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Posts Tagged ‘Anchorage Cottages’

Monday, 12 February 2018

Long Beach

We began with the “little pop outs” on Ocean Beach Boulevard.  The lot by one of them has been cleared of shore pines.

That suddenly made the sidewalk popout to the south side of Seventh Street more visible, especially if this lot is going to be developed.

south pop out, before, with Allan working on the north one.

After. The mugo pine was wobby and rotten at the base, so it is gone. It had had to be pruned so much for traffic sightlines that I was glad of it.

North pop out before:

after

 

north little pop out, after moving rocks out to show more

We happened to see Parks Manager Mike in town and I was able to briefly ask him to get us a pile of Soil Energy mulch.

waiting for my moment

I look forward to the mulch, which I am now confident will appear.

Anchorage Cottages

Today we made our first wake up call to the Anchorage garden.

I am sort of trying to save a tree there: the gold one by the office.

I feel it is needed for verticality.  I also wish the old locust on the right could be saved, because it gives privacy from a big house next door.  There has been talk for awhile of removing the gold cedar, and I had even recommended the best tree service (Arbor Care in Astoria), and then I found myself brooding about the drabness that would result in the tree being gone and realized I had better take the cutting down plan more seriously.  I suggested that Arbor Care would be skilled at going up inside the tree and pruning out all the ugly dead parts and ugly stubby pruning.  Now there may be a chance to save it (and the locust, too, if I had my way.)

Looking up from below, the tree is not at all attractive inside.

Our friend Mitzu the Shitzu was having a spa day so we did not get to see her.  We did meet a fine and friendly and very good dog named Maggie.

sweet Maggie

I am pleased with how a patch of virburnums has filled in so nicely, as I expected they eventually wood after I pruned them down for legginess.

I’d like to see them at least a third of the way up the lower windows.

 

one of the four window boxes

window box crocuses

hellebore and ranunculus

small cupped narcissus

Long Beach

We remembered to clean up one more small bed at Minnie Culbertson Park.

clipping Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and then pulling a few weeds

Ilwaco

At home, I was pleased to erase two clean ups from the work list.

We had time for a brief sit down before going out again to an Ilwaco city council meeting.

Our neighbour next door to the east, Jared, is now on the council, as is Missy, who lives in the next block.  Allan and I had no mission except to show quiet support for the mostly new council and the new mayor.

In the “comments from public” part of the evening, I was surprised to hear a citizen complain that Ilwaco was not lit up well enough for Christmas.  For a tiny town of under 1000 people (929 in 2016), I think we are doing well to have our crab pot lights on First Avenue, and our crab pot tree, lights on the lamp posts on both Howerton and Elizabeth, and beautiful wreath-and-candle lights at the fire station and library and city hall, not to mention the several private homes with lavish displays on Spruce Street.  I thought of how Jenna and Don and Allan and I had decorated and undecorated the crab pot tree and pondered later that volunteer opportunities must be publicized more.  That part of the  meeting inspired some pondering about how instead of criticizing, positivity has better results.  I was sadly reminded of when I was an incomer, new to town and full of ideas—the same ideas, often involving what people should do with their private property, that have been stated by incomers like me over and over again.  I had to go hide out in my little house behind the boatyard for awhile to live it down.  I figured out then that the best thing I could do to improve the town was to create some beauty, and that’s when I imperialized (with permission) a strip of weeds at the boatyard and created the boatyard garden, and later created the post office garden.  (The boatyard turned into a paid job after it was removed for an electrical line and had to be re-created; the post office is still volunteer.) I had thought of doing a low maintenance bed at the new playground, with ornamental grasses and tough perennials, but no one took me up on that one.  I had another big idea about walking around in winter staycations to pick up trash…and then my knee went wonky so that idea fizzled.  It would be a great volunteer community service for someone to take on.  I now have another little gardening idea in mind, one that has been brewing in my mind for a couple of years, but I am hoping to find some help with it.  More on this later, maybe.

My reading is going slowly because of working on my old book lists.  I have these lined up next:

Reading my old book lists makes me remember how I used to read almost exclusively for nothing but entertainment, decades ago.  For the bookish: I have been plugging away at my old book lists and have added several new posts, from 1986 on,  here.

