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Archive for the ‘garden touring’ Category

All of the gardens we toured today were in bucolic country side, making for a pleasant drive between each.

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We soon reached the third garden of the day.

The WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County present:

tour

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The entry drive is a bridge over a river.

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approaching the one acre man made pond

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Allan’s photo

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Only Ann got a good photo showing the pleasing design of a spit of land going out into the pond.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo (coming round the pond the other way)

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a sign warning of roots above the grass

Just as I was navigating that maze of roots, I met up with blog readers Deborah and her sisters from up north!  They had driven down from the tour, a longer drive than ours, and were doing the tour in the opposite order; I hope they enjoyed it as much as we did.  They still had the glorious Willapa riverside garden in store.  They asked where Allan was.  He had parked the van in a provided parking area across the river and was coming round the pond in the other direction.

It always amazes me to hear that people read this blog over their morning coffee.  I tend to actually forget that!  As I told them, while they are reading, I am probably still sleeping.  Deborah is one of my favourite kinds of readers, because she makes comments, as well.

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Allan coming around the other side of the pond

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Glen’s house

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Note how there is not a glimpse of underlying liner in this dry river bed.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Prunus serrula (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

Right about here is where I finally met Terri, tour organizer.  We had been emailing back and forth for a month and have a lot in common in garden interests.  Allan and I will be visiting her garden near Westport sometime in August and are very much looking forward to that.

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view from the porch

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view from the porch

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view from the porch

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Allan’s photo

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on the porch

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before photos

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before photo

Notes about the garden:

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hose watering! (Allan’s photo)

Neither Allan nor I got a photo that got across the vastness of this property that had been transformed into an arboretum.  Ann did:

landscape

photo by Ann Amato-Zorich

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sighted as we stroll back to the exit

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Another huge parklike expanse was to our left on the road side of the bridge.

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Allan’s photo

We did not walk into that meadow because of my ill timed sore foot.  Now, looking at this photo, I wish I had made the effort.

 As we walked to our van to depart, we encountered Teresa from the Planter Box.  It seemed that our timing was off from that of all the other peninsulites.  She told us that she had heard that garden four had a great vegetable garden.  That was our next destination.

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chatting with Teresa, then on to the next garden

 

 

 

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Saturday, 15 July 2017

The WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County present:

Garden Two: “Colorful and Creative”

Every garden tour has one garden that becomes my favourite.  Gina and Jeff’s garden is one that could be my favourite of many tours.

I was thrilled just by looking at it across the street!

Before we crossed the road, we encountered Wendy and Bill, whose garden had been my favourite on last year’s tour.  Since then, I’d learned that for many years they owned the boat Aallotar which I often see at the Port of Ilwaco.  I longed for Aallotar stories but garden touring won out for everyone.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

closer

 

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walk to the front porch

Allan’s photo

wooden window box looks like copper

We finally made it to the check in table!  We could already hear the sound of the river and realized that the garden, while huge, is long and narrow because the river is just past the house and down a steep drop off.

The river sounded wonderful.

a double sort of curb holding the edge of the garden; that lawn is far below

The drop off at the edge of the garden is steep and dramatic.

Allan’s photo

garden creator Gina’s friendly little dog (Allan’s photo)

This cat was also getting attention. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

I felt faint just looking at this path between the house and the edge. Folks with a good head for heights breezed along it.

Allan’s photo

Gina must have a great head for heights; she had picked every bad leaf off of the statuesque hollyhocks.

Allan’s photo

hollyhocks below the edge

I decided to explore the garden that stretched expansively from the other side of the garage.

back wall of garage

Allan’s photo

This was to cover up some sort of unattractive utilitarian thing. (Allan’s photo)

The long, narrow garden lay on both sides of the house between the road and the drop off to the river.  We began with the longest area, to the left of the house.

a sit spot (Allan’s photo)

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on the side of the garage

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detail

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looking down the expansive lawn

Because this garden is a work in progress, I have a feeling that eventually all of these beds will be as full as the ones right around the house.

