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Archive for the ‘perennials’ Category

First, an exciting announcement. The Astoria garden tour is back!  Read more about it here.

Sunday, 16 July 2017

We continued our peninsula garden tour day, with Ann and Evan, at Dave and Melissa’s Sea Star Garden on the outskirts of Oysterville.  On several acres, much of which is ungardenable wetland, our friends have spent the past two years using their rare days off from their gardening business to create their own paradise. Because they used to own a nursery called Glauca Moon, they arrived here with a large palette of plants in pots.

Dave and Mel’s past life

Sea Star Garden

On the left as you enter the driveway is a large raised garden where once a decrepit old house stood (a house that was unsafe to even enter).  This garden came about when a new septic system had to be installed last year.

Melissa and Evan

On top, a carpet of sedums will solve the problem of not being able to plant anything deep rooted on the septic system.

Allan’s photo

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Dave, me, Melissa, Ann, Sean (Allan thinks this looks like a landing party from Star Trek.)

By the back deck of the house is a water feature with waterfall, made by a friend of the previous owner.

Evan and Ann looking at the pond.

the deck pond

in the water (Allan’s photo)

water lilies (Allan’s photo)

pond frog (Allan’s photo)

north of the house

north of the house

The property had been owned by a gardener before and abounds in interesting trees and shrubs.

The Eucalyptus that Melissa named Elvis.

Ann and one of at least two Acer griseum (paperbark maple)

Acer griseum (Allan’s photo)

one of the maples that Dave and Mel brought with them

Acer pseudoplatanus ‘Eskimo Sunset’; This tree had a surprise.

bird nest (Allan’s photo)

old bridge on the north side (Allan’s photo)

Evan, Ann, Melissa in the woods to the north of the house (Allan’s photo)

As Dave and Mel clear the underbrush, they are finding all sorts of hardscapes like two small ponds and a big stone circle with a stone bench.

Evan and the mysterious stone circle (Allan’s photo)

Hostas are one of their favourites in the shade garden.

on the deck (You can find sand dollars on the north end of the beach here.)

Next, we went to the garden of a North Beach Garden Gang friend, just south of Oysterville.

Todd’s Family Garden

As we drove up, Todd was weeding.

Allan’s photo

The house reminded us all of a Frank Lloyd Wright masterpiece.

Around the family home, Todd has planted his collection from his years as the display garden curator at Plant Delights nursery in North Carolina.

in the sunshine

Morina longifolia

Ann and Evan examining and inspecting (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Ann and Evan admire the view of Willapa Bay.

Todd surveys an area full of potential.

You can see Allan taking this photo of the shade garden.

Todd’s shade garden (Allan’s photo)

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Spigelia marilandica ‘Little Redhead’

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

The kitchen garden, which one of Todd’s family describes as “a real garden, none of this foo foo stuff” lay far below.  Because my heel was hurting, I sat this part of the trip out. (Todd kindly offered to go get a truck but I did not want everyone to have to wait.) Allan’s photos of that part of the excursion:

descending on a woodland path

the kitchen and flower cutting garden

Evan in the berry patch

kitchen garden

Ann harvesting carrots

sweet peas

fenced garden

walking to the bay

Todd has a handful of lettuce and carrots that became our salad for the next two nights.

Ann in her element

back up the road (the woods path down was a shortcut)

Meanwhile….

While I waited up top, I looked at my present from Lorna.  She had given me a book as we parted ways at The Oysterville Garden.

Thank you, Lorna!

a dedication that speaks to my heart

I also pondered curmudgeonly thoughts about garden tour programs that I feel compelled to share.  If curmudgeonliness annoys rather than amuses you, please avoid.

One of the gardens on today’s informal tour, Martie and Steve’s, had been on the local tour the day before. The tour program suggested its symmetry was “reminiscent of centuries old British estates” and “will put you in mind of Downton Abbey”.  Perhaps because it had a cricket lawn? Perhaps because of the green lawns in general?  It reminded me of my thoughts about garden tour descriptions, something that is always on my mind during garden tour season.

The Captain Stream House

Martie and Steve’s garden completely stood on its own and did not need to be compared to any other place.  The garden’s lines seemed clean and modern to me and certainly did not remind me of Downton Abbey.  Other than my usual desire to be in the UK, I would rather visit their garden than the site of Downton Abbey, anyway.