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Thursday, 21 December 2017

The night had been just below freezing.  I woke early to a white frosty world, poked my camera out the south cat door for an unscreened photo of frost on the grass…

…and went back to sleep for three more hours.  When I awoke, I suggested that we go do the post-frost clean up, in hope that finally the frost had put the gardens to sleep.

We began a few blocks east at

Mike’s garden,

which we have referred to till now as Mayor Mike’s garden.  He is retiring as mayor at the end of 2017.

The sun was bright, the air cold, and the ground just lightly frozen.

Pieris promising spring

pale pink hesperantha blooming on the west side

salmon pink hesperantha blooming on the north side

pulling spent hesperantha along the front path

Allan raked.

Anchorage Cottages

Some days back, we drove in and right back out of the Anchorage parking lot because I could see the chrysanthemums by the office were still blooming.  And today they were STILL blooming.

Chrysanths that will not quit.

Today, I showed Jody, the housekeeper, who also does some gardening, how to just cut them to the ground when and if they ever brown off (which they will…).  We are not going to keep returning to check on two chrysanthemums.  I also showed her that she could cut the Melianthus if we have a hard enough freeze to make it ugly.

Melianthus major in the center courtyard

frozen birdbath (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo: In early spring, we will cut back this sprawling plant even if it does not get frozen, just to shape it up.

Long Beach

My mind had been on the one big Geranium ‘Rozanne’ that I had left untrimmed.  Surely it would be frozen by now? But no.

Allan’s photos

Frost could make the California poppies ugly, too. At least they are small.

It has been so mild that the Rozannes we cut back early this year have put out rosettes of new leaves.

It got cut back anyway, because we are not going to keep checking on it through January and I don’t want to think about a potential blackened heap of frozen leaves later on.

An anemone was already blooming in Veterans Field.

Allan’s photo

a wreath in Veterans Field (Allan’s photo)

We did some cutting back in Fifth Street Park, of a pineapple sage, some Verbena bonariensis, and a bit of the sprawling Melianthus.

pulling some spent hesperantha flowers

as tidy as its going to get till at least late January

Once upon a time, the scrim of unclipped catmint along the front, above, would have greatly bothered me.  For some reason, this year I think it looks interesting against the dry flower heads of the Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’…or maybe it was just that my hands were so cold.

Primroses (cowslips) were already blooming under a street tree.

I can feel exactly how it will feel to go back to work in late January or early February, and the prospect feels ok.  My only problem is that I have gotten pretty much nowhere on my indoor winter projects.

We celebrated the true end of the work year with coffee, warmth, and Pink Poppy Bakery treats at Abbracci Coffee Bar.

Abbracci co-owner Tony

We and another regular customer each got to take home one of the Christmas centerpieces.. very nice, since we never got around to putting up a tree, and later the flowers can go in my wonderful compost bins.

Abbracci tree and centerpieces

Ilwaco Timberland Library

We had some books to pick up.

at the library entrance

deep shade behind the wall

In the library

As expected, I got quite a pile of books, despite my original staycation plan for re-reading books on my own bookshelves.  Maybe that will wait till sometime when I am homebound for one reason or another.

a new batch, and the previous batch is not done yet

We had brought home a bucket of Abbracci coffee grounds and enough clean compost to add a wheelbarrow’s worth to my bins.  As I chopped it into small pieces and turned some from one bin to another at dusk, I did not mind the cold at all.

I have a compost obsession.

All the work got erased from the work side of the board, as did “Call Accountant”.  I had found an email address for the accountant we want, so I emailed her on the way home this afternoon.  I won’t have to call unless we don’t hear back in my preferred medium for anything business related (email, text, Facebook messaging, anything but a business phone call!).  (Carol, this does not mean you and Bill!)

a joyous sight

Salt Pub

After dark, we attended a Salty Talk at Salt Pub.

“Join Jim Sayce, historian and Executive Director of the Pacific County Economic Development Council, in a SALTY Talks presentation, “Reading the Land: Forensic Ecology” exploring the changes in the local landscape over time. Jim will show us how to recognize the subtle clues that can help find the original or historic landscape of a site within the bones of the built environment.”

