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Saturday, 21 July 2018

2018 Spade and Wade Garden Tour

Sponsored by the Tillamook County Master Gardener Association

After garden four, we realized that we had about a half hour drive to the next two gardens, so we had better put lunch at Hidden Acres Greenhouse next on our agenda.

from the tour program

I had been to Hidden Acres before, on a visit to the Sylvia Beach Hotel and looked forward to revisiting.  It was only two minutes from the previous garden.

Hidden Acres Greenhouse and Café, Tillamook

arriving

Now that is a cordyline I could love.

Oh! (Not complaining when I think it must take several hours to make.)

Allan’s photo

in the restroom

Allan’s photo

noisy nest in the breezeway (Allan’s photo)

out back

hanging basket greenhouse

good signage (Allan’s photo)

perennial house (Allan’s photo)

Small herbs were just $3.95.

Allan’s photo

In the café, where we had our lunch:

The ingredient in hummingbird cake is bananas, just so you know.

I remember loving this café and shop, and I still do.

I want this chandelier, but without the bed springs, which would get too dusty.

Allan’s photo

Allan found a cute pop up book with which I amused myself till lunch arrived, which was soon.

Allan went to get me my specs so I could find a certain rabbit, but then our tasty lunch came and we forgot.

tuna melt and French onion soup and Mediterranean pasta salad

my plant haul

We then were off on a drive to Cape Meares.

The drive looks lovely.  I found it nerve-wracking because of my recurring nightmare of going off a road into water.

It is curvier than it looks, and I was so glad to get onto the cape.  (Going back, on the inside, was not too bad.)  Allan noted that the water was too shallow for kayaking.

Garden Five: A Walk in the Woods, Cape Meares

Allan’s photo

unusually handsome phormiums in front

front porch

around to the side

Crinodendron seed pods

Higher, one crinodendron flower remains. (Allan’s photo)

I used to have a crinodendron at my old garden, from Clarke Nursery, wish I still had it.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Coprosma, maybe hardy here?? (Not where I live)

Pacific wax myrtle

at the back of the house

And now into the woods we go. I passed the garden owner sitting with tour guests at a table talking about wild critters, including elk who come into the back garden.

chatting around the table (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

a most clever idea for a garden tour with rough ground

The tree below had been cut decades before and other trees had grown around the stump.

Allan’s photo

I turned back from a steep path and Allan later went down it.

nurse log (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo, docent with tour goers

Back in the garden, there really were artichokes with the aprons.

and paintings by Jenny Stanley

Allan’s photo

the ocean side of the house

the family dog comes home from the beach (Allan’s photo)

I regret I was not in that part of the garden at that moment to meet that dog!

Barbara had put many of her favourite gardening books out.

on the back porch

On the front porch:

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Just a few blocks down the street is the ocean.

We now drove a block over and a couple of gravel blocks uphill to a garden that I could hardly bear to leave at closing time.  It is glorious, and will be tomorrow morning’s post.

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I am trying to get this blog to be only one, not two, weeks behind before the next garden tour which is, in my garden-tour-experienced opinion, the best of the local tours by far, and so reasonably priced.

**Tuesday, 26 June 2018**

Our main mission was to water.  Fortunately, the weather had been cool and occasionally misty here at the beach so no plants were distressed by our five day absence.

Ilwaco Post Office

Ilwaco post office

Long Beach

Lots of people asked me to ID Allium christophii.

Allium chrisophii

California poppies, Geranium ‘Rozanne’, Cosmos ‘Pop Socks’, Agastache (Allan’s photo)

Brodiaea ‘Queen Fabiola’ and Geranium ‘Rozanne’

Alchemilla mollis in flower reminded me of how Riz Reyes defended it as a good plant.

sign of summer: a WSDOT (Wash. State Dept of Transportation) traffic counter (Allan’s photo)

I found out that a big healthy hydrangea had been removed and this area rocked over because someone thought hydrangeas were invasive.  It made me think about the Hardy Plant lecture about the book Planting in a Post Wild World and about how important green spaces are rather than heat reflecting paving and rock.  I was sad. Also flummoxed because who thinks hydrangeas are invasive??

