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Archive for the ‘public gardens’ Category

a reference post showing the Pacific Way Long Beach planters on 7 September 2017

As much plant life as possible has been left along the edge, even when tatty, to discourage sitters during the Rod Run event (Sept 9-11).  The planters get watered only twice a week except for some spill over water when the baskets above some of them get watered daily by city crew.  The plants are sourced from local nurseries Basket Case Greenhouse and The Planter Box.

I have found when I plant ornamental grasses and other more sophisticated plants in these planters, even people I know comment that they “look like weeds”.

west side south to north

block one west: 

First Place Mall

empty lot (very windy, full of a running hardy geranium from volunteer days)

credit union

block two west:

cottages and Streetside Taco

Herb N Legend Smoke Shop

Fifth Street Park SW (way too much veronica with too short a bloom time)

block three west:

Fifth Street Park NW (full of annoying crocosmia and a running teucrium)

Sweet Phees (shady, lost a couple of cool hardy geraniums last winter)

Hungry Harbor

Third Street Park SW

block four west:

Third Street Park NW  (boring and pushy Geranium ‘Johnson’s Blue’ from volunteer days, re-doing soon)

Stormin’ Norman

Wind World Kites (shopkeeper loves Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’)

Bolstad and Pacific, SW corner

block five west:

Scoopers south (used to be the most vandalized, now seems like it could be made better. Vandal maybe moved away or grew up!)

Scoopers north (full sized escallonias (‘Pink Princess’) left over from volunteer days). The escallonias would be eight feet tall and wide if not clipped.

block six west:

Dennis Co south

Dennis Co north

east side south to north:

block one east:

Powell and Seillor accounting

Paws by the Sea Pet shop  (full size escallonias (Pink Princess) and barberry and euonymus planted in volunteer days, too big to remove)

empty lot (has Gladiolus papilio which I might spread around to others)

block two east:

Coastal Inn (only one with nasturtiums; they swallow other plants)

tattoo shop

Fifth Street Park SE (has way too much variegated vinca)

block three east:

Fifth Street Park NE (hebe, roses, lavenders left from volunteer days)

carousel

souvenir shop (azaleas and junipers and mint from volunteer days, pretty boring except in spring)

Lewis and Clark Square

block four east:

police station, recovering from vandalism earlier in summer

Funland

Cottage Bakery

Long Beach Pharmacy (very windy)

Block Five east:

NIVA green

Elks Lodge

Block Six east:

Dennis Co storage lot (full sized barbarries and euonymus from volunteer days)

lawyer’s office (left side was dug out for plumbing problems, thus smaller Geranium ‘Rozanne’ this year)

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, 7 September 2017

The prediction of “less than an eighth of an inch of rain” would not stop us from watering the Long Beach and Ilwaco planters.  They are so thick with foliage now that rain has to be substantial to penetrate into the soil.

I got to pet local dog Frosty at the post office on the way to work.

Long Beach

At the welcome sign, I pruned down a lot of the silly cosmos that were tall with no buds.  Why do some of them do this, when they are all the same sort (Sensation mix)?

front

from the sidewalk

back

bucket o’ prunings

We split up to water the Long Beach planters.

Lavender and the Herb N Legend Smoke Shop

Even though Rod Run does not officially begin till tomorrow, downtown Long Beach was full of fancy vehicles going round and round or parked to show off.

Folks were already sitting and watching the vehicles.

Allan’s photo

my own agastache admiration

Allan’s photo

Agastache labeled as ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’, that came back from last year.

same planter, new Agastache labeled as ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’. Huh.

Rod Run window at NIVA green

triple batch of cuteness

another trio (Allan’s photo)

sweet pea success (Allan’s photo)

A City Hall VIP walked by and said to me, “The planters look beautiful.  I am so sorry a bunch of asshats will be sitting on them this weekend.”  (That is why it felt urgent to get photos today.)  She added, because she is one who used to do a volunteer planter, “I used to cry after every Rod Run.”

The planter damage is not as bad as when the Run used to be an official parade through Long Beach for hours on Saturday afternoon, coinciding with Labor Day.  The last time that happened, maybe fifteen years ago, the crowds were so chaotic that the local law enforcement said they would no longer police the event unless it was moved to the weekend after Labor Day and no longer had a parade up one side and down the other of the Peninsula.  It’s not the shiny car folks who caused the chaos.  They don’t want to get their vehicles scratched or smudged.  It was a certain element of heavy drinking audience; the other problem was that gridlock stopped emergency access.

