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Posts Tagged ‘6×6 art auction’

Saturday, 3 November 2018

at home

I did not in the least intend to garden today.  With Allan at a holiday bazaar peddling his book, I was planning on a quiet day to blog about Halloween.  But from my desk window, I could see an area of the garden where the BadAster lurks.  I simply had to go dig and pull it.

alluring view

before

after

Aster roots are pinkish and easy to differentiate from others.

I managed to plant one lady in waiting…

Skooter helped.

This is not comfortable because of claws.

Banished from helping:

Around the garden:

planted this a few weeks ago

in the lawn

looking north

very young Acer griseum (paperbark maple)

lots of assorted fuchsias still blooming

This volunteer willow is crunching the fence. (But I love its privacy factor.)

Eupatorium ‘Elegant Feather’

at last, beautyberry success

west bed

Hyemenocallis; I love its angular form and white-grey berries.

Rain saved me from gardening and gave me three hours to blog before our evening event.

Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum 6×6 Art Auction

 

The theme this year for the annual fundraiser was the Wild North West.  The art pieces are almost all just 6×6 inches in size.

One of four silent auction tables

one of two cases of the live auction art

Before the auction, we feasted.

sausage made of…bear

I learned that evening that a black bear had killed two beloved pet goats in the outskirts of Ilwaco, breaking through a plywood-boarded barn door to get the second one.  I still did not eat bear sausage.

loved the woodsy decor

a sell out crowd; most tickets were sold before the doors opened.

We got a good table up front, reserved for Discover Ilwaco, and shared it with Our Kathleen and with Steve and John of the Bayside Garden.

Karla of Time Enough Books ready to take call in bids, by telegraph or telephone.

Security by Richard Schroeder

Bruce Peterson, auctioneer, with assistant Betsy Millard, museum director

the excitement mounts

a call in bid

On the screen is one of the extra offerings, a dinner for 6 prepared in your home by private chef Maddy Moore (of Pink Poppy Bakery).  This special occasion went for $750.00

a telegram bid

and telephone

Then came the pièce de résistance, the annual sock monkey art by Leslie Hall.

The pony express monkey had to be steadied by Betsy because of all the excitement.

This year’s sock monkey art, a photo bomb called Wild Outdoor Monkey:

In the usual bidding war between Karla and her sister, the monkey raised (as I recall) $800 for the museum.

monkey business

Karla hiding in the back to spring the winning bid (Allan’s photo)

Some pieces we especially liked:

I did love these crows, titled “HOA Committee” (homeowner’s association, a neighborhood body full of strict rules)

Oysterville Regatta by Tucker Wachsmuth

a lovely painting of my garden nemesis, salal

I was way outbid on this pretty little thing.  Running Wild in the Hood by Shelley Curtis Weaver (that would be Oregon’s Mount Hood)

But I did get this one, Washed Ashore by Wally Cox!

A few more favourites, photos provided by the museum:

6×6 is one of my favourite Ilwaco events of the year.  It is always in early November; come join the fun next year!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 4 November 2017

On the way to work, I took a bouquet (reassembled from our Halloween bouquets) to the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum for tonight’s event.

Long Beach

We went to Long Beach in a light, cold drizzle.  After a search for a parking spot on a busy Saturday, we repaired to Abbracci Coffee Bar to wait out the rain.  The Dark Sky app promised that it would stop in half an hour.

Tony and Bernardo of Abbracci

new autumnal art by Brad Carlson

Bernardo showed us photos of the successful cast leaves that he had made from gunnera I had provided from nearby Fifth Street Park.

success!

The rain did stop, as predicted, so we were able to start work after our coffee.

We had received in the mail a sympathy card from Dr. Raela at Oceanside Animal Clinic.  At first, I thought I had better wait to read it.  I couldn’t wait.

Dr. Raela’s message helped me a great deal with my feelings about having made the decision to have Smoky euthanized, which was so hard even though it was clear he was not going to get better and that he was so miserable and uncomfortable.  A veterinarian with this much insight and compassion is a treasure indeed.

It took me a while to join Allan at cleaning up the nearby park.

Fifth Street Park, west fence with Super Dorothy Rose.

Allan first did some fall clean up of the SW quadrant of the park.  We leave the Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ standing through the winter here because it helps hide a not very attractive line of old pampas grass behind the restroom building.