 I was reminded of the previous year’s comparison of a small garden to an Italian courtyard, leading to confusion on the part of tour guests (much of which I heard about later…even unto it being mentioned this year, and at the time, a friend texted me from that garden asking for enlightenment about the description).  I think that serious garden tour guests take every word of a description into consideration.  Raising expectations is not wise.  That particular garden (the non-Italian-courtyard) also stood well on its own because its big pots and hand made pavers were all portable; I would have described it as being a small garden that showed perfect solutions for folks who are renters rather than property owners.  There’s no need to get fanciful and make tour guests expect something grander than what is there.  Instead of describing a garden as “extensive” when it isn’t, describe it honestly as small but plant-i-ful. (To be fair, this year the word “extensive” was used to describe a tiny local garden in a newspaper article, not in the program itself.)  I think it is especially important not to aggrandize a garden.

The Master Gardeners’ north county tour, which I have now attended for two years, is good at avoiding hyperbole (with only one exception out of 12 garden descriptions in two years…a solid record of accurate descriptions).

The Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend programs tend to be accurate and non-aggrandizing (although I do remember, just once, looking for a cactus garden that turned out to be a couple of specimens in a pot).

I also do not like being told to walk here, stroll there, sit there, admire this, ask the gardener that.  Just describe the garden in a factual sense.  Here is an imaginary example: If I am told that “a salvaged window defines the edge of the garden by the river”, I will find it and admire it on my own without being told “Be sure to admire the salvaged window,” or “Ask the gardener where she got that window.”  (Clearly, I do have issues with being told what to do—thus 41 years of self employment.)

I don’t expect all readers to agree.  Now, let’s go on to one of my favourite peninsula gardens, the bayside garden of Steve and John.

 

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Wednesday, 1 March 2017

Because I believed the weather forecast (rain and wind) and the wind flag flying over the port office, I decided we had better do a project more sheltered than working at the port gardens.  They and the beach approach garden are the worst jobs in bad weather.

I called Peninsula Landscape Supply and learned they are back to their daily hours instead of limited winter hours.  So off we went to get a load of mulch.

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steaming hot soil energy

Note: When the mulch is hot, wait for it to cool before planting new plants in it.

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one cubic yard

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Elijah Blue fescue at Peninsula Landscape Supply

J’s garden

Our first mulching project used a little over half a yard, at the J’s garden across the street.  There, when previous owner had planted a pretty little garden, she planted many of the shrubs humped up on mounds.  Strange.  Too hard to dig a hole? By now, years later, their roots were exposed.  I have been looking forward to fixing this.

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Soil Energy (Allan’s photo)

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bucket application

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before

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after

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before (hydrangeas in the center, back, are so humped up they are falling sideways)

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after

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after

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before

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after

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fluffed up rose beds by back patio

Norwood garden

We had enough mulch left to do the Norwood garden beds, two doors down from us.

Allan’s photos:

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The soil in the narrow bed in the back had looked quite poor and grey when we weeded earlier this month.  Now the bed looks rich and happy.

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then

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now

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happy Euonymous

Port of Ilwaco

As we had worked on the two mulching projects, I realized the weather forecast had been quite wrong.  We could have pleasantly done the spring clean up all along the port.  With a few hours left in the day, we decided to get as much done there as we could.

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Allan clipping sword fern behind (north side) the port office building

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before and after

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south side port office, before

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after some clipping and two buckets of mulch added

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I especially love narcissi with strongly reflexed petals.

Just across a little lawn is the marina, and the tide was high.

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We decided to get as many of the Howerton Avenue curbside gardens done as possible, concentrating on the most walked-by ones, especially ones with the larger ornamental grasses.

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red twig dogwood at the old Shorebank building

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Shorebank: crocuses and kinnikinnick

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by Ilwaco pavilion, before

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and after

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“drive over garden” before

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and after trimming the santolinas (four different cultivars)

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Fort George Brewery (office), before

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and after (Allan’s photos)

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Art Port Gallery, before

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after

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by Art Port Gallery

We surprised ourselves by getting all of the garden beds done except for the west and east ends. While not enough to erase the job from the work board, we should be able to finish it in just a couple more hours.

Home after 5 PM: Skooter was waiting.

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Allan’s photo

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Skooter and Frosty

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Skooter, Frosty…and Calvin!  (Allan’s photo)

Somehow Allan found the energy to nip across the street and mow the J’s little lawn.