Despite Rod Runner’s disappointment with the change, and their loss of a three day weekend, the new schedule has worked out well in extending the tourist season for one more week and has been a great boon to our planters.

Verbena bonariensis and Melianthus major, Fifth Street Park (Allan’s photo)

We paused after watering, followed by tidying Fifth Street Park, for a coffee and cookie break at Abbracci.

Abbracci Coffee Bar

a nice big batch of coffee grounds for our compost bins (Allan’s photo)

I got to pet darling Sophie.

car spotting (Allan’s photo)

and so it begins (Allan’s photo)

We had an amusing chat with this pleasant fellow, who said he was looking carefully before stepping and that his wife would kill him if he stepped on a plant.  Others over the weekend may be less cautious.

Twice I had seen a most interesting truck drive by.  After coffee, while clipping rugosa roses by the police station, I saw it park across the street.  I dropped my clippers into the roses and toddled over there as fast as possible to photograph it, and later I could not find my clippers.  They will turn up next time we prune the roses down low (probably October!)

I see it and rush to catch it!

saw-topped truck

old vs. new

I do hope this truck shows up at Slow Drag tomorrow night.

Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’ in Veterans Field

Vet Field flower admirer (Allan’s photo)

Figs behind Lewis and Clark Square (Allan’s photo)

a “rat rod” (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

We watered the planters on Sid Snyder Drive.  A couch sits there, having recently appeared.  It would be more useful downtown for viewing Rod Run.

Waterlogue

I got to pet this darling dog, who has a tremendously soft coat.

my new friend Buddy

Ilwaco

I watered and weeded at the boatyard while Allan watered the street trees and planters.

This frog hitched a ride from home on Allan’s water trailer, to where it gets filled up at the boatyard.  Allan caught him in a jar and took him back home again.

It was four o clock when we got started in Ilwaco, and, as a passerby pointed out, the four o clocks were open.

Mirabilis jalapa ‘Salmon Sunset’

Helenium (sneezeweed)

The watering started well, because the long hose for the south end was available.  (When we arrive after the staff departs, the end of it is locked into a shed).

Then I walked further along the fence and found the two middle hoses going up into boats.

hose going into the Tlingit Princess

and into the Sea-Jac

But, oh joy, the long northernmost hose was available today!

Joy and rejoicing!

Between that and our own long hose hooked up to the faucet by the sanican, the watering was easy.

Our local paper recently had a good article about stories from the boatyard this past summer.  This red boat was painted in the favourite colour of the boat owner’s wife, who had died of breast cancer not long ago.

in memory of Mary Lou

Author Luke Whittaker: “The boat had been sitting in Sitka, Alaska since 1989 awaiting a buyer, when 82-year-old Astoria fishermen Roger Marshall, became the unlikely owner last fall. Marshall was simply one fisherman who just wasn’t ready to retire. In October, Marshall bought the boat and nearly died during a desperate 800-mile journey home.

“Coming down I ran into terrible southeast winds all the way,” Marshall said. “I ran into some bum weather coming out of Candle River and I thought I bought the farm.”

Fortunately, Marshall made it home, after all — he had a promise to keep to his late wife Mary Lou.

“I told her when she was dying I would paint it red,” Marshall said. “It was her favorite color.” Mary Lou died from breast cancer in March. In August, Marshall fulfilled his promise with help from Fred Wiest. The bottom is burgundy with white sides and a bold, red stripe stretching bow to stern.”

 

sweet peas reaching the top of the fence

Someone keeps messing with my elephant garlic. Now every single one has been pulled, and a few left behind.

When I see a plant pulled and dropped, I wonder if a driver passing by yelled at the plant thief to stop.

north end of boatyard

Seashells cosmos

looking north

Solidago ‘Fireworks’, a nicely clumping goldenrod

seen while watering planters (Allan’s photo)

one of the Ilwaco planters with Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ and diascias (Allan’s photo)

planter with Acidanthera (Allan’s photo)

Allan finished the planters and rejoined me.  I had had plenty of time to do some weeding and deadheading, too.  I’d been pondering the decision about whether to water the easternmost curbside garden.  Because of Slow Drag visitors tomorrow, we decided it must be done as only a slight drizzle of rain had arrived.  Allan went to accomplish that after dropping me at home.

He passed by our Jenna (Queen La De Da) who was setting up for Slow Drag.

fog rolling in and the shaved ice booth (Allan’s photo)

Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’ (Allan’s photo)

Home again, Allan watched Skooter go fishing.

