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Posts Tagged ‘Anchorage Cottages’

Tuesday, 5 Sept 2017

The grim and hateful news that protection is in jeopardy for young Dreamers (children of undocumented immigrants, teenagers and young adults who grew up here, knowing no other country) cast a pall over the day even though it was expected.  We hope this gets sorted out in the next six months.  We are proud of our state of Washington, which is resisting this decision. As President Obama said today, “This is about whether we are a people who kick hopeful young strivers out of America, or whether we treat them the way we’d want our own kids to be treated. It’s about who we are as a people — and who we want to be.”

Allan and I have already helped pay the rent, as did other concerned locals, for a local family with children, whose breadwinner (a well respected community-minded man with no criminal record) was arrested by immigration authorities, and we will continue to help in that way as much as we can.

Today we did the job routine that has become our Wednesday rounds, in order to get as much if not all work polished off before Rod Run Friday. I like to have that day free to mentally rev up for photographing the Slow Drag at the Port of Ilwaco.

ash on a spider web from wildfires way upriver (Allan’s photo)

The Depot Restaurant

the usual watering and deadheading and weeding…

north side of Depot deck


Cornus ‘Hedgerows Gold’ and Eryngium

The Red Barn Arena

also the usual watering and deadheading and weeding…

near the garden (Allan’s photo)

Diane’s garden

The usual weeding and deadheading and a bit of supplemental watering….

I was pleased that the new planting from last week had made it through the heat. (Allan’s photo)


belly rub for Misty


a different angle on the garden

My good friend Misty.

These, or at least some of them, are going onto the new septic raised garden soon.  Even in this shady corner, they were rich with bees.


Holly was on the front porch (Allan’s photo)


roadside garden


Cosmos (‘Daydream’, maybe)

Long Beach intermission

We drove west again to Long Beach to buy a chrysanthemum at Dennis Company (Basket Case is closed Tuesdays), pick up our check, and make a bank deposit.

Yesterday, I photographed almost all of the Long Beach planters after the sun disappeared behind a smoke haze and a lot of flowers had closed up.  Today, I photographed this one to compare in bright light.

yesterday, flowers closed because of dim light


today


City Hall north side. Allan picked the yellow leaves off of the rhododendron.


Basket Case Greenhouse baskets.

I am flummoxed by a new lens spot that is not responding to cleaning.  It is sort of funny how many pocket cams we own, each with some sort of flaw.

The Anchorage Cottages

We learned from the housekeeper, while doing the usual weeding and deadheading (but not watering)  that the most asked about plant right now is Leycesteria formosa.  She wanted an ID.  I gave her the common name and the info that the berries are edible and taste like burnt caramel, but with a bitter aftertaste.

Leycesteria formosa (Himalayan honeysuckle)


Leycesteria formosa

I also showed her how the Melianthus major in the center courtyard smells like peanut butter.

center courtyard


Melianthus major

And I showed her that the petals of yellow tuberous begonias taste like lemon.

tuberous begonia

The chocolate cosmos is already a regular feature at the Anchorage, and I promised that next year I would try to add a 7 Up plant (Stachys ‘Hidalgo’) to the array.

In deadheading the sweet peas, I saw this:

It was suggested that this might be the frog who lives in the key box (where guests are no longer allowed to drop their keys) but no, I looked…

key box frog is still there


Fuchsia ‘Hawkshead’

window box from indoors (Allan’s photo)


Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ seeds mimicking the rope in the sign

I asked Allan to take the tatty old painted sage out of a pot and replace them with a chrysanthemum.

Allan’s photos

 Because I said sage and not sages, he left the white one in.  I pulled it, leaving the chrysanth off center.  Oh well!

Klipsan Beach Cottages

When we arrived at KBC, a guest had just checked in for a brief stay and introduced herself as a blog reader!  She was Dawn, sister of Debbie W who comments regularly, and although I had met both of them while touring recently near Menlo, my face blindness kept me from recognizing her.  It was a delight to see her at KBC (which she had read about on the blog, and had visited years ago).

me and Dawn: Hi, Debbie!