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before and after

Even though they are invasive, I cannot help loving the yellow ranunculus (lesser celandine) in the lawn.  It’s not the most evil creeping buttercup.  I asked Allan to mow around it.  It will go dormant in the summer.  Sometimes I am just weak about plants.  But it is a cutie.

I’d love another nice day tomorrow so we could finish the port and the boatyard gardens and have the first spring clean up done!

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work board tonight

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Sunday, 26 June 2016

Hardy Plant Study Weekend in Salem, Oregon

Grand Hotel, Salem

from the Grand Hotel: goodbye to our view of Salem

from the Grand Hotel: goodbye to our view of Salem

a plaza with hanging baskets

a plaza with hanging baskets

and sculptures

and sculptures

in the distance: train tracks and a mysterious globe

in the distance: train tracks and a mysterious globe

kudos to the hotel for a good room design with a divider between sleeping and sitting areas.

kudos to the hotel for a good room design with a divider between sleeping and sitting areas.

At breakfast, we overheard another Hardy Planter saying that the fourth garden of the list of eight on today’s tour was south, and all the others were north.  We saved considerable driving time by going to the Salem garden first (even though it meant a late arrival to the plant sales at the first official stop of the day).

garden 20: Laveryne’s Garden

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The front garden was indeed a show stopper.

The front garden was indeed a show-stopper.

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I do love a boardwalk anywhere in a garden.

I do love a boardwalk anywhere in a garden.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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bountiful arrays of clematis

bountiful arrays of clematis

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into the back garden

into the back garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a hedge of clematis

a hedge of clematis

Just over this privacy hedge was a vast ballfield.

Just over this privacy hedge was a vast ballfield.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

clematis embracing lilies

clematis embracing lilies

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dahlias and the ballfield

dahlias and the ballfield

salvias and conifers

salvias and conifers

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looking back at the garden

looking back at the garden

Allan's photo. Allan says: According to http://www.tractordata.com the Bolens 800 garden tractor was only built from 1963 to 1965, over fifty years ago.

Allan’s photo. Allan says: According to http://www.tractordata.com the Bolens 800 garden tractor was only built from 1963 to 1965, over fifty years ago.

We couldn’t linger because of wanting to get to the plant sales while the pickings were still good, so on we drove to…

garden 17: Sebright Nursery

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After we parked in a grassy field, I made a beeline to the vendors.  It was hot, by the way, in the upper 80s.

I don't think there were ten vendors...maybe five...unless I missed some.

I don’t think there were ten vendors…maybe five…unless I missed some.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the famous and affable Roger Gossler.

the famous and affable Roger Gossler.

Dan Hinkley and a hardy planter

Dan Hinkley and a hardy planter

This is when I succumbed to Hacquetia ‘Thor’, and a hardy begonia.  Dan said I had a good eye and had made two excellent choices.  I said he must say that to everyone, but he said not so.  😉

amusing Dan Hinkley tag.

amusing Dan Hinkley tag, photographed at Dancing Oaks the previous evening.

Allan with my acquisitions from Windcliff and from Secret Garden Growers.

Allan with my acquisitions from Windcliff and from Secret Garden Growers.

While I was browsing the Secret Garden Growers table, I overheard one of the owners quote a garden lecturer as having spoken of planting in “generous drifts of one”…what Ann Lovejoy calls the “onesies” of the plant collector.  Or ones-sie-ing, which is impossible to spell.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Hardy planters admiring a cool acquisiton.

Hardy planters admiring a cool acquisiton. (Allan’s photo)

Having spent another small fortune, we walked down a long road to the Sebright display garden and nursery.

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display gardens

display gardens

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Arisaema candidissima

Arisaema candidissima

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

welcome shade

welcome shade

It was so hot that I must admit I did not walk over to that bed.

It was so hot that I must admit I did not walk over to the gazebo.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo: He liked the way this dierama had space to show off its form.

Allan’s photo: He liked the way this dierama had space to show off its form.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

hostas, Sebright's specialty

hostas, Sebright’s specialty

My three hostas at home are all pathetic, snail-chewed things.  At garden after garden on the hardy plant tour, I had seen gorgeous, perfect hostas, all probably from this renowned nursery.

Hardy Planters, including Lucy Hardiman (in purple top) and Nancy Goldman (right).