Soon after, rain began and continued for hours.  That was both pleasing and, because of our boatyard and curbside watering today, mildly annoying.

Friday, 8 September 2017

pre-Slow Drag

I spent the early afternoon catching up on writing this blog, because with two big events coming up, we will have much to share.  Slow Drag happens tonight, Cannon Beach Cottage Tour tomorrow (and the blog will then be more like fifteen days behind Real Time).

Rain had filled most of the rain barrels.

This one, from the shed, is the slowest to fill.

official rain gauge

right: a recent clematis tragedy despite semi-diligent watering

puddle in street with ugly new big-citified yellow lines

on the front window (Allan’s photo)

I am looking forward to the Slow Drag and the Cottage Tour, two of my favourite events, and am also fervently looking forward to afterward, when we have no events for quite some time.

Thursday, despite flat light, we did take photos of all the Long Beach planters.  Tonight, I am publishing a bonus post of the planters for my reference.  It will be on interest only to the most dedicated planter fan.

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Tuesday, 5 Sept 2017

The grim and hateful news that protection is in jeopardy for young Dreamers (children of undocumented immigrants, teenagers and young adults who grew up here, knowing no other country) cast a pall over the day even though it was expected.  We hope this gets sorted out in the next six months.  We are proud of our state of Washington, which is resisting this decision. As President Obama said today, “This is about whether we are a people who kick hopeful young strivers out of America, or whether we treat them the way we’d want our own kids to be treated. It’s about who we are as a people — and who we want to be.”

Allan and I have already helped pay the rent, as did other concerned locals, for a local family with children, whose breadwinner (a well respected community-minded man with no criminal record) was arrested by immigration authorities, and we will continue to help in that way as much as we can.

Today we did the job routine that has become our Wednesday rounds, in order to get as much if not all work polished off before Rod Run Friday. I like to have that day free to mentally rev up for photographing the Slow Drag at the Port of Ilwaco.

ash on a spider web from wildfires way upriver (Allan’s photo)

The Depot Restaurant

the usual watering and deadheading and weeding…

north side of Depot deck


Cornus ‘Hedgerows Gold’ and Eryngium

The Red Barn Arena

also the usual watering and deadheading and weeding…

near the garden (Allan’s photo)

Diane’s garden

The usual weeding and deadheading and a bit of supplemental watering….

I was pleased that the new planting from last week had made it through the heat. (Allan’s photo)


belly rub for Misty


a different angle on the garden

My good friend Misty.

These, or at least some of them, are going onto the new septic raised garden soon.  Even in this shady corner, they were rich with bees.


Holly was on the front porch (Allan’s photo)


roadside garden


Cosmos (‘Daydream’, maybe)

Long Beach intermission

We drove west again to Long Beach to buy a chrysanthemum at Dennis Company (Basket Case is closed Tuesdays), pick up our check, and make a bank deposit.

Yesterday, I photographed almost all of the Long Beach planters after the sun disappeared behind a smoke haze and a lot of flowers had closed up.  Today, I photographed this one to compare in bright light.

yesterday, flowers closed because of dim light


today


City Hall north side. Allan picked the yellow leaves off of the rhododendron.


Basket Case Greenhouse baskets.

I am flummoxed by a new lens spot that is not responding to cleaning.  It is sort of funny how many pocket cams we own, each with some sort of flaw.

The Anchorage Cottages

We learned from the housekeeper, while doing the usual weeding and deadheading (but not watering)  that the most asked about plant right now is Leycesteria formosa.  She wanted an ID.  I gave her the common name and the info that the berries are edible and taste like burnt caramel, but with a bitter aftertaste.

Leycesteria formosa (Himalayan honeysuckle)


Leycesteria formosa

I also showed her how the Melianthus major in the center courtyard smells like peanut butter.

center courtyard


Melianthus major

And I showed her that the petals of yellow tuberous begonias taste like lemon.

tuberous begonia

The chocolate cosmos is already a regular feature at the Anchorage, and I promised that next year I would try to add a 7 Up plant (Stachys ‘Hidalgo’) to the array.

In deadheading the sweet peas, I saw this:

It was suggested that this might be the frog who lives in the key box (where guests are no longer allowed to drop their keys) but no, I looked…

key box frog is still there


Fuchsia ‘Hawkshead’

window box from indoors (Allan’s photo)


Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ seeds mimicking the rope in the sign

I asked Allan to take the tatty old painted sage out of a pot and replace them with a chrysanthemum.

