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Posts Tagged ‘Ann’s garden’

Sunday, 27 September 2015

While I puttered in the garden at home, Allan did about three hours of weeding at the Ilwaco Community Building garden.

entry garden, before and after

entry garden, before and after (minus a haze of tiny weeds)

cyclamen in the entry garden

cyclamen in the entry garden

Afterward, he picked up some alpine strawberries for Our Kathleen, from a garden where we used to weed on School Hill.  We had given it up when it became difficult for me to work on the steep slope.  Now it is in the care of Flowering Hedge Design with occasional help from Sea Star Gardening (our dear friends Melissa and Dave).  Allan knew I would be pleased to see Ann’s garden (in photographs) so well mulched and weeded.

The neighbour cats were at play.

The neighbour cats were at play.

a well cared for garden

a well cared for garden

three bags of alpine strawberries, one for Kathleen.

three bags of alpine strawberries, one for Kathleen.

Meanwhile, I’d been weeding and transplanting astilbes from dry areas to damper areas, and removing a large bronze fennel.

The spiders are enjoying the new arbour.

The spiders are enjoying the new arbour.

Here's the view WITH the fennel on Sept. 7th.

Here’s the view WITH the fennel on Sept. 7th.

and today with it gone.

and today with it gone.

Maybe I have opened up the view in a way that will make walking down the west side path more enticing.

I spent most of the afternoon fretting about the weather, checking various wind forecasts.  We had plans for an evening campfire with Dave and Melissa and yet the wind was gusting at 20 mph.  When Allan got home, he agreed it was too windy and we canceled the campfire dinner.

Imagine the trees whipping back and forth.

Imagine the trees whipping back and forth.

I went indoors to read, continuing my plan to not boot up the computer till the end of the long weekend…except for the irresistable peeks onto Facebook from my phone.  I already felt disgruntled when the wind died completely at dusk, and to make matters worse when I did go online from my phone, I found that there had been a “supermoon eclipse”.  My newsfeed was full of photos of a big red moon.  What a maddening result of (mostly) staying off the internet for a couple of days.  I had been quite in the dark about the big event (and Allan had an inkling, but forgot).  Now wouldn’t it have been nice to have had that campfire and been surprised by a big red moon (even though we would not have seen the eclipse from our tree-surrounded fire circle)?  I finished my book and ended the day in a grumpy mood with a viewing of an episode of the never-cheering Fear the Walking Dead.

Monday, 28 September 2015

I simply had to shake off the “I missed the eclipse!” malaise.  Allan had plans for a boating excursion.  Beforehand, we went to NIVA green to acquire a couple of birthday presents for two friends.  (This meant I have to leave my property not once but twice on the long weekend!)

Heather’s shop, our favourite, had a collection of old postcards, some with writing on the back, and I got one for myself that I found especially touching.

the postcard

the postcard

and the back of the postcard, with the story of a dream

and the back of the postcard, with the story of a dream

She writes to her mother and sisters: “I dreamed about all of you last night.  Thought I was there and you and I had arranged about a table you found in the attic.  I didn’t want you to put it there (ha ha).” I wish I could decipher the part where she writes “…I don’t have anything from you..”  Something about the postcard made me feel all verklempt, not in a bad way, just in the way of savoring human contact in the same way that I feel when I read room journals at the Sylvia Beach Hotel.

I bought myself another little present, too...

I bought myself another little present, too…I won’t wear these spider earrings around Melissa!

After driving me back home, Allan went off boating (next post) and I gardened.  I was outraged to find that the deer had been inside the new arbour eating my new Joseph’s Coat rose.

much nibbled foliage!

much nibbled foliage!

I knew they COULD easily jump the front fence…and yet had hoped they would be creatures of habit (the habit of walking through the area where the new arbour now blocks them) and not go to that extreme.  Now more deer proofing would be necessary.  I have enough deer in my gardens at work; I want to keep them out at home.

We can run wires between these two posts.

