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Archive for the ‘garden touring’ Category

Thursday, 11 May 2017

As one storm passed over and another was due, with far worse weather predicted for tomorrow, we arranged to visit one of our favourite gardens a day earlier than planned.

While this Willapa Bay garden merits a visit at any season, rhododendron time is its peak.  Some of the rhodos had already bloomed, starting in February. (As I was looking something up for this post, I ran across this article that I think will please rhododendron fans.)

Join us as we walk with Steve and John from the house, down through the gardens and back.   In the photo captions, which we hope are correct, R. of course means Rhododendron.  All mistakes in identification are completely mine and will soon be corrected, because Steve and John will catch them.  I have virtually no expertise in rhododendrons.  Until I began to visit this garden, I had no idea how wonderfully varied they are.

close admiration of the tomentosum (soft underside of foliage) on a trio of R. pachysanthum by the front door

One of a curve of five or six Chamaecyparis pisifera ‘Vintage Gold’

John at the start of a new path laid by local landscaper Steve Clarke

A well-built Steve Clarke wall guides the path around to the pump house.

chives in the kitchen garden (Allan’s photo)

A soft and misty space between rain storms.

Allan’s photo

To our left, R. loderi ‘Venus’ carried its fragrant flowers almost out of reach this year. Underneath is the white R. ‘Olympic Lady’.

looking up into R. loderi ‘Venus’

R. loderi ‘Venus’

new foliage on an old pieris

golden Taxus (prostrate yew) embracing several plants, including R. ‘Ken Janeck’

Allan’s photo

We are looking at an Osmanthus burkwoodii that is just recovering from the winter and early spring winds…

Garden bed to the north of the driveway:

Corokia virgata ‘Sunsplash’, center

textures

Allan’s photo

shapes, including Pittosporum kohuhu (nicknamed golf ball pittosporum).  Note the twirly conifer to the lower left.  My notes just helpfully say “little twirly yellow guy.’

Steve IDs for me as Chamaecyparis obtusa ‘Nana Lutea’
(Nana Lutea Dwarf Hinoki Cypress)

Allan’s photo

Walking into the upper north gardens…

two toned pink R. ‘Perry Wiseman’ and, in the background, the white R. ‘Pohjola’s Daughter’

a wealth of pink tones on R. ‘Perry Wiseman’

Allan’s photo

a variegated wiegela, I think (Allan’s photo)

an impeccably perfect hosta

the brightness of new growth

Allan’s photo 😉

new growth on R. ‘Winsome’, a word that we agreed has fallen out of use.

This area around a tree had been the dreaded salal just two days ago, and now look:

sword ferns

Walking down toward the irrigation pond….

Tall R. ‘Beauty of Littleworth’ blooming above a pair of new rhodos

close up of the young pair, R ‘Scarlet Wonder’, in the above photo, one blooming and one not.

twins with different personalities

R. ‘Butterfly’

Allan’s photo

looking back at the de-salaled tree

R. ‘Milky Way’ with flowers like powder puffs

R. ‘Milky Way’ (Allan’s photo)

R. sinofalconeri (species) with fuzzy new leaves

R. stenopetalum

Thujopsus dolobrata

Allan’s photo

Looking south across the driveway, you can see the same full grown thujopsis that the driveway was made to curve around.

more bright new calyxes

R. ‘Susan’

R. ‘Susan’

Crossing over to the south side of the driveway…

cinnamon fern

Allan’s photo

more fuzzy new growth on R. leucaspis (species)

Steve’s favourite, ‘Starbright Champagne’

Rhododendon ‘Starbright Champagne’ blooming a couple of years ago

Looking west, I gasped when I saw (below) a vasty new area that Steve and John had grubbed out of rough undergrowth:

I know this will soon be a display of wonderful new plants.

Below is a new area created last year:

looking east

The paths are delightfully soft and springy underfoot.

impeccably pruned sword ferns by the stream ditch that bordered the estate; you can see on the other side what they look like uncared for (just brown and tatty).

new area made last year

a handsome Disporum ‘Night Heron’

strongly textured R. erosum

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Allan’s photo.  The background of native meianthemum is not a favourite and will be controlled as time permits!

Podophyllum ‘Spotty Dotty’ showing off

Allan’s photo

Athyrium ‘Goliath’, Japanese painted fern

a soft and kind Mahonia ‘Soft Caress’, no prickles!

more of the new area

Kalmia latifolia 'Sarah'

Kalmia latifolia ‘Sarah’ (Allan’s photo)

perfectly trimmed deer ferns (Allan’s photo)

bluish new foliage on R. lepidostylum

R. ‘Little Carmen’

stunning new silver foliage. (The fuzz on the top of leaves is called tomentosum.) Steve says: R. sinofalconeri (like the other, smaller Vietnamese form we identified before, but this one goes 10-30′!))

(If you think I can read my notes on all these names, think again.  At least a third of these rhododendron identifications involved emails to Steve. Every time I visit this garden, I plan to spend the next winter making a proper database for my garden…and don’t.)