Allan’s photos

 Because I said sage and not sages, he left the white one in.  I pulled it, leaving the chrysanth off center.  Oh well!

Klipsan Beach Cottages

When we arrived at KBC, a guest had just checked in for a brief stay and introduced herself as a blog reader!  She was Dawn, sister of Debbie W who comments regularly, and although I had met both of them while touring recently near Menlo, my face blindness kept me from recognizing her.  It was a delight to see her at KBC (which she had read about on the blog, and had visited years ago).

me and Dawn: Hi, Debbie!

Allan and I did the usual deadheading and grooming and weeding, with no need to water (We love that!)

looking in the east gate


the bird bath view

After yesterday’s daytime scorching heat and evening wind, lots of leaves and fir needles had fallen into the garden.

Mary raking the paths


in the fenced garden


one of Mary’s roses


All summer I pull Japanese anemones, and then I love them when they bloom.


Podophyllum (Allan’s photo)


Bella on the lawn (Allan’s photo)


Bella in the basement as we left (Allan’s photo)

Port of Ilwaco

We decided to get a head start on tomorrow’s work by watering and weeding along Howerton Avenue at the Port, starting at the east end.

When we arrived home to pick up another hose, we found a shocking sight.  Our quiet, bucolic, country-feeling street had been painted with bright lines.  I do not like it.  Allan thinks it is going to speed up traffic instead of making it safer.

the way it used to be


now

Since the double yellow line means no passing, a traffic cop could write tickets all day three blocks west at the post office, where passing and U turns are frequent.  When I kvetched about it on Facebook, I learned that other residents (just some that I know) are also not thrilled.  We wished we had been asked or notified. It is what it is now.  (We learned the next day that the Department of Transportation done-it.) There is not enough paint remover to take us back in time.

It cheered me up to pet Rudder from next door.

At the east end of Howerton Avenue, I made the radical decision to simply skip watering the easternmost bed.  Some rain is predicted for later this week—not much, but enough to help this quite drought tolerant bed.  I think my snap decision was influenced by feeling disgruntled about the street painting job.

east end bed


Yesterday’s heat scorched even the armeria (sea thrift); watering today will not fix that.

If we get no rain, we will have to break down and water this garden on Friday.  It is the most difficult and requires the longest hose length.

We found a rock in a garden bed further west:

As I walked along weeding, I made mental note of plants I want to move in the fall, like this Miscanthus ‘Gold Bar’ that is languishing in the bed by the Fort George Brewery office.

sad Miscanthus ‘Gold Bar’

Further down the street, in my favourite bed, the same grass is doing much better.

by the Ilwaco pavilion, more sheltered from wind


a happier Miscanthus ‘Gold Bar’

I am not doing much clipping back today.  I want as much plant growth as possible in all the beds to keep people from standing upon them during Friday evening’s Slow Drag.

The drive-over garden has knit together again.


Port Office garden


low tide with haze, possibly from wildfire smoke upriver mixed with fog


can’t see the hills to the east at all


Howerton Ave: smoke or fog? We could smell smoke, faintly. (Allan’s photo)

Our friends in Portland and Olympia are experiencing heavy smoke and falling ash from the fire east of Portland in the beloved wilderness area of the Columbia River Gorge.  Some photos: here, and here (before) and here.

We left off at Time Enough books and will do the rest of the watering tomorrow afternoon and evening.

 

 

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Sunday, 3 Sept 2017

As we passed through the town of Castle Rock on our way to Evan Bean’s garden, I remembered childhood camping trips for two weeks each summer at the Toutle River, a beautiful campground that got washed away when Mt St Helens erupted in 1980.

 After our garden visit, we returned to Castle Rock and stopped to admire the public gardens.  I was pleased to find a Facebook page for the volunteer (!!!) group that does these gardens.  And, oh, LOOK! They have an annual garden tour (which we have, tragically, missed).

 Next year!

The first garden runs along the parking lot and street of the Riverfront Trail.  Allan went up onto the trail and got photos of the river.

I think this might presage a boating trip.

One of them waved.

The bank below the trail is newly planted.

Allan’s photo

how it gets watered (Allan’s photo)

This looks like the work truck.

Gateway Park

It was 96 degrees as we walked through the garden.

We had driven up that curved road heading to Evan’s garden.

