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Posts Tagged ‘Aconitum (monkshood)’

Saturday, September 21, 2013

A beautiful day was the last sort of day I expected.  The forecast had called for rain, some wind, thunderstorms, and small hail.  I expected to sleep and then get caught up on the computer.  Instead, I found myself walking down to the Saturday Market at ten fifteen!

evidence of yesterday's rain

evidence of yesterday’s rain

Just as I took the above photo two houses east of ours, I saw Devery and Tuffy coming toward me on their way to the market, so we walked down together.

It was a social occasion for Tuffy.

It was a social occasion for Tuffy.

Mr. TuffMan

Mr. TuffMan

Devery bought some delicious produce from De Asis.  The sight of okra took her back to her childhood on Saint Kitt’s Island.

at De Asis Produce

at De Asis Produce

Then we parted ways as I went on through the length of the market to take more photos for the Discover Ilwaco page.

More produce from De Asis Farm:

peppers

peppers hot

and sweet

and sweet

The market had about half as many booths as usual.  I bought a hoodie from Blue Crab Graphics…a purple zippered one with Kelly’s design one of our lighthouses on it.  Kelly told me that she had set up in the rain and many vendors had not come.  They would be missing a beautiful day.

new hoodie!

new hoodie!

Further on, the English Nursery booth

Further on, the English Nursery booth

reflective pool by the Shoalwater Cove booth

“reflective pool” by the Shoalwater Cove booth

The pedestrian road called Waterfront Way, which is the market promenade on Saturdays, has a slope toward the middle which provides good reflections after rain.

another booth reflected

another booth reflected

The basket from The Basket Case Greenhouse still looks wonderful in front of the Don Nisbett Art Gallery.  Don waters it frequently and lavishly.

Don's basket

Don’s basket

The ones by the Port Office are good, too, although not as lavishly trailing without Don’s extra watering.

Port Office

Port Office

It’s just as well they don’t trail more or they would hide our garden underneath.  (Some of the garden plants also came from The Basket Case:  Eryngiums, Agastaches, Santolinas, Lavenders, Nepeta, and Cosmos and Salvia Viridis from The Planter Box.)

At the Pink Poppy Bakery booth, Madeline was selling some treats to Jim and Jet Neva.  Jim, great friend of port landscaping, may have retired but is still doing a lot for the port.  He was there to put up the second warning flag for tomorrow’s weather (two red triangle flags equal a gale with winds of 39-54 mph).

Jim and Jet at Pink Poppy Bakery

Jim and Jet at Pink Poppy Bakery

flowers from Pink Poppy Farm

flowers from Pink Poppy Farm

I got two Guinness chocolate cupcakes and some shortbread to share with Allan later, then  checked out the westernmost curbside garden on Howerton.

The business for sale is the Imperial Schooner Restaurant.

The business for sale is the Imperial Schooner Restaurant.

And walked past the boatyard…

boatyard

And on up First Avenue, checking the city planters along the way.

the colourful Portside Café

the colourful Portside Café

My destination was a late breakfast at Olde Towne.  Their window display foretells the imminent arrival of autumn.

at Olde Towne

at Olde Towne

In the way of small towns, I ended up having my meal with our client Ann and local masseuse and baker Diane.

Meanwhile, unbeknownst to me, Allan had woken up an hour later than me (lucky to get good sleep!) and gone to the market himself, where he met our friend Donna, her new puppy, Blue, and…some pirates.

Little Blue!

Little Blue!

Donna and the pirates.

Donna and the pirates.

This one looks familiar.

This one looks familiar.

I am sure Queen La De Da had something to do with all this because it was some sort of significant pirate day.  (Talk Like a Pirate Day, I’ll bet.)

While sitting at Olde Towne,  I got a text from Donna that she had Blue over at Judy and Tom’s house.  I had finished my breakfast panini, gulped my coffee, and excused myself in haste so I could hustle home and meet the little pup.

Donna, Blue, and Tom

Donna, Blue, and Tom

Tiny little Blue looked lost in the lawn, which Tom had been unable to mow as often as usual due to weather.

Baby Blue

Baby Blue

After a long visit, during which Allan ambled down to join us (having just returned from the market), I harvested a few things from the garden.  I knew the pole of purple beans in the garden boat would most likely tip over in the wind.

long purple beans

long purple beans

Inspired by the meal yesterday at Himani Indian Cuisine, Allan wanted to make raita.  Maybe because I had found and emailed him a recipe.  So cilantro and mint and a cucumber were harvested for that.  And tomatoes for me and Judy.

The garden looked unkempt but I took most of the afternoon trying to muster the energy to weed three small sections.

sunflowers by the east fence

sunflowers by the east fence

Allan pointed out that when I had sent him out to retrieve Sheila’s hanging vase from  the shed wall after dark the previous evening,  I had neglected to tell him that the photo that reminded me of the vase also showed a big spider.  He noticed the spider when reading the blog later that night!

and the beautiful hanger made by Sheila (New Leaf Plants and Pottery)

vase from New Leaf Pottery…with spider

In the dark, he had gotten tangled up in the web.  Today, the spider was rebuilding.

determination

determination

I miss the vase but it cannot be up there during autumn winds.