Gunnera reflected, Fifth Street Park

I was disappointed as we drove home to catch someone we sort of know, who often passes by our gardens, who has agreed with us that picking and stealing is damaging, picking herself a big bouquet out of the Long Beach parking lot berms.  When I asked her to stop, and she turned, I knew who she was, and I was sad.  She said sorry, but I realized she was the same person that the city manager’s wife had seen picking.  How disheartening.

To go on watering required a dose of ibuprofen and tylenol.

Shelburne Hotel

elephant garlic

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ (Allan’s photo)

the first sweet pea (Allan’s photo)

Ilwaco

I watered the boatyard while Allan watered the street trees and planters.

audience (Allan’s photo)

Allan left me the trailer for weeds.

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ and santolina

When we got home, we found that our dear friend Tony Hofer had toured the garden and left us a watermelon.

Thanks, Tony!


**Wednesday, 27 June 2018**

The Depot Restaurant

watered

The Red Barn Arena

The “water me!” sign has been working.

audience

Diane’s garden

Allan’s photo (showing the house next door and the big Red Barn horse trailer)

Diane wanted more flowers in one of her containers that just had subtle hardy begonias and a heuchera so we went to

The Basket Case

a welcome rain as we left the Red Barn (where we leave our trailer to go to Diane’s because her driveway is tight)

Basket Case greeters

my buddy, Buddy (Allan’s photo)

Greeting is hard work.

Basket Case co owner, Darrell (Allan’s photo)

Diane’s again

some filling in on the septic box garden

The new roadside bed is taking a long time to fill in….I should have planted more. (Allan’s photo)

Must remember, re perennials: “The first year they sleep, the second year they creep, the third year they leap.” But I should have filled in with more annuals.

The Planter Box

I was on a quest for some plants for a restaurant friend.


The neighbour’s cat was visiting Teresa.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We got there pretty late, but we did get there!

birdbath view

The garden is full to overflowing, the way I like it. Beloved friend and KBC manager Mary likes more space between plants, likes some ground showing.  Now I have Planting in the Post Wild World to cite!

The tall plant is Thalictrum ‘Elin’.

Cosmos ‘Xanthos’ (with ‘Seashells’ in the corner)

Tetrapanax papyrifer ‘Steroidal Giant’

OleBob’s Restaurant, Port of Ilwaco

In the evening, we redid some pots for our friend Chef Laura of OleBob’s.  They had been full of dead and dying pampas grass, of all things.

before, June 15th

Someone had pulled the pampas grass out, which saved us some time.

working on it

after, with pancho. Lemon balm and lemon verbena included for Chef Laura to garnish her tea. (Allan’s photo)

At home, I found THIS MANY snails on one cluster of lilies.  They went for a long walk.

my cute little nemesis


**Thursday, 28 June 2018**

Ilwaco

I do love an all Ilwaco day.  Our mission was to water as many of the port curbside gardens as possible.

We started at the fire station where I was furious that someone had stolen a cheap little silly celosia.  Stealing from a volunteer garden and even worse from the volunteer firefighter’s garden!

There used to be three.

Fire Station garden (Allan’s photo)

We went on to weed and water along the port curbside.

the only eremerus of many that bloomed, and it is short. (Allan’s photo)

Let it be known that except for Time Enough Books and the Freedom Market gardens, we do the curbside only (left) not the business properties (right).

one of my favourite beds

When I got to my most favourite bed to take my usual photo, I yelled.

Someone had put great gaping ugly holes in my photos.

The santolina will recover. The lavenders might not.

I was livid.  I went to the port office, where I have been mildly agitating for some signs at the boatyard, and waved my arms around.  Of course, the office staff was supportive and upset on my behalf because they all love the gardens.  I posted the photos on Facebook, too, with an accompanying rant, and our dear friend Artist Don Nisbett spotted it.  He emerged from his gallery with this, which by the time he found me watering nearby he had already shown to the port; they just wanted him to add the word please.

He is going to laminate signs and the port will get them installed in my most favourite curbside beds and at the boatyard.  The number is the non-emergency police number.  I know they have better things to do than go after plant thieves…but…it was a brilliant idea to add that.

I am not a hugger, but Don got a big hug.

When we got home, Allan dug out a sickly hypericum stump for me, the one I cut back and later regretted…

I had time to sift out a couple of barrows of compost for the now empty spot.

looks like bin four is full of good stuff

I got one of my new ladies in waiting planted in one of my new troughs.

tag by Dan Hinkley, I do like that sort of thing.