I noted that somebody does hose watering.

roses and hydrangeas

This park runs for several blocks along a one way street going into town from the north.

Feast your eyes on the hanging baskets!  The park shows to the left in this photo.

I realized that each pole has a round banner which appear to be made by locals.  Let’s look at the baskets along this street and then get back to the park.

The baskets have gold sweet potato vine and at the top, some pink gaura making a spray of flowers.

Many hands make light work.

Now for our walk through this most amazing park.  I think that despite what the map below says it is called Gateway Park.

It’s long and narrow, between Huntington Avenue and Front Street.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

around the base of a tree (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

One plant source is Tsugawa. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo, looking down from the road

Is this really all hose watered by volunteers?! (Allan’s photo)

white gaura (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

We’ve walked south, and now we are walking back north.

On the way through town earlier in the day, my first hint of the great garden spirit here was a glimpse of the city hall garden, so we went looking for it.  On the way, we came upon what seems to be the same commercial street and stopped to admire its planters and baskets.

Castle Rock Blooms banner

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

dangling sweet potato vine (I think that is what it is)

painted rock (Allan’s photo)

 

It was 4:30 PM and we were the only pedestrians.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

sidewalk garden beds

We found City Hall a couple of blocks away.  It had been a great benefit of my freeway avoidance that we had glimpsed its garden on our route earlier in the day.

Allan’s photo

pink gaura, also used in the baskets

Digital cameras are weird. And WOW, what a garden.

The only other person we saw was a man across the street waiting at a table and holding a bouquet. There is a story there.

waterfall rock

Water rill goes under the entry walk.

seems like they get a lot of donations…

Allan’s photo

I was well and truly astonished by Castle Rock.

Here are a few bonus photos from our drive while looking for city hall:

On the way home:

The part of highway 4 (Ocean Beach Highway) between Longview and Cathlamet scares me, but what’s new….I’m no fun on the driving part of a road trip.

The 99 degree temperature as we passed through Longview dropped to 79 as we got closer to the beach.

In Naselle, we paused for a look at the big garden by the library.

They were having a party.

and the garden across the street….

with its big rooster.

I’m kind of in love with Castle Rock now, and I fantasized about moving in retirement to join that group of volunteers….if only it were not so hot there!  Here’s an upcoming event that you might want to attend.

castlerock.jpg

 

 

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Tuesday, 29 August 2017

front path before leaving for work

This could have been an all Ilwaco day, had I not wanted to get a head start on tomorrow.  We have some planting to do at Diane’s garden, and I’m not sure how long it will take, so best to get ahead by getting other jobs done today.

On the way out of town, we noted to our sorrow that the street sweeper had knocked out the patch of volunteer poppies that Allan has been nurturing all summer.

poppies reseeded in the street, at sunset last night

today 😦

But wait.  If that was a mechanical street sweeper truck, why did it leave cigarette butts and all?

We delivered our B&O tax form belatedly to Ilwaco City Hall.  It is such an easy form to do; why do I put it off?

Allan noticed this showy nasturtium in a city hall planter.

The Depot Restaurant

after watering

‘Fireworks’ goldenrod hints of autumn.

I hope folks parking here in the evening have enjoyed the scent of Nicotiana ‘Fragrant Cloud’.

Petunia ‘Pretty Much Picasso’ and gold sweet potato vine, combined by Basket Case Greenhouse Roxanne.

spoon petaled African Daisy (osteospermum) in purple…

and white

Long Beach

I belatedly delivered our B&O tax to city hall.

Meanwhile, Allan did some clipping of lambs ears on the west side of city hall.

before and after

Stachys byzantina ‘Silver Carpet’ does not have many blooms, which can be an advantage if all you want is the soft silver foliage.

City Hall west side

There is much crocosmia to pull in the narrow part of the garden (not planted by us! I have almost totally gone off planting Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’).

Meanwhile, I did some sightline pruning in the wee popout a block north of city hall, where a maple that was once planted, then cut down by the city crew for sightline reasons, is returning in a bushy way.

before

after?

really after

That area gets no supplemental water so is pretty sparse.  I now think I should make that determined maple into a wee rounded shrub.

The Anchorage Cottages

Apparently I had sight lines on my mind.  When we had to park by the street below the Anchorage Cottages (due to a big truck in the parking lot), I got the urge to “lift” a tree to make for a better view of the road for folks leaving the resort.

before, looking toward the Anchorage exit

after

Mitzu comes to see what’s what (Allan’s photo)

Mitzu supervising

debris from two trees whose branches I clipped

I’m glad the soft foliage of chameacyparis is set well back from the street.