Allan’s photo

delicious burger with salad subbed for fried (Allan’s photo)

window reflection

night marina

More boats than one used to decorate with lights.  The winter storms and wet weather caused too many electrical problems and so that pretty tradition ended just a few years back. We were happy to see one or two boats still carrying it on.

The Salt holiday tree

The lecture was well attended for one so close to the holidays.

Museum director Betsy Millard introduces the lecture (Allan’s photo)

Jim has a good collection of photos to illustrate how you can see the underlay of history.  For example, a line of trees representing old fence lines (where the trees grew up under the fence and the fence eventually disappeared):

He showed our changing views due to accretion of the beach (in some places half a mile wider than it used to be) and the growth of beach pines, which were not there a century ago.   Many beach trails were begun over 100 years ago and have simply been lengthened by trodding feet as the beach itself moved westward.

Allan captured some of the interesting old photos:

The “elephant rocks” used to be out in the surf, as an old photo showed, and are now well inland of Waikiki Beach.

rocks once out in the surf…

and now on land

An old highway has gone back to nature by the new highway 101.  Through a layer of grass and moss, the yellow line of the old highway occasionally shows through.

Jim Sayce

Jim’s laser pointer was not working.

The old and new photos pleased and fascinated us.

Jim’s blog, circa 2011 and before, is here.

It is now time for five weeks of true staycation.

 

 

 

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Monday, 6 November 2017

Frosty looking cute in the morning

Even though my neurotic cat Frosty (the late Smoky’s brother) still wants to sleep in the garage rather than have to spend the night indoors, I won’t let him.  It is cold out there.  He wakes me up at 6 AM yowling to go out, so I then open the south cat door for him.  So far the other two cats have not figured out this happens.  Frosty seems to go out and then come back in soon after, because I find him asleep in my room when I wake up again.

Long Beach

We happened to nab a parking spot right next to a street tree that needed its batch of Lysimachia punctata cut back for winter.

before and after (Allan’s photos)

We found a reversible rock.

not sure what it means

The Anchorage Cottages

We left Long Beach to work at the Anchorage first, mainly because I did not know how long we would be there, and the rest of the time could then be devoted to Long Beach.

Arbutus and Melianthus major in the center courtyard

arbutus flowers (to be followed by strawberry like fruit, thus the common name strawberry tree)

I love arbutus so much, why do I not have one in my yard?

I’ve been meaning for ages for us to dead-wood the arbutus. No time for that today.

I did a nice under-pruning and lowering from the top of the big Solanum crispum ‘Glasnevin’ in the corner; wish I had a before picture.

just an after

Allan pulled Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ from the narrow bed under the blue sign, and on either side of it he planted some starts of shasta daisies.  I know folks who would turn up their noses at that.  I think the daisies will look spiffing with the white window trim.

before and after (Allan’s photos)

I put some redtwig dogwood twigs in the window boxes, just because it is something I like to do.

Long Beach

I planted a whole pot of cloves of elephant garlic on the west side of city hall.  The very few that were there this past summer were a hit with the city hall staff, who called it  “The Horton Hears a Who plant.”  It was so disappointing when someone picked off all the round flowers that I said I was going to plant so many that surely some flowers would be left next year.

planted them on the upper tier

after planting and clean up of the long narrow tiered beds that were planted originally by Gene and Peggy Miles, when Gene was city administrator (Allan’s photo)

lots of clean up accomplished on the north side, too

I do not clean up my gardens this way.  I leave a lot more plants standing into late winter.  In public gardens, most passersby would not understand that and would just see it as messy.

We turned next to pulling Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ at the front of Coulter Park (Allan) and tidying up a planter across the street (me).

Coulter Park, before and after (Allan’s photo)

Allan also photographed the planter project.

before

After work, we returned a couple of forgotten Halloween party items to Scott and Tony’s townhouse in north Long Beach, along with a tall houseplant that needed a place with tall windows.

painted rocks that Scott and Tony’s friends leave in their little entry courtyard

Port of Ilwaco

We did a security check on the business of a friend who will be out of town for two more days post surgery and then had a look at the garden at the port office.  It needs some trimming.  We were almost out of daylight, so it will not get done today.