At the end of the day, Don came over with a present for us.

T shirts!

Oh, why the crab, you might ask? Ilwaco is a fishing community and one of its biggest fisheries is crab.  Don had already made this “crabby gardener” art.  I don’t know who he was thinking of when he painted it. 😉


**Friday, 29 June 2018**

I woke up feeling like a cough or cold was brewing in my lungs.  This worried me because I am a hypochondriac AND because I am obsessed with getting to the Grays Harbor garden tour next weekend.  I canceled our Garden Gang dinner because of feeling poorly.

Skooter behind the garage

J’s and Norwood gardens

We started at the J’s, kitty corner across the street.  I heard meowing and looked at our house and saw Skooter watching us.

He is to the right of our driveway.

Blackberries that were coming from next door got cut.

Allan’s photo

Weeded the Norwood shade garden, too (two doors down)

our post office garden

Long Beach

Welcome sign finally has some colour, but is no Withey Price masterpiece…sigh.

We checked to see if the rugosa roses had been machine-trimmed on the beach approach, which I was hoping for.  They were not.  I felt very sorry for myself as I started to shear them.  They were out onto the road a few inches and this will not do for the heavy traffic of Fourth of July.

poor pitiful me

I sheared and Allan picked up. After, Allan’s photo

There was no street parking downtown, so we parked in the big parking lots.  I wondered if we are going to have to string trim the big center berm…and when?

We watered all the city planters in town but not the ones on the beach approaches.

I was grumpy because a new fence is blocking an alley where we have ALWAYS walked through with our hoses when there is no main street parking.

While working, I met a nice blog reader named Peggy, which cheered me up considerably. She offered to bring a crew of friends to help us put up our heavy cement bench!  I demurred because the garden is a mess and I have to focus on weeding for company next week.  It was awfully sweet and I may end up taking her up on it in August.

Allan’s photo

The nice Wind World Kites owner took my heavy bucket of water and walked it to the far planters in Fish Alley.  His greeting is always “How’s the hardest working girl in Long Beach?”

Thank you!

Shelburne Hotel

We watered.

Salvia ‘Black and Bloom’ in the back garden

Allan went up to water the sad rose on the balcony above the pub deck.  I was watching because it worried me; if it gets too much water, it will overflow onto the deck where people are dining.

casting a suspicious eye

It was going well, with the drained water from the rose pot going into the gutter.  Then it turned out the end of the gutter was missing and whoosh, a small waterfall went onto the deck, just missing a diner.  Thank goodness she was a cheerful and understanding sort.  I was so mortified I cried out NOOOOOOOO as the water fell, and then went and hid in the van. fretting that the episode would end up on Trip Advisor.  “I was dining on the deck and the gardener poured water on me and the other gardener was in the garden yelling NOOOOO and it was not a pleasant dining experience.  One star!”  We will NEVER water than rose again when anyone is dining.

I dared to emerge again and did some weeding along the front and was soothed by guests enjoying the garden.

sweet peas

front garden

Ilwaco

Allan watered the planters and street trees and the post office garden while I watered and weeded the two west beds at the port.

before

after, with many oxeye daisies cut back or pulled.

I met two lovely people who just moved to Ilwaco.  I was so sure I’d remember their names, but have forgotten now.  I had pulled some elephant garlic out of this part of the Freedom Market garden…

…because people use it as a walk through. The new folks and I agreed that it is unexpected that people would walk and jump over the log.  But they do.  I gave them the bulbs to either eat or replant in their new garden.  I was so tired I was not up to finding a spot for them.

Meanwhile, Allan had been watering.

watering at the post office (Allan’s photo)

sanguisorba at the post office (Allan’s photo)

We finished at sunset.

Allan’s photo

 

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Monday, 25 June 2018

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

presented by the Northwest Perennial Alliance

Monday’s four tour gardens were in the Puyallup area, starting at 9 A.M.  We did not leave the Anderson School till noon because of the wonderful long walk and talk with Riz Reyes, which I would not have missed for any other garden, and for some reason we went north instead of south for a little while and our GPS failed us for about half an hour.  By the time we got to Puyallup on a highway rather than a freeway, it was 2:30 and we decided we to go straight to Old Goat Farm, which closed at 4:00 (as did the four tour gardens).