Hardy Planters, including Lucy Hardiman (in purple top) and Nancy Goldman (right).

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how so perfect? how?

how so perfect? how?

cardiocrinum (center); the snails always get mine before it barely starts.

cardiocrinum (center); the snails always get mine before they barely start.

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the nursery

the nursery

I did acquire a choice Sanguisorba ‘Lilac Squirrel’ and wish I could have acquired more plants.  I was daunted by having to carry them up the hill, and because Allan’s back was still “out”, I could not load him down like a pack pony.

a small purchase (Allan's photo)

a small purchase (Allan’s photo)

On the way out, Allan photographed this amazing flower; I had to ask on Facebook for an identification:

Caesalpinia gilliesii . Bob Nold said probably easy from seed and is hardy in Denver.

Caesalpinia gilliesii . Bob Nold said probably easy from seed and is hardy in Denver.

Next: an iris nursery and owner’s personal garden

 

 

 

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Saturday, 25 June 2016

Hardy Plant Study Weekend in Salem, Oregon

evening soirée at Dancing Oaks Nursery

Prepare for a looooong blog post.  I have not been to this nursery since I visited it with Sheila before the Eugene Hardy Plant weekend of eight years ago.  It is glorious and we are going to look at almost every bit of it.

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I was overwhelmed by plant shopping excitement and I forgot the part about the Beardless Irises garden book.

It goes up and over a steep hill.

The gravel road to Dancing Oaks is long and mysterious. It goes up and over a steep hill.

Eventually, one comes to the pillars marking the outskirts of Dancing Oaks.

Eventually, one comes to the pillars marking the outskirts of Dancing Oaks.

so excited

so excited

We parked with many other vehicles in a big grassy field and I made a beeline for the plant sales, which were already in full swing with booths from Far Reaches Farm and Dan Hinkley’s Windcliff.  I seem to have missed one plant I was urgently questing for: Dierama ‘Merlin’, the new, extra dark “angel’s fishing rod”.  I saw someone carrying away what might have been the last one. Nevertheless, I did acquire a goodly assortment of cool new acquisitions.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

plant sales!

plant sales!

cool plants

cool plants

amusing Dan Hinkley tag.

amusing Dan Hinkley tag.

Dan Hinkley and the hardy planters (Allan's photo)

Dan Hinkley and the hardy planters (Allan’s photo)

After Allan helped me schlep two boxes of plants up to our van (in hot sunshine, but the plants would be okay for a couple of hours), I headed over to the Dancing Oaks greenhouses for more plant shopping.  (I’ll be itemizing all my new plants later when I plant them at home.)

This building is central to the garden.

This building is central to the garden.

On the way....I am not officially garden touring yet, though.

On the way….I am not officially garden touring yet, though.

inside one of the greenhouses

inside one of the greenhouses

For some reason I resisted this one, and now I am so sorry.

For some reason I resisted this one, and now I am so sorry.

Allan's photo: He saw our friend Ann giving this plant a lot of attention. Not sure why that did not inspire him to immediately buy one!

Allan’s photo: He saw our friend Ann giving this plant a lot of attention. Not sure why that did not inspire him to immediately buy one!

I had my head down in the eryngiums reading tags when Garden Tour Nancy, who was also at the weekend tried to have a conversation.  We had been passing in our vehicles like ships in the night because we were touring at a different pace. I said (hot, tired, and hungry for dinner but unable to stop till I secured my plants!) that this was not a good time for me to talk.  She said later, when we did chat, that it was the same way that she shops at a book sale, very focused on getting the books she wants before someone else does.

I acquired another two boxes of plants, including….at last…Eryngium ‘Miss Wilmott’s Ghost’, which I have wanted for years.

I do believe this is Miss Wilmott’s Ghost, reseeded by a path near the greenhouses to poke folks in the ankle.

Miss Wilmott's Ghost, named because she supposedly scattered the seeds of it in all her friends' gardens.

Miss Wilmott’s Ghost, named because she supposedly scattered the seeds of it in all her friends’ gardens.

At last, I sat for the delicious catered dinner, one of the best I have ever had at such an event.  My mind was on finding time to tour through the whole garden before the evening ended.

Allan's photo of a half consumed dinner. The heat had sapped my skills at narrative flow.

Allan’s photo of a half consumed dinner. The heat had sapped my skills at narrative flow.

