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Posts Tagged ‘Adrian Bloom’

Today at the Ilwaco Post Office, the Lollipop Asiatic lilies have popped open.  It is actually not my favourite lily, but I got them for free somewhere, a good price for a volunteer garden.  I will be donating my one remaining Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ because I realized this morning that the post office is lacking one.

Ilwaco post office

Ilwaco post office

We went to Basket Case to pick up three Erysimum for the Ilwaco planters, an Azara microphylla for Larry and Robert, a Lobelia tupa for our own garden, and some Dianthus for Jo’s garden.  I sorted out the Sanvitalia situation.

Sanvitalia, a favourite annual

Sanvitalia, a favourite annual

Sunbini and Aztec Gold

Sunbini and Aztec Gold

Of the two cultivars offered at the Basket Case, I think Sunbini is a little tougher and can hold up better in the truly challenging conditions of the Ilwaco street planters.

Next time we go to the Basket Case, I hope to have room to finally get two hanging baskets for our garden, now that we will have a little more time to water them.  (Who am I fooling? With three gardens to get ready for the garden tour, when will that extra time be?)

Petunia 'Pink Lemonade'

Petunia ‘Pink Lemonade’

Here are the plants I wish people would go buy because they need to be in the ground!  First, ALL the Agastaches would love to have their roots in the soil.  Then, the lovely Sidalcea is getting so tall it is bending over!

Sidalcea...a favourite of my grandma

Sidalcea…a favourite of my grandma

The Lobelia tupa is an exciting plant that it seems no one but me is buying because it is not flowering yet.  The two Brunnera, Looking Glass and Jack Frost are excellent for shade.

Brunneras

Brunneras

There are still some hardy geranium ‘Rozanne’ available.  It has won the Royal Horticultural Society award for plant of the century!  Inspired by Adrian Bloom’s  photo of his river of Rozanne, I now have my own Rozanne river in my garden.  I think one of the reasons I moved to our sunny lot was just so I COULD have a river of Rozanne.

Adrian's Rozanne river, my Rozanne river

Adrian’s Rozanne river, my Rozanne river

His is curving and I like the effect of the grasses so much that, now that I look at his photo, I think I might add some grasses on either side of mine.

On to work!  We had dithered away the morning with sleeping late because of rain, waiting for rain to stop, and shopping.  We had two big projects to accomplish today at Andersen’s RV Park.

At last, on the east side of the house semi-shade bed, my weeding project:

before

before

and after

and after

The west side of the house behind the office was Allan’s project:

before

before

after

after

Allan's before and after set

Allan’s before and after set

There is some newspaper under the mulch to try and keep the pernicious quack grass from coming back too quickly.  Both projects were mulched with Cow Fiber (dairy manure) from The Planter Box.

Meanwhile, energetic park staffer Al was looking for a project, too, so I showed him an awful place in the garden shed garden.  A trench had been dug last year for some sort of plumbing or electrical fix, and had never been filled in because I was never sure the fix-it project was done.  Now we were running out of time to get it looking nice by summer.  I suggested it could be covered with rock, not made back into a garden, and in an amazingly short time Al fixed it.

Al accomplished this in one hour.

Al accomplished this in one hour.

This is a good spot to be graveled because sometimes a rig is parked by here and has to hook up to electric and cable.  I could put a pot here if we ever need a plant in this area.  It was a wonderful quick fix to a very unsightly area, full of quack grass that would have taken back over with a vengeance had I tried to weed it and plant it.

Al also weeded a raised bed with three blueberries in it and has cheerfully agreed to add liquid fertilizer every ten days when it is his shift to water the assorted planters.

Here are some beautiful things:

Allan's photo of Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Allan’s photo of Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

I don’t know the name of the perennial poppy, below, that I got from Joy Creek nursery but it is just the sort of colour that Lorna most likes.

poppy

poppy

The picket fence garden today

The picket fence garden today

the poppy field, with Al walking by the back

the poppy field, with Al walking by the back

by the office

by the office

Agyranthemum 'Butterfly' and Petunia 'Pink Lemonade'

Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ and Petunia ‘Pink Lemonade’

A quite heavy rain came along at seven, so we went to dinner at the Depot Restaurant.  I had been anxious to see the garden, because I had been told that Susie of the Boreas Inn has taken Ciscoe by there to see it!  We had not checked on it over the weekend because our car was out of order, so I hoped it had looked good.  It did…till I got to the corner by the front door and found a big dead branch on the Cistus.  Oh no!   Allan lopped it off, and here it is, a great embarrassment, in our trailer.

It was really bringing down the tone.

It was really bringing down the tone.

Next Wednesday the Sisters on the Fly club will be at Andersen’s, and now that we have ALL the big clean up projects done at last, we just need one day to weed from one end of the gardens to the other and it will look spiffing.

Even more important, my friends Sheila and Harold will be staying at the park next month on garden tour weekend, and I want the gardens to be impeccable for that happy occasion!

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After a detailed viewing of each area and plant in Tom and Judy’s garden, Ann brought her garden club four doors east to walk through our garden.  We began with everyone smelling the peanut butter foliage fragrance of Melianthus major (South African honey bush) by the sidewalk fence.  (Some have dared to say it smells like old socks, but I tell you, it smells just like peanut butter!)

Melianthus major

Melianthus major

The tour of fragrance continued with the low, lemony smelling Santolina (lavender cotton) next to the driveway.  I realize that in many cases I will grow a quiet little plant specifically for its fragrance (although I also do love the look of Santolina’s silver, green or chartreuse foliage).

sniffing santolina

sniffing santolina

along the front path

along the front path

in the front garden

in the front garden

Foreground, above:  a tall Eryngium (sea holly) in blue, another Eryngium in silver-blue, and chartreuse Nicotiana langsdorfii.

between house and shed

Between house and shed…

several club members took photos of this scene,

several club members took photos of this scene.

“As I gaze upon the garden, my heart grows peaceful, still.

From its colour comes my being, from its spirit comes my will.”

I love putting that quotation by Ryan Gainey in my garden because his video called Creating the Romantic Garden was enormously influential in my choice to buy a garden of my own down here.  (Note: I need to write about that sometime.)

At left corner of photo above, you can see a gardener pausing to examine a “before” photo of the garden.

into the back garden

into the back garden

in the back garden

in the back garden

looking south at the river of hardy Geranium 'Rozanne'

looking south at the river of hardy Geranium ‘Rozanne’

My Rozanne river, inspired by a photograph in a lecture by Adrian Bloom at the Hardy Plant Society study weekend 2010, has been a big success in my garden, blooming from early June through October.  The slide showing Adrian’s own blue Rozanne river might have been why I decided I had to move from my old shady garden to this sunny one.

at the south end of the big flower beds

at the south end of the big flower beds

Everyone had to go past the fire circle to the bogsy woods and look at the fairy doors.

steps to a fairy door

steps to a fairy door

fire circle and bogsy woods

fire circle and bogsy woods

back to the driveway

back to the driveway

photography

photography

As we lingered in the front driveway, one of the club members photographed a frog on a flower…

Frog on Cosmos in front garden

Frog on Cosmos in front garden

Finally, Tom Hornbuckle took two photos of me and Judy; I had remembered them as being taken on post tour day (which is where I posted the other one), but now I realize that they were on this happy garden day.

gardening neighbours

gardening neighbours

It is a real bond being on the garden tour (a bond we also share with Ann of today’s garden club, whose garden was also on the Peninsula tour).  We worried about weeding, new plants, had we spent too much? (no doubt!) and what refreshments to serve, but it was all very worthwhile.

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