Allan’s photo

Almost sunset at the marina:

home

I feel sad when I come home to Calvin sleeping alone, in the chair where for the past couple of months he spent the day sleeping with his new best friend, Smoky.  I wish he would bond with Frosty.  He must miss Smoky as much as I do.

Calvin wakes up.

Two nights ago, when I was petting Calvin, I realized I had already lost the hand memory of how much softer Smoky was than any other cat.  Calvin feels soft to me now.  I clipped a tiny bit of Smoky’s fur, before his final visit to the vet.  It felt intrusive to clip very much. It is just enough soft fur, in a little wooden box, to touch with one fingertip.  I can’t bear to go there. But I don’t want to forget that softness.  My hand aches to pet him again.

Smoky and Calvin on October 7th

Calvin and Smoky on October 19th

October 26th

Frosty and Smoky, mid October.  Note the subtle patterns on Smoky’s oh so soft fur.

Smoky was nice to all cats, humans, and nice dogs.

Frosty and Calvin will share my lap, but without affection and with the occasional squabble.

Frosty and Calvin a couple of nights ago

detente but no affection

I occupied my mind with a re-write the work board, dividing the fall clean up list into before and after the first heavy frost, for the purpose of giving me more tasks to erase.  Erasure gives me satisfaction at day’s end.

I then got to erase City Hall and Anchorage.

Below, at 2:45 AM (technically the next day):

Frosty, the odd kitty, has a new favourite place now that he is not sleeping in the garage: right in the middle of the open space in the bedroom.

Why not a comfy chair?

As I write this two days later, he is sleeping in that exact same peculiar spot.

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Tuesday, 17 October 2017

After hearing rain pelting and strong wind at night and this morning, I was surprised when the weather turned sunny.

I must remember now that on sunny days, the greenhouse door must get opened.

It would be too easy to go to work and leave the plants to bake.

Greenhouse spider had wisely made a web off to the side today.

this much rain overnight

My plan to get the garage ready today for bulbs changed.  Because of the sun emerging, I happily decided that I could re-do a garden corner by digging out Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and making a space for interesting new plants.  Then I looked at the weather and saw that 54 mph winds were predicted for tomorrow, along with 1-2 inches of rain.  The most telling point was when I looked at UPS tracking and saw my bulbs are now due to arrive on Thursday, not Wednesday, affecting my work plans for later in the week.

The work board is full of bulbing now. And some at home projects have appeared.

I asked Allan if he would mind going to work to do some pre-emptive storm clean up at two resorts.  He agreed so off we went.

In the driveway, I looked at my agastache and cosmos, hoping some flowers will survive the storm.  I’m planning to make bouquets on Friday to decorate for a charity auction that will benefit local Hispanic families affected by ICE (my way of contributing without actually having to people).  Both cosmos and some (not all) agastaches originate in Mexico so it would be special to add them to the arrangements.

left, Agastaches, right, cosmos, far upper left, Skooter

Because I am eager for compost, we made a quick detour to the city works yard and nabbed two of the hanging basket plants from the debris pile…

They are big loose basket shaped mounds. Not organic because of Miracle Gro use. Never mind that, I want them.

…and then went on to…

The Anchorage Cottages

Mitzu!

center courtyard

decided to leave these window boxes for one more week

Allan installed the spring bulb window boxes and I added yellow violas.

We pulled tall cosmos in the bed above.  This area gets lots of wind that would knock them over by the weekend.

We started the project of re-doing two out of three pots at the Anchorage.  One was just full of Lamium, probably ‘White Nancy’, leaving no room for other plants.

before, last week

Because we needed more soil and plants for the two pots, we went on to

The Planter Box.

autumn colour on trees for sale

autumn display

We got lavenders, violas, a lemon cypress, potting soil, pumpkins, bulb food, and some pavers for a project at home.

our three pumpkins

Then on to

Klipsan Beach Cottages

While Allan planted some aruncus (goatsbeard) starts in the woodsy swale by the clam cleaning shed and pulled crocosmia and iris leaves, I pulled tall cosmos out of the fenced garden.  Perhaps because of being over-fertilized, several of them shot up to great height without many flowers.

before

after.  The cosmos were just silly this year.

before

after

More prolific, shorter, flowering cosmos can stay for awhile.

late honeysuckle flowers

bright hamamelis foliage

blueberry fall colour

blueberry

blueberry and tetrapanax

tetrapanax flower buds

Hydrangea ‘Izu No Hana’ had few flowers this year.