R. quinquefolium

R. quinquefolium , one of those you would not even guess was a rhodie!

Allan’s photo

looking back as we walk toward the house

a brief detour to look across the pond

drizzle begins (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

R. ‘Carmen’

R. ‘Medusa’

R. ‘Kodiak’

detail, R. ‘Kodiak’

Allan’s photo

mossy backdrop for R. ‘PJM Compacta’

looking back

Rain started as we approached the house…

However, despite rain, I had to see the ladies in waiting.

R. ‘Tall Timber’

Due to rain and over-excitement I only got a fuzzy photo of this amazing R. benhallii that looks like an enkianthus.

Steve told me that Professor Ben Hall at the University of Washington has finally had this rhododendron named after him.  You can read more about his research here.

a covetable euonymous

weird and wonderful R. spinuliferum

By now, the rain was quite serious.

from inside the house

the dell of evergreen huckleberries

from the north window: the succulent pump roof landscape had frozen out over the winter.

Steve showed us some photos of how the pump roof had looked in close up late last summer:

like a miniature forest, we all agreed

It was time to warm up with tea and a treat.

John’s coconut banana bread (Allan’s photo)

A torrential and noisy sheet of rain fell. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

As we finished our cake, tea, and plant talk, a beautiful light fell over the bay.

Allan’s photo

From the front door (telephoto), Steve pointed out the glow of the red maple in the far distance.

On the way down the drive, departing, we took a few more photos of the early evening light.

A silver shower of rain suddenly fell off this tree.

Allan’s photo 😉

north of upper driveway

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

a row of redtwig dogwood along the lower driveway (Allan’s photo)

by the entrance drive (Allan’s photo)

the entrance driveway (Allan’s photo)

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Steve’s photo

 

Allan cropped his photo because of raindrops on the lens.  I got the full view of the driveway, above, from Steve. I asked for the names, and here they are: “From the east, R. ‘Red gold’ — then two numbered (unnamed) crosses by Jim Elliott (from Knappa).  Next, four of R. ‘Gala’ — then two (low) R. ‘Naselle” — then R. ‘Lem’s cameo’  — then three R. ‘Nadine’ with  R. ‘Golden gala’ (not in bloom this year) on the very west end [closest to the highway].”

This rhododendron-lined driveway is shared with the home next door, which has just  been listed for sale.  It was once Clarke Nursery.  We all want to see gardeners buy it, and you’d have the best neighbors in Steve and John.  Here is the listing.  Here is the garden on the Rhododendron Tour.  And here it is on the July garden tour.  Just imagine yourself driving past that line of peachy rhododendrons to your own piece of bayside paradise.

We were glad to have found a time between storms to visit.  The next day began with a pea sized heavy hail storm that I imagine might have damaged some of the blossoms at the Bayside Garden, and rain and wind continued during the whole of Friday.

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Skooter enjoyed reading this blog post along with Allan.

 

 

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Sunday, 12 March 2017

Because we had a political meeting in Naselle this afternoon, we had decided to leave home in time to drive half an hour further and visit a museum in Skamokawa.

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driving along the Columbia River

I was not best pleased that it was a beautiful day and would have been excellent for weeding the boatyard garden.

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two wrecks?

Here is what the white remnant of a boat looked like in 1995, in the same little bay:

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For some reason, it had been deemed unsalvageable.

As we drove along, I pondered the fact that the many conifers along our roads are why our landscapes look more somber than the airier ones that Mr Tootlepedal photographs in Scotland.

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scenery heavy with evergreens

We arrived at our destination in Skamokawa: Redmen Hall, which I had read was hosting an exhibit about tugboats and steamers on the Columbia.

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The view from the parking lot

A back door offered easy access without all those stairs…and a disheartening sign.

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NOOOOOOOO

Across the highway, below, is a general store and café where we have stopped before.  I thought that, because of Skamokawa being such a small town, I might luck into a museum docent there.

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looking down on the grocery store and post office

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Redmen Hall from below

In a room right on the river, behind the store, an antiques sale was on for the day.

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antiques in a light filled room

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I used to have an apple like this till my good friend Sophie (a dog) broke it…for which she was forgiven.

I found two things to buy.  One is a present so I cannot show it!

And sure enough, when I mentioned having driven from Ilwaco to find the museum was closed, I learned that one of the docents was ill, and another one offered to open it for us.

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behind the store/café

Off the deck by the store, a boater was buzzing around.  I am sure Allan wished he was out boating, too.

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Allan’s photo

We followed the docent back up to Redmen Hall.  The hall was once a school house.  Amazingly, it used be down where the highway is.  When the road was put through, the building got moved up the hill with “steam donkeys” (not really donkeys!).

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The old school house remembered.

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Allan went straight up to the bell tower. (I did not.)

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Step on a pedal to open the shutters for the view.

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The views from the bell tower.

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river town from high above (and a boat ramp)

On the second floor, well designed historical panels go all around the walls of a big open room.