I then joined Allan in weeding and deadheading by the cottages.

center courtyard

Melianthus major

Note to self: The soil looks thin again, mulch it this fall.

Allan found a painted rock, from a “rocks” group in Pocatello, Idaho.

a late Tigridia (Allan’s photo)

north end of courtyard: Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ and Hebe ‘Quicksilver’ looking grand.

south end of courtyard: same two plants, not so great

Soon the row of seeds from Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ will look a lot like the rope in the painting.  I planned that (not).

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer” seedheads mimicking the rope in the sign in a previous year

Ilwaco

We stopped at home to get the long hose for watering the east end curbside garden at the port.  I could see so much that needs doing in my own blown-about garden.  My foot hurt so I knew I would be doing none of it at the end of the day.

so much dead-leafing to do.

We watered at the port, Allan at the east end and me at the west.

east end garden (Allan’s photo)

I look forward to some rain and to not having to drag hose down the sidewalk.  Just when I was feeling quite tired and sore whilst watering in front of Time Enough Books, a woman came up to me and asked if I wanted any Shasta daisy seeds that she had in her car.  I said no, because they don’t do well in this dry gardens.  Seeing the cosmos in the boat planter, she told me that they were a favourite of her mothers. Then she kindly offered me a large paper cup of sweet tea that she had just bought at McDonalds in Long Beach.  I said no, because it would make me have to pee.  (Well, it would, which is a problem when busy gardening!)  She laughed and said she was prepared for me, though, and she reached into her bag and handed me this present!

So thank you, Christina from Nemah, who is clearly on a mission to spread joy wherever she goes.

looking east from Time Enough Books…

…and looking west

Minutes later, a fellow walked by with a black lab.  Of course, I wanted to pet the dog, and learned his name was Tai and that “he can spell!” said the man.  He then showed Tai a treat and spelled out “S-P-I-N” and Tai spun around.  Next came “S-I-T” and Tai sat.

Then “W-A-I-T” and Tai waited while his guy walked away.  Tai joined him by the green metal box (background in above photo) and the man spelled “J-U-M-P” and Tai jumped up onto the box.  All three of us were delighted.  Tai still had soft puppy-like fur.

Allan joined me at the west end by the Freedom Market, where I watered while he ran the string trimmer down the sidewalk edge.

before and after: Can you tell the difference?

Tai came by again

I still wanted to do a garden along the bark strip by Freedom Market, where in midsummer almost all the plant starts (which were not many) that I had put in there were stolen. Another problem is that people walk through the bark area.  Maybe, thought I, I could plant just around the two existing roses.

would look nice with some flowers

I think I have given up on this idea after this evening, when I saw two young male customers run right through between the roses, where one tiny yarrow start remains, and vault the log.

If that’s a path, too, I think I give up!

Or….maybe I’ll try planting Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ and see what happens.

Our neighbour Devery arrived home at the same time we did.  Her dog, my little friend Royal, got very excited.

How much is that doggy in the window? The one with the beautiful tail!

As predicted to myself, my foot hurt so I got no evening gardening done except for watering essential potted plants.  I hope for lots of gardening energy when the weekend days off arrive.

Here’s a text that arrived today from Todd, showing his new puppy on the job.

Todd’s photo of baby Ansel! (black and white dog/Ansel Adams)

I have not yet met this pup and hope to remedy that soon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Monday, 28 August 2017

Long Beach

With the terrible flooding in Houston going on, I’d feel like a wretch if I complained about the weather here.  So let me just share:

And let me add that calling this “warm” is nuts.  “Smoke” was also in the forecast for today and created a haze around the edges of the sky.  We think this time it is from wildfires in Oregon rather than in Canada.  Later, someone said we had had “100% humidity”.  It felt very different from any hot weather that I have experienced here.

Fortunately, most (but not enough) of our work day involved watering.

We began with two north blocks so that I could buy some spray paint on sale.  I need to repaint the tall bamboo poles in our garden before winter.

I briefly popped into the always fascinating NIVA green shop to add to my photo collection for the shop’s Facebook page.

in NIVA green

Today we watered the planters and the street trees.

My walkabout photos:

across the street in Fifth Street Park: the classic frying pan photo being taken

Those folks getting their photo taken do not know that they are supposed to fling their arms up like they are clams frying in a pan.  Not that clams have arms.  But that’s what people do.

