Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘agastache’

Monday, 22 July 2019

New cat Jazmin is still making my room her territory, still growling at the door and not ready to meet the other cats.

We had checked on the Ilwaco planters upon our return last night and found them wanting in moisture and even, here and there, a bit droopy.  So we reversed the polarity of the neutron flow and did Ilwaco watering first.  Almost unheard of because it’s better to water in the evening, and the parking is harder during the day. Allan had to do more walking with heavy buckets of water. (I think we will be giving up this planter job at the end of 2020. It is too hard on back and knees. Allan will be 68 by then.)

Ilwaco

We filled our 25 five gallon buckets with water at the boatyard and then I weeded and groomed the planters and street tree gardens while Allan applied the water.

at the boatyard

We took time to move the Saturday Market banner, which had been hung up behind a stately Panicum ‘Northwind’ while it was small.

 

Allan’s photo

Better to move the banner than have someone cut down the grass.

The thirstiest plant in the planters was golden oregano.

Allan’s photo

I had some success with calendula seeds under a street tree.

The Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ that I put in the center of each planter (economical for the city because they were free) are somewhat successful.  Deer spray has worked to protect them.  But some, in both sun and slight shade, have diseased leaves.

Per Google, probably powdery mildew. Maybe.  I will try improving the drainage in the affected planters with grit.  I had the same problem with a few purple leaved sedums last year.  Darn it.

Maybe they don’t like liquid fertilizer.

dahlias (not ours) at Ilwaco city hall

Long Beach

We picked up our check and tidied the garden at Long Beach city hall.

Long Beach City Hall

Uh-oh, we might need to lower that rhododendron so the sign shows.

Allan’s photo

elephant garlic, known in the city hall office as the Horton Hear a Who plant.

We moved the van to mid town and separated to water the street trees and some planters (Allan) and the rest of the planters (me).

I realized that I had to trim the police station roses (Rosa rugosa ‘Alba’) where they’d gotten too wide for the sidewalk.

My photos while watering:

Fifth Street Park east side

Tinkertown Mall (getting new paving)
Tigridia
new real estate office
sweet peas, Fifth Street Park west side

a handsome blue agastache

Speaking of agastaches, I was pleased to get this email from Annie’s Annuals: “…whether you say “Aga-STAK-ee” or “A-GAS-ta-key” (heck, you can even call it Aga-STASH and we won’t blink..”   I say A GAS ta key, on the advice of Bob Nold. This was the first other place where I have found that very proper pronunciation.  Even on Gardener’s World, the presenters say Agastashee…. or even Aga-stash. So I was glad to be vindicated.

I noticed another hidden sign, the new sign for the World’s End Pub.

This time it is Not My Problem (unlike the rhododendron at City Hall).

It will show from the intersection.  The pub, which will have a pirate theme, is not yet open.  I feel bad for them missing the summer trade.

Allan’s photos while watering:

golden fuchsia
Sanguisorba ‘Pink Elephant’, Geranium ‘Rozanne’

After watering the planters, we weeded half of the beach approach garden because the Sandsations sand sculpture event starts on Wednesday.  Allan took all the photos out there.

ANOTHER coreopsis pulled out, and not by deer.

I am sure the coreopsis are being pulled by people trying to pick the flowers.

wildflower seed success

Ilwaco

We returned to our Ilwaco watering with our volunteer gardens at the fire station and post office.

fire station
fire station east side, success with calendula and bachelor buttons from seeds and happy, healthy Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (same sedum divisions as I used in the Ilwaco planters)

 

Read Full Post »

Thursday, 23 July 2015

The Depot Restaurant

The Depot garden on north side of deck gets its weekly deadheading and supplemental watering.

The Depot garden on north side of deck gets its weekly deadheading and supplemental watering.

cosmos and (new this year) lilies

cosmos and (new this year) lilies

Cosmos and Gladiolus papilio

Cosmos and Gladiolus papilio

Gladiolus papilio

Gladiolus papilio

Depot east wall

Depot east wall

Long Beach welcome sign

The godetia at the sidewalk end are starting to decline, as they do.

The godetia at the sidewalk end are starting to decline, as they do.

front of sign

front of sign

Echibeckias are now joining with Agyranthemum 'Butterfly'

Echibeckias are now joining with Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’

I'm not sure what I think of that colour combo.

I’m not sure what I think of that colour combo.  Wish the Geranium ‘Rozanne’ would size up and cool it down with blue.

back of sign

back of sign

Anchorage Cottages

We do love a job where the watering is taken care of.