Iris foetidissima

Fuchsia ‘Debron’s Black Cherry’

Eupatorum rugosum ‘Chocolate’

Persicaria ‘Golden Arrow’

looking in east gate

birdbath view

roses

Rose ‘Bow Bells’

I had been collecting cosmos and other clean clippings to take home for my empty compost bin.

I am 5’6″. Look how ridiculously tall the Cosmos ‘Sensation’ is.

We finished at KBC with some dumping of pots of annuals to make space for incoming bulbs.  (Must remember to buy potting soil.)

Anchorage Cottages again

We finished dealing with the two empty pots.  Allan’s photos:

Long Beach

We were pleased to get done in time to nip into Dennis Company during their last fifteen minutes to buy some more Halloween lights.  The clerk tested out two so-called purple lights that turned out to be reddish. Another spider lights string and a cool ghost-projector made up for that.

We did a bit of deadheading and weeding on the Dennis block.

Port of Ilwaco

I pulled some cosmos out of the south facing Port Office garden, first garden to be battered by wind.

I left the ones at the far end in case the storm does not come.

Allan took photos from the Port Office deck.

gale warning flags are up

 

Almost in the dark, with Allan’s help, I added today’s compost treasures to my third compost bin, layering the green material with brown from the second bin.  The third bin is already almost full.

Across the street, early morning wind had already knocked the J’s decor around.  Allan fixed it, for now.

The only change to the work board is that I remembered more bulb clients, and now we have only one pot to re-do at the Anchorage, this one:

Beth finds the fuchsia messy and I don’t like that it got infested with columbines.




reading

I found that popular book about The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up more annoying that instructive or amusing, and yet the author intrigues me so I have just read the sequel.

This time, because of her honesty, I find her more endearing than annoying.

She admits to having “very few interests other than tidying.”

She shares how she got into trouble tidying her family’s possessions.

The same thing that made me reject her first book is repeated in this one.  Books do not belong in a closet!

Just no! No, no.

My library is one wall of the living room, and the gardening books take up another shorter wall.

And I still reject the belief that socks have feelings.

My socks have never once complained about being rolled into balls to keep pairs together.

Marie Kondo is awfully sweet, though, and while I would never let her loose on my stuff, I’ll agree that she has some good ideas.  I need inspiration, because there will be people coming for Halloween.  In fact, if you are a local liberal Halloween lover, you, too, are welcome to stop by.  I need to clean the house for company (which might include friends of Tony and Scott whom I do not know).  From the dust, you would never think I had been a professional self employed housecleaner in Seattle for 18 years.

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday, 11 October 2017

The forecast had been for bad weather on this Wednesday.  Instead, we seemed to have had most of the rain overnight.

Wheelbarrow by the compost bins was empty at dark last night.

passionflowers in our back garden

The Depot Restaurant

north side of dining deck

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’

Long Beach

deadheading the welcome sign

For the rest of our Long Beach session, my goal was simply to deadhead and tidy the planters.  Because of iffy weather, we parked on each block instead of walking the route.

Below: The rugosa roses that we fight in this street tree garden always win, and they look grand right now.  Across the street is the office of NW Insurance and Financial, where we had our Medicare meeting yesterday.

The sky to the north looked ominous.  I hoped the wind from the west would not bring rain.

murky sky to the east behind a dream house of mine (close to all Long Beach activities)

sky to the northwest

Then the rain came.  We hoped to take shelter at Abbracci Coffee Bar till we remembered they are closed Wednesdays in winter.  We waited out the squall in our van.

In twenty minutes, the weather was fine again.

Before the rain, we had pulled Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ from under a street tree.  After, Allan pulled it out of the planter by Wind World Kites while I checked on three blocks worth of planters.

before (Allan’s photo)

Allan pulling crocosmia.

after (Allan’s photo)

after; I clipped a lavender way back for better traffic sightlines.