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looking back

Squash and big healthy tomatoes grew in the roadside bed.  Someone commented about the fertile farmland valley silt in this area.

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Allan’s photo

One of the folks strolling toward me said (because of my knee brace, cane, and sore heel related limp), “Nothing stops you from garden touring, does it?!”

The garden beds on the river side go right up to the cliff edge.

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right on the edge….I wondered if eventually these trees would go.

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I would have to crawl on my belly to weed up to that edge!

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Allan’s photo

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plants clinging to the very edge of the steep drop off!

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Allan’s photo

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looking down (Allan’s photo)

I tip my gardener’s cap to the bold gardener who weeds along that curving edge.

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Most of the beds are more safely inland.

We turned back and walked toward the house.

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garden tour guests enjoying a sit spot

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peach tree near the garage

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a perfect rose

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I am now thinking about how this garden does not seem bothered by deer.

When Ann (Spiffy Seeds, The Amateur Bot-ann-ist) toured this garden just after we did, she especially noticed the burned tree (which went right over my head).

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photo by Ann Amato-Zorich, who says “Burned tree. Nature’s own shou sugi ban.”

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rustic woodsy planter

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from another angle

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and another….an idea I am going to emulate.

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Allan’s photo

To reach the other side of the garden, I went along the front of the house.

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Brick front porch wrapped front and right side of the house.

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front garden

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looking out from the porch

On the right side of the entry porch, the brick porch narrowed and became L shaped.  Its decor was so fascinating that I could have spent an hour there.

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This area had a concrete floor and a high roof with a chandelier and a skylight.

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story of my life!

I could almost weep with delight over all of these artful vignettes.

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Just off the porch was a waterfall pond.

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Going around the corner of the house, we found another tiny shady pool.

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Allan’s photo

Around the corner at the back of the house, we passed through an arbour to a greenhouse.

We failed to step back and get a long shot.  Ann kindly provided us with this:

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photo by Ann Amato-Zorich

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sink fountain

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Allan’s photo

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in the greenhouse

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We recently saw someone making a cool light fixture like this on a tiny house show.

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in the greenhouse

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in the greenhouse

Near the greenhouse, steps and a path go down to the river level.

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looking down

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plantings on the upper bank (Allan’s photo)

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from the path going down; garden creator Gina in view (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

We learned later that the rock retaining wall was new this past year, and Gina has begun planting it up.

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Allan’s photo

I was still up on the top level by the greenhouse.

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the back porch and sunroom

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the other side of the path I couldn’t do!

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Looking down again, I could see a great temptation for reaching the river level:

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The kitty was there!

Someone told me that an easy access driveway was available at the other end of the garden.  I made my way in that direction.

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by the greenhouse, a basket ready for berries

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past the greenhouse

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looking back at the house and L shaped porch

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an easy road, with a greeter

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kitty welcoming Allan to the river road

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Allan’s photo

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along the river bank

I learned later that the river causes much destruction along this bank during a stormy winter.  The lawn survives!

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looking up the newly cleared area to the greenhouse

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The river made a beautiful sound.

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Allan’s photo

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new rock wall with tour guest for scale

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Look at the edge on that lawn.  Allan noticed that all the bare ground was weed free and carefully raked.

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the river bank, which likely gets flooded in rainy winters

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the sound of water always in the background

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the path down from below

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Allan’s photo

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We made our way back up the easy road to the top and appreciated the garden for awhile longer.

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a natural hose hanger

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Look who we met arriving just as we were leaving!

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Dave, Melissa, Todd, Pam (downtown Seaside gardener)

They would be one garden behind us all the way.  Ann and Evan arrived just after this photo was taken. We should have just slowed down and toured with them, because they would notice things that we had missed.  I am always afraid of running out of time, so on we went to the next garden.

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I’m thinking how much I loved this garden and that I did not want to leave.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 15 July 2017

The WSU Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County present:

tour

A focus of the Master Gardener tour is very personal gardens that are designed and maintained by their owners.

Garden One: “Shades of Paris”

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Like all of the gardens on this tour, this one was located by a quiet country road.