Allan and I did the usual deadheading and grooming and weeding, with no need to water (We love that!)

looking in the east gate


the bird bath view

After yesterday’s daytime scorching heat and evening wind, lots of leaves and fir needles had fallen into the garden.

Mary raking the paths


in the fenced garden


one of Mary’s roses


All summer I pull Japanese anemones, and then I love them when they bloom.


Podophyllum (Allan’s photo)


Bella on the lawn (Allan’s photo)


Bella in the basement as we left (Allan’s photo)

Port of Ilwaco

We decided to get a head start on tomorrow’s work by watering and weeding along Howerton Avenue at the Port, starting at the east end.

When we arrived home to pick up another hose, we found a shocking sight.  Our quiet, bucolic, country-feeling street had been painted with bright lines.  I do not like it.  Allan thinks it is going to speed up traffic instead of making it safer.

the way it used to be


now

Since the double yellow line means no passing, a traffic cop could write tickets all day three blocks west at the post office, where passing and U turns are frequent.  When I kvetched about it on Facebook, I learned that other residents (just some that I know) are also not thrilled.  We wished we had been asked or notified. It is what it is now.  (We learned the next day that the Department of Transportation done-it.) There is not enough paint remover to take us back in time.

It cheered me up to pet Rudder from next door.

At the east end of Howerton Avenue, I made the radical decision to simply skip watering the easternmost bed.  Some rain is predicted for later this week—not much, but enough to help this quite drought tolerant bed.  I think my snap decision was influenced by feeling disgruntled about the street painting job.

east end bed


Yesterday’s heat scorched even the armeria (sea thrift); watering today will not fix that.

If we get no rain, we will have to break down and water this garden on Friday.  It is the most difficult and requires the longest hose length.

We found a rock in a garden bed further west:

As I walked along weeding, I made mental note of plants I want to move in the fall, like this Miscanthus ‘Gold Bar’ that is languishing in the bed by the Fort George Brewery office.

sad Miscanthus ‘Gold Bar’

Further down the street, in my favourite bed, the same grass is doing much better.

by the Ilwaco pavilion, more sheltered from wind


a happier Miscanthus ‘Gold Bar’

I am not doing much clipping back today.  I want as much plant growth as possible in all the beds to keep people from standing upon them during Friday evening’s Slow Drag.

The drive-over garden has knit together again.


Port Office garden


low tide with haze, possibly from wildfire smoke upriver mixed with fog


can’t see the hills to the east at all


Howerton Ave: smoke or fog? We could smell smoke, faintly. (Allan’s photo)

Our friends in Portland and Olympia are experiencing heavy smoke and falling ash from the fire east of Portland in the beloved wilderness area of the Columbia River Gorge.  Some photos: here, and here (before) and here.

We left off at Time Enough books and will do the rest of the watering tomorrow afternoon and evening.

 

 

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Tuesday, 29 August 2017

front path before leaving for work

This could have been an all Ilwaco day, had I not wanted to get a head start on tomorrow.  We have some planting to do at Diane’s garden, and I’m not sure how long it will take, so best to get ahead by getting other jobs done today.

On the way out of town, we noted to our sorrow that the street sweeper had knocked out the patch of volunteer poppies that Allan has been nurturing all summer.

poppies reseeded in the street, at sunset last night

today 😦

But wait.  If that was a mechanical street sweeper truck, why did it leave cigarette butts and all?

We delivered our B&O tax form belatedly to Ilwaco City Hall.  It is such an easy form to do; why do I put it off?

Allan noticed this showy nasturtium in a city hall planter.

The Depot Restaurant

after watering

‘Fireworks’ goldenrod hints of autumn.

I hope folks parking here in the evening have enjoyed the scent of Nicotiana ‘Fragrant Cloud’.

Petunia ‘Pretty Much Picasso’ and gold sweet potato vine, combined by Basket Case Greenhouse Roxanne.

spoon petaled African Daisy (osteospermum) in purple…

and white

Long Beach

I belatedly delivered our B&O tax to city hall.

Meanwhile, Allan did some clipping of lambs ears on the west side of city hall.

before and after

Stachys byzantina ‘Silver Carpet’ does not have many blooms, which can be an advantage if all you want is the soft silver foliage.