(Allan’s photos) before

after

before

after

I began by cutting back the Darmera peltata in the SE quadrant by Benson’s Restaurant.  Even though I still like the way it looks before, I know the city crew will appreciate having the pond edge clear so they can do their fall clean up of fallen tree leaves in the water.

before

gunnera and darmera leaves obscuring the edge

a little darmera start in the waterfall

Allan came from his first project across the street and tidied up the little monument garden some more.

before

after shearing the lady’s mantle

Allan pried off a big piece of darmera that had attached itself to the side of a rock.

I showed him how the leaves having fallen off the maples had revealed a bindweed that had climbed from the hydrangeas in the back corner way up into the tree.

how embarrassing! (Allan’s photos)

He removed the bindweed with the pole pruners.

I had not intended to prune the big hydrangea, until I realized that it was so tall it was obscuring the lamp post in the corner of the park.  Much pruning ensued, including the ivy (from the lot next door, from whence the bindweed also comes) that was also interfering with the light.

This is just the hydrangea debris.

 Three tarp loads of darmera and gunnera debris got dragged by Allan half a block to our trailer to go home into our compost bins.

North, across the side street, the classic frying pan photo being taken (Allan’s photo)

Here is the before again:

before

And the after:

I think the city crew will be happy to see this on Monday.

I have an idea that a string trimmer might be the answer to cleaning up this difficult very muddy bed in the same park:

Next time!

We still had a lot of clean up to do.  Allan hauled the third tarp full of compostable debris to the trailer, which was parked up the street past Abbracci.

tarp load number three (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan noticed the three bikes parked in a tree garden. When he joined me back in the park, with the van and trailer moved to the side street in order to load up the hydrangea debris, he asked me to see if the bikes belonged to coffee shop customers and if so to request that they move them out of our garden.

All too typical.  Signs on the lamp posts, by the way, say no bicycle riding on the sidewalks, which is often ignored.

The coffee shop which was empty save for the owners and for a dad with two young daughters, who indeed owned the bikes.  I asked if they would please move the bikes out of “my garden”.  The dad said, “YOUR garden? I thought it was a public garden!”

“Yes, it is a public garden, and I’m the public gardener,” I replied, with every effort to be jolly and pleasant.  “I just tend to call it mine because I work on it, but the city would prefer if people not put their bikes on the plants.”

“Do you have a card to prove you’re the public gardener?” the dad asked.

I could not help but laugh, and said, “No, I’m not a card carrying public gardener.  I could send my husband here with an orange vest on, but we are too busy cleaning up the park.”  I just gave up and left.

I realized later that Allan had been dragging his tarp of debris past the big windows of the coffee shop and loading it into the trailer.  The dad must have seen!

Not long after that, the dad and two daughters went bicycling past us, heading down the main sidewalk (despite signs on almost every lamp post saying no bicycling on the sidewalks).  We were parked in full view, with a traffic cone behind us, a few feet up the side street, loading debris. I called out in my jolliest voice, with a smile, “Here’s my public gardener ‘card’, this trailer full of debris!  See how full it is? We just cleaned up this park!”  I added, “Girls, look!  Public gardeners!”  The girls looked but the dad gazed straight ahead and kept pedaling.  I was laughing because it was so ludicrous to have been asked for a card.  Why would I even care where people park their bikes if I were not responsible for the plants?

I went back into Abbracci for a moment to confirm that I had not sounded mean when I asked the guy to move the bikes.  Nope.  I observed that the soil under the tree was a bit compacted by the bikes, that more damage would have been done in the summer when the plants were fuller, and that there is plenty of room for bikes on the sidewalk next to the bench.  (To my eternal amazement, summer does not stop people from parking bikes, strollers, and dogs on top of the plants under the trees.)

We dumped the hydrangea debris at City Works and got home with less than an hour to spare before our evening event.  The offload of the compost debris would have to wait till Sunday.

6×6 Art Auction

Tomorrow’s post, shared from Our Ilwaco blog, will be all about the always entertaining annual 6×6 at the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum.  I just want to share the personal aspects of it here.

I was touched that the museum reserved a table for us.  They know we will share photos on Discover Ilwaco and in our blog, so we got a great view of Karla, the communications expert, and of Bruce, the auctioneer, as you will see in tomorrow’s post.

