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Archive for the ‘public gardens’ Category

Tuesday, 9 October 2018

A sunny day turned reading plans into work reality.   I had rearranged today’s work in order to stay to home because we were expecting a cable telly repairperson in the afternoon to replace our suddenly plotzed DVR box.  I had briefly pondered if it were a sign to give up cable telly and just watch shows online.  I could not find the energy to figure out a new thing so had resignedly waited the two days for a repair appointment.

Ilwaco

I planted the Conca D’Or lily bulb into the fire station garden while Allan photographed a couple of Ilwaco houses that are further along with Halloween prep than we are.  (We have not begun.)

on Spruce Street

another Spruce Street house….

…wherein lives a friend sympatico with us (not shown in the window).

I wonder if she had just gotten back from a demonstration we had not heard about?

Allan helped by deadheading at the fire station.

We dug out annoying plants from two of the city planters kitty corner from the boatyard.

part of the boatyard garden

the north side of the boatyard

I once had a garden running partway along the north fence as well as the full length of the east fence.  Only the east garden remains because a pipe laying project about fifteen years ago put paid to the north garden.

A teucrium (?) of great vigor had completely filled up one of the planters, and in another, a golden oregano had repeatedly been crispy by watering days.

Allan’s photo

We had a bag of potting soil that had an unfortunate large vein of sawdust in it.

Allan’s photo

formerly swamped with golden oregano (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

I should have dumped the whole bag of potting soil into the wheelbarrow and mixed it up.

We took the teucrium (?) and golden oregano down to the port and planted it in curbside beds where a reasonably vigorous plant is welcome.

east end

port crew member at work tidying the bank of the marina (Allan’s photo)

Allan at work at the west end

While waiting for the cable repair, we worked across the street from our house at the J’s.

ghosts in Jay and Jodie’s tree

azalea oddly in bloom

Looking at that photo, I think that I will remove those blue fescue.  They are well past their prime.

The only irksome thing about waiting for the cable repair was the several automated phone calls from the company wanting to be assured that we had not changed our mind about the two hour window for the appointment.

The situation reminded me of how people say “First World Problems” about things like cable tv or mobile phone woes.  This excellent essay explains why the phrase is problematic—and inspired me to read the novel Open City by Teju Cole.

In case you don’t click the link, here is part of what Cole wrote about “First World Problems”: “I don’t like this expression “First World problems.” It is false and it is condescending. Yes, Nigerians struggle with floods or infant mortality. But these same Nigerians also deal with mundane and seemingly luxurious hassles. Connectivity issues on your BlackBerry, cost of car repair, how to sync your iPad, what brand of noodles to buy: Third World problems. All the silly stuff of life doesn’t disappear just because you’re black and live in a poorer country. People in the richer nations need a more robust sense of the lives being lived in the darker nations. Here’s a First World problem: the inability to see that others are as fully complex and as keen on technology and pleasure as you are.”

Here is another essay on the same topic.

And The Guardian eloquently weighed in right here.

Right after another automated call let me know that the repair would take place in a half an hour, two cable guys arrive, one a trainee, both efficient and pleasant.  The new DVR box is smaller and yet also so subtly grumbly at all times that much later, while reading at midnight, I thought we had a dripping leak somewhere. It was just the disk making a faint racket, the sort of racket that most people would say only bothers me (but Googling proved it does bother other people with sensitivity to noise). Every appliance we have had to replace this year, (refrigerator, washing machine, and now the DVR) is noisier than the old one we had before.  I wish the engineers would realize that quietness is a worthy goal.

I failed, by punching the wrong menu number, to correctly take the survey in yet another phone call right after the appointment was over, so I missed my chance to give the guys a good review.

But I digress.  In one of Marion Cran’s books, she mentions being told that her books were “discursive”.  The kindest part of the definition is “rambling, digressive, meandering, wandering, maundering, diffuse.