City Hall west side

There is much crocosmia to pull in the narrow part of the garden (not planted by us! I have almost totally gone off planting Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’).

Meanwhile, I did some sightline pruning in the wee popout a block north of city hall, where a maple that was once planted, then cut down by the city crew for sightline reasons, is returning in a bushy way.

before

after?

really after

That area gets no supplemental water so is pretty sparse.  I now think I should make that determined maple into a wee rounded shrub.

The Anchorage Cottages

Apparently I had sight lines on my mind.  When we had to park by the street below the Anchorage Cottages (due to a big truck in the parking lot), I got the urge to “lift” a tree to make for a better view of the road for folks leaving the resort.

before, looking toward the Anchorage exit

after

Mitzu comes to see what’s what (Allan’s photo)

Mitzu supervising

debris from two trees whose branches I clipped

I’m glad the soft foliage of chameacyparis is set well back from the street.

I then joined Allan in weeding and deadheading by the cottages.

center courtyard

Melianthus major

Note to self: The soil looks thin again, mulch it this fall.

Allan found a painted rock, from a “rocks” group in Pocatello, Idaho.

a late Tigridia (Allan’s photo)

north end of courtyard: Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ and Hebe ‘Quicksilver’ looking grand.

south end of courtyard: same two plants, not so great

Soon the row of seeds from Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ will look a lot like the rope in the painting.  I planned that (not).

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer” seedheads mimicking the rope in the sign in a previous year

Ilwaco

We stopped at home to get the long hose for watering the east end curbside garden at the port.  I could see so much that needs doing in my own blown-about garden.  My foot hurt so I knew I would be doing none of it at the end of the day.

so much dead-leafing to do.

We watered at the port, Allan at the east end and me at the west.

east end garden (Allan’s photo)

I look forward to some rain and to not having to drag hose down the sidewalk.  Just when I was feeling quite tired and sore whilst watering in front of Time Enough Books, a woman came up to me and asked if I wanted any Shasta daisy seeds that she had in her car.  I said no, because they don’t do well in this dry gardens.  Seeing the cosmos in the boat planter, she told me that they were a favourite of her mothers. Then she kindly offered me a large paper cup of sweet tea that she had just bought at McDonalds in Long Beach.  I said no, because it would make me have to pee.  (Well, it would, which is a problem when busy gardening!)  She laughed and said she was prepared for me, though, and she reached into her bag and handed me this present!

So thank you, Christina from Nemah, who is clearly on a mission to spread joy wherever she goes.

looking east from Time Enough Books…

…and looking west

Minutes later, a fellow walked by with a black lab.  Of course, I wanted to pet the dog, and learned his name was Tai and that “he can spell!” said the man.  He then showed Tai a treat and spelled out “S-P-I-N” and Tai spun around.  Next came “S-I-T” and Tai sat.

Then “W-A-I-T” and Tai waited while his guy walked away.  Tai joined him by the green metal box (background in above photo) and the man spelled “J-U-M-P” and Tai jumped up onto the box.  All three of us were delighted.  Tai still had soft puppy-like fur.

Allan joined me at the west end by the Freedom Market, where I watered while he ran the string trimmer down the sidewalk edge.

before and after: Can you tell the difference?

Tai came by again

I still wanted to do a garden along the bark strip by Freedom Market, where in midsummer almost all the plant starts (which were not many) that I had put in there were stolen. Another problem is that people walk through the bark area.  Maybe, thought I, I could plant just around the two existing roses.

would look nice with some flowers

I think I have given up on this idea after this evening, when I saw two young male customers run right through between the roses, where one tiny yarrow start remains, and vault the log.

If that’s a path, too, I think I give up!

Or….maybe I’ll try planting Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ and see what happens.

Our neighbour Devery arrived home at the same time we did.  Her dog, my little friend Royal, got very excited.

How much is that doggy in the window? The one with the beautiful tail!

As predicted to myself, my foot hurt so I got no evening gardening done except for watering essential potted plants.  I hope for lots of gardening energy when the weekend days off arrive.