Allan’s photo

Our Steve and John of the Bayside Garden attended.

John and Steve (Allan’s photo)

They have mounted another attack on salal in their garden, and we hope to go see the results next week.

A friend said that she had a gift for me.  It was a rainbow bracelet in honor of Smoky (and the Rainbow Bridge).  My face blindness kicked in and I had to go up later and ask her who she was: Leslie, who paints the sock monkey painting each year, and who I know quite well online but not so much to recognize in person…yet.  If her little dog, the Bean, had been with her I would have known her identity right away.

Allan’s photo

Two artist friends, Heather of NIVA green (our favourite shop) and Joe Chasse, attended.

Heather and Joe (Allan’s photo)

We were pleased that Joe sat at our table, and I was particularly pleased that I won his art piece in the silent auction.

Joe’s 6×6 creation, at home with me

I also bid on and won Wendy Murry’s piece.  I’ve gotten hers all but one of the years that she has submitted art.  This year, because the theme was the sixties, the piece is very 60s in feel.  I had a bit of a battle to win it.

“When the power of love overcomes the love of power, there will be peace.” -Jimi Hendrix

Our Kathleen got the other piece I bid on.  I had forgotten to increase my bid!  I will be able to visit it in her cottage.

1964 Long Beach by Leslie Price, won by Our Kathleen

The mosaic piece was right next to Wendy’s!

Allan’s photo

Usually the art in the live auction goes for a pretty penny, and my favourite live auction piece this year, by local artist Wendi Peterson (spouse of the auctioneer, Bruce) sold for $350.00  (I once bid almost that much for, and won, a piece by Wendy Murry in the live auction.  Not this year, with my recent vet bill.)  I am happy to admire the painting here:

Three Dog Night by Wendi Peterson

Later, at home, with Frosty:

 

 

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Saturday, 15 November 2014

I was pleased to be finally ready to plant bulbs in the Long Beach planters. It’s the biggest job, and often done in bad weather. The day did start out rather cold…

chilly south window view

chilly south window view

our front garden

our front garden

Rubus linneatus took a blast of frost.

Rubus linneatus took a blast of frost.

Tetrapanax looks a little droopy.

Tetrapanax looks a little droopy.

I felt great satisfaction with the view from my seat in the van, just before we pulled out of our driveway.

looking west

looking west

After last evening’s efforts, Nora’s lawn is nicely mowed, and there is no garbage in view on the street. (The caged tree is my Davidia involucrata ‘Sonoma’; I’m not sure the deer would eat it but I don’t want to take a chance.)

Long Beach

The frost had been well timed for us, as for once we have the opportunity to do the last clean up of the city planters while we plant the bulbs. In recent years, I recall trying to squeeze the bulbs under annuals that were not gone yet.

While I clipped and tidied the six planters in the southernmost block, Allan dug the white yarrow out of a planter that had been annoying me for years.

He forgot to take a before, so here is a during.

He forgot to take a before, so here is a during.

The yarrow is terribly rooty and pesky and allowed for little variety in this planter.

The yarrow is terribly rooty and pesky and allowed for little variety in this planter.

after

after

I decided that this year, I would not leave Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ standing in the planters. Otherwise, every time we drive through town this winter I’ll be worrying over old flower heads that may start out architectural but will become increasingly battered.

I bid a possible premature goodbye to these and other sedum stands and cut them back hard.

I bid a possible premature goodbye to these and other sedum stands and cut them back hard.

The planter below, by the bus stop, is one that was planted by a volunteer with a rampant hardy geranium. We might redo it some year; this year, I just pulled out enough to plant bulbs.

too much of a reasonably good thing

too much of a reasonably good thing

Across the street from it is the planter in which another volunteer planted Escallonia that wants to be eight feet tall. She used to maintain her three volunteer planters impeccably, and they do look good although they require much clipping. (I clipped lots of old flowers off the lavender, as well.) The contrast between the would-be tall shrubs and the flattish geraniums across the street is extreme and it bothers me.

One of three planters with escallonias.

One of three planters with escallonias….hard to fit bulbs into this one.

Every street tree bed got a clump of Dutch Iris rainbow mix. I noticed last year that the Dutch iris was blooming during the May parade. I hope that it does so in 2015.