We do love a job where the watering is taken care of.

windowboxes and Crocosmia 'Lucifer' on east wall

windowboxes and Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ and cosmos on east wall

center courtyard

center courtyard

center courtyard with Nicotiana langsdorfii

center courtyard with Nicotiana langsdorfii

Tigridia and Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve

Tigridia and Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve

Solanum crispum 'Glasnevin'

Solanum crispum ‘Glasnevin’

colour coordinated lilies

colour coordinated trumpet lilies

lilysign

I don’t know the name of that particular lily and wish I did.  I probably got it from my mother’s garden.

lily2

lily3

Agastache 'Acapulco Salmon and Pink' by the office

Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’ by the office

Agastache 'Cotton Candy'

Agastache ‘Cotton Candy’ and cosmos and Nicotiana langsdorfii

Agastache 'Golden Jubilee' with Gaura 'So White' and Petunia 'Pretty Much Picasso'

Agastache ‘Golden Jubilee’ with Gaura ‘So White’ and Petunia ‘Pretty Much Picasso’

the successful sweet pea patch against east wall chimney

the successful sweet pea patch against east wall chimney

sweet peas

sweet peas

sweet peas

sweet peas

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

Long Beach

We watered all the planters and groomed Fifth Street Park.

Rose 'Super Dorothy' in Fifth Street Park

Rose ‘Super Dorothy’ in Fifth Street Park

Fifth Street Park with Basket Case Greenhouse basket

Fifth Street Park with Basket Case Greenhouse basket (watered and fertilized daily by city crew)

Fifth Street Park

Fifth Street Park

Fifth Street Park

Fifth Street Park

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

Lewis and Clark Square planter, looks perkier than when just re-planted yesterday.

Lewis and Clark Square planter, looks perkier than when just re-planted yesterday.

center newly planted

center newly planted

I pruned down the rhodo behind the wall so this new restaurant shows better.  (The top of the rhodo was looking windburnt and pitiful anyway.)

I pruned down the rhodo behind the wall so this new restaurant shows better. (The top of the rhodo was looking windburnt and pitiful anyway.)

I'm excited about a kabob house opening soon.

I’m excited about a kabob house opening soon.

Uh oh, the horsetail is already back at the Bolstadt pond.

Uh oh, the horsetail is already back at the Bolstad pond.

sign at NIVA green

sign at NIVA green

I was getting lots of compliments on the planters, and on the hanging baskets (which I always credit to Basket Case Nancy and the care of the city crew), so I was in a happy place on this day.

Geranium 'Rozanne'

Geranium ‘Rozanne’

Coulter Park

Coulter Park

'Hopley's Purple' oregano

‘Hopley’s Purple’ oregano

early evening light

early evening light

pink Salvia viridis and pink dahlia, Allan's photo

pink Salvia viridis and pink dahlia, Allan’s photo

We finished the workday with weeding and deadheading at the City Hall gardens.

lily by city hall entrance

lily by city hall entrance

Basket Case baskets

Basket Case baskets

hall2

I just had a revelation.  I have spelling Bolstad as “Bolstadt” lo these many years.  Ooops.  It’s far too late to go back and correct dozens of blog entries.

baskets

basket4

Allan's photo: hostas lace-leafed by snails

Allan’s photo: hostas lace-leafed by snails

City Hall west side

City Hall west side

Allan's photos: grooming a gladiolus

Allan’s photos: grooming a gladiolus

Allan's photos: making annual poppies look better by taking off old leaves

Allan’s photos: making annual poppies look better by taking off old leaves (because we want them to reseed); they are in front of the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

city hall lily

city hall lily

The Cove Restaurant

Ah, I’d been looking forward all week to our dinner with Melissa and Dave (Sea Star Landscape Maintenance) at The Cove.

Sondra's garden at The Cove

Sondra’s garden at The Cove

open doors to evening light

open doors to evening light

dinner salad

dinner salad

strawberry salad

strawberry salad

Melissa's noodle bowl

Melissa’s noodle bowl

ahi tuna for me, of course

ahi tuna for me, of course

scrumptious cannolo for dessert

scrumptious cannolo for dessert

PLC (Parking Lot Cat)

PLC (Parking Lot Cat)

We enjoy having this Thursday tradition, and Allan and I were ready for our new-this-year tradition of three days off.