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What Skamokawa means

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interpretive panels

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the kind docent who let us in.  The way the panels are put together reminds me of my grandma’s scrapbooks.

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when the road went through

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a dance where “ladies may walk on their partners feet, and no questions will be asked”.

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another strong woman

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river pictures (Allan’s photo)

A glass case held birds provided by the Audubon Society…

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an erstwhile Mr Grumpy had fine plumage.

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the view

We dropped a contribution into the money jar and also spent a pretty penny in the well -stocked gift shop, including two books (quiet, because one is a present), a documentary called Work is Our Joy (about gillnetting), and some notecards.  If we’d had time, we could have watched Work is Our Joy right in the museum.  I will enjoy it from my comfy chair at home.  I already identify with the title.

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One of three nooks of books.

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Well represented: the books of Grays River author Robert Pyle

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Musician Doug is the spouse of our friend Beth; they live nearby but we had had no time to look them up.

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river town art

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most of our purchases

The hall is open Thursdays through Sundays from noon to four.  We recommend a visit.

We had a little over half an hour to to get back to our Indivisible meeting in Naselle.  I could not resist a side trip to the historic 1905 Grays River covered bridge.

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on the way

Tying in with our visit to Redmen Hall: author Robert Michael Pyle lives in a house with a view of the covered bridge.  I thought it would be kind of nosy to add a photo of his house, so here is the bridge.

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under the bridge (Allan’s photo)

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The river running fast and high.  (Allan’s photo)

In particularly stormy times, the river has flooded the valley.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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Here we go.

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the other end

Before we turned around, I had to get a closer look at two trees beside  the parking area.

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going in for a closer look

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moss and licorice fern

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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assorted critters

Ooops.  I suddenly realized time had slipped by and we would be 25 minutes late to the meeting at Hunters Inn, Naselle.  I told myself that it was ok; we have been to almost every liberal political meeting available since November so we could be late to just one.

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part of the gathering

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postcards laid out on three booths

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One member brought this.

We discussed, shared ideas, and laid some plans for future events.

On the way home, Allan and I detoured to look at a garden we had admired when attending last month’s meeting.

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The garden in question is next door to Naselle Timberland Library. (Allan’s photo)

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lots of narcissi about to bloom (Allan’s photo)

Next door: a large garden which I intend to look at every time we have a Naselle meeting.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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pieris and the church next door

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Right across the street sits another charming house.

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I wonder if there will be sweet peas on that fence in summer. Or that could be a dog path!

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wrap around porch

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a tree with personality

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Allan’s photo

As we got close to home, I looked at the weather forecast and must admit I did begin to fret about losing what might be the only nice gardening day this week.  Remembering that we now have light till after 7 PM (yay for daylight saving time!), I resolved to get two hours work done in my own garden.

While clipping some Joe Pye weed, I gave an experimental dig at a large fuchsia.

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one of two many fuchsia magellanica

To my surprise, it shifted, so Allan helped me pull it out.

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after…Ok, he pulled, I watched and encouraged.

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project: clean up middle bed, before…

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and after

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Woe!! One of two matched asophedels has disappeared from the right hand pot.

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I will snag this asphodel from a different pot.

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Frosty

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bogsy wood swale

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Oh for more time in the garden; so much to do.

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Skooter obsessing about the frogs.

The unfortunate forecast:

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Resolved: no more daytime meetings on nice days till we have spring clean up done!

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Sunday, 1 January 2017

Steve and John threw a big “do” in the afternoon at their home  by the bay, in the setting of one of my favourite peninsula gardens.

Because many folks were expected, we parked below and strolled up through the garden.

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conifers by the irrigation pond

conifers by the irrigation pond

Some ice remained on the irrigation pond.

Some ice remained on the irrigation pond.

south side of the driveway

south side of the driveway

the former salal bed

one of the former salal beds (so impressively cleared out last year!)

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approaching the house

approaching the house

near the front door

near the front door

coral bark maple

coral bark maple

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Steve later told me he had picked up every fallen leaf the day before, and then a wind blew and down came more.  I said the golden leaves, from a tall cotoneaster, were like gold leaf on a fancy dessert.

coral bark maple (Allan's photo)

coral bark maple (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the pump house roof garden (which has been covered at night because of frost)

the pump house roof garden (which has been covered at night because of frost)

Inside the house:

looking out the front window at the coral bark maple

looking out the front window at the coral bark maple

just part of the delicious food items

just some of the delicious food items

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My favourite: a caviar and shrimp topped creation that was like the fanciest ever deviled egg.

My favourite: a caviar and shrimp topped creation that was like the fanciest ever deviled egg.

an exquisite mango dipping sauce; I tried not to be greedy.

an exquisite mango dipping sauce; I tried not to be greedy.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I should have known all of these people.  Because of face blindness, I was fairly well flummoxed except for a few.

dessert with a view

dessert with a view (looking east)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo; John in the checked shirt

the view north to the pump house and kitchen/dahlia garden

the view north to the pump house and kitchen/dahlia garden

a tablescape

a tablescape

After noshing a bit, I happened to look out the front window again and saw the arrival of Dave and Melissa, walking up the drive with Nanci of Nanci and Jimella’s Café.