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impeccably maintained

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tour guests checking in (Allan’s photo)

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I was well chuffed to be there.

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flowers in patterns

There were lots of zinnias and dahlias that would be in bloom not long from now.  If I lived closer than an hour away, I would be trying to get a peek when the bed above is in full bloom.

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Red white and blue in this place could evoke the French flag.

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pasture just beyond the garden

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People were walking back across the pasture from a nature path, possibly for nearby Fuss Creek.

I missed this opportunity and another, in the third garden, to explore further, because I was having an extra problem today of having a sore foot!

To my left was a fenced kitchen and flower garden.

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berries and roses

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I continued to be impressed by the complete lack of weeds.

 

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This fence was possibly designed to keep out more critters than just deer.

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Guests were invited to snack on the berries.  (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

We turned our attention to the large patio at the side of the house.

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I felt this might remind the owners of the tradition of dining outdoors in France.

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waterfall pond

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Allan pointed out that the black and white photo in the program got a better overview of the pond than either of us did.

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Between garden and pasture, a wide maintenance path would make wheelbarrowing easy.

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looking back at the house

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fire circle between pond and pasture

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Allan’s photo

Neither Allan nor I got as good a photo of the fire circle as did our friend Ann (Spiffy Seeds, The Amateur Bot-ann-ist) who was touring just behind us.

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photo by Ann Amato-Zorich: “my dream s’mores making fire pit”

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view over the pond from the fire circle

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beyond the garden

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hot tub

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to the next level

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The red tape was a warning where steps went down.

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a sit spot outside a fenced garden and more zinnias that will be colourful soon

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Allan’s photo

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fenced kitchen gardens with berries

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Allan’s photo

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between the house and the fenced berry patch

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Allan’s photo

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looking back as I walk around the house

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Salix integra ‘Hakuro-nishiki’ (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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zinnias, a big porch, quilt display

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I wish I had asked who was the quilter.

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leaving the colourful and impeccably maintained garden

 

 

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Wednesday, 5 July 2017

Touring Mark and Brian’s Garden

With our workday almost done, we drove almost to Nahcotta to tour a garden new to us.  When garden owner Mark had posted some beautiful photos of it on the Peninsula Gardeners Facebook group, I had commented that I would be hanging over the fence trying to see in if I walked by. I was forthwith invited to come visit.  Because I focus on one thing at a time, I did not look closely at the address until we were on our way from Klipsan Beach Cottages.  Then I said “OH my gosh, I think this is the garden I have wanted to see for a long time!”  Sure enough, as we parked, I knew that it was the place where I HAVE peered wistfully over the front fence, wishing to see what was in the secret garden.

I am incorporating into this story some of Mark’s photos that drew me into this hidden paradise.

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the front garden

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beginning our tour

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front garden

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by the woodsy edge of the front garden

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cool and wavy trellises

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cosmos!

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deep blue Salvia patens

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washing machine tub planters!

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talking about the assorted raised boxes

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Now I want a kitchen garden just like this.

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The sides come off.

I’d put a kitchen garden like that in the sunny spot between our fence and Devery’s garage parking pad so we could both harvest.

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Allan’s photo: fence between front and back garden

At last, I got to go through the gate to the back garden.

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having entered the secret garden (Allan’s photo)

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view upon entering

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Immediately, we heard the sound of a waterfall and found the source: a large pond with stream and two waterfalls.  Mark said when they bought the house, it was a strawberry bed, and as he cleaned it out, he found a big cement pond.  He and Brian then constructed the stream bed that runs down a slope from behind.

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Mark’s photo

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Mark’s photo

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up the slope to the waterfall

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I did not quite succeed with this photo of the pond from under the maple branch.  Let’s just call it impressionistic.

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Allan’s photo

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maple admiration society

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at the pond’s edge

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Allan’s photo

We turned our attention to the garden on the west side of the house, which I had been thrilled to see was a double wide, like ours, but with better windows and nice wood siding.