5 more iris under each tree....and I decided to let the sedums under the trees stay up for the winter.

5 more iris under each tree….and I decided to let the sedums under the trees stay up for the winter.

The frost had knocked back all the dahlias and agyranthemums.

frosted planter before

frosted planter before

and after

and after

the planter in front of Home at the Beach gift shop

the planter in front of Home at the Beach gift shop

Its nasturtiums had gone to mush.

Its nasturtiums had gone to mush.

Here it is all cleaned up.

Here it is all cleaned up.

Allan's photo of me taking the after photo of the Home at the Beach planter.

Allan’s photo of me taking the after photo of the Home at the Beach planter.

Allan had finished the yarrow planter re-do and had got the Dutch iris planted under four of eighteen street trees.  By the second block he was able to join me in working on planters. I kept ahead of him, clipping perennials and pulling annuals, and then placing the bulbs, and he followed behind “bulbing” and tidying up each planter.

The weather was stunning…pleasantly warm when wearing a comfy jacket and with no wind.

outdoor picnicers at Streetside Taco

outdoor picnicers at Streetside Taco, with planter santolina in the foreground

We worked until 3:45 and got two blocks done, and were working on block three of six. I was just about to start clipping one more planter when I hit the wall and felt I could do nothing more. I stopped in mid-cutting of a plant.  Fortunately, when I looked at the time, I realized that we needed to dump our debris and go home because we had a five o clock engagement at an art auction.

Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

Every year the museum three blocks west of us has a 6X6 art auction in mid November. All the artwork must fit into a 6 by 6 inch format. This year, we were hoping to be joined by Garden Tour Nancy and her husband, Phil. Nancy was unable to attend and we did miss her so. Phil did join us and local architect David Jensen made the fourth person at our table.

IMG_1586

Allan's photo:  There is a silent auction with four tables of art.

Allan’s photo: There is a silent auction with four tables of art.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

and a live auction with these pieces

and a live auction with these pieces

live auction items

live auction items

I liked this booklet by Mark Tyler much,

I liked this booklet by Mark Tyler much,

A wooden bowl with some tops plays with the 6X6 format.

A wooden bowl with some tops plays with the 6X6 format.

a 6X6 quilt

a 6X6 quilt

All proceeds benefit the museum. This year, for the first time, some items other than art were auctioned, as well.

for example, this fine local tuna

for example, this fine local tuna

Depot Red wine in the silent auction

Depot Restaurant Red Wine in the silent auction

Two museum staffers cater the event under the name Two Monkey Catering.

IMG_1581

Allan’s photo

 

Wine and beer loosen the pocketbooks.

Wine and beer loosen the pocketbooks.

Schroeder Security guards the art while local photographer Bruce Peterson is the auctioneer.

Schroeder Security guards the art while local photographer Bruce Peterson is the auctioneer. (Allan’s photo)

the list of ways in which the event had been publicized

the list of ways in which the event had been publicized

Jacob and Maddy Moore of Pink Poppy Bakery were the white gloved art wranglers.

Jacob and Maddy Moore of Pink Poppy Bakery were the white gloved art wranglers. (Allan’s photo)

I am sure there is a better term for the folks who place the art on the easel. Maddy had contributed an item to the silent auction: six dozen cookies from her bakery. The bidding was heated on that one.

IMG_1608

Maddy places a piece on the easel. (Allan's photo)

Maddy places a piece on the easel. (Allan’s photo)

Allan bid on this piece of Chinook tribal art by Charles Funk; it went too high for his budget.  (Allan's photo)

“Goose”: Allan bid on this piece of Chinook tribal art by Charles Funk; it went too high for his budget. (Allan’s photo)

CharlieFunk1

a packed house and lively bidding

a packed house and lively bidding

Karla and Betsy

Karla and Betsy

Karla is on call at the telephone for bids from “international callers and ships at sea”…

karla2

karla3

Dinner and Golf for 6 at the Cove Restaurant

Dinner and Golf for 6 at the Cove Restaurant

Our friend Jean Nitzel of the Picture Attic art and framing shop won that bid. I asked her later if she golfed, and she said no, but she loves the Cove Restaurant and the deal she got was excellent just for the dinner part. The same thought had crossed my mind…not strongly enough.

support staff standing to the side

support staff standing to the side (Allan’s photo)

Bruce, Karla from Time Enough Books, and Betsy, the museum director (Allan's photo)

Bruce, Karla from Time Enough Books, and Betsy, the museum director (Allan’s photo)

Why the sock monkey, you may well ask. All will become clear…. (ish).

through the live auction display case (Allan's photo)

through the live auction display case (Allan’s photo)

Schroeder Security and auctioneer Bruce

Schroeder Security and auctioneer Bruce Peterson (Allan’s photo)

So about the sock monkeys….Karla and her sister have a thing about them and every year have a fierce bidding war for the sock monkey art piece. This year there were two pieces of…monkey art. Karla had paddle number 95.