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

bonus post: Sunday, 28 June 2015

I didn’t want to sully the beauty of the Jane Platt garden with the trauma of our parking before the tour, so have added this last bonus post.  (I keep this record for myself and don’t really expect anyone to read two posts a day.) The Jane Platt garden entrance is on a curvy road, with a private road up a steep hill to a parking lot by the garden entrance. Because that lot was full, the volunteers on the main road told us to park by a blind curve, facing the wrong way, where a car had just pulled out.  I don’t blame them at all; they had just arrived and were unprepared for the situation.  Unlike an earlier tour garden on a curvy road, there were no cones or signs to slow traffic down.  After considerable trauma (mine) and turning around (scary!!) a bit further down the road after pulling out on the blind curve (ACK!), we parked facing the right way.  Then a red Miata came roaring around the corner at top speed and veered toward the middle of the road, and sped past with a roar.  I had already gotten out of the van and hobbled, with my cane, down between two parked cars, or it would have taken me out.   Panic: How can I cross the road, with a cane, if cars might come that fast?  I still find is disconcerting to not be able to move fast.  I used to walk so fast that random men in downtown Seattle would make fun of me (for not walking like they thought a woman should, I guess).

We were between two blind curves.  I managed, because I had to, to cross the road (feeling like a chicken), and then the volunteers let Allan bring the van and drive us up the steep narrow road to the actual parking lot, because another touring vehicle had left.  (They said they should have had traffic cones and signs.) All through the beginning of the garden I was in a tizzy about that red car, and filled with dread about leaving again.  I encountered Jeanne, and bent her ear about it, and realized I was spoiling the tranquility of the garden so did my best to unwind and enjoy it…quietly.  (I was told that way up in the quiet Platt garden, people had heard that red car roar by like a race car and wondered what was going in.)

After touring the garden, we left and the volunteers at the top of the narrow road told us no one was coming up.

the drive down to the public road (Allan's photo)

the drive down to the public road (Allan’s photo)

 When we got to the bottom, another car was turning in to go up, and the volunteers were on the walkie talkie saying “Why didn’t you tell us someone was coming down!”  I was terrified to have Allan turn left, in front of the blind turn, so we turned right.  The previous day, when I had asked Todd if route 26 home would be closer to today’s gardens, he had said “Just don’t get lost in the west hills; it’s bad there.”  Well, sure enough, we did get lost.

where we were

where we were

Or sort of lost.  The GPS thought it had the right idea and took us all around those curves at the lower right.  I kept saying “Ignore the GPS!  Go down! Down!!!!” thinking if we followed the main downhill road, eventually we would come out somewhere level.  (We would have, somewhere around 405 and I-5 closer to Portland.) Instead, we kept circling up! up! until we went right by the Platt road again heading the other way.

Around about that time, a text from Todd arrived.  (He had been touring ahead of us that day.)  It said “Road curvy to Platt garden and if out of parking walk up the driveway.”  This warning had been floating in the ether and arrived too late.

I have never, ever been so glad to head west again on the Sunset Highway toward the coast.

I told Allan I would pay for the plants he’d bought over the weekend, to make up for the screaming.

leaving the heat of Portland behind...

leaving the heat of Portland behind…

over the coast range...

over the coast range…

back to delicious beach weather

back to delicious beach weather

We stopped at Fred Mayer in Warrenton (almost home!) to buy milk.  I discovered that they had really good plants.  Somehow, I was determined to fit them into the van.

Agastache 'Golden Jubilee' for only $1.79!

penstemons

penstemons

I filled my cart with gallons sized penstemons and agastaches that were only about $6 each.

I filled my cart with gallons sized penstemons and agastaches that were only about $6 each.

I was inspired by Evelyn Haddon’s lecture about Hellstrip Gardening to add more colour to the port gardens, and decided to donate some plants (and, of course, keep some for my own garden).

mine

I managed to get the plants loaded into the van, telling Allan to let me open the side door so I could grab the ones that might fall out.

crossing the Astoria bridge with the Long Beach Peninsula in sight

crossing the Astoria bridge with the Long Beach Peninsula in sight

We took a drive around the Port of Ilwaco just to make sure the plants were holding up all right, so that we could sleep in the next day before going out to water.

the coastal sky

the coastal sky over our bogsy woods, from the port

sky over the boat storage yard

sky over the boat storage yard

sunset from our very own driveway

sunset from our very own driveway

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

 

 