A walk around the garden was in order just in case the predicted wind was terribly bad.

Aconitum in back garden

Aconitum in back garden

Verbena bonariensis

Verbena bonariensis

a very nice daylily

a very nice daylily

heavily flowering Fuchsias everywhere

profusely flowering Fuchsias everywhere

From the south end of the garden, I could see the two flags now flying over the port..

gale warning

gale warning

But we had only the slightest breeze and the evening was warm.

late afternoon light

late afternoon light, looking north from the bogsy wood

My usual garden companions had followed me all around.

Smokey

Smokey

(You can see how the back lawn is mostly creeping buttercup.)

Mary

Mary

She's Smokey's mom.

She’s Smokey’s mom.

Suddenly it seemed essential to have the first and possibly last campfire of the season!  I had checked last month with two VIFs (very important local firefighters) and learned that despite a county burn ban it was ok to have a small campfire in one’s own town garden.  Work, and blogging in the evening, had seemed to get in the way of having a fire until now.

At first the wood was steamy from yesterday’s rain.

steamy

steamy

But then it caught very nicely and we had hot dogs and smores for dinner.

a real campfire

a real campfire

Gunnera by the bogsy wood

Gunnera by the bogsy wood

Smokey thought the fire was a great idea.

my shoulder cat

my shoulder cat

During our fire time, not a breath of wind stirred the danger tree almost right overhead.  By next year’s campfire season, we will have dealt with this tree, if the storms don’t do it for us.  Then we won’t have to wait for completely windless nights, as they are rare here.

a quiet danger tree

a quiet danger tree

I collected some kindling from the bogsy wood.

I collected some kindling from the bogsy wood.

And we shared one tall beer featuring Deadliest Catch's Sig Hansen on the bottle.

And we shared one tall beer featuring Deadliest Catch’s Sig Hansen on the bottle.

I had sent last minute messages to Kelly and to Jenna before our spontaneous campfire.  Jenna did not get the message til the next day, and Kelly had to do something else.  We knew Judy and Tom were in for the evening, so it was just me and Allan and the cats…for most of the evening.

no company!

no company!

Light fades behind the alder grove.

Light fades behind the alder grove.

I had left two of the gates open in case Jenna and Don or Kelly showed up.  When it was good and dark and we were letting the fire die down, I looked over Allan’s shoulder and within three feet behind him stood a deer.  I just said “Oh my god!” while I considered whether or not a photo would capture the event and decided that the flash would make everything look too harsh.  “What, WHAT?” Allan exclaimed; “Don’t just say “Oh my GOD! What is it!?”  He later asked me if I had seen any horror movies lately.  I finally told him what was RIGHT behind him and stood up, and the deer scurried away down one of the paths.  A keystone cops in the dark chase ensued with two humans, two flashlights, two open gates and a deer that kept going round and round the dark paths.  We finally got it herded out the side gate to Nora’s driveway, and Allan made a circuit of the yard to make sure the deer had not brought a buddy.

The whole experience, including the deer’s visit, was so enjoyable I wish that we had done it more often.  Now we can only hope for a nice October evening with no wind (because of Danger Tree) to have one more campfire with company.

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Just outside the lower gate…golden hops has escaped the hedgerow and twines around my newspaper boxes.

golden hops

To the right of the lower gate, and orange lily seeks some room next to the tall wild impatiens (jewel weed, touch-me-not).  The jewel weed’s sap is good for nettle rash and insect bites.  Its flowers look like orchids. Its seeds leap out in a startling way when the seed pods are touched. It threatens to be on the noxious weed list, yet even though it seeds prolifically it is easy to pull.  I would not plant it next to a wild marsh, though.

jewelweed and lily

view from the gate

Ghilsane de Feligonde and Rosa palustris

Rose ‘Ghislaine de Feligonde‘ blooms profusely on the left side of the path.  I happened upon this rose quite accidentally when the owner of an old rose nursery north of Seattle suggested it to me.  He said I would be very happy with it.  It moved with me to the beach, twice before settling in our Ilwaco garden.  (And in 2010 it moved with us to our new Ilwaco garden.)

Behind it, up higher, blooms the pink Rosa palustris.  Palustris means ‘swampy or marshy’ so when I ran across this rose I knew it might grow well in the damp ground of the stream arbour gardens.  It is a once-blooming rose and puts on a good but not a very long show.

peachy daylily and rose

A peachy daylily accidentally echoes the colours of Ghislane.  A lot of perfect effects in my garden are unplanned.  I’d like to think I subconsciously knew what I was doing…but probably not.

The right fork of the path takes you past a stand of white aconitum (Monkshood) said to be deadly poisonous to the degree that you should take care to wash your hands after deadheading it.  They are usually known for coming in dark delphinium blue.  The coolest one I ever had was a metallic pale blue called ‘Stainless Steel’ but unfortunately I neglected it in a pot and lost it.  I must put it on my wish list.

monkshood

To the left of the gate, both the Allium abopilosum and the Anchusa have toppled…I haven’t had much time to weed, and might have reached in too hastily to untwine some pernicious bindweed.

Allium and Anchusa

In the upper garden across from the pond, a richly red lily blooms among tall perennials…

lily

…And that’s about all the time I had for my garden in July of 2009.

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