It was the right choice.  We did not get out of the Old Goat gate until 4 PM, and we did not get into our own driveway until 8:30 PM.

Fortunately, our friend The Outlaw Gardener is a prolific tour-goer and he will take us to vicariously enjoy the gardens that we missed today:

Julie and Ernie’s garden in autumn

Camille and Dirk’s garden and their garden the previous year with photos by the Camille herself.

The third garden, Mick’s, was described as having “many steps on a steep slope.”  I was glad to find that Outlaw had toured it, here.

Our Outlaw friend visited the fourth garden, Scott and Patricia’s, and describes it here.

I am inspired by the way that Peter (Outlaw) incorporated the tour descriptions to go with photos of each garden feature.  I will go to the effort of doing that on future garden tours (if I remember).  Thank you, Peter, for giving us such a good look at the gardens we missed.

And now we will achieve a longtime desire of actually visiting…

Old Goat Farm

Allan’s photo

 

Allan’s photo

 

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo, admiring a fern

Allan’s photo

 

 

Allan’s photo

so much fun with boxwoods!

I remember now that my parents’ property in Yelm, fairly near to this farm, was full of round rocks.

I went home inspired to re-do my tired old fern table.

Allan’s photo

cardiocrinum giganteum, which I have tried to grow but…snails

approaching civilization

on the other side of a fence

Phlomis (Allan’s photo)

 

behind the nursery building

making my way around

making my way around the building

Clematis Florida Sieboldii

 

behind the house

I wanted to pet the dog but it walked away slowly.

the house from the nursery area

the nursery

Allan’s photo

inside the sales building

I turned my attention to plant shopping and stopped taking photos till we were on our way out.

in the nursery shop (Allan’s photo)

Allan explored further and saw areas that I had missed.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

and critters that I had looked for and missed. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

One of the kind owners wheeled a wagon full of plants across the lawn for us.

I was lagging behind and got to give a belly rub.

Goodbye to the wonderful Old Goat Farm.

As we left, it was closing time and another vehicle was arriving.  I think it was June and Jimi Blake, the Irish speakers from the study weekend (but I might be wrong).

If you want to see some Puyallup gardens for yourself, a tour is coming up:

Tomorrow we will return to once a day posts with a final Hardy Plant post of lecture notes and some thoughts about garden tour etiquette and some photos of my favourite garden of all (ours, upon arriving home).

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Thursday, 22 March 2018

We did not do much work today.  We’d have done none, had we not had an appointment with our excellent new accountant who lives at the north end of the Peninsula about forty minutes away.  Since we were driving north, we also resolved to do a bit of work up that way.

First, we stopped in at the Port of Ilwaco office to try to find out more about the boatyard garden (will it be dug up for an important water project, and if so, how much?).  I could not connect with the port manager today to find out. We did deadhead the narcissi on the south side of the office in the full-on cold wind. A shopper from the Don Nisbett Art Gallery next door got caught in my photo because I was too eager to escape the wind to let him walk out of the way before snapping the shot.

On the way north, we bought some potting soil and two more packets of sweet pea seeds at

The Planter Box.

(I have resolved to plant sweet peas along the boatyard fence as I always do.  Surely the diggers, if diggers they be, would not dig by the fence all the way along.)

at The Planter Box

violas

After our accounting appointment, we briefly worked at

Klipsan Beach Cottages

where Allan trimmed a big sword fern and I planted a few sweet pea and poppy seeds.

looking in the east gate of the fenced garden

I recently came across a photo that compares the yews when Robert and Denny laid the pavers and the yews were first planted in 2003:

and now:

The garden, while still somewhat bare, has plenty to show of interest:

early tulips

blooming rosemary

blueberries

new foliage of Thalictrum ‘Elin’ which will tower overhead.

summer in the fenced garden with Thalictrum ‘Elin’ at middle right

Euphorbia characias subsp. wulfenii

Euphorbia (dulcis ‘Chameleon, probably)

Euphorbia myrsinites (donkeytail spurge)

daphne (several years old despite a miffy reputation)

azalea

double hellebore

pieris

pulmonarias

hyacinths

camellia (Allan’s photo)

And inside, out of the bitter cold and wind that was blustering even in that sheltered garden:

our good friend Bella, sensibly indoors

Ed’s garden

On the way south, we visited our friends Ed and Jackson Strange to drop off some plant starts (libertia and Lonicera fragrantissima and some rugosa roses; he can pot up and sell the latter at his big plant sale on Memorial Day weekend).