Dave and Mel and Nanci

Dave and Mel and Nanci

view to the southeast: the clipped huckleberry glade

view to the southeast: the clipped huckleberry glade

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a show of clouds to the east. The table centerpiece is called Reflections, by local artist Jim Unwin.

a show of clouds to the east. The table centerpiece is called Reflections, by local artist Jim Unwin.

Jim Unwin himself admires another artist's creation.

Jim Unwin himself admires another artist’s creation.

Seaside gardener Pam, her spouse Dave, and Sean and Jim arrived.  I gazed at this seasonal tableau while seated and chatting with Pam.  Outside, hummingbirds hovered around a blooming camellia.

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Dave and Melissa and I took an afternoon walk through the garden.

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The most sensitive rhododendrons are saying Brrrr. And it is supposed to get colder.

The most sensitive rhododendrons are saying Brrrr. And it is supposed to get colder.

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Some rhodos are just fine with the cold.

glowing dogwood twigs

glowing dogwood twigs

I hope my pittosporum 'Tasman Ruffles' eventually gets this tall.

I hope my Pittosporum ‘Tasman Ruffles’ eventually gets this tall.

The baby specimen rhododendrons are toddler sized now.

The baby specimen rhododendrons are toddler sized now.

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moss and berries

moss and berries

Pretty sure this is my favourite, whose leaves will be silver in springtime.

Pretty sure this is my favourite, whose leaves will be silver in springtime.

The irrigation pond mirrored the garden.

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back up the driveway

back up the driveway

Sean and Allan

Sean and Allan

"Take a better picture!" said Sean, but I was too far away.

“Take a better picture!” said Sean, but I was too far away.

Back inside:

clouds over the Willapa Hills

clouds over the Willapa Hills

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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We departed as the clouds began turning pink.  Thank you, Steve and John!  We overheard many words of praise about the “do”.

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twilight coral bark maple

twilight coral bark maple

On the way home, we made a detour over to Klipsan Beach Cottages to deliver Denny’s belated birthday present.

at Klipsan Beach Cottages

at Klipsan Beach Cottages

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

by the office door

by the office door

A bit of a social whirl will continue as we have a political meeting and a special birthday tomorrow, followed by a not so exciting dentist appointment on Tuesday and then…back to reading.

One of these days I WILL get back out into my own garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday, 14 September 2016

THE Oysterville garden

Having heard that the  Oysterville garden had reached another peak of glory,  we made our workday one or two jobs shorter than usual and headed north in the late afternoon, arriving at 4:30 PM.  I had been thinking about the aster collection so was glad to be invited to visit while they were all blooming.  They are the gardener’s mother’s favourite flower and a herald of autumn.

looking in from the street

looking in from the street

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autumn crocus along the roadside lawn

It is the season of glory for ornamental grasses.

It is the season of glory for ornamental grasses.

late blooming clematis and asters

late blooming clematis and asters

looking in (Allan's photo)

looking in (Allan’s photo)

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approaching the front gate

approaching the front gate

potted plants on either side of the brick entry path

potted plants on either side of the brick entry path

asters and ornament

asters and ornament

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clipped boxwood in pots

As expected, we found Melissa at work in the garden.

As expected, we found Melissa at work in the garden.

Our Melissa (Allan's photo)

Our Melissa (Allan’s photo)

golden cotinus

golden cotinus

tall pink asters to tone with the house of palest lovely pink

tall pink asters to tone with the house of palest lovely pink

All this, and we still have not set foot inside the garden.

We are happy to have an invitation to enter.

We are happy to have an invitation to enter.

Before the stern “keep out” signs, folks would just wander through at any time, thinking perhaps that it was a park.  The other day when Melissa was working there, a fellow slowed his vehicle down and called out “What is this place FOR?”  Her reply was that it is a private garden, but she wishes she had said “An amusement park for honeybees!”

phlox, Joe Pye Weed, asters

phlox, Joe Pye Weed, asters

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking north down the front lawn

looking north down the front lawn

the south side of the house

the south side of the house

brick path inside the boxwood hedge, which I just realize matches up with...

brick path inside the boxwood hedge, which I just realize matches up with…

south side of the driveway

…brick path on south side of the driveway; the stakes mark new(ish) columnar beeches

south side of driveway

south side of driveway

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

north side of driveway

north side of driveway

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None of us know the name of this tufted grass.

None of us know the name of this tufted grass. I intend to find out by asking Scott Weber of Rhone Street Gardens.

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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the terrace that always makes me weepy

the terrace that always makes me weepy

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Let's go up there.

Let’s go up there.

Melissa and me in plant appreciation mode (Allan's photo)

Melissa and I in plant appreciation mode (Allan’s photo)

on the terrace

on the terrace

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For the first time, I notice how the boxwoods come to a point.