Read Full Post »

August 11, 2013

I got up early, invigorated by the idea of tour day, and I do mean at about 8 AM.  The night before, I had made tabouli which I dressed up with all sorts of vegetables from my garden: cucumber, tomatoes, chives, cilantro on the side, and edible flowers:  Calendula, tuberous begonia, borage, chive flowers.  We had some lemon water to offer, and Allan had bought some animal crackers but forgot to put them out. Brownies (and Allan’s favourite, red licorice) did not seem quite right to offer on a serious and healthy edible garden tour.

a welcoming table

a welcoming table

I arranged some samples of edible flowers on plates, an idea I swiped from last year’s edible tour at Lisa Mattfield’s Homewood garden.

edible flowers

edible flowers

On the shed wall across from the tabouli table:

Let's see, what's edible?  Fuchsia flowers, and a Stevia to the right

Let’s see, what’s edible? Fuchsia flowers, and a Stevia to the right

The beautiful wall vase was made by my friend Sheila, who brought it to me when she came from Oregon for the Music in the Gardens tour.

wall vase

wall vase

In the remaining time before noon,  I rushed around pulling a few more weeds and wishing again that we had run the string trimmer around the garden beds…

I thought Pam Fleming from my favourite local collectors’ nursery, Back Alley Gardens in Gearhart, might come and was feeling the garden was not at its required tour perfection…

I put out some of my favourite garden books, this time mostly ones with an edible theme (Winter Gardening in the Maritime Northwest, The Bountiful Container).  Even though it is purely ornamental, I did simply have to put out my very favourite garden book, Shocking Beauty by Thomas Hobbs.  And I hung at the gate a print of the cover of the Beverly Nichols’ book, Garden Open Today.

garden open today

garden open today!

My garden was looking much more ornamental than edible….

garden boat (The "Ann Lovejoy") with cosmos and elephant garlic.

garden boat (The “Ann Lovejoy”) with cosmos and elephant garlic.

But I had gone to great effort to grow salad greens in containers all over the garden.

salad containers, background

salad containers in background

It really is an ornamental garden, though; there is just no denying that.  Lisa really had wanted us to be on the tour, and I did my best…

In the greenhouse, I had tomatoes from The Planter Box, The Basket Case, and the River Rock Farm booth at Long Beach’s Columbia Pacific Farmers Market.

in the greenhouse

in the greenhouse

lavender as one enters the back yard

lavender as one enters the back yard

encouragement to smell scented geraniums, etc

encouragement to smell scented geraniums, etc

laundry lines and raspberries

laundry lines and raspberries

my grandma's embroidered pillowcases

my grandma’s embroidered pillowcases

one of four corn plants, and potatoes on the debris pile

one of four corn plants, and potatoes on the debris pile

veg box

veg box

To have more edibles with little open ground available, I had planted some drawers with autumn crops of kale, and labeled them.  Kale is ornamental as well as edible.  I could have just labeled them and not even planted the seeds! But the seeds are in there, I guarantee it.

Let the tour begin!!

Local jobbing gardener Diana Canto and her dog Lucy were first to arrive just after the tour start time of noon.  Diana is the gardener who created the Bristol garden, featured on the Music in the Gardens tour.

Diana and Lucy

Diana and Lucy

Soon after, Nancy (Music in the Gardens tour organizer) and Phil Allen arrived.

Phil, Nancy, Lucy, Diana

Phil, Nancy, Lucy, Diana

group

Phil, Nancy, Diana, and I

Phil, Nancy, Diana, Lucy, and I

in the distance, tour guests

in the distance, tour guests

Our friend Sarah Sloane, local author (of the charming children’s book The Marble Game) and topiary artist, came early.  I showed her the topiary that she gave me last year and said “I have been clipping on him”.  “Hand me the scissors!” she said, and went to work.

sarah3

Sarah Sloane

Sarah Sloane

s3

More people came, in fact we had quite a rush of about 18 people in the first hour and fifteen minutes!

tour guests

tour guests as Sarah clips  the topiary bird

Ann Gaddy came to see the garden.  I was thrilled to meet her.  Her father, Pete Hanner, is the one who told the story about my garden at my neighbour, Nora’s, funeral earlier this year…  Ann intends to bring Pete sometime soon, and I look forward to seeing him again.

 Ann Gaddy in the garden
enjoying Ann's company

enjoying Ann’s company

We had “met” on Facebook but not in person before this day.  Note Frosty, above, in the background watching from his cat perch.