After the repair, we had time to garden for two more hours at

The Shelburne Hotel.

I went into the north side garden by the pub windows to dig out the utterly silly echinops, AKA blue globe thistle plants there.  From the original clump I planted in the sun years ago, these had been moved all over in my ten year absence.  They won’t bloom in this deeply shady bed.

before

I like the short, narrow bladed, and very controllable round-handled shovel when I am working by the old windows.

after plant removal and then shifting of a pulmonaria and scrophularia, both with white or silver leaves.

The last of the sweet peas are still good enough to stay.

looking north

looking south

from the south end sidewalk

Meanwhile, Allan had checked the plants on the second floor decks and balconies.

dahlia on the room four deck

He then sheared down the Persicaria ‘Firetail’ that had been planted under the rhododendron at the south end of the property.

before

My former spouse and former co-gardener stopped by for a chat.

In the mail today arrived three books by Marion Cran.

Garden Talks has transcripts of her 1920s gardening radio show. She is said to be the first gardening broadcaster.  The little book is Garden Wisdom, excerpts from her various books. Gardens of Character is her second to last gardening memoir.  I set aside the final memoir, Hagar’s Garden, and sat down straightaway to read halfway through Gardens of Character (with a break for dinner and This is Us).

12:30 AM: Skooter usurps the late night reading lap space

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Wednesday, 3 October 2018

One of my Eryngium giganteum (Miss Willmott’s Ghost) is going to bloom.  I wish it would have waited till next year.

Miss Willmott jumping the gun

The very big spider had a meal.

I had organized the day around being home to meet some out of town blog readers who were passing through in the afternoon.

Long Beach

We worked some more on straggly Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and other tired plants in the planters.

police station planter

Police Station last week

today

I hope I will be able to get my mitts on the six planters that remain hanging about town, two of them here on the police station, for my compost.

cosmos by the stoplight

santolina ready to be clipped…not today

The planter with wire vine (below) needs to be completely dug out.  I might not have enough mulch left in my Soil Energy pile to fill it back up again.  This time, ALL the soil must go.  Two years ago, we thought we could sift the roots out.  Nope.

Muehlenbeckia axillaris up in everthing

When I planted it, I thought it was a cute little house plant that would last one summer.

This is what it wants to do:

before, three years ago: a great splodge of Muehlenbeckia axillaris (wire vine)

Cosmos ‘Cupcake’ in Lewis and Clark Square

Pacific Tree Frog in Lewis and Clark Square planter

Some planters in sheltered spots still have excellent looking Geranium ‘Rozanne’

my favourite planter by Dennis Company

windier planter by Dennis Co parking lot, before

On the way through town to our next job, The Red Barn, we saw one of the Red Barn horses and rider and good dog heading for the beach.

Allan’s photo

Soon Amy and a friend from The Red Barn rode by.

Allan’s photo

We pretty much skipped the Red Barn garden today; rain had taken care of everything.

At the Red Barn

Still no Cosmo the barn cat to be seen on our short garden check up….

Diane’s garden

In Diane’s garden, we managed to get the deadheading done in 45 minutes.

roadside garden, a nerve-wracking deadheading job

a peaceful moment

Allan deadheaded the raised box garden.

The nasturtium is pale yellow ‘Moonlight’, because Diane likes soft colours.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

at home

We got home in time to offload the compost debris and then to spend some time with Debbie and Alan, who stopped by on their way to Cannon Beach.  Debbie and her sister Dawn read this blog daily, and are good commenters, which all bloggers much appreciate.

me and Debbie and a bouquet for their room in Cannon Beach

garden touring

We learned that before his career as a scientist, Alan had been a guitarist in a series of Northwest rock bands.

I found online an old photo of a band that predated one called Shiloh.

Debbie and Alan brought us a little birdbath for which Debbie had sought a good home.

(right) at home for now in the cat garden, destined for the fire circle area

Allan’s photo

Dawn sent this beautiful plate, based on the book The Country Diary of an Edwardian Lady, a book that I have and love.