The proprietor of Wind World Kites likes the crocosmia, which is why this is the only planter than still has a substantial amount.

After all the wind and rain, peace reigned for the rest of the day.

Veterans Field

Anchorage Cottages

greetings from our good friend Mitzu (Allan’s photo)

center courtyard

I had been concerned about the rain delay and getting work done in time for a social engagement.  After some pruning and tidying at The Anchorage, I felt we were nicely back on schedule.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We spent an hour and a bit deadheading and clipping back some plants as we whittle our way into fall clean up.

black currants under the tetrapanax

Tetrapanax flower bud

Allan in the garden

He cut back more of the big rugosa rose.

birdbath view

pink Symphoricarpos (snow berry)

dinner with Judy and Larry

One good thing for us that has come out of this year’s local liberal politics has been getting to know Judy and Larry.  We went to their north Ocean Park home for a “simple supper”.

Judy contends with deer and raccoons in her garden.

a deep blue tradescantia in a wheelbarrow, moving from one part of the garden to another

rust flowers on the west wall

handsome front porch containers; cannas are from The Basket Case

pond in the back garden

neat little fountain

Amaryllis Belladonna

a work-in-progress sit spot with wisteria

After our garden stroll, we went indoors; it was too chilly to have a little fire in the chiminea.

I asked to see Judy’s art; our artist friend Michele Naquaiya had told us about it.

First, Judy showed us two pieces by Michele.

Scratchboard painting by Michele Naquaiya

Scratchboard painting by Michele Naquaiya

a kitty corner

Judy had taken a class from Michele in the Zentangle technique.

one of Judy’s Zentangles. I liked them all very much.

I finally got to meet Judy’s cats, brothers, one bold (Elwood) and one shy (Jake).

Elwood

We dined on a delicious chili soup with bread and talked for three hours.

This morning, when I had opened my front door, I had found an apple pie from darling Tony and Scott, made from apples from our tree.  We took it along to dinner and that was our dessert.

Tony and Scott’s Dutch apple pie.

On the way home, we detoured to see the Halloween decor at the Long Beach home of Cathy and Bob (Captain Bob’s Chowder folks).

spooky!

When we got to our driveway, Allan said “Why did Todd only leave one?”

I was confused.  I had put out four Lonicera fragrantissima plants for Todd to pick up.  Why would he have left one?  Then I saw it.

One zucchini by the garage door.

Later in the week, I learned from Todd that he and his father have given away 2050 zukes this year.

Before we settled down to watch the Rachel Maddow show, I lined up and admired the bookmarks Judy had given us.

Even though I may not be much of a social animal, these times with special friends are precious.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday, 29 September 2017

Allan was sad to see the painting of the shed gutter had not worked.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo: Paint had fallen into a spider web.

This spider, who had likely entered the van on some plant debris, had made a web inside my van door.  I did not let her come to work with us.

These garden spiders don’t scare me.

We stopped at Dennis Co on the way to work to get some paint for the window trim (which you have seen in yesterday’s post).  Allan was also able to repaint the gutter successfully.

Anchorage Cottages

The weather was just too hot to do any of the pruning projects we had planned.

These viburnums can wait for another day.

arbutus and hydrangea in the center courtyard

On the way to our next job, I was appalled at the temperature.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We stayed only to do the most important deadheading and tidying.  The heat was just too much.

bird bath view

roses

the other bird bath with Persicaria ‘Golden Arrow’

Japanese anemone

hardy fuchsia

autumnal hamamelis

Peninsula Landscape Supply

We picked up a yard of Soil Energy.

bird baths by the pond

We learned that starting next week, PLS will be going to their off season hours, open till three on Tuesday, Thursdays, Saturdays.  This will require us to be less spontaneous during mulching season. We will have to make proper plans and schedules.

signs available in the office

On the way back to Ilwaco, we decided we had to delay our boatyard mulching project till early evening’s cooler weather.

Ridiculous weather! What happened to our nice crisp autumn?

home

This is the handsome gate of our “Starvation Alley Cranberry Farm” neighbours to the east.