Jackson was most excited to see us.

We humans toured Ed’s exquisite small garden.

a WELL mulched gunnera

the deck

Erysimum ‘Winter Orchid’

In the back garden, I scored a presale on the sort of garden bench I have wanted for a long time.

Ed helped Allan load it into our trailer, where it still sits, because I can’t help unload it.  We need help to get it into the back yard; the top piece is SOOOO heavy.

Long Beach

The sun had come out again as we drove further south.  Even though the wind was cold and fierce, we decided we could just about stand getting some buckets of mulch for Fifth Street Park.

Allan’s photo

before

after (Allan’s photos)

While Allan applied the mulch, I deadheaded narcissi in front of the Hungry Harbor, and then we rewarded ourselves for our work in truly miserable wind, with crab rolls at Captain Bob’s Chowder.

Captain Bob’s is behind the NW quadrant of the park.

Captain Bob’s cookies

Refreshed and warm again, we soon got cold by deadheading a few narcissi at city hall and then a rough deadheading of the narcissi at the welcome sign.

before

I took my after photo from inside the van….

….while Allan finished up the back of the sign, somewhat out of the wind and in a rain squall.

The rain stopped again.  We had had enough.  The local weather shows why we could not take anymore today, with 34.5 mph wind that felt like 35 degrees:

 

I had some cyclamens from MaryBeth to plant at the Shelburne. Next time!

At the library, we picked up a book and Allan took these photos:

Fritillaria meleagris

hellebore

and a quilt

At home, I delivered some narcissi clippings to the compost bins and ever so briefly enjoyed my garden.

Corylopsis pauciflora

a good crop of shotweed in this bed

window box

Frosty came with.

Allan’s photo

None of us stayed outside for long.

All I could erase today was one sweet pea task; Fifth Street still needs more mulch.

I am determined to take tomorrow off in order to avoid more cold wind.

 

 

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Tuesday, 15 August 2017

The garden that we visited today is so excellent that I need a long evening or day off to blog about it.  Meanwhile, I can much more easily share the trip there and back.

A bouquet of flowers in our van, ready for the almost two hour drive to the garden.

southbend

Part one of the drive: 101 to 401 to 4 to 101

As we drove along the Columbia River (on our route through Naselle that avoids the dreaded—by me—Willapa Curves), we saw that the river was carpeted with little fishing boats.  It is the height of little boat “Buoy 10” fishing season.  We pulled into the Dismal Nitch viewpoint to have a better look.

The long flat stretch of the Astoria bridge is the background here.

Tongue Point

Allan’s photo

When we arrived in South Bend, we took a coffee break at Elixir Coffee.  I had been wanting to experience their ambience.  Many years ago, Robert and I used to have a burger or fish and chips at a restaurant in the same location whenever we drove down from Seattle.

Elixir Coffee

This oyster is near Elixir.

right on the water

flower stall inside the coffee shop

For a moment, I thought the middle book on the table, below, was a journal for patrons to write it and I thought, “Uh oh, I might be here for more than the 15 minutes we had allotted.”  Fortunately for our plans, it turned out to not be a journal.

We had our coffee and tasty scones out on the deck.

view to the north

and to the southwest

I wish there had been a heron in view.

I’m sending the gardener we were going to visit a photo of the café.

We did keep our coffee break to about fifteen minutes and then embarked upon the second hour of our drive, which took us up to Aberdeen and then over toward Westport.

We turned on a road that would dead end into our destination.  On the way, I admired this cool bay window on a double wide:

I want a window like this very badly now.

Just past that house, looking ahead down the road, I saw my first glimpse of our destination garden and exclaimed “Oh, my gosh! LOOK!”

I knew right away, from my first sight of the garden bed at the end of the road, that we were in for something special.

The garden will be tomorrow’s post.  It is huge, stuffed full of cool plants, and has a beach as well, so prepare yourself for a long-winded tour.

However, in the interest of having this blog not fall more than two weeks behind Real Time, I must combine the trip there with the trip home and save the garden tour for tomorrow.

aberdeenwestport

We had gone up 101 to Aberdeen; we returned on 105 via Westport and Tokeland.