The stanza around the edge is part of a long poem by Jean Ingelow.

An empty sky, a world of heather,
Purple of foxglove, yellow of broom;
We two among them wading together,
Shaking out honey, treading perfume.

Crowds of bees are giddy with clover,
Crowds of grasshoppers skip at our feet,
Crowds of larks at their matins hang over,
Thanking the Lord for a life so sweet.

Thank you!

I learned that Dawn was probably the mystery woman who had met our friend, gardener Prissy at The Waves in Cannon Beach after reading about her on this blog!

Alan and Debbie went on their way to a three day vacation.  Allan and I got back to work.

We had considered returning to the boatyard.  A chilly little wind had suddenly come up, and the shelter of the Shelburne Hotel seemed much more appealing.

The Depot Restaurant

I remembered that we needed to deadhead at the Depot (and water the window boxes).

north side of the dining deck

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’

in one of the window boxes

The Shelburne Hotel

Allan checked the pots on the second story decks.

the middle deck

We continued with some fall clean up cutting back and cosmos removal.  I made the big decision to remove all but one of the sweet pea tangles.

sweet pea on its way out

Three clumps of peonies in the garden had been planted too deeply sometime in the past.  Allan lifted them all and grouped them together.

Allan’s photo

just one left now

looking north

Have I ever mentioned that the front garden is on the east side? So it does not get all day sunshine.

looking south

I dote on this garden.

one more sweet pea clump that can stay for now (lower right)

A huge job awaits Allan this winter: pruning the wisteria.  It is so overgrown you could hardly see the flowers.  He will have to do the pruning because I get dizzy looking up; I will do the hauling to the trailer.  Probably this will happen at the very beginning of next February, except for some clipping back this fall before we go on staycation.

The pub called to us, and so we had an early (for us) dinner at 7:15.

fish and chips

the view from our table

How about that, we had another very good day.

 

 

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Tuesday, 2 October 2018

I had hoped for another reading day.  Sunny weather sent us out to work, thwarting my desire to spend a day reading Marion Cran.

the red rain gauge

the very big spider

Long Beach

Writing up the September planter reference post over the weekend had filled me with desire to clip back the tatty looking Geranium ‘Rozanne’. Like this one:

I did not get an after, but I did get a photo of the Salvia leucantha:

And the smoke shop:

smoke shop, before

after

Not every Rozanne needed clipping, just maybe half of them. Probably depends on how much wind each planter gets.

one of many wheelie carts of Rozanne debris for my compost bins

Meanwhile, Allan had been digging the big old lavender out of the planter we redid last week.  It had looked just awful in the planter reference post:

last week: Fifth Street Park NE, just redone, big lavender has to go

after, today

Allan’s photo, not easy to dig out

new soil and planting

after

We did a bit of clipping and deadheading in Fifth Street Park.  It is looking at its best now—after the tourists have mostly gone home.

NW corner

I love the purple aster.

I divided that aster from the boatyard; I wish I could remember its name.  The tall asters are the ones I like, and I must collect more.

I hope planty people notice my Melianthus major.

SW corner of park

South side; these grasses (which a landscape architect chose years ago for this spot) will flop forward over the lawn soon.

corner

Each street corner had a supposed dwarf pine, chosen by the same landscape architect.  This side it is indeed dwarf, and the other side is huge!

I got to pet these darlings.

We saw Scott and Tony walking Bailey and Rudy through town, two more dogs to pet.

Scott and Bailey

Tony and Rudy

It was past time to dig the dangity blang non blooming cosmos out of the welcome sign—AND the one that was blooming, because it could not stay there all by itself.

before, back

after

both sides, before

after

front, before

after

We saw a big frog, a medium frog, and a little baby frog.

big

medium

little (Allan’s photos)

I am sure they had a bad day, with their shelter being almost all removed.