After a scrumptious piece of strawberry cobbler for dessert, I leapt…well, creaked and hobbled up and began touring the gardens.  (This led to a couple more plant purchases.)

Folks still dining on the tasty food.

Folks still dining on the tasty food.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

bamboo, pruned for light and space

bamboo, pruned for light and space

I remember this garden idea inspired me greatly eight years ago.

I remember this garden idea inspired me greatly eight years ago.

a dripping water feature

a dripping water feature

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dripping water

dripping water

'Twas hot and bright for my little pocketcam.

‘Twas hot and bright for my little pocketcam.

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Acer palmatum 'Fairy Hair' aroused plant lust.

Acer palmatum ‘Fairy Hair’ aroused plant lust. I did not find it for sale, which does not mean it wasn’t available.

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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Lobelia tupa...never does this for me at the coast, must need more heat to get big.

Lobelia tupa…never does this for me at the coast, must need more heat to get big.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

sit spots can be found throughout the garden

Sit spots can be found tucked in throughout the garden.

I found a pond.

I found a pond.

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such a pleasant vista hidden away in a shady area

such a pleasant vista hidden away in a shady area

handsome horsetail

handsome horsetail

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oooh....Arundo donax variegata...I used to have this.

oooh….Arundo donax variegata…I used to have this.

 I immediately returned to the greenhouses to successfully quest for one of these.

I immediately returned to the greenhouses to successfully quest for one of these.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

'Mermaid' rose...I do have this.

‘Mermaid’ rose…I do have this.

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Eryngium variifolium (Allan's photo)

Eryngium variifolium (Allan’s photo)

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asclepias...on my third visit to the shed containing the check-out cash register.

asclepias…on my third visit to the shed containing the check-out cash register.

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I wandered into the shrubs and trees for sale area and was gobsmacked by a cloud of white.

Acer campestre 'Carnival' (variegated hedge maple)

Acer campestre ‘Carnival’ (variegated hedge maple)

I had to have it, bought it, got help carrying it to a holding area where we could pick it up on the way out.  (The evening would have been easier if I had done that with all the plants I bought.)  I was fortunate to overhear that these do better in the sun than deep shade. (That may only be true here in the Pacific Northwest and in the UK, not in areas with brighter and hotter sunshine.) I would have planted it far into the shade because it looks so delicate.

outside the buying shed...the obligatory photo of the shop cat

outside the sales shed…the obligatory photo of the shop cat

By the sales shed...How many times, three? have I tried to grow Argyrocytisus battandieri (pineapple broom), and had it not bloom (my old garden), or just simply plotz (my new garden).

By the sales shed…How many times, three? have I tried to grow Argyrocytisus battandieri (pineapple broom), and had it not bloom (my old garden), or just simply plotz (my new garden).

Dierama (not 'Merlin')

Dierama (not ‘Merlin’)

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below the sales shed

below the sales shed

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an undiscovered sit spot

an undiscovered sit spot

a sit spot guarded by stone cats

a sit spot guarded by stone cats

Steps made of cottage stone have become rusticated.

Steps made of cottage stone have become rusticated.

into the sun again: a prickly cloud of Eryngiums. (I bought several different kinds, including the exciting new 'Neptune's Gold'.

into the sun again: a prickly cloud of Eryngiums. (I bought several different kinds, including the exciting new ‘Neptune’s Gold’.

The vendors' tables were still selling.

The vendors’ tables were still selling.

After seven PM, the shadows were getting softer.

After seven PM, the shadows were getting softer.

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kitty cat!

kitty cat!

back to the dripping water

back to the dripping water

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This looks like the tree that I bought; if it is, it gets a lot bigger than the tag suggests.

This looks like the tree that I bought; if it is, it gets bigger than the tag suggests (10′). Maybe that IS what 10 feet looks like.

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into the lower shade garden again

into the lower shade garden again

giant bamboo

giant bamboo

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treasures!

treasures!

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A hardy planter ogling this sedum drew my attention to it.

A hardy planter ogling this sedum drew my attention to it.

I wanted it but was too shopped out to go looking for it.

I wanted it but was too shopped out to go looking for it.

looking again at the stacked garden idea

looking again at the stacked garden idea

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I took Allan to see the white tree....love the way it is like a cloud in the evening light.