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Mark’s photo

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looking across to the pond, what a view! (Mark’s photo)

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Mark’s photo

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west facing deck with strong shadows

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on the porch

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Mark’s photo

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Mark’s photo

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west side flower garden

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dierama (Mark’s photo)

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Mark’s photo

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a deer fenced area…The additional height on top was added because deer jumped this!

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just done blooming

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on the shed wall

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Allan’s photo

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roses protected from deer (Allan’s photo)

Beyond the house is a luxuriously large chicken coop.

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just part of the multi-roomed coop

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friendly girls

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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an old door recycled from Penttila’s Chapel

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up the ramp, in the door, hoping for a treat

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by the greenhouse

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echeverias

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geranium with great foliage

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on the corner of the deck

We began to wend our way out of the garden because we had more watering to do in Ilwaco before day’s end.

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love these grasses in wooden boxes

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another view of the pond

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Allan’s photo

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hydrangea (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

Soon we are going to have Mark and Brian over to have a walk about in our garden.  I felt so lucky to have gained entry to theirs.

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Monday, 3 July, part two

Karen and Steve’s garden

On the way south from working in Long Beach, we took a side road so that I could sneak a peak at a project whose progress I’ve been watching on occasional drive-bys: the building of a rock wall and resulting raised front garden at the home of landscaper Steve Clarke.  As we tried to subtly drive past while craning our necks, we were spotted and hailed by Steve’s spouse, Karen, and were delighted to be invited to tour the inner sanctum of the garden.

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We’ve been watching this front garden appear.

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The distortions of  (cheap) digital photography make it hard to show that this wall is perfectly level.

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well cut and fitted rocks (Allan’s photo)

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Steve’s plush carpet of new lawn (Allan’s photo)

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established bed on south wall of the house

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south wall garden

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the joy of garden touring

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Acer palmatum ‘Shishigashira’

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south wall sit spot

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geranium (bee) and Erysimum ‘Wenlock Beauty’, we think

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One of Karen’s artful containers

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and another

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more container combos

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containers and ingredients (new plants)

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stacked blue pots

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Allan’s photo

We walked between garage and house to Karen’s floriferous back garden.

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a mosaiced step up

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Allan’s photo

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the back garden….The house dates to the mid 1920s.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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I was commenting how Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’ tends to revert to green in one year.

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in the back garden

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detail

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These tall eryngiums in the foreground will soon be turning steely blue.

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Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ is already at is peak of blue.

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Allan’s photo

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detail and textures

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astilbes (love them)

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blue hydrangea

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Hedge is on the north side.

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Allan’s photo.  I think that’s ‘Orange Rocket’ barberry, which I am still trying (and failing) to successfully grow.

I briefly mistook these monkshood for delphiniums and had a pang of delphinium envy!

Colorful oxalis

Backlit continus (smokebush)

An agastache centerpiece

An exclamation point as you go from the back to the front garden.

Walking back around to the southwest side, we admired the kitchen garden.  I’d love to have something this organized.

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The lattice enclosure (right) hides the wheelie bin and so forth.

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on the lattice enclosure: a display of ‘Pretty Much Picasso’ petunias

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This kitty in the shop window was a guest for the day.

It was fortuitous to get invited into this garden created by true plantspeople.  Karen is good friends with Our Lorna, former owner of the site of our former longtime job, Andersen’s RV Park, and it may be that a campfire with Lorna and Karen at our garden just might be in the works.  I hope so!

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Thursday, 8 June 2017

*Overseas is not as exotic as it sounds; it’s just what we say around here about crossing the Columbia River to northwest Oregon state.

We had a lovely rainy day so there was no guilt at all about not gardening.

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The half an inch of predicted rain had materialized.

Before leaving Ilwaco, we finally found time to go to the botanical art exhibit at Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum, three blocks west.

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“The Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum is honored to present an exhibition of 82 paintings by Frances Stilwell representing the native plants of Oregon’s eight Ecoregions.

After moving to Oregon in 1969, Stilwell began defining her new home by learning and drawing the native plants. Since then, Stillwell has published two books related to Oregon’s native plants including the exhibition’s companion book, ‘Oregon’s Botanical Landscape; An Opportunity to Imagine Oregon Before 1800’.”