The debris looked more impressive before Allan walked on it. (This is after).

Well.  That was my worst failure of a garden bed in long time.  I picked Cosmos ‘Sensation’, even though I knew it gets tall, because I thought the Geranium ‘Rozanne’ would grow vigorously and swamp a shorter cosmos.  So the cosmos was too tall for the sign.  Even where I did not have to clip it, it did not bloom, perhaps because the conditions there are too lush.  It is one of the few gardens that has an irrigation system.  I hope that next year will be better.

I kept the non weedy debris for my compost bins.  The cosmos root balls would get dumped at city works because they have horsetail in them. On the way, we did some clean up at city hall.

clipping back floppy Miscanthus ‘Variegata’, west side

after (Allan’s photo)

City Hall, west side

I noticed that the baskets were down!

I am happy to say I snagged all four baskets (minus the basket) out of the debris pile when we went to dump.

On the way home, we pulled Gladiolus papilio out of one last planter.

Last week: Vacant lot, too much running Gladiolus papilio, Rozanne is tired

today

We got home in time to deal with the vast amount of compost.

clipping into smaller pieces and layering green and brown

We had found one dramatically fasciated cosmos:

It was not till a few days later that I read that fasciation may be caused by a virus and such material should not be composted.  Oh well.  I LIKE fasciated stems.

I enjoy fall clean up and composted and petting dogs, so this was a good work day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Friday, 28 September 2018

 

the temperature when we left for work

Last year I swore I would not work if the temperature was over 75.  But needs must…

Shelburne Hotel

We watered the Shelburne garden just in case the predicted rain did not come.  The hotel was hosting a big weekend of food and music with a band called The Super Saturated Sugar Strings.  One of the band members, a chef, was going to prepare the Friday dinner in the Shelburne Restaurant.  I like the name of the band and it all sounded very interesting but I had no energy to attend, just to get the garden ready for guests.

The Sugar Strings event sounds fascinating as I read about it now.  I have regret at not making the effort to dig deep for a bit of extra evening energy.

“5-course dinner and Parlor in the Round music featuring members of SSSS

Sugar Strings frontman Carlyle Watt will be crafting a multi-course dinner at the historic Shelburne Hotel in Seaview, WA. Carlyle studied at the Culinary Institute of America at Greystone in California’s Napa Valley, and he is currently the head baker and executive chef at Alaska’s award winning bakery, Fire Island Rustic Bakeshop. In 2017, he was nominated as an outstanding baker by the James Beard Foundation. Carlyle’s ability to merge baking, pastry, and culinary techniques creates a unique and memorable dining experience. When the Sugar Strings go on tour, Carlyle brings his passion for food along, hosting pop-up dinners, guest-chef appearances, and generally keeping the band well-fed to sustain their high energy shows. 

Collaborating with Carlyle in the front of the house will be The Sugar String’s bassist, Kevin Worrell, presenting his hit Alaskan singer-songwriter showcase, Parlor In The Round. This dinner theater will feature local favorites Pretty Gritty and the Strings’ own Kat Moore, taking turns with songs and stories inspired by the evening’s bill of fare. As host, Kevin will select written submissions from the audience as prompts for musical improv games, and as fodder for his quick-witted banter.”

I don’t think I could have dug deep enough for improv energy, though.  As long as no audience participation was required, I would have been ok.

A different event was taking place in the pub tonight (the hotel has a pub and a dining room).  We think that is the event for which Todd was bringing flowers.

Allan’s photos

As Todd hurried off to another obligation, Allan and I had time, for once, to do a thorough job of weeding, deadheading, and tidying the paths without rushing off to another obligation of our own.

in the Shelburne back garden

front garden, 82 degrees F.

Japanese anemones

one of two matching planters at the front entry

Not only did we have time for a nice garden tidy (except for big projects like battling the aegepodium or houttuynia), we took time for a tasty pub lunch of two new menu items.  Because we rarely take a break for lunch during a work day, our lunch is usually some sort of home made sandwich scarfed down while we work.  This was a special reward for working in hot weather.