For the first time, I notice how the boxwoods come to a point.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a stray salvia

a stray salvia

across the driveway

across the driveway

Japanese anemones and asters

Japanese anemones and asters

south side of garage

south side of garage

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button sized orange chrysanthemums

looking east along the driveway

looking east along the driveway

south side of driveway, Japanese anemone and solidago

south side of driveway, Japanese anemone and solidago

fennel and solidago

fennel and solidago

Japanese anemone

Japanese anemone

anemone and aster

anemone and aster

behind the garage

behind the garage

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

pumpkins and sunflowers at the west end of the driveway (Allan's photo)

pumpkins and sunflowers at the west end of the driveway (Allan’s photo)

We noticed the many different shapes of the sunflowers.

We noticed the many different shapes of the sunflowers.

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We turned the corner to the allée of ‘Incrediball’ hydrangeas.

entering the allée (Allan's photo)

Melissa and Dave and I entering the allée (Allan’s photo)

the allée

the allée, running east west (looking east)

lawn path, running north south

lawn path, running north south (looking north)

white begonias

white begonias

urns of tree ferns and begonias

urns of tree ferns and begonias

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

hamamelis foliage

hamamelis foliage

Primula vialii in the woodsy garden along the west side of the north-south lawn path

Primula vialii in the woodsy garden along the west side of the north-south lawn path

at the west end of the allée

at the west end of the allée

progressing up the allée

progressing up the allée

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looking west

looking west

We have emerged onto the north lawn.

We have emerged onto the north lawn.

the outside of the allée

the outside of the allée

asters and angelica

asters and angelica

tall pink aster backed with hornbeam

tall pink aster backed with hornbeam

the north border

the north border

more of the aster collection

more of the aster collection

Japanese anemones; there's room here for their running habit.

Japanese anemones; there’s room here for their running habit.

more tall pink asters

more tall pink asters

the front border

the front border

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This begonia ruffle around a big potted boxwood has looked perfect all summer long.

This begonia ruffle around a big potted boxwood has looked perfect all summer long.

'Queen Elizabeth' roses

‘Queen Elizabeth’ roses

Rosa 'Queen Elizabeth'

Rosa ‘Queen Elizabeth’

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borrowed view of yews across the street

borrowed view of yews across the street

Artemisia 'Powis Castle' and Joe Pye weed

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ and Joe Pye weed

Verbena bonariensis

Verbena bonariensis

front gate from inside

front gate from inside

sarracenia

sarracenia

Tetrapanax, Allan, Dave

Tetrapanax, Allan, Dave

new tetrapanax leaves

new tetrapanax leaves

proceeding south on the front path

proceeding south on the front path

some dark pink asters

some dark pink asters

More of that grass. Scott thinks it might be Pennisetum 'Red Head' going to seed.

More of that grass. Scott thinks it might be Pennisetum ‘Red Head’ going to seed.

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looking north; we have come full circle.

looking north; we have come full circle.

outside again

outside again

outside, the pear sculpture, and way in the background is a tall old pear tree.

outside, the pear sculpture, and way in the background is a tall old pear tree.

Sea Star Garden

Before going home, we went to see the garden of Dave and Melissa (Sea Star Gardening).  Contractors had just finished putting in a new septic system, involving a new dirt road and the knocking down of a derelict old house toward the front of the property.

the new road

the new road

Dave and his favourite hen

Dave and his favourite hen

the chicken yard; left: big old paperbark maple

the chicken yard; left: big old paperbark maple

Deer chomped the hosta collection in the shade garden.

Deer chomped the hosta collection in the shade garden.

coleus with miraculous lack of snail damage

coleus with miraculous lack of snail damage

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the tall old eucalyptus that they call "Elvis"

the tall old eucalyptus that they call “Elvis”

pond and waterfall just off the front deck

pond and waterfall just off the front deck

with very large frogs

with very large frogs

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beside the deck

beside the deck

on the exterior garage wall

on the exterior garage wall

This glorious hour and a half of garden touring had made a good end to a short workday.

Tomorrow: back to the gardening rounds in Long Beach and Ilwaco.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 10 September 2016

cottage

A benefit for the Cannon Beach History Center

We departed from the delightful Anchor cottage at 4:40 PM for the rather long walk back to the one modern-ish dream house we had not yet seen.  I rather doubted we would get there by tour’s end at 5 PM.

We had a quick gander at the exterior of a cottage across the street from the Anchor, just west of The Sea Star cottage.

Heeszel's Hut

“Heeszel’s Hut”

The cottage sign. I do like a cottage to have a name.

The cottage sign. I do like a cottage to have a name.

Just around the corner to the east is a set of tiny cottages, each with its own name sign, that I have admired before and today admired again.  I’d have a perfect photo of each of them, had not a vehicle full of lucky vacationers pulled up to one and begun unloading groceries.

Cozy

Cozy

Comfy

Comfy

Care-Free

Care-Free

We then applied ourselves to walking back to the modern house, past the Stephanie Inn and the Cannon Beach Lodge.  We arrived at the last tour home at 4:48 PM.  (We were doing them all out of order.)