IMG_1650

 

Either she or her sister won the first sock monkey piece, and then Karla came to sit at our table to bid on the second…this one:

LeslieHallLipe

Screen Shot 2014-11-16 at 9.34.28 PM

I believe Karla and her sock monkey friend won the Leslie Lipe painting at around $300. Phil had taken my camera to get a better angle so gets the credit for the above photos.

photographer Phil

photographer Phil

much hilarity over monkeying around (Allan's photo)

much hilarity over monkeying around (Allan’s photo)

I was lazy and mostly just sat at the table taking photos from one spot; Allan energetically walked around the room and got all sorts of angles.

Allan's photos

Allan’s photos of our table

Phil bid on this gorgeous piece by Tokeland artist Wally Man, and did not get it as the price soared.

WallyMann

Phil considers whether or not to up his bid.

Phil considers whether or not to up his bid. To the left, I am thinking about how the Wally Mann piece is my favourite of the paintings. (Allan’s photo)

I almost bid on this one (below), depicting the controlled burn of Red’s, an Ilwaco icon. That happened long after Red’s had stopped being the most popular restaurant on the Peninsula and had turned into a rundown antique store. Phil had memories of having dined there as a teenager. The burn happened around 2007.

Dirk's photograph went for a goodly sum.

Dirk’s photograph went for a goodly sum.

The spot where it stood is still a vacant lot downtown because the 2008 downturn in the economy put the kibosh on the building that was going to replace it (a proposed attractive and lovely structure of shops and townhouses).

I wanted the gingko box by Renee O’Connor and thought about writing in the full bid. Instead, I “let” David Jensen win it.

ReneeO'Connor1

David has designed some beautiful craftsman style homes around the Peninsula.. You can gaze upon them here.

David Jensen, left

David Jensen, left

Our friend Rita wins a bid.

Our friend Rita wins a bid.

At the end of the event, Sondra, owner of the wonderful Cove restaurant came to greet me.

Sondra and me

Sondra and me

Then she learned that we had been bidding against each other on a silent auction piece. As it happened, I was the winner (and had been expecting her to walk over to the auction table and up her bid!)

She said she had figured out just where she was going to hang the little piece of art.

She said she had figured out just where she was going to hang the little piece of art.

I felt bad, but not too terribly bad.

I felt bad, but not too terribly bad.

Here's what I got...3 dimensional.

Here’s what I got…3 dimensional.

I confess I had been so tired before the event that I had the urge to just sit at home with me feet up. Of course, it turned out to be an evening of such hilarity that I am most pleased that we went.  The benefit surely raised thousands of dollars for the museum.

Tomorrow: back to bulbing. The end is in sight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 2 November, 2013

The predicted storm arrived around 3 AM with much bluster.  That’s only about an hour after my usual falling asleep time so I barely noticed till around 8 A.M. when loud gusts rattled a tarp in the work storage area outside my window.  I worried briefly about whether or not the power would go out and fell back asleep.

Fortunately, despite a day full of wild wind, the power did stay on for the two Ilwaco events I had been eagerly anticipating.

I had just signed up for the National Blog Posting Month on blogher.com and then realized that November 2 might be my biggest writing challenge.  Since I am running two days behind, the blog post scheduled was Halloween, which is kind of a big deal here and had generated lots of photos.   Would I fail to post on the very first day of signing onto the challenge after having missed very few days in the last several months?  No indeed.   I began my Halloween post before the first event and got about one third of the way through the photo story before heading one block down to Time Enough Books for the 1 PM book signing.

There, in the foyer, stood my dear friend (and Music in the Gardens tour organizer) Nancy Allen, frying up a batch of crab cakes.

our dear Nancy

our dear Nancy

Her spouse, Phil, had harvested the crabs that very morning off the North Jetty.