Sarah, me, and Ann

Sarah, me, and Ann

One man turned out to be very interested in biochar.  I told him he and Jim Karnofski would have a lot to talk about, and he said he was going to Jim and Vera’s Biocharm Farm next.  He had been to a national bochar conference of some sort recently.  I hope he and Jim had a great time having a discussion on the subject.  As Mr. Tootlepedal (one of my two favourite bloggers of all time, the other being Mary Ruston of Moosey’s Country Garden) commented on my photos of Jim and Vera’s veg, “A very good advertisement for his methods.”

Another man introduced himself as from Astoria.  In conversation, I realized he had had his garden on the Astoria garden tour before, and I had been there.  It is in this blog entry as the Wigutoff garden, a lovely front garden that leads up to a deck with a Columbia River view, and had more edibles than I do, as I recall.  Unfortunately it was written when I used smaller photos on my blog (and before my great computer crash where I lost all original photos from 2010-12).  (Yes, I have a better back up system now!)

I believe this is Mr. Wigutoff from Astoria.

I believe this is Mr. Wigutoff from Astoria.

I have no idea why there is a corkscrew next to The Intelligent Gardener book.  I swear I was not boozing during the garden tour!  I have my phone out because am looking up Mr. Wigutoff’s garden on my blog.  (Allan tells me the corkscrew was to open his own bottle of Mexican soda pop.)

A young couple passing by on the street had asked early in the tour (which began at noon) if they could come in just to see our garden.  They had sailed down from Alaska in their boat and were docked at the marina.  Of course, we said yes.  They wandered appreciatively through the entire garden and I think they stayed for over an hour.

I showed the woman the way the seeds of the Impatiens balsamina jump when you touch a ripe pod (which is why it’s common name is Touch Me Not and why it is a class 2 noxious weed….ooops).

She's about to test out a seedpod.

She’s about to test out a seedpod.

laughter as it pops

laughter as it pops

Something about her smile and her voice convinced me I had met her before, but that was impossible.  She must have strongly reminded me of someone.  Her partner took a great interest in the cats.

cat

Frosty loved the attention.

Frosty loved the attention.

I wish them both smooth sailing and hope touring our garden gave them a fond memory of Ilwaco.

Debbie Haugsten came with her friend Charlene.  They arrived at the peak of the early guests, so we did not have time to visit.  Later, due to my face blindness, I thought maybe she had been with Helen Westbrook (whose fabulous Astoria garden I like to visit) but Debbie helped me sort it out later….

Debbie and Charlene

Debbie and Charlene

charlene

The two Colleens from Peninsula Landscape Supply arrived and stayed for awhile.

Sarah and Colleen

Sarah and Colleen

Not only was I happy to see them but I also was glad they could meet Sarah.  I think the topiaries would be a great addition to the stock at Colleen’s garden center.

And then, after they left, there was….no one else!   Sarah kept clipping the topiary as we visited on the patio.  Allan got discouraged after awhile and put the tabouli salad away.  He made us a lunch of chili and mandarin oranges (a house specialty that Sarah enjoyed).  After awhile, thank goodness, Judy came  from her garden four doors down to see how the tour was going and kept us company for awhile.

Allan noticed that Sarah’s dogs were in the car, so we invited them both in.

patiently waiting

patiently waiting

Judy loves little dogs.  They provided much entertainment as we continued to wait and marvel at the lack of tour guests.  These two dogs won the obedience trial at the Doggie Olympic Games in Long Beach earlier this year and they performed some cute tricks for us.

Judy

They liked Judy very much!

They liked Judy very much!

The tour was due to end at five;  Sarah and Judy had left by about four.  The bird was re-shaped to Sarah’s satisfaction.

an excellent bird

an excellent bird

I have to admit that I was kind of let down when my friends had departed.  I did not expect the 500 people who had come through on Music in the Gardens tour 2012, but I was hoping for at least 50!  I walked through the garden taking some photos of it while it was in such excellent condition (and pulled a few more weeds on the way).

That one spot of lawn always gets brown.