Before going in, we simply had to pull chickweed out of the museum’s two planters.

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beargrass and beargrass baskets

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I liked the impressionistic paintings so much that I bought the accompanying book.

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Now for our shopping trip overseas.

ilwacoseaside

Astoria

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We’d go to more events in Astoria if I enjoyed crossing the 4.2 mile bridge.

We drove into downtown to buy a t shirt at Old Town Framing for Astoria Pride 2017.

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flowers in a downtown window

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large street planters

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Allan’s photo

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and individual shop planters

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In Warrenton, just southwest of Astoria, we checked out the plant stock at Fred Meyer and Home Depot because I have often found cool plants at Fred’s…not so much this time…and because I need a couple of small hydrangeas like Cityline Rio.  I was disgruntled because both stores had hydrangeas which were not marked with cultivar names. Just “hydrangea” is not enough of a label for me.

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feeling disgruntled at a big box store

We bought some feeder fish for our water boxes at the local Petco.  (I’d rather shop at smaller places but sometimes, here away from the city, the choices are limited.)

We turned right onto Broadway in Seaside, Oregon, to make the loop of

Pam Fleming’s Seaside Gardens

Because the frustrating hydrangea shopping had consumed a lot of time, the photos are taken from the van on a drive by.  Sometime I’d like to have a leisurely enough trip to text city gardener Pam and meet for lunch.  You can see the gardens at their summer peak in this post from July 2015.

 

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Taken backwards after driving past because I admired the pool of still water underneath the clipped ceanothus.

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I envy Pam’s big, irrigated planting beds.

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impressionistic

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a store named after me

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the turn-around

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We drove on south from Seaside to shop at Seaside 7 Dees. I found some fairly common plants that I wanted for my garden.

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Allan’s photo

 

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a couple more Euonymus ‘Green Spire’

A nice Salvia patens was a good find.  My best find was a flat of Asclepias syriaca, which had been on my must have list since I saw it last summer in the Deerly Missed gardendeerly.png

Well, syriaca and speciosa are not the same one…but close in appearance.  I hope.

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Allan liked the fountain. (We’ve seen a version with crows, too.)

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Their beaks clack as water runs through.

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He found himself a new “parsley fern”.

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My cart; I wish I could have found two cartloads of cool plants to buy.

I am aware of the contradiction in my recent rejoicing that planting time was over.

Note the gold leafed Tradescantia ‘Blue and Gold’.  I have tried this plant repeatedly and the snails always get it.  My memory of seeing it in Lucy Hardiman’s Portland garden years ago always inspires me to try again.

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Lucy’s garden, 2001, gold tradescantia in pots on the deck

Unfortunately, the hydrangea selection at 7 Dees did not include any that I wanted for the J’s garden although I did get myself one called ‘Shooting Star’, which might be one I have seen in The Oysterville Garden.

Perhaps, thought I, I had not tried hard enough while looking at the hydrangeas at Home Depot.  We went back to try again; I hoped that scanning the tags might reveal the names of the different cultivars.  Nope.  The scan just said “Hydrangea”.  I tried to explain that there are a lot of folks with the surname Smith, but individual Smiths are names Mary, Bob, or Lucy.  I got crickets and blank looks.

We had not had time to eat yet so we decided to have a meal at the cute Uptown Café in the adjacent mall.  (I wished I had decided that earlier; we could have waited to get our feeder fish and saved them the ride to Seaside and back.)

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Tradescantia ‘Blue and Gold’ outside the café, planted with lots of sidewalk around it so probably not vulnerable to snails.

The back of the menu explains much about the charming decor of the café.  Its ambience is more important to me than the food.

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wood partition from an old church

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south wall

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Old doors from Astoria houses.

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veggie burger

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fish tacos

home again

…after accomplishing the tedium of grocery shopping.

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This snail had ridden all the way down and back with us on the back of the van. (Allan’s photo)

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chickadee poised to take food to the nest

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new batch of ladies in waiting

The new fish had one casualty, a plain silver one.  The store clerk had put in extras for that eventuality.  They got floated around in their bag for an hour in the water boxes before being divided into their new home.