A fellow walked by and, as often happens, complimented the planters.  Then he asked, “Do you take care of the big pansy buckets, too?”  I somehow knew he meant the big hanging baskets from the Basket Case Greenhouse, which the city crew waters every morning.

Herb ‘N Legend Smoke Shop

My friend Tam from the smoke shop showing off his whiskers.

California poppies

more California poppies

Agastache ‘Blue Boa’

the carousel

Eryngium and Agastache in the big Lewis and Clark Square planter

Why don’t I plant more eryngiums in the regular sized planters?  How odd that I do not.  Must fix that.

Allan and I met up halfway through and had a break at Abbracci Coffee Bar for refreshing iced coffees.

a black labrador to pet

in Abbracci

Allan’s walkabout photos:

Geranium ‘Rozanne’

deadheading

Cosmos ‘Sonata’

The bees go round and round the center of the cosmos.

by Wind World Kites

With the trees and planters watered, we moved the van to park by Veterans Field, where I did some weeding while Allan pulled old Crocosmia ‘Lucifer from a corner of Third Street Park.

Veterans Field with Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’

Crocosmia project, before (Allan’s photos); looked like a bear had sat in it.

after

We walked along the Bolstad beach approach garden, clipping any rugosa rose stem that had strayed into the street.

the Bolstad approach, looking east

The city crew was dismantling kite festival…(Allan’s photo)

We think this selfie was with the rugosa roses instead of with the arch! (Allan’s photo)

While I went into city hall to sort out some paperwork, Allan pulled some more Crocosmia.

before

after (The gold shrub is Physocarpus ‘Dart’s Gold’

Ilwaco

I had intended to walk the planter route, checking on them for chickweed and so forth.  However, my foot hurt too much so I went home, watered, and belatedly did our B&O quarterly tax forms.  Allan watered the Ilwaco trees and planters:

Pennisetum macrourum at the boatyard

poppies reseeded in the street at sunset

A kind local friend gave me the sort of foot brace you wear while sleeping in order to help cure plantar fasciitis.  I think it is helping…but it is slow going getting better.

 

 

 

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Thursday, 17 August 2017

The workday began with optimism that we could get everything done in order to get Friday off to relax and to blog about Tuesday’s day trip.  The pressure was low; if the work spilled over on to Friday, that would not be a problem.

First thing: Delivering flowers to Don Nisbett Gallery, for Jenna to take to their guest condo, in which she is hosting a bevy of mermaids over the weekend.

Long Beach

I often remember the deadheading of the welcome sign just as we are about to drive past it.

deadheading cosmos

Allan looked over the top of the sign for this one.

front side.

back side with Allan trimming the tatty Geranium ‘Orion’, which will be replaced with Rozanne (like the one at right) this fall.

I had intended to water the Long Beach planters first and then see how much time was left for the beach approach garden.  Then, in order to dump our debris while the city works lot is open (to save having to wrestle with the big gate), I decided we should weed the beach approach and its planters first.  Kite Festival starts Monday so we want it to look good.

Someone had left this rock in a planter.

This week, someone had added a plant to the Lisa Bonney memorial planter instead of taking plants away.

This pansy is new. Thank you.

I got to pet three lovely bassets.

Later, we saw in town a license plate that read AGLBST.  It came to me that it meant Agility Basset, i.e. dogs who compete in agility courses.  I bet those bassets belonged to that car.  If you want to watch an unusual breed of dog compete in agility, have a look at this video featuring my cousin’s St Bernard.  I imagine bassets would also be endearing to watch.

Our friend John and his darling dog, Tippi, stopped to visit.

Someone had helped themselves to one of my circle of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’.

rather a large amount of trash, neatly boxed.

note to self: just remove these old bearded iris from this planter in fall. Planted by a volunteer years ago, they do not do well.

I’m pleased there will still be rugosa roses blooming during Kite Festival.

We then weeded and deadheaded Veterans Field.

Allan also weeded the little park behind Lewis and Clark Square, which is heavy on crocosmias, including the small red ones to the left.

Because a biggish event, Jazz and Oysters, will be at Vet Field this weekend, I suddenly got the notion to apply mulch to the corner garden in order to fluff it up.  We were shockingly short on buckets. They have made their way from the work trailer into the garden at home.  Fortunately, I was able to find a stack of buckets at city works to borrow.

adding mulch at Veterans Field

We then took another buckets-load of mulch out to a couple of low areas on the beach approach garden.

second load of assorted scavenged buckets (Allan’s photo)

The beach approach now looks relatively spiffing for Kite Festival.