Westport Winery

 

Allan’s photo

After our day in her garden, on the recommendation of our garden host, we toured the gardens at Westport Winery and checked out their nursery.  It proved to be excellent.

The nursery is on the left side of the building.

plants for sale

shopping

Allan’s photo

iris sculptures (Allan’s photo)

Near the nursery is outdoor seating for the restaurant.

giant scrabble game

Allan’s photo

one of my four plant acquisitions

After purchasing four treasures, we walked around the large display garden.  I was having foot pain by then and could not even make it all the way to the back of the garden—it’s huge and is divided into themes, each area with excellent signs.  Allan was out there, too, and we did not even see each other in the vast garden area.

Fragrance Garden

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

the driftwood arch entrance to an “underwater” garden that I found most inspirational.

The early evening light made it feel like being underwater.

Allan’s photo

I walked along a series of gardens behind the main building.

behind the outdoor dining area

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

looks like a green roof in the making? (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

a wall of bottles behind a bench (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

patterns of thyme

lavender labyrinth

a showy kniphofia

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

I am sure we missed a lot of garden here because of time and disability.  I hope to return…If not before, next July when the Master Gardener tour will be in this area.

Westport

We took a slight detour from our route home to see the boats in the Westport Harbor.

Allan’s photo

a substantial safety fence

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Planters along the harbor were a new addition since the last time we drove through here.

an enticing row of cottages

If we had gone on the road past the cottages, we would have found this memorial garden.  I wish we had…but then we would have not gotten out of the woods before dark.

westportgarden.png

Allan google-earthed it.

pelicans (Allan’s photo)

jetty (Allan’s photo) Me: “Don’t break a leg up there!”

We passed this mural and I wondered if this Andersen was any relation to our friend Lorna’s dad.

mural.jpg

After a drive down the coast, most of which was along a quiet highway with few views of the water, we made one more detour to look at the famous Tokeland Hotel.

It is said to be haunted.

I had hoped to be home before dark.  Because the detours took longer than expected, it was dusk by the time we passed through South Bend and reached the long road along Willapa Bay.

marshes at low tide

We got out of the woodland roads and to the Columbia River by dusk and home by dark.  I look forward to writing tomorrow’s post about the garden visit that was the focal point of our journey.

A text from our friend Tony asked me if we had found the cake.  Cake?  We had come in the garage door.  I checked the front porch and indeed there was a delicious pineapple cake left there for us.  You might recall that Bailey and Rudy are our pomeranian friends.

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Monday, 22 May 2017

I couldn’t stay at home with my friends, because we had many plants to plant.

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Smokey

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Frosty

DSC09339

always in the mood for a belly rub

DSC09340

Skooter on the front porch…

DSC09341

blocking the door with his hind legs. “I couldn’t go to work today; my cat wouldn’t let me out.”

We did go to work, starting with picking up some more cosmos at

The Planter Box

DSC09342

I could not resist this gorgeous clematis.

DSC09343

a hot bright day

The temperature was already soaring, and would soon be up to 85 degrees F.

More clematis, that I did resist, so they might still be there for you:

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baby birds (Allan’s photo)

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little bitty poultry (Allan’s photo)

Erin’s garden

Melissa and Dave were working at our former job, Erin’s garden, and had some Agastaches and boxwoods for me among other Blooming treasures.  We stopped to load up the plants.  I was thrilled to see my old friend Felix:

DSC09352

I’ve missed this guy!

Allan went up the stairs to look at our old garden.  I would not be surprised if those are our original santolinas from the creation of this garden several years ago.  It pleases me to see it looking so good.

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Long Beach

For the rest of the day, Allan took all but three of the photos.  My lack of enjoyment in the task of planting translates into not thinking about taking pictures.

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No plants stolen out of the most recently completely re-done planter.

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City crew member repairing the cracks from when it was driven into by an errant vehicle. They had been repaired, but needed to be mudded with a consistent color.

You can see from the lamp post flag, above, how very windy it had become.  For once, I did not mind the wind so much because it cooled the air.  However, at 20 mph, it was a little hard on the new plants we were planting.

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As we went around, I pruned Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ so that it will not be top heavy. Now the flowers will be smaller and the plants won’t splay open.

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I almost removed this stray elephant garlic just for looking like a silly onesie. It was saved by being hard to pull.