#2: Beach Haven

a modern ocean view home

a modern ocean view home

from the programme:  This stunning home was built in 1982 by J. Thomas Ayers and Alan Schoenberg in the Cannon Beach tradition of exposed shingles.  This is the perfect example of an oceanfront dream home.  The home was designed to be passive solar with the observation area and bathroom and sauna on the top floor.  The metal connectors on the beams throughout the house were designed by Carl Friedman, who was a local at the time.  The connectors were designed to look a bit like razor clams, a local delicacy in Cannon Beach.  The custom rock work inside was done by Nikos Maragos, a Greek stone-mason who did lots of work in Cannon Beach.  

Beach Haven entry

Beach Haven entry

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UH-OH!

UH-OH! The tour officially ended at five.  We had not dawdled…well…maybe in the Sea Horse (the cottage with a tower).  11 stops is a lot for a four hour walking tour.

The home was still open, but with no one in sight.  We went into the the ground floor level and when I realized it was all bedrooms, with the main living space upstairs, I backed out because it was too late for me to be going slowly up and up and then even more slowly down the stairs.  Allan ascended and there found no tour guests (and why should there be at 5:02 PM!), just a volunteer who was unsuccessfully trying to close a window with a complicated latch.  He was able to assist, and also able to get a few photos for me (and you) to see the interior.

bedrooms on the ground floor

bedrooms on the ground floor

further up

further up

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all set for tour day

all set for tour day

the view

the view

rock work by Nikos Maragos

rock work by Nikos Maragos

a view deck

a view deck

a house of stairs

a house of stairs

a fireplace built to allow light from high windows

Two photos show the fireplace built to allow light from high windows.

higher still

higher still

the view

the view

looking down

looking down

looking down on me, outside, decided to get a photo of the beach

looking down on me, outside, decided to get a photo of the beach

the west side of the Beach Haven

the west side of the Beach Haven

on the beach below, a bonfire ready to go

on the beach below, a bonfire ready to go

looking north to Haystack Rock

looking north to Haystack Rock

I thanked this man for adding a splash of yellow to my photo.

I thanked this man for adding a splash of yellow to my photo.

(Why is this beach so much more beautiful than ours?  Even more than Haystack Rock, the best feature is the lack of vehicles on the beach.  Unlike the beaches by Long Beach, it is NOT a state highway!  I don’t even see the point of an ocean view that includes trucks and cars driving back and forth.)

looking south

looking south

the south wall of Beach Haven

the south wall of Beach Haven, with the high up windows that Allan had helped close, and autumn clematis and the neighbours’ sweet peas.

the porch next door

the porch next door

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

another view house

another view house

ocean view garage

ocean view garage

In case you are wondering, a home like the one by that garage would sell for over $2 million dollars.  I am not joking.  In Cannon Beach, even a small non view cottage is round about $400,000.  That is one reason why, despite my love of the cottages there and the vehicle-free beach, I don’t live on the north Oregon coast.

When we arrived back at the Tolovana Wayside parking lot, I received a text from Seaside gardener Pam asking us to join her and Sean at the Warren House, which turned out to be right across the street.

Warren House Pub

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

They had finished their meal but were willing to linger to visit with us and talk about the cottages.  We had seen them only at the central cottage (my favourite, the Sea Horse!) Pam’s favourite had been The Anchor.   Sean’s architectural taste runs much more toward the modern than mine, and in fact, his own fabulous Gearhart home is for sale.

Pam and Sean at the Warren House. Yes, Sean is just that glamorous.

Pam and Sean at the Warren House. Yes, Sean is just that glamorous.

Earlier in their meal, part of Pam’s sandwich had been stolen by this frequent visitor to the pub deck.

Sean's photos

Sean’s photo

Sean's photo: "His name is Crackers because he likes oyster crackers."

Sean’s photo: “His name is Crackers because he likes oyster crackers.”

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You don’t have to choose to feed Crackers; he just takes what he wants.  Allan and I managed to eat a plate of nachos without attracting his notice.

We stayed for bit after Sean and Pam left, and then departed by the back door of the pub, where I saw one of the cutest dog faces ever.

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

His only interest was in waiting for his people.

His only interest was in waiting for his people.

ADA access

ADA access

faithful pooch

faithful pooch

I wonder if Pam knows about the pleasant garden seating behind the pub.

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east wall of the pub

east wall of the pub

We had sat on the west facing deck with a slight ocean view.

We had sat on the west facing deck with a slight ocean view.

This had been a day of delight, especially getting to finally visit the Sea Horse (the House that Jerry Bosco Built, the cottage with the square tower).  It will be in my dreams, waking and sleeping.  This was possibly the last of the “tour days” of 2016, days that lead to many blog posts and put the quotidian blog far behind.

The setting sun glowed so brightly from the Astoria Megler bridge that for a moment I thought Cape Disappointment was on fire.

the setting sun from the highway on the Washington side

the setting sun from the highway on the Washington side

Next: back to everyday stories of gardening…with a visit to one of my favourite gardens later in the week.