Here’s a text that arrived today from Todd, showing his new puppy on the job.

Todd’s photo of baby Ansel! (black and white dog/Ansel Adams)

I have not yet met this pup and hope to remedy that soon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday, 23 August 2017

Yesterday, I noticed some disturbing wilting on the Eleagnus ‘Quicksilver’ by the garage.  I posted a couple of photos to Facebook this morning….

By the time we got to our first job, Ann Lovejoy had replied that it might be verticillium wilt. (One of the greatest things about Facebook is being Facebook friends with gardeners I admire.)  Anxious Googling ensued.  Turns out this is all too common a disease.  I’m amazed now that I’ve escaped having it in all the years I have gardened.  Just in case that is for sure what my Quicksilver has, I realized it might have to be removed.  It was a daunting thought on my mind all day.  What if it spread to my Japanese maples or worse yet my new Acer campestre that I want to see get huge?  However….I had to turn my mind to work.  I will admit I was googling verticillium all day between jobs.  I learned that Eleagnus is especially susceptible to it.  And that maybe Davidia is not; I certainly hope that is true because my beloved Davidia ‘Sonoma’ grows in the same bed.

The Depot Restaurant

north garden

Red Barn Arena

Allan’s photo, before

and after trimming Shasta daisy foliage

Allan trimmed and watered while I walked across the pasture to…

Diane’s garden

Misty hobbles across the pasture to greet me.

The toll was a belly rub.

Arriving at Diane’s, I immediately noticed that the septic box thingie had been cleared of weeds.

an empty palette for planting

My inspiration for planting this will be Somsri’s garden.

Misty again

the roadside garden

I look forward to a fence being put up along the road edge of the lawn so that the narrow verge garden can be replanted.

I weeded next to the porch….

…and petted Holly’s paws and schnozz.

a narrow gap by the wall

AlLan joined me just as I was planting a stray penstemon into the septic garden.

Long Beach

While passing through town, we made an emergency stop to stake and tie a gladiola.

Allan’s photo before it was fixed

The Anchorage Cottages

Mitzu (Allan’s photo)

The key drop box had a new resident who Beth was afraid  would get hurt if someone dropped keys into the box.

way down inside….this little frog comes out sometimes.

bikes to borrow (maybe guests’ bikes, too)

sweet peas

center courtyard

north end of center courtyard with walk through to west lawn

Bells of Ireland

The Planter Box

We stopped just to say hi to Theresa, whom we had not seen for awhile.

in the big greenhouse

fuchsias and begonias (Allan’s photo)

succulents (Allan’s photo)

by the entryway

pretty little portulaca (moss roses)

After a brief visit and some moaning about my possible verticillium wilt, we headed back to work at…

Klipsan Beach Cottages

…where after an hour of weeding and deadheading, I took some photos for the KBC Facebook page.

looking in the east gate

the birdbath view

bright new rose foliage

Strobilanthes atropurpureus

Helenium

I love this plant.

lilies and Thalictrum ‘Elin’

threadleaf coreopsis and Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’

Soleirolia soleirolii (baby’s tears) was one of my grandma’s favourite plants.

cottages on the ridge

sit spot under Tetrapanax ‘Steroidal Giant’

clipped some ivy to reveal a frog

sanguisorba

St Francis in the dog memorial garden (Allan’s photo)

We had time for more work, so on the way home we weeded in Long Beach at

Veterans Field….

where the flag pavilion garden is getting taken over by Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’.

I like it.

home

I clipped and clipped at the Eleagnus branches and the more I clipped, the more I knew the whole plant had to go. (One gardening source said to “put the bed [where verticillium wilt occurred] to lawn for 15 years”.  !!!)  Teresa advised soil removal, as did other sources….  I think I am instead going to try planting resistant plants here.

Allan helping

Huge roots invading in all directions is one reason it had to go.

Looks like it had nitrogen fixing roots…just too many of them.

I don’t know if this cut shows verticillium wilt inside or not.

It is gone. I moved a volunteer cotoneaster to take its place for now.

From the past…Eleagnus ‘Quicksilver’ by our garage fills the whole front garden with fragrance right now.