Allan’s photo

crab cakes with apple and fennel cabbage slaw and roasted red pepper aioli

beer battered fish and chips

and that oh so good blackberry cream cheese tart

looking north into the front garden as we depart

We thought because of the heat that it would be a good night for a campfire dinner.  Allan bought some hot dog buns at the grocery store across the street while I did a tiny bit more gardening.

Ilwaco

As soon as we approached Ilwaco, we decided the campfire idea was not a go.  Between Seaview and Ilwaco, we drove into a cool and breezy fog, so welcome after two days of heat.

I worked for awhile on the boatyard garden while Allan watered the Ilwaco planters, we fervently hope for the last time in 2018.  The Long Beach parks manager spoke this week of winterizing the LB planters because of rain being predicted, and yet the forecast only calls for slight chance of minimal rain.  I would love a good rain at last once a week now.  We are so tired of watering.

fog at the end of the boatyard

Allan’s photo

Cosmos in the boatyard that looks like ‘Happy Ring’ (which I did not plant this year).

I like Cosmos ‘Happy Ring’ very much, just have not seen it for sale anywhere lately.

solidago, sweet peas, lavender, Allium christophii seedhead

tall pink aster, possibly ‘Harrington’s Pink’

looking north

I walked home via the post office and the fire station to weed and deadhead those two small volunteer gardens.

Ilwaco Fire Department

This time, the day had been well planned enough that Allan was not out watering in the dusk.

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, 27 September 2018

We admired a sunflower cottage in Seaview on our way to work.  This is a garden I toured a couple of years ago, but I cannot for the life of me dredge up that old post.

The Depot Restaurant

With no watering necessary thanks to rain, we just weeded and deadheaded.  Chef Michael expressed his satisfaction with our rhododendron pruning job from last week.

Sanguisorba ‘Dali Marble’

I found a rock.

from Nevada!

A mole had made three hills back by the rhododendron.  I snagged the nice sifted soil to even out a patch of lawn at home by the bogsy woods.

On our way to our next task, we had confirmation that the weather was much too hot.

Long Beach

We checked the welcome sign, deadheading the four agyranthemum, and I wondered why I continue to live in hope that these cosmos will flower this year.  It is time for them to go, but not on such a miserably hot day.

We tidied the corner garden at Veterans Field.  I want to make it shrubbier.  More shrubby, less fussy.  Cistus, maybe.

Diane’s garden

I got to pet my very good old friend Misty.

a patch of shade

Allan’s photo

Deadheading took an hour!

raised box garden

Allan’s photo

a mole in the raised bed?? (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo of a reseeded pansy in the gravel

roadside garden

We deadheaded the barrels next door at The Red Barn and once again did not see that darling orange barn cat, Cosmo.  I think it has been three weeks now.

driving north

The Basket Case Greenhouse

We stopped in at The Basket Case for a browse and to say hello.  The family cat had a litter of kittens 12 weeks ago.  (Like me with a cat long ago, the humans had not known how early one must get a cat spayed.)  The homes for these little darlings had fallen through.  By the time you read this, they will be up for adoption at the South Pacific County Humane Society.

I was sorely tempted and probably was only saved by having had another vet bill for Skooter yesterday.

tiny mama kitty

kittens

Allan’s photo

I resisted.  If I had been on staycation, I probably would have taken two.

Back in the greenhouses, I petted both Penny and Buddy.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

My buddy, Buddy

Darrell (Allan’s photo)

Darrell and Roxanne (and some Geranium ‘Rozanne’ for the LB planter we re-did last week)  (Allan’s photo)

tin goats

Ocean Park interlude

We had a gardening themed t shirt to drop off at our friend Terran’s house.  She has just started her own gardening business, BeeKissed Gardening, and we recommend her highly.