That one spot of lawn always gets brown.

archway to back garden

archway to back garden with Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’

entering the back garden....This is where folks always exclaim they did not know it was so big.

entering the back garden….This is where folks always exclaim they did not know it was so big.

elephant garlic

elephant garlic

Leycesteria 'Golden Lanterns'

Leycesteria ‘Golden Lanterns’

cat bench

I had been worried all the lilies would be done by tour day, but there were still plenty of them.

lilies

lilies

Eryngium and lilies

Eryngium and lilies

more lilies

more lilies

afternoon light on the garden boat

afternoon light on the garden boat

blue Agastache

blue Agastache (hyssop) and Eupatorium (Joe Pye Weed)

Verbascum 'Eleanor's Blush'

Verbascum ‘Eleanor’s Blush’

Geranium 'Rozanne' river from the side

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ river from the side

my flock of chickens

my flock of chickens by the garden boat

Sheesh, not only is my garden not full of edibles, but I don’t even have real chickens!

more Agastache because I love them.

more Agastache because I love them.

by the bogsy wood, many empty chairs...

by the bogsy wood, many empty chairs…

by the edge of the bogsy wood....Hey, salmonberry groves have edible berries!

by the edge of the bogsy wood….Hey, salmonberry groves have edible berries!

weeded woodsy edge with before photos clipped to  branches

weeded woodsy edge with before photos clipped to branches

into the bogsy woods

into the bogsy wood at the south end of the lot

same area as above in November 2010

same area as above in November 2010

looking north from the bogsy wood

looking north from the bogsy wood

looking west

looking west

Gunnera

Gunnera

salmonberry tunnel

salmonberry tunnel

plant table inspired by George Schenk

plant table inspired by George Schenk

another well weeded bogsy wood area

a well weeded bogsy wood area

Oh well, it IS nice to have the garden almost perfect on occasion!

fairy door with market basket; the fairies have gathered their "edibles"

fairy door with market basket; the fairies have gathered their “edibles”

another fairy dwelling

another fairy dwelling

Judy’s son said the fairies do not need stairs because they can fly.  But they DO need stairs for their pet frogs.

from the bridge over the swale, looking west

from the bridge over the swale, looking west

fish in the well weeded swale

fish in the well weeded swale

south edge, inside fence, looking east.  The property goes further south outside the fence.

south edge, inside fence, looking east. The property goes further south outside the fence.

Emerging from the bogsy wood, I photographed my way up the west side path.

looking north

looking north

beside the shade garden

beside the shade garden

blue

blue bottle hanger from The Natural Nook in Gearhart

blue bottle hanger from The Natural Nook in Gearhart

Fuchsia magellanica

Fuchsia magellanica and purple trunks of old camellia

before photo of the camellia which is now just purple painted trunks

before photo (with no garden) of the camellia which is now just purple painted trunks . Nov 2010

looking back south

looking back south

walking north into the sun

walking north into the sun

And then….JOY!  Another garden guest arrived!  She was a member of The Mozart Chicks quintet who had performed at Pink Poppy Farm on Music in the Gardens tour day and had reprised their performance with a trio during the edible tour!

a musician in our garden

a musician in our garden

I walked around with her, and as she left, Pam and Kathy from Back Alley Gardens and The Natural Nook in Gearhart arrived.  More joy.  I really had been rather glum about having only nineteen people so far (and pretty much all of them in the first hour with three hours in between having no new arrivals).

Pam Fleming  and Kathy Cates

Pam Fleming and Kathy Cates

We walked all around every inch of the garden, which was most satisfactory and made my day.  Pam told us that she and Kathy had not known where our street, which is one block south of the main drag through Ilwaco, was.  I am so used to people having a GPS that I never thought to make sure the program had more specific directions.  Because of their determination to visit us, they turned back when they realized they were heading east out of Ilwaco.  But what was worse was that Adelaide’s Coffee in Ocean Park, the northernmost ticket sales point, had been CLOSED.  CLOSED on Sunday?  On tour day???  Which is when most people buy tickets???  When their hours say they are OPEN on Sundays?  Why had they agreed to sell tickets at all????  I found out later that they had told Lisa, the tour organizer, a few days before that they would be closed that day.  Whatever the emergency was, if there was one, my mind is still boggled that this happened.  How many other people might have tried to buy tickets and then given up and done something else with their day?

Because of this fiasco and having to drive back south to buy tickets at Jimella and Nanci’s Café in Klipsan, the only two gardens that Pam and Kathy visited other than ours was Pink Poppy Farm and the Millner Garden.  They loved Pink Poppy Farm…who wouldn’t? and Pam raved about a pink drink with Shiso (Perilla, a Japanese herb)….somehow the Shisho made the drink a gorgeous pink colour.  Then they went to the Millner garden at the Planter Box.  Pam was so taken with Ray Millner’s talk about the health benefits of his garden that she had made a movie of him with her iPad to show to Back Alley plantswoman Prissy.