Sure looks different without it.

I had originally planted it for privacy in case a bad neighbour moved into Nora’s house.  Now we have Devery next door and we dote on her, so having the big shrub gone is not a problem.  I would like a cool eucalyptus for the spot; they resist verticillium wilt.

And of course, we also have Devery’s dear little Royal as our neighbour next door as well.

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Wednesday, 16 August 2017

After a glorious garden tour day trip, we were back to our Wednesday work rounds.

at home, Dichroa febrifuga (right)

Davidia ‘Lady Sunshine’

at the post office

The Depot Restaurant

…the usual watering and weeding….

south and east of the dining deck

the view from inside (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

hops dangling from the lattice (Allan’s photo)

lattice wall of hops on north side of deck

Allan’s photo

north of the dining deck

lilies and persicaria

Once upon a time, when I first started buying lilies, I did not like the ones with polka dots.  Now I love them.

You can see I cut off the pollen on flowers that might brush and stain people’s clothing.

The barrels and window box flowers on the north side are planted by Roxanne from the Basket Case.

Diane’s garden

Holly arrives home and is happy to see me.

Misty relaxing

my dear old friend Misty

the roadside garden with Stipa gigantea and blue Perovskia

project for this fall: start planting up this septic tank box

The Red Barn

While I took care of Diane’s garden, Allan watered and deadheaded at the Red Barn.

oregano

I will replace this sad old Erysimum soon!

The Basket Case Greenhouse

I wanted to see what new perennials were available, and did find some, along with a chrysanthemum that will have “green” flowers.

lots of good new lavenders

zinnias

I found some Geranium ‘Rozanne’ which I will keep till later for replacing four of the ‘Orion’ geraniums in the Long Beach welcome sign.

me and Buddy

sweet Penny (Allan’s photo)

We stayed for a long time having a conversation about current events, which was so absorbing (described as a mental health break) that when I finally said we must get back to work, we almost drove off with the van tailgate open. A shout from Roxanne’s father saved the day.

Klipsan Beach Cottages 

looking in the east gate

blue berries on Billardia longiflora

honeysuckle berries

lilies

lilies and veronicastrum

in a container, white flowered little shrub that I cannot ID

hydrangea glowing blue in the shade

lilies and cosmos

hardy fuchsia

hummingbird on agapanthus (Allan’s photo)

We have started to pull some of the bloomed-out Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’.  It will always come back.

before and after (Allan’s photos)

The Anchorage Cottages

office courtyard (with a peculiar camera effect on the chimney)

sweet peas

center courtyard

center courtyard garden

I met this darling Cairn Terrier.

Port of Ilwaco

We watered the Howerton Avenue curbside gardens under our watering care, from the Ilwaco Pavilion to the west end.

It started as a warm evening.

gardens still looking fine

Miscanthus ‘Gold Bar’ (Allan’s photo)

Eryngium and yarrow (Allan’s photo)

Time Enough Books garden boat

I trimmed back the elderberry but my foot hurt too much to walk on the river rock to pick off the yellow leaves!

The next morning, I would be delivering some flowers to Nisbett Gallery and I’d ask Allan to pick off those yellow leaves.

Just as we were finishing the watering, the weather quite suddenly turned to this:

While the drizzle was enough to make us soaking wet, it was only enough to briefly refresh the gardens.  The watering had still been necessary.  Of course, Allan got asked by a passerby why he was watering while it was raining.

 

 

 

 

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Friday, 4 August 2017

Before work, Jenna (Queen LaDeDa) came over to find out what plant cuttings she could have for a Jake the Alligator Man event costume: a “wild woman”.  While I did not have anything to make a mossy head dress with, we found all sorts of ideas while walking through the garden.  She will come tomorrow morning, probably before we wake, to acquire the materials, because it is too early to cut them now.

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Jenna and I on the hunt for plant costume ideas.

After she departed, I started to pick four bouquets for my favourite Art Night participants.  I ran out of steam after two bouquets.

Port of Ilwaco

I delivered a bouquet to Don Nisbett’s Art Gallery.  (He is Jenna’s spouse.)

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And to Salt Hotel.