Terran’s front door window (Allan’s photo)

Terran’s work trailer, on the same base as our trailer.

Because of the Timberland Library meeting last night, we wanted to take a look at the Meeting Tree by the Ocean Park branch.

Ocean Park Library

inside

The Meeting Tree goes back to when Ocean Park first came into being as a church camp.

a community meeting spot since 1883

Allan’s photo

This property south of the library is for sale.  Last night at the meeting a woman said it used to belong to her family and she intends to buy it back, build her house at the other end and preserve this historic tree.

There I met a friendly dog named Daisy Duke.

bumper sticker on Daisy’s vehicle

I like the spiky summer blooming heather in the library garden much better than the plain white flat winter blooming heather at the Ilwaco branch.

compost bin behind the library!

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We spent an hour and a half tidying the garden and doing another stage of fall clean up.

Timmie

the pond island

the pond island

Allan’s photo

fall colour on hamamelis

south gate to the fenced garden

the birdbath view

driveway garden with Tiger Eye sumac

a visit with Donna and doggies

On the way home, we visited our friend Donna and met her new puppy.

a beachy, cottage-y townhouse

Donna’s older dog, Blue, took a shine to Allan.

And to me.

new puppy Savannah

puppy bliss

Blue (Allan’s photo)

Blue and Savannah (Allan’s photos)

sleepy after play

Ilwaco Halloween….And so it begins…

When we got home at dusk, we found Jody across the street had won the imaginary prize for being the first to start on Halloween.

We had better start thinking about putting our Halloween lights out.

 

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24 September 2018

Long Beach, Washington

My monthly planter reference post.  Pretty dull for anyone other than me.

Six blocks of planters, going north to south

 

Block one, east side

law office (just Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and golden oregono)

law office

Dennis storage lot

Dennis storage lot

Block one, west side

Dennis Co north (lots of Knautia that used to be variegated, reverted to green)

Dennis Co north, Rozanne is too far gone to look good but still blooming

Dennis Co south

Dennis Co south, my favourite

Block two, east side

Elks. Rozanne still good here

Elks

NIVA green with old dwarf rhodie

NIVA green

Block two, west side

Scoopers north

Scoopers north, escallonia left from volunteer days, green santolina

Scoopers south

Scoopers south also has old dwarf rhodie

Block three, east side

Pharmacy parking lot

LB Pharmacy parking lot, finally started pulling the mint

Cottage Bakery

Cottage Bakery, Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’ reverted to green

Funland

Funland, where someone stole the north side santolina 😦

Police Station

Police Station

Block three, west side

SW of stoplight corner

SW of stoplight corner, has old rose reverted to root stock that I want out

Wind World Kites

Wind World Kites

Stormin’ Norman’s

Stormin’ Norman, needs total dig out because of wire vine, pink gaura has been rather fragile

I put in pink gauras to replace the bad agastaches that were diseased.  Semi-successful, people admire them, but they are brittle.

Third Street Park (Gazebo)

Gazebo

Block four, east side

Lewis and Clark Square

Lewis and Clark Square

Carnival Gifts, shrubby, and with mint

Carnival Gifts, shrubby from volunteer days

Carousel, must pull crocosmia, and oh! the horses have been taken in for the winter

Carousel

Fifth Street Park NE

Fifth Street Park NE, shrubby from volunteer days, giant hebe, running rose, woody old lavenders, should at least get the lavenders out

Block four, west side

Third Street Park

Third Street Park, tired Rozanne needs clipping

Hungry Harbor

Hungry Harbor, has a good very dark leaved phygelius but too much golden oregano

Sweet Phees with excessive golden oregano

Sweet Phees, more interesting from the inside with heuchera and astilbe

Fifth Street Park NE, just redone, big lavender has to go soon

Fifth Street Park NW

Block five, east side

Fifth Street Park SE with Salvia leucantha

Fifth Street Park SE, Rozanne is tired, will clip next time

Oceanic RV Park

Oceanic RV Park, Crocosmia trying to come back, must pull

Coastal inn with great zauchsneria in the middle

Coastal Inn, all in a boring muddle from the other side

Block five, west side

Fifth Street Park SW, where the veronica redeemed itself with a rebloom along the edge