Done with mulching at the beach approach, too tired to go back for an after photo.

It was close to four o clock when we started watering the main street planters.  We skipped watering the street trees this week because of last Saturday’s rain.  We might regret that.

My walkabout photos:

Gladiolus papilio and still blooming pink oenothera

a couple of gladiolus, saved from volunteer days in the planter we re-did this spring.

I don’t really liked the regular old glads in a planter because they look clunky when deadheaded.  There are some in the Ilwaco planters that someone else must have put in, because I didn’t.

Allan’s walkabout photos:

Fuchsia, probably Golden Gate

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and cosmos

Salvia viridis (painted sage)

Just when I felt everything was going swimmingly and we’d have no problem getting Ilwaco watered as well, I remembered that we had to water the seven planters along the Sid Snyder Drive beach approach.  We split up to each water, me the east end and Allan the west end.

on Sid Snyder approach

AND we had better check up on the Kite Museum because…Kite Festival is coming.  (How could I almost have forgotten that after that kite festival painted rock?)

My heel was plaguing me as I dragged myself and my sore foot over there from my last planter.

World Kite Museum

Our new planters look good. Note the little blue painted rock.

penstemon has gone a bit flopsy

I just need those plants to stay perfectly beautiful for ten more days!

By now, it was after six.  Allan rejoined me and said he had the energy still to water the Ilwaco street trees and planters.  In order to get Friday off, I was determined to match that energy and get the boatyard watered and at least slightly deadheaded and weeded.

Ilwaco

Allan untangled and set up our long hose for me.  I was feeling punchy, my dogs were barking, and I was utterly determined to get this done.

watering south of the gate

boatyard work (Allan’s photo)

By the time I had the south stretch of garden watered, a breeze had come up and I wished I had my sweatshirt.  I could see Allan at the very far end of the block with his water truck.  It was simply too far to go.

Allan is way down at the end of the chain link fence.

Things took a turn for the better when I found two hoses hooked up on the inside of the fence halfway and two thirds of the way down…and they were just lying ready for me instead of being hoisted up with the nozzle end going into a boat.

This broken down patched old hose was a beautiful sight to me…

As was the hose at the far end.

I was so happy about the hoses that I swear my heel hurt less. I also realized that all day while working, in the back of my mind this chant was running over and over: No Trump, No KKK, No Fascist USA.  Clearly the news is always weighing on my thoughts.

viewing the garden from the inside, sweet pea success

It is frustrating to see deadheads from inside of the fence.

note to self: divide and make maybe two more clumps of this vigorous perennial sunflower (some sort of helianthus)

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ on both sides of the fence. I cut it back hard in early spring.

From whence did this boatyard buddleia volunteer blow in?  It’s a noxious weed.  I had mercy.

a boat with bikes on board

I had time to go to the outside of the fence and get some of the deadheads I had seen.

looking south

It was getting dark-ish when I found a broken bottle in the garden.  This photo below is to remind me of where it was, because I know there is still sharp glass there.

Note to self: Be careful next time.

Parts of the garden look bad with scrimmy horsetail no longer hidden by annual poppies.  I did not have time to deal with all of it.

a particularly sad spot

Other parts made me happy with beauty and interest.

I must stick more cuttings of the artemisia in the ground this fall. I do love it so.

This was my favourite spot today.

cosmos, looking lush but not many blooms yet

I keep thinking that when the last summer art walks roll around  (September 1), I should put up a sign at the boatyard reading “Gardening is the Slowest of the Performing Arts.”  I doubt I will have the energy to make that happen.

Meanwhile, Allan had the planters done.

watering planters till sunset

the one remaining big Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

Someone had sat on and smashed flat part of this planter.

Allan rejoined me just as it was almost too dark to see.  When he parked the water trailer at home, he found this hitchhiker.

My damnable right heel was plaguing me severely for the rest of the evening.  I wondered if it makes any sense at all to push so hard on a ten hour day just to get an extra day off.  And yet I do love a three day weekend.

Lest you feel achy with sympathy, I can report as I write this that I  experienced almost no foot pain on the two days off that followed, during which I only did some light watering at home, a tiny bit of planting, and a lot of news reading and blogging.  Allan’s much more interesting Saturday boat excursion will be tomorrow’s post.

 

 

 

 

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