We can run wires between this post and the new arbour to the west..

We can put a post in the corner and run more wires.

We can put a post in the east corner and run more wires.

But what can we do about the short gate??

But what can we do about the short gate??

While pondering that, I took some photos of a shrub that I cannot identify.  Nor could Todd.

an angular evergreen shrub

an angular evergreen shrub

It has white and grey berries.

It has white and grey berries.  (That’s a melianthus leaf intruding.)

I am going to post this on the Plant Idents group.

I am going to post this on the Plant Idents group.

A mere ten minutes later, Ian Barclay writes:  “Hymenanthera angustifolia, aka Melicytus angustifolius”.  Thank you!

In the afternoon, Debbie and her dog Ralph came over to get some divisions of plants for the Master Gardener fall plant sale.  I gave her some large Fuchsia magellanica pieces from one that keeps coming back in the wrong place in my garden (a bed that went from shade to sun when we cut down a big old rhododendron to get a view of Cape Disappointment’s hills).

Debbie and Ralph wheeling the fuchsia.

Debbie and Ralph wheeling the fuchsia.

I did not have my camera at hand till the end of the visit, so you will have to take my word that Ralph greatly enjoyed the garden.

my good friend Ralph

my good friend Ralph

After loading up the fuchsia, some sanguisorbas, some pink turtlehead, some astilbes, and plenty of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, Debbie and I had a good visit leaning up against the front fence.

Later, I even sat down for awhile on the patio.

Later, I even sat down for awhile on the patio.

Ironically, after the cancellation of yesterday’s campfire due to the wind that maddeningly died down at dusk, today gave us perfect weather.  When Allan returned from boating we decided to go ahead and have a fire on our own and have another one next weekend with Dave, Melissa and Our Kathleen (weather permitting).

sunset sky

sunset sky to the west

and to the southwest over the port

and to the southwest over the port and Cape Disappointment

a nice fire

a nice fire

gathering kindling (Allan's photo)

gathering kindling (Allan’s photo)

Smokey got his own chair.

Smokey got his own chair.

We got our full moonrise over the east side of the garden.

We got our full moonrise over the east side of the garden.

Allan's photo: The moon at the end of Lake Street had a pink hue.

Allan’s photo: The moon at the end of Lake Street had a pink hue.  “Pink, pink, pink, pink moon.”

Allan's photo, one block east.

Allan’s photo, one block east.

Allan's photo, Lake Street moon

Allan’s photo, Lake Street moon

Allan's photo: moon over the work trailer!

Allan’s photo: moon over the work trailer!

and roasted our ears of corn in foil with butter, salt and pepper.

We roasted our ears of corn in foil with butter, salt and pepper.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Just for fun, I had posted some fire photos on Facebook and tagged Ilwaco artist Don Nisbett who had commented a few weeks ago that he’d like to smoke a cigar by our camp fire.  To our delight, he arrived as the fire was dying down, and proceeded to puff a fragrant cigar (and I do mean that it smelled good).  We had plenty of wood and built the fire up again.

Don by the fire

Don by the fire

Don and Allan

Don and Allan

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

moon over the gearshed

moon over the gearshed

campfire and moon

campfire and moon

We sat around talking for almost three hours and it more than made up for having missed the moon and fire the previous evening.

Before leaving, Don showed Allan the details in the Nisbett tiles that we have in our kitchen, depicting the Port of Ilwaco.

Before leaving, Don showed Allan the details in the Nisbett tiles that we have in our kitchen, depicting the Port of Ilwaco.