Fifth Street Park SW

smoke shop, tired Rozanne needs clipping

Smoke shop has nice yellow dahlias. Rozanne looks good from inside

Streetside Tacos, love the very old santolina, Rozanne still good

Streetside Tacos, this was one of my four original volunteer planters so those santolinas are about 20 years old

Block six, east side

vacant lot

Vacant lot, too much running Gladiolus papilio on south end, must pull!, and Rozanne is tired

Paws by the Sea pet shop

pet shop, escallonias from volunteer days

Powell and Seillor accounting

Powell and Seillor, very windy planter

Block six, west side

Credit union

credit union, has good pink dahlias

bus stop, boring but ok, just took out and replaced old lavender

bus stop, boring low cranesbill geranium of some sort from volunteer

First Place Mall, the parsley amuses me

First Place Mall with parsley

 

 

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Wednesday, 26 September 2018

On Monday night, at midnight, after our excellent day out gardening touring, Skooter came roaring in the cat door with someone hot on his tail.  This time Allan got a look at the culprit, probably the same one who has chased Skooter in the dark before: it was the orange cat from across the street.  He was sitting on the gate looking back.

Skooter had a trace of blood on one paw.  We cleaned it and had been watching him.  After a Tuesday of slight limping and no improvement, I made an appointment for him at Oceanside Animal Clinic for this afternoon.  He and Frosty had to stay in for the first part of the day.  I was filled with dread at the thought of keeping Skooter indoors for a week of recuperation.  Much yowling, dirty looks and spraying in the house would surely ensue.

We would have time to water the Long Beach planters before the appointment.  We also did the September Planter Reference Post.  I will add it as a bonus post tonight because it is dull for most anyone but me.  The light was difficult today with sun and shadow.  It will be the only time for the rest of the month that we will be checking each planter, though, so the reference post must be done.

Long Beach

The city crew was fixing a flagpole in Veterans Field.

I do try to get photos of the crew at work because its workers are so beloved that they have their own fan group on Facebook.

Just a few photos taken while watering:

Othonna, wish I knew which one.

new batch of Cerinthe major purpurascens

Salvia leucantha (Allan’s photo)

The carousel horses have gone into winter storage. (Allan’s photo)

Allan took a photo as a reminder that back in about the year 1998-ish, the planters were installed and each one was taken on by a volunteer.  I did four, and that is what led to my being employed by Long Beach and eventually, when the volunteers mostly fizzled out, caring for all the planters, first with Robert and now with Allan.

handsomely refurbished building for rent

WHY must people tie their dogs in the gardens?

I did find the dog’s person and she did move the dog.  I went into the shop that the dog was watching so intently and asked loud enough for all to hear (with every effort to sound friendly) whose dog it was.

My camera continues to have a mind of its own, taking random photos at unpredictable intervals.  It caught this one of my bucket of compost clippings.

I found a rock.

I haven’t posted the Fish Alley mural this year.

Hanging baskets are still good at the police station.

interval

We got home at 1:15 to wrangle Skooter and found two vocally unhappy cats in the house.  As soon as Skooter was in his travel box (yowling), Frosty was so grateful to go out into the sunny day.

We were so relieved that Skooter did not have an abcess on his foot, just a puffy spot where a tiny piece of the neighbor cat’s claw had broken off!  The vet said she, too, has a cat who came to her as an outdoor cat and will not settle for being indoors.

Skooters paw before the other guy’s claw piece was removed.

Skooter was happy to be let out back at home onto the soft green grass.

Allan’s photo

He pretty much slept for 30 hours because of a couple of shots that he was given, waking only to hiss at me when I cleaned his paw.