At the base of the ornamental plum in our front garden (a tree I did not plant) is a hamamelis glowing with autumn colour.

Look to the left side of the tree trunk.

 

Tiger Eyes sumac

another hamamelis

I retreated indoors from the heat and was joined for a bit by our neighbours to the west, Devery, and her dog Royal.

It was Royal’s first time in our house. He was excited.

Ilwaco boatyard

After five o clock, we mulched 1/3 of the boatyard.  I think my estimate that three yards will cover it all is pretty close.

before (Allan’s photo)

after (Allan’s photo)

Allan sweeps up

Aster ‘Harrington’s Pink’

leveling mulch with a broom

looking south from the north end

As we had begun our mulching, a Londoner on a bicycle had stopped to ask the location of Salt Pub.  I had to tell him the sad news that it is closed on Wednesdays.  Where could he eat, he asked, after returning from a two block jaunt to make sure Salt was closed.  I was sad to say that the only option was our little local market.  In an ideal world, we would have invited him to come to our house for a campfire, with sausages, and then driven him to his campsite at Cape Disappointment, but our conversation took place just as we got stuck in to an hour of unloading mulch.

After work, we went to the little market ourselves in search of some fancy sausages, and found him outside.  He had managed to find an apple for his dinner, with some cheese that he already had.  I was afraid that “Disappointment” might sum up his feelings, and I did so wish he had been here on a night when Salt was open.

the Londoner

I was able to guide him to having breakfast tomorrow morning at the Portside Café, where his quest for pancakes should be well satisfied.

We had a good chinwag about politics.  He said he almost bet £5000 on Brexit not passing, and woke up in shock that morning (and relief that he had not made the bet). He had experienced the same shock and dismay last November 9 at the result of our election.

I told him that I used to be married to a Leedsman.  “Oh, that must have been tough!” said he.

Allan and I did not succeed at the local in our quest for fancy sausages so drove on up to Sid’s Market in Seaview, where we met with success.  We also met again a nice RVing couple who had asked us at the boatyard where to shop for groceries.  They, too, had met with shopping success. We then went home to have a campfire on the one of the warmest evenings of the year.

Nicotiana by the campfire

the moon just caught in the trees

Allan’s photo

coals

When I looked at the temperature at 1 AM, it was still 72 degrees outside.  That is just unheard of here at the beach.

Friday, 29 September 2017

After taking Thursday off so Allan could finish painting the shed, we slept late.

Skooter slept late, too. He puts his feet over Allan’s head like earmuffs.

We had believed the forecast of a half inch of rain.  The rain came overnight rather than during the day, which turned out so fine that tourists would be looking at our public gardens.  While we did not have to water, we certainly had to tidy after all.

This much rain overnight!

By the post office, we saw the first sign of Ilwaco Halloween.

And so it begins.

The Depot Restaurant

just some quick deadheading

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’ towering

Long Beach

the welcome sign

We tidied the gardens at Veterans Field while the Columbia Pacific Farmers Market was in session.

Allan’s photo

I found a home for a duplicate plant of mine in Fifth Street Park. I had bought in, then realized it was the same white sanguisorba I had acquired at a Hardy Plant sale from Dan Hinkley, back when it just had a number, not a name.

Allan planted it in here, toward the back.

Needing energy, we got coffee to go.

at Abbracci Coffee Bar

We did a walk around town just to deadhead the planters.

passing by the farmers market again

I stopped it at NIVA green to take a few photos for their Facebook page, and for some reason I had to buy this little stove.

It spoke to me somehow.  Now it is mine and I don’t quite know what to do with it.

Allan pulled Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ from under the street tree near the pharmacy.

before

after

Here is a sad thing: The old, peeling cranberry mural on the south end of Dennis Company is now almost covered.  $58,000 has been spent to try to restore it five different times, and it is now too far gone to save.

Goodbye to a Long Beach icon. (Allan’s photos)

The paint peeled badly after a restoration just a couple of years ago.

Here it is in better days.  I will miss it.

We then drove up to Peninsula Landscape Supply for another yard of Soil Energy.

The shaved ice booth was heading down to Ilwaco for Saturday Market.