Because of the heat and wind, we had to water every planter into which we plopped cosmos starts, and each plant had to be pinched for bushier growth.

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one of our two watering apparatus

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We’re using agastaches from Blooming, via the Basket Case, for uppies by each pole.

I sent Allan to deal with the above planter.  I couldn’t face hacking into the running, aggressive Geranium ‘Johnson’s Blue’, left over from volunteer days.  (I think that often the volunteers just used to put in free starts from their own gardens.  Which is fine, except that free starts tend to be pushy plants.)

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The spot Allan battered out for the new plants probably won’t last for long before being encroached on again.

I swear we will redo that planter this fall, with a total dig out and new soil!

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The Agastache ‘Mexican Giant’ had better get giant quickly.

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Third Street Park. I wanted to go across and met that dog, The Mighty Quinn, but was too busy planting.  By the time I got over there with some cosmos, he was walking away.

Ilwaco

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utter chaos in the vehicle by the end of the day

We unloaded all the new plants onto the driveway so I could sort and water them.  Allan went off to water the Ilwaco planters with the first 2017 excursion of the water trailer.

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This is the second time this street tree pocket has looked like this. I think someone is helping themselves to golden marjoram starts.  Or lady’s mantle.  Speaking of invasive free plants, the trees were pretty much planted up with what we could find for free, back before there was a plant budget.

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Allan lent a hose to the local window washing crew, who had come up short from the nearest faucet.

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His loaner hose was not the best.

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the one shady planter….with some free hardy begonia transplants struggling a bit.

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last task: watering the post office garden

I had taken about the same out of time to sort and water all my new plants, then schlepping them to the ladies in waiting area.  My back hurt like the dickens.  Tomorrow: Planting Time continues.

 

 

 

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Friday, 19 May 2017

Ilwaco

I had had a bright idea several days ago of some shrub rearrangement at the J’s across the street.  Of three dwarf hydrangeas, one looked fairly good, one quite sad but with a few leaves, and one looks dead but has green underneath the bark when I scrape a stem.  Putting the good one in the middle would at least make the picture balanced.  And if the good one turns up its toes, we can replace it with three matching ones.  If not, we can maybe replace the outer ones with a matched set of two, so it won’t be off balance.

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before (Allan’s photos); the good hydrangea is off to the left.

Underneath the soil, Allan found landscape fabric.  That explains why so many of the shrubs were planted on mounds (by the previous owner, not the J’s).

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landscape fabric underneath! No wonder the shrubs could not get their roots down; no wonder they were tipped over sideway.


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replanted with the best one in the middle and with all three given some Dr Earth evergreen fertilizer.


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a tidy garden at the J’s

I got to pet a sweet dog at the post office.

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Allan’s photo

Further down the street, we saw our friend Ed Strange (Strange Landscaping) and his buddy, Jackson.

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Jackson! (Allan’s photo)

On the way out of our town, we had one plant to put in at the main intersection and four at the Ilwaco city hall planters.

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PPR means Peninsula Poverty Response.  I should probably replace this leggy Erysimum, right?

Long Beach

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City Hall: The Basket Case baskets are hung up all over town now.

While Allan weeded and groomed Fifth Street Park, I checked on a couple of blocks worth of planters.

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Sparaxis in a planter. I need to plant this in every planter. It seems not that common in bulb catalogs.


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Sparaxis and Cerinthe major purpurascens


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a gorgeous tail wagger in a parked vehicle (taken from a distance so as not to get him too excited).


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NOOOOOO.  One of my special new orange bidens pulled right out of the soil in a planter.


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I had planted a matched pair to tone with this building.

The abused plant still looked alive at the base.  Remembering a live faucet on the outer wall of the Hungry Harbor across the street,  I filled my bucket partway, dunked the plant, lugged plant and water bucket back across, and trimmed and replanted the bidens with water in the hole, then clipped its partner plant to match in size.

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dogs big and little outside the Hungry Harbor

Last fall, I had had a big mystery while bulb planting.  A set of three special Camassia ‘Sacajawea’ bulbs had gone astray while I was planting Fifth Street Park.  I looked for them so hard.  Today, I saw the three of them about to bloom under one of the street trees (along with a noxious weed Iris pseudocorus that I had tried to get rid of).  How could this be?