Port of Ilwaco

We returned to work by finishing the tiny garden of roots at the Port of Ilwaco.

success, with two lavenders, some Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, a curry plant and some poppy seeds.

To tie in with the CoHo charters lavascape to the west, I want to get a good heather to go in here.  NOT a boring white winter blooming heather, but one of the showy spiky ones that blooms in summer.

Here is a before photo. I think the curb might have been a slight casualty. The escallonia blocked traffic sightline from parking lot driveways.

The tall ship Hawaiian Chieftain was in port.  We took a short work break to have a look.

The Salmonater belongs to our neighbour, Jeff Norwood.

After that brief break, we attacked some of the Pennisetum macrourum in the boatyard garden. For years, this pushy grass stayed in a well-behaved clump at the south end.  And then it started to run, and run, and run.

before

half an hour later

before by Allan

A member of the Peninsula Gardeners stops to tell me that some plants I gave her are doing well.

after

There is still more to dig.  We throw it out in our wheelie bin, not in any debris pile.

still do to

This evening, we quit work early to go to a meeting at

Ilwaco Timberland Library.

Allan saw this family by where he parked.

The issue was an urgent one of sudden library closures.

a crowd entering the meeting room

Librarians setting up a feed for overflow crowd in the library itself.

Allan’s photos of the full house:

The South Bend and Randle groups

From Brian Mittge on Facebook:

The people of Randle came by LEWIS Mountain bus all the way to the corner of the state in Ilwaco and spoke loudly that they would fight to keep their library after a draft Timberland Regional Library administrative report recommended closing it and many other small libraries (including Salkum, Packwood and maybe Winlock, depending on how you read between the lines). The seven members of the Timberland Board, who hadn’t seen the draft report until quite recently, voted unanimously to keep Randle open for at least one more year.

So tonight was a good night, but if y’all care about your small local libraries, it might be wise to look into budgets and facility reports. This issue isn’t going away. Check out the draft facilities plan here:http://avca_media.s3.amazonaws.com/…/Proposed_Capital_Facil…

It’s important to note that this proposal from administration doesn’t necessarily have the support of the seven trustees, who would be the ones to vote on any library closure.

By the way, props to Brian Zylstra for calmly and thoughtfully leading a meeting that could have gone sideways, and to Edna Fund for eloquence, urgency and clarity in her remarks.

Dedication to their library!

Here are the notes I took.  I started typing them into my phone halfway through the meeting.  I wish I had started earlier. Many people spoke passionately and so eloquently.  In fact, everyone was eloquent, from librarians themselves to off-the-grid residents of Randle. Could it be because all were bonded by their love of books and years of library life? I think so!

Comments from many different library patrons:

We’ve had 17 years of war maybe that’s why we don’t have money for libraries. 

The small town libraries are used as warming centers and for people who have no internet access at home to get fishing or burning permits and other online things.

These libraries are the only Community centers in small towns. 

South bend library was closed this week with no warning because of issues with the building. 

People off the grid in Randle use the library for many services.

Poverty and lack of transport even for five miles (re proposal that the Raymond library be used to replace South Bend’s library permanently.)

After school, South Bend children walk to the library.

Widening gap between haves and have nots 

Arts and humanities programs that schools no longer offer are available at the library.

Every decision we make today affects the world we live in tomorrow. We’re diminishing our future by closing libraries.

The library is an anti depressant and anti isolation for youth and seniors. The lack of a library’s community facilities will lead to depression, suicide, and geriatric death. 

Every community had the same story about how important their library is.

Why are the three lowest income highest poverty rate communities the ones with are their libraries under threat?

Montesano and Hoquiam are on the chopping block with no notice so their residents were not here. 

Many shared stories of childhood library memories. 

We need our country to be smarter and make better decisions and help the world. 

After the meeting, the Randle people gathered by their chartered bus for the three plus hour drive back home.

Allan’s photo

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