Ilwaco boatyard garden

We got another third of the garden mulched, all the way to the south side of the gate.

Unfortunately, we have to cover a multitude of poppy seeds.  In my own garden, I might dig and replant them.  No time for that here.

I’ve saved seeds and will re-sow.

To finish our relatively short day, we deadheaded the cosmos at the port office and Time Enough Books gardens.  I took some photos of the marina from near the port office.

someone else enjoying the view

an hour before sunset, along Howerton Avenue

home

Kniphofia ‘Earliest of All’ is changing shape.

Devery came to pick some Cripp’s Pink apples to make some applesauce.

She stood on a bucket to get some.

Canna in bloom in the water boxes

I made a sit spot in the new bogsy wood clearing.

on the table: broken china bits that I found in 2010 when making our garden

I had a sudden brainstorm which Allan helped me bring to fruition.

Skooter supervising

He helped me move this….

…out to the salmonberry cave….

…where I like it very much.

And it gave me room for a new little sit spot on the east wall of the house.

Next: another long weekend.  We are enjoying the short work weeks between tourist season and the soon to arrive fall clean up and bulb season.

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Wednesday, 20 September 2017

We got a late start because of rain in the morning.  From last night to mid morning, we had had this much rain:

the rain gauge

So we would not have to water this week, much to our delight.

Calvin enjoying the overflowing water bowl.


Skooter enjoying the view from the roof.

The Depot Restaurant

…only needed a brief deadheading visit.

ornamental grasses around the dining deck


neat yellow bands on the Zebra grass (Miscanthus ‘Zebrinus’

Long Beach

We got a small head start on tomorrow’s Long Beach tasks.

deadheading at the welcome sign


welcome sign front


Allan’s photo


The “you” was blocked by unproductive cosmos greenery…


…so Allan fixed it.

Anchorage Cottages

Mitzu coming to greet us.


Allan’s photos: closing in


closer


and closer


center courtyard


Center courtyard arbutus was popular with bees and a hummingbird or two.


Soon we will trim the viburnums in this bed.


Cosmos ‘Sonata’ in the office planters (Allan’s photo)


Allan’s photo


sweet peas looking tatty…will give them just one more week….or two

The Planter Box

My quest for a few more plants for Diane’s septic box garden netted a couple of heathers, armeria and lavenders.  A good selection of fresh new plants on display made me wish I had a bigger new garden to do.  We got three bags Gardner and Bloome Harvest Supreme for the Diane project.

Pennisetum ‘Jade Princess’…gorgeous and tender


assorted echinaceas

Klipsan Beach Cottages

All we accomplished was some light deadheading and deadleafing and a bit of weeding.

The fairy door had taken a tumble…in the almost tornado of Monday, perhaps.


fixed (Allan’s photos)

Mary agreed we could cut down the rugosa rose, below, right, background.  The stems are looking ugly and it needs refreshing.

rugosa rose; we will wait till the leaves do their nice color change.


too early for fall clean up

I noticed that the Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’ that usually reaches the top of the greenhouse is half that height this year.  Perhaps the sprinkler did not reach far enough into that area.

sit spot


bird bath view

What is up with the cosmos growing so tall with much greenery and no flowers?  I googled and the conclusion was too much nitrogen fertilizer.  That might make sense, because Mary does fertilize this garden, and I applied fertilizer pretty lavishly at the welcome sign, and also I tend to put a dab of fertilizer (Dr Earth all purpose or rose and flower) in each planting hole.  It paid to finally google about this cosmos problem.

The Red Barn

…just got the slightest tidying.

our audience


This fellow is especially handsome.

Diane’s garden

Allan did the mulch spreading and planting in the middle of the huge septic tank thingie.  I planted along the edge and tended to the rest of the garden. I should have taken photos and did not.  Allan did.

We can now take this project off the work list because the basics are done.

home

our neighbour Royal with his bestie, Frosty

Allan took a nap, saying that the job at Diane’s had been hard, and that it used to be easier to just jump up onto a raised bed.  I share his regret at “not getting stronger”.

Tomorrow: Without having to water, we should be able to get a Long Beach planter project done without having to rush.

 

 

 

 

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