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Saturday, 10 September 2016

cottage

A benefit for the Cannon Beach History Center

We now walked to north of the Tolovana Beach Wayside.  The rest of the tour took place in these blocks:

tolovana

along the way: walkers engaging with a very tame bunny by the main road

along the way: walkers engaging with a very tame bunny by the main road

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo of the much admired bunny

Along the highway, Allan saw this sign and remembered that we had toured the Lost Art of Nursing Museum on the 2011 tour.

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#11:  The garden at the Inn at Cannon Beach

I had planned to leave this garden-only stop for last so that we’d for sure have time to see all the cottages.  We had walked up to Hemlock, the main road, not sure if there was a cut through.  (I see now from the map that we could have walked along Pacific all the way to the next home on the tour.)  I saw the tour marker pointing to a place and when I figured out where we were, we toured the garden after all.  (My original plan would have worked out better for time.)  I thought the inn was a big fancy “dream home” until I took a step to one side and saw the sign: Inn at Cannon Beach.

me having a moment of confusion (Allan's photo)

me having a moment of confusion (Allan’s photo)

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from the programme:  Take a stroll through this lush garden centered around a courtyard pond.  The grounds at the Inn at Cannon Beach are the perfect example of how a hotel shows Cannon Beach at its best with nature teaming with the beautiful garden.  You’ll notice a bountiful variety of hydrangeas, fuchsias, water lilies, and Crocosmia Lucifer, among others.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

bunnies on the front lawn

bunnies on the front lawn

a walkway between two wings of the inn

a walkway between two wings of the inn

Akebia on the arbor. Mine never have made pods like these.

Akebia on the arbor. Mine never have made pods like these.

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akebia pod

akebia pod

outdoor seating

outdoor seating

bunnies everywhere!

bunnies everywhere!

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I know they damage gardens, yet...dang, they are cute!

I know they damage gardens, yet…dang, they are cute!

the pond

the pond

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more wildlife

more wildlife

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

agapanthus (Allan's photo)

agapanthus (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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debonair

fuzzball

fuzzball

departing through the pergola

departing through the pergola

I overhead guests saying they had very much enjoyed their stay.

the front lawn bunnies; if only they would stick to just grazing on the lawn

the front lawn bunnies; if only they would stick to just grazing on the lawn

sign post across the street. Cute how Australia is upside down.

sign post across the street. Cute how Australia is upside down.

#1:  “vintage beach retro” dream home

I appreciated that this year the description of the tour said “vintage cottages [and] beach dream homes”, making it clear that not all the homes on offer would be old. As an avid fan of tiny vintage cottages, the new description saved me from dismay when I saw large modern houses.  This one, while big, looked like it could be a well done add-on to a historic cottage.

from the programme:  One of the newer homes on the tour, built in 2000, it is the perfect design of vintage beach retro.  The home was built by local architect, Jimmy Onstott, whose work has appeared in Oregon Home Magazine.  The ironwork was done by Darryl Nelson, a 3rd generation Timberline blacksmith.  Many of the features in the home are antique or salvaged, including the front door, which is from a Portland school.

We’ve twice toured a cottage in previous years with metalwork by Darryl Nelson.

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the front garden

the front garden

hardy fuchsia (Allan's photo)

hardy fuchsia (Allan’s photo)

west end of front garden

west end of front garden

west side path

west side path

the front door from an Portland school (Allan's photo)

the front door from an Portland school (Allan’s photo), great for leaving notes!

Just watch, pretty soon we are going to have a chalkboard on our manufactured home front door!

a classic Cannon Beach stone fireplace

a classic Cannon Beach stone fireplace

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an old fashioned pantry off the kitchen

an old fashioned pantry off the kitchen

lovely Jadeite dishes

lovely Jadeite dishes

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out the back

out the back

school theme continued upstairs (Allan's photo)

school theme continued upstairs (Allan’s photo)

looks very much like a vintage cottage, well done! (Allan's photo)

looks very much like a vintage cottage, well done! (Allan’s photo)

a sittable skylight (Allan's photo)

a sittable skylight (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

dreamy tub with skylight (Allan's photo)

dreamy tub with skylight (Allan’s photo)

Here are some more photos from the website of the interior designer.  Even though this house was modern, it was most definitely dreamy.

next: a long walk and two vintage cottages

 

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Monday, 25 July 2016

My dear friend Patti J (she who has the loveliest Seaview garden and who was the originator of the local garden tour) had asked me if I would take her to see that most glorious garden in Oysterville.  When Allan and I visited Ocean Park Debby last Wednesday, that news had already reached her, and she asked if she could come along.  Well, of course!  Lunch was planned as well, and we all had looked forward to the afternoon.

THE Oysterville Garden

Before we entered the garden, Debby admired the view across the road.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo: Debby was planning to paint that tree.

THE Oysterville garden. The stakes mark a new beech hedge.