I took Allan to see the white tree….love the way it is like a cloud in the evening light.

heading back to the sales shed and holding area to pick up my own white tree.

heading back to the sales shed and holding area to pick up my own white tree.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Because we won’t be going to the Hardy Plant weekend next year (its year to be in Canada), I would like to return to Dancing Oaks and Sebright Nursery on an overnight springtime shopping tour of our own.

Next: one more day of garden touring before we return to everyday life and once a day posting.

 

 

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Saturday, 25 June 2016

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend

garden 10: Vineyard Garden

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We tried, oh so hard, to get to the first garden by at least 9:30 but we did not make it till 10.

arriving at the vineyard

arriving at the vineyard

view over the vineyard

view over the vineyard

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

We walked down this vineyard road to get to the garden.

We walked down this vineyard road to get to the garden.

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the garden

the garden

looking back at the vineyard

looking back at the vineyard

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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entering a sunny and beautiful garden

entering a sunny and beautiful garden

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kitchen garden

kitchen garden

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bright sunny day and another camera that I am about to nickname "Spot"

bright sunny day and another camera that I am about to nickname “Spot”

trying the iPhone instead

trying the iPhone instead

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Hardy Planters (Allan's photo)

Hardy Planters and their hats (Allan’s photo)

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the gazebo

the gazebo

Later, there were people chatting all around the gazebo.  I didn’t read to the last sentence of the program description till writing this blog post so did not realize there was a wine tasting going on.

Allan's photo

Because Mt. Hood was not visible from the house, they built the gazebo where they could see it, as captured in the stained glass. (Allan’s photo)

view of mount...Mount Hood??

View of Mount Hood from the gazebo (Allan’s photo)  

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo; it was so hot I had to wear my hat.

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Paths led downhill from the sun garden into the shade.

Paths led downhill from the sun garden into the shade.

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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I am envious of the large rocks in this garden.

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sun to shade, hard to photograph and bright on the eyes in real life

sun to shade, hard to photograph and bright on the eyes in real life

hard to show it but I still want to share

hard to show it because of the light but I still want to share this garden with you

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

superb signage

superb signage

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo; I want that brunnera!

Allan’s photo; I want that brunnera!

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found another sit spot

found another sit spot

wending my way uphill again

wending my way uphill again

on the little garden shed

on the little garden shed

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back toward the sunny garden

back toward the sunny garden

another sit spot

another sit spot

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turning back toward the shade

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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I wonder how an arch like this is built?

I wonder how an arch like this is built?

Allan's photo; koi pond gazebo in the distance

Allan’s photo; koi pond gazebo in the distance

followed the sound to a stream

I followed the sound to a stream

looking back up the slope

looking back up the slope

bananas

bananas

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo, koi pond gazebo

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koi pond

by the pond

by the pond

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Again, I wonder how the koi in these various gardens are protected from herons and raccoons (and bears?)

Again, I wonder how the koi in these various gardens are protected from herons and raccoons (and bears?)

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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on a path down to the house

on a path down to the house

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

to one side, another path

to one side, another path

in a breezeway, the door of the house carved by the homeowner

in a breezeway, the door of the house carved by the homeowner; to the right, steps up to the deck overlooking woods

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo.  Garden guests gathered in awe around this carved door.

on the deck (Allan's photo)

on the deck (Allan’s photo)

in the window (Allan's photo)

in the window (Allan’s photo)

below the deck, a musical instrument fountain

below the deck, a musical instrument fountain

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returning to the sunny garden

returning to the sunny garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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The sweet old dog was out and I got to pet her.

The sweet old dog was brought out and I got to pet her.

I followed her to the gazebo because she reminded me of my good friend Ralph.

I followed her to the gazebo because she reminded me of my good friend Ralph, much loved and much missed.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan finds the little garden shed at the top of the garden.

Allan finds the little garden shed at the top of the garden.

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That was an excellent garden, even though we did not notice that a wine tasting was going on.  I had begun to feel that I simply must clear out my salmonberry grove to plant more of a variety of plants in the bogsy woods.

Next: my favourite Saturday garden.  The vineyard garden is a close second favourite, almost tied.  My weakness for ornamental grasses puts the next garden at the top.

 

 

 

 

 

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We continue to publish twice daily so that we won’t fall a month behind.  Here is garden 5 of the 24 that we saw over three days.

Friday, 24 June 2016

Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend in Salem, Oregon

garden five: woodland, lavender, kitchen garden

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from the road

from the road

entering through a planted meadow

entering through a planted meadow

The woodland garden comes first.