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The camassia has variegated leaves.

I figured it out.  I was sorting bulbs and handing Allan sets of narcissi to plant under each street tree, and must have handed him the camassia by mistake.  I thought it would do well in the park where the soil is damp; I will try to transplant it later.  That tree, with its mess of vigorous hesperantha (formerly schizostylis) is not the best place to show off something special.

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Fifth Street Park, NW quadrant

You might agree with me that a trio of something tall and columnar would look great in that park.  I’m not supposed to plant anything taller than the fence!

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that big dog again


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I transplanted some red monarda, divided out from Vet Field garden last night, into this damp bed in the SW quadrant.


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Darmera peltata and gunnera in Fifth Street Park (SE quadrant)

Some of that red monarda would do well in the damp bed behind the gunnera, etc.  But will I remember for long enough to get some moved from Vet Field?

We took time to go to Abbraccio Coffee Bar.

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crossed dogs outside of Abbracci (I got to pet one). (Allan’s photo)


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A delightful Abbraccio break (with no checkers played)….I used to love to play checkers but honestly do not remember how.  Allan challenges his computer to chess on most nights.

I rushed out of the coffee car to meet a tiny Boston terrier…Lily, age 4 months…who was causing quite a sensation.

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Before leaving Long Beach, we dumped a small load of debris, mainly so I could ask the city crew to get the water turned on for the welcome sign garden (where we had pulled dead tulips at the beginning of our Long Beach time today).

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When we went to city works to dump debris, Allan found this marble in the pile.

The Planter Box

We picked up some cosmos for Long Beach and elsewhere.

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The big front greenhouse showed signs of a rush on annuals. (Allan’s photo)


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healthy Seashells mix cosmos (Allan’s photo)


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with Teresa, some desk-leaning rest

The Basket Case

The gardening grapevine (AKA Melissa) had told me that a Blooming Nursery truck had been seen on its way to Basket Case this morning.  We had to see what was new.

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plants overflowing in abundance


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Hot Toddy: cute name for a daylily. (I don’t collect daylilies, though.)


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I could not resist a new to me red salvia named ‘Free Speech’.


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per Blooming Nursery


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couldn’t resist some agastaches and echinaceas…

Another new feature: Penny, the grandparents’ dog, who is being dogsat this week.

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Allan’s photo


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my sweet, soft, adorable, and quietly talkative new friend Penny

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Darrell

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got me some penstemons and agastaches and lemon grass and more

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We drove north to KBC to plant some cosmos and to weed and tidy the garden.

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our good friend Bella (Allan’s photo)


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Clematis montana in evergreen huckleberry (Allan’s photo)


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horrifying bindweed pretending to belong (Allan’s photo), in the debris area behind the garage


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creeping buttercup removal featuring the ho mi tool (Allan’s photo)


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Mary, garden owner, edged outside the fenced garden. (Allan’s photo)


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Mary’s edging tools


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nicely edged


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belly rub time


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Bella will put her foot on your foot or arm to ask for more belly rubbing.


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fenced garden weeded and with cosmos planted


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bird bath view


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sit spot


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Rhododendron ‘Cynthia’


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the pond (Allan’s photo)

Long Beach

Although I was tired, we found the energy to plant some agastaches in the big Lewis and Clark Square planter.  While I delegated the planting (which I so do not enjoy), I checked on the intersection of planters.

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This planter has the weedy, running, short season of bloom blue geranium (‘Johnson’s Blue’?), not nice, long blooming, well behaved Rozanne. I thought about re-doing it this spring. Did not get to it. Maybe in fall.  Originally planted by a volunteer.

We also found the energy to finish planting the two planters at Ilwaco City Hall.  We had meant to plant cosmos in the Kite Museum pocket garden and completely forgot to stop there.

at home

Allan amazed me by finding even MORE energy to mow (while I sat in my chair and read the scintillating news of the day).  Way out in the bogsy woods, he found that our bridge railing had just rotted away and fallen over.  The water in the swale had been up to the base of the railing for most of the winter.

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??!!??


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Later: Skooter wants to come in Allan’s window!


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Skooter

We now have two days off, except for maybe having to water all the newly planted Ilwaco planters on Sunday.  (Edited to add: Some drizzle on Friday night saved us from watering Sunday.  I hope we don’t regret waiting till Monday.)

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