Pam taking an iPad photo

Pam taking an iPad photo

We sat in the patio and talking about gardening, especially public gardening.   (Pam does the gorgeous Seaside, Oregon gardens and I have admired her work for years.)  Allan brought the tabouli salad back out.  Time passed.  Pam played us a bit of the video of Ray Millner.    They were thinking of stopping by Painted Lady Lavender Farm for the very end of the Beach Bellydance Festival but we kept nattering on.  (Last year the festival was beautiful and I was sorry to have missed it this year.)  By the time they departed, they decided to skip the festival.  On the way out, we all had a good look at Allan’s garden, especially his unidentified mystery fern.

Kathy and the mystery fern

Kathy and the mystery fern

One more guest wanted to come in, but by now the tour was over….

Onyx from next door

Onyx from next door

…except for Vera and Jim Karnofski who came up from Biocharm Farm to bring us the big tour sign to return to Lisa the next day.    We walked all around with them, and they took some tabouli with them to eat later.

I had emailed Nancy Allen to bemoan we had only had 23 people.  She responded:  “Phil told me I shouldn’t tell you Andrea had 130” [at the Patten edible garden].   I believed it for about two minutes and thought that many many people had been unable to find our address!  It tied in with Pam and Kathy having told me that they heard the Pink Poppy Farm-ers were surprised they had so many people.  But it turned out that the 27 people that they did get seemed to them like quite a few for the edible tour (that only got 20 people in 2012!)

This tour needs a better attendance, especially since it is a benefit for the food bank.  We have the Facebook page now, and had some good publicity in both the Chinook Observer (local weekly paper) and the Daily Astorian.  Next year we need to get a promo on the public radio.  The tickets are extremely reasonable:  $7 or 5 cans of food for the food bank.  I hope it is just not that people (like me) are more interested in purely ornamental garden tours….but I won’t pass up the chance to tour any kind of garden.

Read Full Post »

Some of the flowers that were in bloom on Peninsula garden tour day, July 21st 2012, through further garden open days until August 10th:

Lily 'Landini'

Lily ‘Landini’

Nicotiana langsdorfiiCampanula 'Pink Octopus'

Nicotiana langsdorfii
Campanula ‘Pink Octopus’

lily

lily

I get lilies for several catalogs…and in bags at Costco…so am terrible at remembering the names.

Clematis 'Etoile de Violette'

Clematis ‘Etoile de Violette’

flower mix

flower mix

left to right:  Lychnis coronaria (rose campion), Valerian, some nasturtiums from where I threw fall clippings onto this bed, daisies in the background

flowers

flowers

California poppies, Astilbe, Agastache, Stipa gigantea, Joe Pye weed…just a nice haze of flowers

Artemisia 'Powis Castle' with Eryngium

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ with Eryngium

poppies

poppies

I got lots of poppies from the One Stop Poppy Shoppe., including the one above (with cosmos).

Papaver rhoeas

Papaver rhoeas

Papaver paeoniflorum

Papaver paeoniflorum

black peony poppy

black peony poppy

lily

lily

Melianthus major and lily

Melianthus major and lily

Cosmos

Cosmos with tree frog

Agastache and lily

Agastache and lily

I went crazy for Agastaches in 2012 and got wonderful local nursery The Basket Case Greenhouse to order many different cultivars from Blooming Nursery.

fuchsia container

fuchsia container

I can’t remember the name of the cute little annual, above…but I got it from Back Alley Gardens.

begonia and coleus

begonia and coleus from Basket Case Nursery

back garden

back garden

Above, Eryngium, Echinops (blue globe thistle) poppies, nasturtiums, Verbena bonariensis

poppy and lily

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’, annual corn poppy and lily

lily

lily

This yellow and white lily was from a Costco bag and filled the garden with extraordinary fragrance in early August evenings.

lily and sambucus

lily and Sambucus ‘Sutherland Gold’

I ran the bag of lilies all down the back garden in the big east side bed.

matching rose and hardy gladiolus...accidental!

matching rose and hardy gladiolus…accidental!

detail with the new rose

detail with the new rose

Now it is time to leave our own garden for awhile and get on with sharing the other wonderful gardens that were on the 2012 garden tour.

Read Full Post »