The woodland garden comes first.

I turned to the left to explore the woodland garden, on the uphill side of the house.

Most shade gardens on this tour had perfect hostas.

Most shade gardens on this tour had perfect hostas.

Later on the tour, I commented to our friend Ann about the perfection of the hostas, compared to our sad snail-bitten ones.  She said that most locals would have bought them from Sebright Nursery (which we would visit later) and would be taking specially good care of them since they were purchased from friends.

in the woodland

in the woodland

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If I could grow hostas like this, I would have one of every kind.

If I could grow hostas like this, I would have one of every kind.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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Here is the campanula that Our Kathleen recently told me is a runner. Looks like she is right.

Here is the campanula that Our Kathleen recently told me is a runner. Looks like she is right.  I’d be happy if mine turns out to be as vigorous.

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Allan's photo: He liked the faucets appearing with frequency along the fenceline.

Allan’s photo: He liked the faucets appearing with frequency along the fence line.

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These few railingless steps to the deck daunted me. Perhaps I could find another way up there.

These few railingless steps to the deck daunted me. Perhaps I could find another way up there.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

path leading out of the woodland

river birch path leading out of the woodland

river birch path

river birch path

on the way to the vegetable garden

on the way to the vegetable garden

looking back to the woodland garden

looking back to the woodland garden

the enclosed kitchen garden

the enclosed kitchen garden

The house and lavender bank is to my right.

The house and lavender bank is to my right as I walk downhill to the veg garden.

from the entry gate

from the entry gate

inside the veg garden with new beds laid out

inside the veg garden with new beds laid out

spent poppies

spent poppies

red rocks in the berry patch

red rocks in the berry patch

purple sage (Allan's photo)

purple sage (Allan’s photo)

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The yard sloped down steeply past the veg garden.  I overheard the owner say he had tipped the tractor twice while trying to develop the lot.

debris pile

debris pile

the other gate to the kitchen garden

the other gate to the kitchen garden

at the top of that gate

at the top of that gate

looking down on the veg terrace carved out of the sloping lawn

looking down on the veg terrace carved out of the sloping lawn

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a flowery walk to the veg garden

a flowery walk to the veg garden

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This grass is used all down one side of the property.

This grass is used all down one side of the property.

perennial borders on the other side of the estate from the river birch walk

perennial borders on the other side of the estate from the river birch walk

There's Allan photographing the lavender bank.

There’s Allan photographing the lavender bank.

tall wooden fence at the property line

tall wooden fence at the property line

 

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

perennial border going up the slope

perennial border going up the slope

The lavender bank curves from the front to the side of the house.

The lavender bank curves from the front to the side of the house.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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perennials to my left, going uphill

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To my right, the house and the lavender.

To my right, the house and the lavender.

I spy, through buzzing bees, a non stairway access to the deck.

I spy, through buzzing bees, a non stairway access to the deck.

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crab art

crab art

an impressive patch of Rhomneya coulteri

an impressive patch of Rhomneya coulteri

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

the view from the deck

the view from the deck

Allan had made it up onto the deck with ease earlier in his walk; here are his photos:

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an observer from an upper balcony

an observer from an upper balcony

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As I walk uphill, the rock wall by the house segues from lavender to ferns.

As I walk uphill, the rock wall by the house segues from lavender to ferns.

further uphill

further uphill

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

a boardwalk

a boardwalk

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I loved the boardwalk and gave it a lot of attention.

I loved the boardwalk and gave it a lot of attention.

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the house with clematis arbour

the house with clematis arbour

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

other side of the driveway from the boardwalk

other side of the driveway from the boardwalk

vast planted woodland meadow

vast planted woodland meadow.  I asked my “grass people” friends and had this one IDed as Pennisetum orientale ‘Karley Rose’.

having come full circle, returning to the woodland garden

having come full circle, returning to the woodland garden

Look who I missed on the way in.

Look who I missed on the way in.

A last look before departing.

A last look before departing.

This garden did not have the feel of a new garden.  I enjoyed every aspect and envied the space to do vast sweeps of one plant.  There is still more space to develop, although what is left is a challenging downhill slope below the veg garden. Much respect to the owners for doing most, if not all, of this garden creation themselves.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, 23 June 2016

Oregon Garden, Silverton

Having toured the entire Oregon Garden by tram and then walked through the Amazing Water Garden, the Bosque, and the Conifer Garden (where I lost Allan), I continued on alone through the rest of the garden.  Allan took a different route, and for awhile he wondered where the Oregon Garden Resort was (where we were staying).  That’s how big the garden is.