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Allan watered the Time Enough Books curbside garden and did some other garden tidying in the area.

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We finished weeding the south end of the boatyard garden.

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battling the scrimmy little horsetail

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I pictured lots of people parading along here between a downtown gallery and the port this evening.

From a distance, Allan thought the name of this incoming boat was “Sleepwear”.

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Allan’s photo

Allan liked the idea shown below, of a rope tied to the hose on the boatyard faucet that people use to power wash their boats.  It keeps the faucet from being yanked by the hose, he says.

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While we had been near Time Enough Books, I’d seen shop owner Karla.   She said she would be at the museum this evening for their exhibit opening and so I thought I might just give a third bouquet to the museum.  We took a break to go home and make one more bouquet.

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Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

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Seaview

On the way to Long Beach, we stopped by the cannabis emporium to get me a product that the Freedom Market does not have in stock.

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Mr Doobie’s in Seaview

I’ve been taking a tincture called Ethos 2:1, mostly CBD, on the recommendation of a friend.  As promised, it does not get me high but what I think it has done is almost eliminate my back spasms.  I doubt it’s a placebo effect because I combine all new medications with a big dose of skepticism.

We acquired these photos, two blocks from the pot shop, of a garden I enjoy in passing.

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peeking over the fence

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Across the street from that garden, I asked Allan to photograph the deck railing that I quite like.  The garden is good, too.  We had a communication breakdown over getting a photo that included the garden on the corner of the property.  Maybe next week.

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Long Beach

Allan thought a drive-through coffee would be helpful for the day.

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Horses had been through the drive through before us!

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at the drive through window

I thought all we had to do in Long Beach was to give the planter at the end of Sid Snyder Drive some water (done!) and then dump yesterday’s debris.  On the way to city works, we found one more thing to do.

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Minnie Culbertson Park, before

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after

I had seen an ad in the local paper about a wee dahlia “farm” in the town. (I left off the line with the phone number:)

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Of course, we had to have a look.

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gardener Dale picking a bouquet for a visitor

He said there will be lots more dahlias starting next week.  He was also offering lots of little plants for sale in cute little containers:

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My grandma would have loved the wooden shoe.

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Allan’s photo

Dale’s pond had sprung a leak.  You can see it will be good-looking when re-filled.

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Basket Case Greenhouse

We needed soil and plants for an Ilwaco planter.

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new shade cloth entryway

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Allan’s photo

Buddy wanted to get in our van and Allan handed him to me.

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Roxanne and I joked that I was taking him home.

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I gave this little darling back most reluctantly.

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Klipsan Beach Cottages

We’d postponed our weekly cleanup of KBC because of Wednesday’s heat.  I clipped a whole lot of brown lady’s mantle out of the driveway garden and have no photos to show for that.  After working, we took photos for the KBC Facebook page (which I administrate).

The sky was still grey with a smoke haze from the fires in Canada.

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lawn border

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in the fenced garden

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I cannot ID this special plant, a gift from Mary’s plantsman brother, with golden yew.

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Veronicastrum and Nicotiana ‘Fragrant Cloud’ (kind of a fail photographing white, as usual)

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Dierama (Angel’s Fishing Rod)

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birdbath view

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Allan’s photo

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the pond island

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I see they bought those string lights that were “shiny objects” to me last time we went to Costco.  If I see them for sale again, I will not resist. Or maybe I will resist because we don’t have effective outdoor outlets.  Oh well!

The Anchorage Cottages

On the way south, we made the briefest stop at the Anchorage.  Since we had been there Monday this week, I felt we should do a second quick deadheading.

I am quite worked up about how this dierema is darker than any of my others.

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This thrills me.  I wonder if it would come true from seeds.

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in the office courtyard (Allan’s photo)

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When it was built, partly by moving WWII cottages from Cape Disappointment, the Anchorage was Ocean Front. Now, because of beach accretion, it is about a half mile from the beach.  A path leads through piney woods to the shore.

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Astilbe and Fuchsia ‘Pat’s Dream’

As I had begun to deadhead, I’d asked Allan to photograph an adorable caravan in the car lot at the corner.