Phil, forager and gather extraordinaire

Phil, forager and gatherer extraordinaire

I heard someone comment jokingly to Nancy “They don’t like you much!” because she was relegated to the foyer.   She explained that the smell of cooking crab could not be allowed to mingle with the books in the store.

The event, a signing of the book Soup Night, by Maggie Stuckey, had drawn a good crowd.

in the bookstore

in the bookstore

Maggie Stuckey gave a brief talk about how she had found a soup night group in her Portland, Oregon neighbourhood.

I do think this photo of her is cute!

I do think this photo of her is cute!

She described seeing neighbours walking up to a house, each carrying a soup bowl and a spoon; this saves on clean up for the evening’s host.  She became inspired to write about how Soup Night groups create a sense of community.

Maggie Stuckey describing Soup Night

Maggie Stuckey describing Soup Night

Maggie researched Soup Night groups, finding them throughout the USA, and collected stories and recipes for the book.  Here in our Long Beach Peninsula area was the largest number geographically of recipe contributors.

The rest of the event was all about mingling and eating, just like a real Soup Night would be.  The soup samples were offered in bowls full, not just tiny tastes as I had expected, and two salads and the crab cakes were also part of the scrumptious fare.  Charmingly, the recipe contributors signed the books, each on the page on which their recipe appeared.

Nancy signs for her crab cakes.

Nancy signs for her crab cakes.

crab

Our friend, client, and realtor Cheri Diehl waits to get Nancy to sign.

Our friend, client, and realtor Cheri Diehl waits to get Nancy to sign.

Virginia Tackett signed the page for “Not Your Grandmother’s Green Pea Salad”.  Her name tag had the page number on which her recipe appeared, as did the tags for each of the recipe contributors.

Virginia Tackett

Virginia Tackett

signing

signing

My favourite soup was a creamed garlic and onion creation by Dennis Battles.

Dennis signs for Roasted Onion and Garlic Cream Soup

Dennis signs for Roasted Onion and Garlic Cream Soup

Local author Sydney Stevens signed for her recipe Southwestern Lentil Soup.  Delicious.  We spoke briefly about blogging when I told her I intend to read her Oysterville Daybook, about life in the small Peninsula town of Oysterville,  from the beginning to the present day this winter.  She asked me to be on the watch for any subject she might repeat herself on.  I agreed it is very hard to not repeat oneself.  For me, I am sure there is much repetition over the years as our work goes round the year in repeating cycles.

Kennette Osborn from Ocean Park was the first to sign her soup recipe (page 104), before i got the idea of photographing the signers.  Her “Surprise Beef Stew” had a wonderful twist:  It is served with cool crispy coleslaw stirred in right before eating.

I don’t want to give away that I bought two books, as someone might guess it is her Christmas present…but I did.

me and bookstore owner Karla

me and bookstore owner Karla

a warm and happy event

a warm and happy event

I hope someone in Ilwaco is inspired to start a soup night.  Preferably someone who does not live in a big fancy intimidating house (not that our town has many of those).  Oh, maybe someone on the flatlands so we could walk there!  But it would not be me;  I am not much of one for hosting inside my house as am generally too busy outside (or blogging) to make it tidy enough inside.

As we left for our next of three events, we saw a sign of the season on the OldeBob’s readerboard:

It is crab time.

It is crab time.

Over along the meader line (the variable line that divides the city from the port parking lot), a murder of crows gathered on the rough grass….

crows

and then took to the trees.

trees

We drove straight on up to Long Beach to an art show opening…

poster

where we were pleased to find Kent and Betsy Toepfer, along with Jan Richardson of Windy Meadows Pottery.  The Toepfer garden was one of my favourites on a past Music in the Gardens tour.

Jan, Allan, and the Toepfers

Jan, Allan, and the Toepfers

We had a good visit and discussed, but did not solve, some of the world’s problems.

love Betsy colourful art and Jan's little house

love Betsy’s colourful art and Jan’s little house

love the two little pigs by our friend Jean Nitzel!

love the two little pigs by our friend Jean Nitzel!

Later we learned that our neighbour (four doors down!) Judy had bought one of Jean’s “little birdie” paintings.