The front lawn and boxwood hedge

The front lawn and boxwood hedge

on the other side of the driveway, a brick path through to the neighbours

on the other side of the driveway, a brick path through to the neighbours

boxwoods and Hydrangea paniculata

boxwoods and Hydrangea paniculata

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I say it every time....

I say it every time….

....This part of the garden makes me weepy.

….This part of the garden makes me weepy.

the clipped contrasting with the exuberant

the clipped contrasting with the exuberant

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on the terrace with Patti

on the terrace with Patti

Debby and Patti

Debby and Patti

On the terrace. Patti marveled at the Aeoniums.

On the terrace. Patti marveled at the Aeoniums.

Aeonium.

Aeonium

The shadow on the floor shows how the backs of the chairs echo the shape of the window.

Aeonium and boxwood admiration was the intent of this photo, but the shadow on the floor (lower left) shows how the backs of the chairs echo the shape of the window.

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onward down the south side: a pittosporum with black stems, white rose, Melianthus major leaves

view from the terrace: a pittosporum with black stems, white rose, Melianthus major leaves

other side of driveway: Helenium, and I think that is Crambe maritima in the lower left corner

other side of driveway: Helenium in the center, and I think that is Crambe maritima in the lower left corner

Enough wheelbarrows for the gardener and his helpers, Melissa and David and sometimes Todd, to move mulch together.

Enough wheelbarrows for the garden creator and his helpers, Melissa and David  and sometimes Todd, to all move mulch together.

At this point in our tour, Patti expressed amazement at the garden and I said, “You haven’t seen my favourite part yet!”  “There’s MORE?” she asked.

We greeted the owner and creator of the garden, who was painting in the garage; I made introductions.

outside the garage door

outside the garage door

Then we went round the corner to the hornbeam and hydrangea allée.

at the center of the allée of Hydrangea 'Incrediball'

at the center of the allée of Hydrangea ‘Incrediball’

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Our Patti in the hydrangea allée

Our Patti in the hydrangea allée

Hydrangea 'Incrediball'

Hydrangea ‘Incrediball’

hornbeam arch at the far end of the allée

hornbeam arch at the west end of the allée

We explored the shade beds at the northwest area of the garden.

The lawn runs north south through the shade borders (Allan's photo)

The lawn runs north south through the shade borders (Allan’s photo)

Patti loved the size of the tree ferns in pots.

Patti loved the size of the tree ferns in pots.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

We all clustered to admire this glowing rhododendron.

We all clustered to admire this glowing rhododendron.

Patti and I had a rest while Debby looked over the pumpkin patch.

Patti and I had a rest while Debby looked over the pumpkin patch.

sunburned hydrangea heads by the pumpkin patch

sunburned hydrangea heads by the pumpkin patch

Wayne was in attendance today.

Wayne was in attendance today.

I got to administer a belly rub.

I got to administer a belly rub.

Wayne

dear Wayne

around the corner to the big lawn

around the corner to the big lawn

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

on the north side

on the north side

the northern border

the northern border

Macleaya cordata (plume poppy)

Macleaya cordata (plume poppy)

front garden cardoons

front garden cardoons

Everyone loved the ruff of begonias in the big boxwood pot.

Everyone loved the ruff of begonias in the big boxwood pot.

Drumstick alliums have gone all purple now.

Drumstick alliums have gone all purple now.

looking north

looking north

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

pink roses against the exquisitely pale pink house

pink ‘Queen Elizabeth’ roses against the exquisitely pale blush pink house

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boxwood and roses

looking north again

looking north again

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purple verbena bonariensis

purple Verbena bonariensis

We have much to say about the glories of the garden.

Debby and Patti and I have much to say about the glories of the garden.

in the front border

lilies in the front border

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

our Patti (Allan's photo)

our Patti (Allan’s photo)

sarracenia and matching gold leaved pelargoniums

sarracenia and matching gold leaved pelargoniums

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Patti at the front gate

Patti at the front gate

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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front walkway

front walkway

Thank you and goodbye till my next visit to this ever changing garden.

Bailey’s Café

We repaired to Bailey’s Café in Nahcotta where we continued to talk about the Oysterville garden, garden tours,  and gardening in general.  Crowded when we arrived, the café became almost empty as we lingered till closing time over a delicious lunch.

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

My favourite is the pita tuna sandwich.

My favourite is the pita tuna sandwich.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

after the lunch crowd

after the lunch crowd

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Patti bought three small Eric Wiegardt paintings.

Patti bought three small Eric Wiegardt paintings.

outside, a mountain of oyster shells and a view to the Port of Nahcotta

outside, a mountain of oyster shells and a view to the Port of Nahcotta

...and the old pilings from the railway line

…and the old pilings from the railway line.

We drove our gardening friends home to their gardens.

Debby's front walkway in Ocean Park

Debby’s front walkway in Ocean Park

Back at home in my own garden, I gardened on into the evening with many deep thoughts about boxwoods, while Allan watered and weeded at the Ilwaco Community Building.

 

 

 

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