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such a cute face

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I smile in response.

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Would make a great guest house.

Ilwaco

We drove past the boatyard garden to see the crowds of strolling art walk patrons that I had imagined…and saw no one at all till we drove past the galleries along the port.

We had every intention of immediately finishing the day by planting up the Ilwaco planter that got dug out, due to poor drainage, last weekend.  That is, until I looked at my Ilwaco Facebook feed on my phone to see if there were some last minute Art Walk posts that I could share to Discover Ilwaco.

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I saw this photo from the museum!

The exhibit opening was on a topic that interests us.  We had planned to see it later in the month because of a reluctance for peopling (me) and simply wanting to get the work day done.  But the snacks called to us and soon we were there.

derby

Join the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum as we explore the history of “Derbyville” and the early years of salmon derbies, recreational fishing, and the emergence of the charter-boat fishing industry on the Long Beach Peninsula. This exhibit will be on view August 4 – October 7, 2017.

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the big room (The plates were about to get replenished)

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Allan’s photo.  Someone at the museum said “No one’s ever brought us flowers before.”  That gives me a new bouquet target.

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center: Dan and his wife had just toured our garden today (by invitation).  (Allan’s photo)

We did not have time to thoroughly peruse the exhibit.  I can see it is one that I will very much enjoy.

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I like this sort of display.

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This history goes back to when our garden was riverfront property, before the port was built out on fill.

Information about the mayor, for whom our street of curbside gardens at the Port if named:

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We had to get back to work and plant the planter by the fire station.

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Allan made the small hole, added this week by the city crew, bigger.

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new plants getting firmed up

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red for the fire station, including Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

At home, our neighbor Mary from two doors down brought us some freshly caught salmon and, of course, I dragged her back to see the towering, fragrant lilies.

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Skooter indicated that he would like to have a campfire some evening soon.

Now for two days off, with some more lily guests invited.

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Monday, 31 July 2017

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spent flower and bud on my night blooming cereus

We stopped at Ilwaco City Hall to ask that a hole be drilled into the non draining planter out of which Allan had dug all soil.

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one of the two city hall planters from above

Long Beach

We did our usual “tree day” watering rounds, meaning Allan watered the street tree gardens and a couple of blocks worth of planters, while I watered most of the planters.

My Long Beach walkabout:

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colourful Long Beach

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planter by Funland

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Alchemilla (Lady’s Mantle) still making a nice understory in Fifth Street Park.

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found a painted rock from Everett Rocks.

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bright and glowing California poppies outside the popular Hungry Harbor Grille

Allan’s Long Beach walkabout:

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I, too, had noticed this darling family.

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lilies in Fifth Street Park

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cosmos, fuchsia, Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’ in a planter

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Lysimachia punctata in a tree garden

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Rose against the south wall of Funland (used to be a city garden, now cared for by the business).  I planted the rose years ago, either ‘Fourth of July’ or ‘Berries and Cream’.

We took mercy on a couple of the planters on the Bolstad approach and took two big jugs and two buckets of water to them.  It is not fair that Allan has to do all the heavy lifting.

He found a Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ pulled out and left to dry.  Deer usually just nibble.

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This is human caused damage.  It went into a bucket of water to get refreshed and then got replanted.

The Anchorage Cottages

We went a day early because a heat wave is predicted.  It is good for all gardens to be soaked before the heat.  Beth had done a great job making sure all beds were well watered.

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center courtyard with blue potato vine

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pots in center courtyard

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that moment of lily glory

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intentional (I wish!) colour match of lilies to sign.

Long Beach

We watered the Sid Snyder Drive planters (which are plumbed for hose connection).

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Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ in a Sid Snyder planter

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checked up on kite museum planters

Ilwaco

Allan watered the Ilwaco planters.  I went home to do the dreaded monthly billing and some watering in advance of the heat of perhaps as high as 90 degrees predicted for Wednesday.

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wild sweet peas under an Ilwaco tree.

Jodie from across the street and her family member Doug came over to see the garden.  Doug was smitten with all the cats.

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communing with Skooter

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We’ve been taking Tuesdays off sometimes lately.  This week, we will work Tuesday so we can take a heat wave day off later in the week.