Back home again, we checked out how well the cosmos in the boatyard garden had held up to the wind.

Cosmos holding up very well indeed.

Cosmos holding up very well indeed.

I had another hour or so to peck away at my blog entry about Halloween, and then we were off to the 6X6 art auction at the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum.

6

a full house

a full house

I started the event in more of a hungry than a photographic mood, so neglected to be able to show you the tasty buffet.  Then, with loaded plate, I stood around feeling shy as most of the seats were full.  We finally pulled up an extra chair and joined Kelly of Blue Crab Graphics and local potter Karen Brownlee and her spouse, squeezing five into a table for four (at 6X6).

I attended for the amusing repartee of the auctioneers and to support the museum and also with determination to acquire another piece by Wendy Murry.  It was in the silent rather than the live auction; that could mean I would get it cheaper without the frenzy of bidding.  And yet it is fun to bid with a raised, numbered paddle, and I was sorry to not have the opportunity.

the silent auction, one of four tables

the silent auction, one of four tables

I made a low bid, and soon saw a slightly higher one, then bid again.  Then someone who I knew could far outbid me bid again.  What to do?  I wanted it very badly.  Last year I had gotten this glorious three dimensional piece by Wendy:

Sideshow by the Seashore by Wendy Murry

(that’s Wendy MURRY!)  and three years ago I got this one:

wendy

So before I could be outbid this time I decided to go for the new-this-year ‘buy it now” option.

bought it now

bought it now

Wendy's art, 2013

Wendy’s art, 2013…it is my preccciiioussss!

It is all for a great cause and I have never tired of the pleasure of owning the other two creations by Wendy.   I will economize in some other way.  Now I could relax and enjoy the live auction without having to keep crossing the room to check on my bid.  (For most of my life, I had so little disposable income that it was not until attending this event for the first time in 2010 that I even knew the difference between a live and silent auction!)

the live auction items

the live auction items

Our friend Don Nisbett’s 6×6 piece was the first in the live auction.  Bruce Peterson is the witty auctioneer and a security person protects the valuable art.

don

Crabby Before Wine by Don Nisbett

Cartwheel Kids by Normandie Hand

Cartwheel Kids by Normandie Hand; museum director Betsy Millard at right

Karla from Time Enough Books took bids on the “international phone”.  The presence of the sock monkey will become clear later.  Or maybe not.

Karla on the international phone line

Karla on the international phone line

security

security

Pepper by Renee O Connor

Pepper by Renee O’ Connor

I have bid on and miraculously won two beautiful flower tiles by Renee in previous years; the dog, while attractive, I could resist.

the poppy tile from 2011!

the poppy tile that I won in 2011!

Gray's River Road by Wally Mann

Gray’s River Road by Wally Mann

After all these beautiful small pieces had been auctioned for between $150 and $300 or so dollars each, the annual Sock Monkey picture came up on the screen.

sock monkey on a train

Night Train by Leslie Hall Lipe

All I have been able to figure out over the years is that Karla adores sock monkeys, as does her sister.  Leslie Hall Lipe does a piece of sock monkey art each year.  (This one, with the train, is actually my favourite.)  The bidding war between Karla and her sister immediately became fierce.

Night Train

Night Train

the 2012 monkey

the 2012 monkey

and the 2011 monkey

and the 2011 monkey

Karla fights for the monkey.

Karla fights for the monkey.

another bid

another bid by Karla and her monkey friend

But her sister won as the monkey art went for $750 dollars.

the crowd applauds the winner

the crowd applauds the winner

It’s just another example of the mysterious ways of the town of Ilwaco.

The silent auction continued for another half an hour.  One of my favourite pieces was two ravens by Jean Nitzel (of The Picture Attic shop in Long Beach):

ravens

It was, or they were, won by Kelly of Blue Crab Graphics.  When I saw Kelly bid on Jean’s art, I backed off and focused my attention on winning Kelly’s own piece. ( I will show it in a later post; since I was the one who acquired it, Kelly took her piece home to do a small tweak on the design that had been bothering her!  That’s the kind of connection with the artist that comes with living a few blocks apart.)   What a satisfying feeling of having supported our museum and been part of the Peninsula community all day long.   And I got home in time to finish and upload my Halloween blog post.  Sunday, rain or shine, we really must get back to work!

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