Oregon-Garden-Map

annuals mixed with perennials as I continue my garden exploration

annuals mixed with perennials as I continue my garden exploration

The Drought Tolerant Garden (on a sunny slope)

The Drought Tolerant Garden (on a sunny slope)

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unclipped santolina

unclipped santolina; this is why I clip them hard in early spring.

the demonstration Fire Restistant House

the demonstration Fire Resistant House

fascinating stuff

fascinating stuff

rock instead of plants next to the house

rock instead of plants next to the house

Below the Fire Resistant House: The Pet Friendly Garden.

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Pet Friendly Garden

Pet Friendly Garden

Although I have a curmudgeonly aversion to statues of children, this one has a cool feature of water dripping out of the flat bowls.

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watering and cooling off station

watering and cooling off station

Both the Oregon Garden and the Oregon Garden Resort are dog friendly.

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The Pet Friendly Garden

The Pet Friendly Garden

Good dog.

Good dog.

Love him!

Love him!

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The Pet Friendly Garden has a naturalistic (or maybe it is natural!) stream.

The Pet Friendly Garden has a naturalistic stream.

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It is a built water feature; you can see a glimpse of the underwear (liner). I like this very much and wish I had the energy and know-how to make a feature like this.

useful tips throughout the garden

useful tips throughout the garden

Pet Friendly Garden

 in the Pet Friendly Garden

I next came upon the rose garden.  Even when riding by earlier on the tram, I had seen that most of the roses were nibbled by deer, which led me to wonder how much other damage deer do in the 80 acre garden.

nibbled roses

nibbled roses

not enough fence to keep the deer out

not enough fence to keep the deer out

looking back toward the rose garden

looking back toward the rose garden

Have fallen back in love with threadleaf coreopsis, hope I can find a start at a job (KBC) where the garden owner has gone off it and keeps pulling it out!

Have fallen back in love with threadleaf coreopsis, hope I can find a start at a job (KBC) where the garden owner has gone off it and keeps pulling it out!

I found the Tropical House.

I found the Tropical House.

inside, warm

inside, warm

the Pavilion

the Pavilion

a stunning hydrangea

a stunning metallic coloured hydrangea

across the road

across the road; We’d had a lot of rain.

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Allan looked down upon the sunflowers but never did find the pavilion or tropical house.

Allan looked down from above upon the sunflowers but never did find the pavilion or tropical house.

I do very much like a metal building.

I do very much like a metal building.

On the same level, a bit further down

On the same level, a bit further along; I followed the sound of the waterfall.

splashy and loud

splashy and loud

I think this waterfall was descending from the wetlands that provide water for the gardens.

I think this waterfall was descending from the wetlands that provide water for the gardens.

classic bedding out: octopus and starfish

classic bedding out: octopus and starfish

Some easy stairs to climb.

Some easy stairs to climb.

I wanted to be up there.

I wanted to be up there.

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The air had an intense sweet fragrance here.

The air had an intense sweet fragrance here.

lilies (Allan's photo)

lilies (Allan’s photo)

Kniphofia 'Little Maid' (Allan's photo)

Kniphofia ‘Little Maid’ (Allan’s photo)

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Punica granatum 'Nana' (dwarf pomegranate) (Allan's photo)

Punica granatum ‘Nana’ (dwarf pomegranate) (Allan’s photo)

Eryngium venustum (Allan's photo)

Eryngium venustum (Allan’s photo)

down the slope (Allan's photo)

down the slope (Allan’s photo)

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Nearby were some small “garden rooms” created by different landscapers.

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wish I had big rocks in my garden but...no way to get them in.

wish I had big rocks in my garden but…no way to get them in.

Walking down a path….

on one side, compost demonstration garden

on the left, compost demonstration garden

another view

another view to the right

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composters

composters of all sorts

down on the rose garden level again

down on the rose garden level again

Past the rose garden, we had seen, from the tram, an old oak woods descending down the hill.  I did not walk there as it was outside of the designed garden.  Now, passing the fire resistant house again, I looked for a way up to the rest of the landscaped terrain.

 

 

 

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