Next:  Allan’s Monday paddle of the Surfside canals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Monday, 24 March 2014

After yesterday’s perfect day….Well, it would be rare to get two perfect days in a row.  As we were getting ready to go to work, with a peaceful little plan of spending all day in Ilwaco (first at Ann’s garden and then at the Port if we had extra time), Ed Strange drove by.  He paused and commented about several days of rain being due.  What??  I had neglected to check the weather and had been counting on tomorrow being good for planting sweet peas at Klipsan Beach Cottages.  The previous evening, we had been just 30 blocks away at the end of the day, at J9’s new digs.  If only I could have pulled out one half hour more of energy, we could have gone to KBC and got the sweet peas done.  A glance, after Ed drove off, at the forecast of rain and 30 mph winds for days made me realize that I had to totally change the plan and go way up north just to get those sweet peas in.

rain

our front garden:  I would rather have stayed home.

our front garden: I would rather have stayed home.

First, we’d dug up some plants to share, so we stopped at Larry and Robert’s (where Ed was mowing) and planted a Pulmonaria (white) and a …plant with brown feathery foliage.  I wonder if whacking my head hard on a tree at the end of the day is why I can’t remember the name? (A few minutes later, with a surge of relief:  Anthriscus sylvestris ‘Ravenswing’!!)

Larry and Robert's garden boat

Larry and Robert’s garden boat

by the boat: needs weeding!

by the boat: needs weeding!

If our plans had not changed, we could have spent half an hour here weeding (and getting in the way of Ed and his employee as they mowed).

Some dead narcissi flowers in the Ilwaco street planters had been bothering me.  We stopped to pluck them and admired the new display in a downtown window.

Wendi's window

Wendi’s window

And then, the long drive north.

eleven miles

eleven miles

We worked for a short time at Golden Sands Assisted Living to make the drive more worthwhile,   weeding and then planting some assorted colours of California poppies (‘Copper Pot’, ‘Tequila Sunrise’ ‘Dusky Rose’, ‘Buttercream’).

The Golden Sands courtyard garden is filled with promise and as I weeded and planted, my thoughts ran like this:  Might it be be garden tour worthy this year after all?

Golden Sands courtyard

Golden Sands courtyard

If only I can keep other workers from doing any more pruning like this:

Rhodos pruned last fall before I cried "Stop!"

Rhodos pruned last fall before I cried “Stop!”

With the sprinkler system working and the dairy manure mulch, the garden could be fabulous this year.  By the end of April, I’ll know if it would be worthy.  It would be fun for the assisted living residents to have the garden on tour, I think.  It would have to be described as a grandma-style cottage flower garden full of passalong plants.  But  wait…We have two out of town garden events to attend in the month before the garden tour and I don’t know if we’ll have time to get a garden ready…

Golden Sands: early tulips

Golden Sands: peacock  tulips

more peacock tulips

more peacock tulips

The northwest quadrant, a neglected one last year, looking wonderful with mulch.

The northwest quadrant, a neglected one last year, looking wonderful with mulch.

On we went to Klipsan Beach Cottages to plant sweet peas.  When we pulled into our parking space we saw a glorious sight:  Denny had removed a hideous old Phormium and replaced it with a new length of fence.

Denny's project: deer fence extension

Denny’s project: deer fence extension

Last time we worked there I had given the Phormium the evil eye but hadn’t expressed my derision to anyone but Allan.  Now it’s on the debris pile, as if Denny had read my mind.  He had a heck of a time getting it out with a pick and shovel.

good riddance

good riddance

Considering that he is ten years older than us, it’s a bit embarrassing that lately I’ve been advising people to hire a backhoe to get rid of big old Phormiums.

Bella had been keeping Denny company while he worked.

Bella had been keeping Denny company while he worked.

I planted sweet peas along the fence here.

I planted sweet peas along the fence here (with Denny mowing in background)

more sweet peas went here

more sweet peas went here

Allan did some weeding; I had hoped he would put magnesium sulfate on the roses while I planted sweet peas.  However, it was one of THOSE days and that bucket had been left at home.  And the temperature was 66 degrees and we both found it considerably too hot; even Denny complained about it.

