted boxes in front of Artistic Bouquets.  They were planted up by John, an apprentice of Mark whose garden we toured yesterday.

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Artistic Bouquets planter…I got Agastache ‘Golden Jubilee’ envy.

Ilwaco

Allan dropped me off at the boatyard to weed and water, while he got the water trailer and watered the Ilwaco street trees and planters.

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weeding the back edge while watering from behind the fence

All had to look good because Friday night would be an art walk with people walking from downtown businesses to the port.  We would not be going because for the past three years, I find art walks to be too peopley for my social comfort zone.  Today marks the three year anniversary of a shunning situation that represented the worst side of small town living.  However, the resulting increased desire for reclusiveness has gifted me with much higher productivity and less aimless “hanging out”.  I think it is a good thing, and also quite possibly a bad thing, or, as Monk would say, a blessing and a curse.

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south one third of the boatyard garden

The weeding went pretty easily, and I had long enough hoses to do over half of the watering from the front side, which enabled multi-tasking.

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Allan’s photo, looking south

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo: reseeded poppies by the sidewalk

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Allan’s photo

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a flying bird!

Our reward for a long work day will be three days off.

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