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the new fish

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There are lots of places to hide from predators.

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We had had this much rain.

Tomorrow: One work day, followed by a two day weekend with a couple of events that might preclude getting the new plants planted.

 

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Thursday, 11 May 2017

As one storm passed over and another was due, with far worse weather predicted for tomorrow, we arranged to visit one of our favourite gardens a day earlier than planned.

While this Willapa Bay garden merits a visit at any season, rhododendron time is its peak.  Some of the rhodos had already bloomed, starting in February. (As I was looking something up for this post, I ran across this article that I think will please rhododendron fans.)

Join us as we walk with Steve and John from the house, down through the gardens and back.   In the photo captions, which we hope are correct, R. of course means Rhododendron.  All mistakes in identification are completely mine and will soon be corrected, because Steve and John will catch them.  I have virtually no expertise in rhododendrons.  Until I began to visit this garden, I had no idea how wonderfully varied they are.

close admiration of the tomentosum (soft underside of foliage) on a trio of R. pachysanthum by the front door

One of a curve of five or six Chamaecyparis pisifera ‘Vintage Gold’

John at the start of a new path laid by local landscaper Steve Clarke

A well-built Steve Clarke wall guides the path around to the pump house.

chives in the kitchen garden (Allan’s photo)

A soft and misty space between rain storms.

Allan’s photo

To our left, R. loderi ‘Venus’ carried its fragrant flowers almost out of reach this year. Underneath is the white R. ‘Olympic Lady’.

looking up into R. loderi ‘Venus’

R. loderi ‘Venus’

new foliage on an old pieris

golden Taxus (prostrate yew) embracing several plants, including R. ‘Ken Janeck’

Allan’s photo

We are looking at an Osmanthus burkwoodii that is just recovering from the winter and early spring winds…

Garden bed to the north of the driveway:

Corokia virgata ‘Sunsplash’, center

textures

Allan’s photo

shapes, including Pittosporum kohuhu (nicknamed golf ball pittosporum).  Note the twirly conifer to the lower left.  My notes just helpfully say “little twirly yellow guy.’

Steve IDs for me as Chamaecyparis obtusa ‘Nana Lutea’
(Nana Lutea Dwarf Hinoki Cypress)

Allan’s photo

Walking into the upper north gardens…

two toned pink R. ‘Perry Wiseman’ and, in the background, the white R. ‘Pohjola’s Daughter’

a wealth of pink tones on R. ‘Perry Wiseman’

Allan’s photo

a variegated wiegela, I think (Allan’s photo)

an impeccably perfect hosta

the brightness of new growth

Allan’s photo 😉

new growth on R. ‘Winsome’, a word that we agreed has fallen out of use.

This area around a tree had been the dreaded salal just two days ago, and now look:

sword ferns

Walking down toward the irrigation pond….

Tall R. ‘Beauty of Littleworth’ blooming above a pair of new rhodos

close up of the young pair, R ‘Scarlet Wonder’, in the above photo, one blooming and one not.

twins with different personalities

R. ‘Butterfly’

Allan’s photo

looking back at the de-salaled tree

R. ‘Milky Way’ with flowers like powder puffs

R. ‘Milky Way’ (Allan’s photo)

R. sinofalconeri (species) with fuzzy new leaves

R. stenopetalum

Thujopsus dolobrata

Allan’s photo

Looking south across the driveway, you can see the same full grown thujopsis that the driveway was made to curve around.

more bright new calyxes

R. ‘Susan’

R. ‘Susan’

Crossing over to the south side of the driveway…

cinnamon fern

Allan’s photo

more fuzzy new growth on R. leucaspis (species)

Steve’s favourite, ‘Starbright Champagne’

Rhododendon ‘Starbright Champagne’ blooming a couple of years ago

Looking west, I gasped when I saw (below) a vasty new area that Steve and John had grubbed out of rough undergrowth:

I know this will soon be a display of wonderful new plants.