 

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Wednesday, 5 July 2017 (part one)

Allan had not gotten enough sleep because of Skooter’s 2 AM antics:

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Skooter somehow attained the highest bookshelf.

We set off on our work rounds that take us north once a week, along with a plan for a garden tour (which will be tomorrow’s post).

Port of Ilwaco

We began by bucket watering the drive over garden, a small pocket between two driveways,  at the port.

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It had been driven over.  (Allan’s photo)

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driving by the boat yard

The Depot Restaurant

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southeast of dining deck (Allan’s photo)

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north side of dining deck

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The Escallonia ‘Pink Princess’, which wants to be ten feet tall, is growing again to hide the Clamshell Railroad sign.  The restaurant was a train depot in days of old.

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I’ve suggested removing the escallonia.  Chef Michael thinks, I am sure correctly, that it keeps a bad driver from running into the corner of the building.

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after

The Red Barn

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These helianthus have to go.  They don’t get enough water.  (Allan’s photo)

After watering the garden and the planted barrels, we walked next door to

Diane’s garden.

We had to walk along the highway because the field we usually cross was occupied.

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These tire tracks did not inspire confidence.

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One of the back yard planters

I got to see my good friend Misty, although she went straight into the house when Diane brought her home from errands.  Then Holly came out of the truck.

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Do I hafta sit?

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not for long!

Whiskey was also visiting.

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So ready to play with Holly.

We drove back to the beach side on Sid Snyder Road to…

The Anchorage Cottages

Many guest vehicles were in the parking lot, so we parked behind the office, giving you a different entry view as I walked around the west side of the cottages.

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We were greeted by our good friend Mitzu, who has had to take tranquilizers because of a week’s worth of fireworks noise.

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Mitzu has had a stressful week of fear.  (Allan’s photo)

I weeded and deadheaded; Allan fertilized all the containers and the window boxes.

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center courtyard, Rose ‘New Dawn’

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by the office

We drove across Pioneer Road to the bay side to see what new plants might have arrived at

The Basket Case Greenhouse.

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successfully growing a tomato in a bag of soil

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greeted by my friend Penny

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a real sweetheart

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Darrell in the center greenhouse (Allan’s photo)

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gazanias coming forward

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gazanias

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gazanias

We drove back to the ocean side on Cranberry Road to make a delivery to

Jim Unwin’s Hobbit Studio.

We were giving Jim and Annie a Feliway cat comfort diffuser that I no longer needed, for Annie to try to help their two cats get along better.  This entailed a tour of the art studio, which we have visited before on the peninsula wide studio tour that takes place every Thanksgiving weekend.

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Jim’s Hobbit Studio

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Jim at his work bench.

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a double silhouette and a little sailboat (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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art ingredients

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Annie’s rose (Allan’s photo)

We drove north to

Klipsan Beach Cottages

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Tetrapanax ‘Steroidal Giant’ taller than the fence (Allan’s photo)

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Tetrapanax

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red dragonfly (Allan’s photo)

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June bug

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lily and roses

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birdbath view

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east gate

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garden art from the Forsythea shop in Astoria

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Mary’s new rose

Our good friend Bella was in the basement and did not want to come out.  She is terrified of fireworks and despite being given tranquilizers and having music played for her to drown out the noise, she has tried to dig through the floor, has hidden in the closet, and has climbed into the bathtub for safety.

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She had her paw over one ear.

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Nine days of fireworks fear for peninsula animals (Allan’s photo); from June 28th to July 5th.  Ridiculously long.

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on the basement couch

We drove further north, almost to Nahcotta, for a garden tour which will be tomorrow’s post, and then south to do some watering of the curbside gardens at

The Port of Ilwaco.

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Ilwaco pavilion curbside garden (Allan’s photo)

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Something happened at the port.  (Allan’s photo)

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the condor (Allan’s photo)

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Westernmost bed needs its daisies clipped or pulled.  Next week.

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a fasciated Linaria stem in the Salt Hotel garden

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eryngium, yarrow, and parsley

Join us tomorrow on the garden tour that delighted us today.

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