Below is a new area created last year:

looking east

The paths are delightfully soft and springy underfoot.

impeccably pruned sword ferns by the stream ditch that bordered the estate; you can see on the other side what they look like uncared for (just brown and tatty).

new area made last year

a handsome Disporum ‘Night Heron’

strongly textured R. erosum

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Allan’s photo.  The background of native meianthemum is not a favourite and will be controlled as time permits!

Podophyllum ‘Spotty Dotty’ showing off

Allan’s photo

Athyrium ‘Goliath’, Japanese painted fern

a soft and kind Mahonia ‘Soft Caress’, no prickles!

more of the new area

Kalmia latifolia 'Sarah'

Kalmia latifolia ‘Sarah’ (Allan’s photo)

perfectly trimmed deer ferns (Allan’s photo)

bluish new foliage on R. lepidostylum

R. ‘Little Carmen’

stunning new silver foliage. (The fuzz on the top of leaves is called tomentosum.) Steve says: R. sinofalconeri (like the other, smaller Vietnamese form we identified before, but this one goes 10-30′!))

(If you think I can read my notes on all these names, think again.  At least a third of these rhododendron identifications involved emails to Steve. Every time I visit this garden, I plan to spend the next winter making a proper database for my garden…and don’t.)

R. quinquefolium

R. quinquefolium , one of those you would not even guess was a rhodie!

Allan’s photo

looking back as we walk toward the house

a brief detour to look across the pond

drizzle begins (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

R. ‘Carmen’

R. ‘Medusa’

R. ‘Kodiak’

detail, R. ‘Kodiak’

Allan’s photo

mossy backdrop for R. ‘PJM Compacta’

looking back

Rain started as we approached the house…

However, despite rain, I had to see the ladies in waiting.

R. ‘Tall Timber’

Due to rain and over-excitement I only got a fuzzy photo of this amazing R. benhallii that looks like an enkianthus.

Steve told me that Professor Ben Hall at the University of Washington has finally had this rhododendron named after him.  You can read more about his research here.

a covetable euonymous

weird and wonderful R. spinuliferum

By now, the rain was quite serious.

from inside the house

the dell of evergreen huckleberries

from the north window: the succulent pump roof landscape had frozen out over the winter.

Steve showed us some photos of how the pump roof had looked in close up late last summer:

like a miniature forest, we all agreed

It was time to warm up with tea and a treat.

John’s coconut banana bread (Allan’s photo)

A torrential and noisy sheet of rain fell. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

As we finished our cake, tea, and plant talk, a beautiful light fell over the bay.

Allan’s photo

From the front door (telephoto), Steve pointed out the glow of the red maple in the far distance.

On the way down the drive, departing, we took a few more photos of the early evening light.

A silver shower of rain suddenly fell off this tree.

Allan’s photo 😉

north of upper driveway

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

a row of redtwig dogwood along the lower driveway (Allan’s photo)

by the entrance drive (Allan’s photo)

the entrance driveway (Allan’s photo)

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Steve’s photo

 

Allan cropped his photo because of raindrops on the lens.  I got the full view of the driveway, above, from Steve. I asked for the names, and here they are: “From the east, R. ‘Red gold’ — then two numbered (unnamed) crosses by Jim Elliott (from Knappa).  Next, four of R. ‘Gala’ — then two (low) R. ‘Naselle” — then R. ‘Lem’s cameo’  — then three R. ‘Nadine’ with  R. ‘Golden gala’ (not in bloom this year) on the very west end [closest to the highway].”

This rhododendron-lined driveway is shared with the home next door, which has just  been listed for sale.  It was once Clarke Nursery.  We all want to see gardeners buy it, and you’d have the best neighbors in Steve and John.  Here is the listing.  Here is the garden on the Rhododendron Tour.  And here it is on the July garden tour.  Just imagine yourself driving past that line of peachy rhododendrons to your own piece of bayside paradise.

We were glad to have found a time between storms to visit.  The next day began with a pea sized heavy hail storm that I imagine might have damaged some of the blossoms at the Bayside Garden, and rain and wind continued during the whole of Friday.

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Skooter enjoyed reading this blog post along with Allan.

 

 

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