We headed the eleven miles back to Ilwaco with two Long Beach stops on the way.  On the trip north, I’d noticed some dead narcissi flowers in the planter in front of the Cottage Bakery.  This could not stand!

before deadheading: tattered old blooms

before deadheading: tattered old blooms

We also planted sweet peas around the second of two planter tuteurs, this one by the Paws by the Sea pet supply shop.

paws

The storefront used to be the Liquor Store, which was apparently very important for folks to find, so it got its own special planter tower to help them find it.  Paws by the Sea was lucky to inherit it.

As we passed through Seaview, I made a sudden decision to check the Depot garden for deadheading and indeed, some narcissi needed it.  I would hate for a diner to have to look at dead flowers on the way in.

The Depot Restaurant

The Depot Restaurant

Allan checks the kitchen garden.

Allan checks the kitchen garden.

If the Escallonia at the corner of the building were mine, it would be cut to the ground by now.  The winter hit it hard.

escallonia2

I did not have time to deal with at all as we wanted to get to Ann’s garden.  Later this week, we are taking a friend to the Depot for a celebration and I can then find out if we can cut the escallonia all the way and let it re-sprout.

Finally at last we got to Ann’s garden.  She and Butch had done some good gardening work already this spring; we went over all the beds on the front, west side, and back garden and got more weeds.  I planted starts of Anthriscus and Pulmonaria and some California poppy seeds (‘Dusky Rose’ and ‘Copper Pot’) and two plants from the Basket Case Greenhouse:  Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ and Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’.  I hope all are of no interest to the deer who frequent this garden.

in the midst of weeding the back garden

in the midst of weeding the back garden

Ann and Butch do all the work inside the vegetable gardens, fenced with old windows

Ann and Butch do all the work inside the vegetable gardens, fenced with old windows

The weather had turned cold and windy (and we complained a bit about that).  I stood up and slammed my head hard when weeding under the front garden tree.  I always hurt myself on that tree even though I always tell myself I will know better this time.

that mean tree

that mean tree

Being a hypochondriac, I fretted for awhile that I might have a concussion or, far worse, a hematoma.  (The latter recently, shockingly, happened to a friend.)  So far, I’ve survived.

The garden is full of frustrating scilla (bluebells)….and lily of the valley and wild garlic (or some kind of allium) and is very up and down, on a steepish slope, so is quite a challenge.

peonies swamped with scilla

peonies swamped with scilla

It has made a wonderful difference having most of the beds mulched with dairy manure.  Even the big creeping buttercups sometimes pull out easily as if they were in butter; the base soil is heavy clay.

Ann has a good collection of hellebores.

Ann has a good collection of hellebores.

The cottagey charm of the garden had inspired my admiration for years and keeps drawing me back to work there even th0ugh it is far from the easiest garden t0 tackle.

Ann's charming front garden

Ann’s charming front garden

Even though we got a late start, we got enough done so that we can relax and enjoy the rainy days that are said to be just about upon us.  I hope for a few breaks in wind and rain so that I can get my own sweet peas planted.  Other than that, I’ve just purchased a new book and am hoping for a day to sit and read it from cover to cover.

hoping for a rainy day!

Ironically, hoping for a rainy day to read this!

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, October 5, 2013

The first photo that does not show what I want it to show:

many many gulls in the sky over Nora's house

many many gulls in the sky over Nora’s house

We had to work, but for a workday it was a pretty easy one.  We went to Ann’s garden just up on school hill.  Another photo that does not show what I hoped it would:

spider webs...take my word for it...

spider webs…take my word for it…

There were three or more big, perfect spider webs in the area of Ann’s garden along the fence.  I did not want to ruin the spiders’ day so I saved the weeding along there for another time.

After a couple of hours of work, we went to Olde Towne Café for a couple of hours of coffee klatsching with Judy and Tom and Patt (former Ilwaco resident who is dog, cat, and housesitting for our client Cheri).  Tom and Judy were on time while the rest of us lagged a bit, and they are the ones who got to enjoy the full band of Double J and the Boys perform.  Only two musicians were left when we got there.

music at Olde Towne

music at Olde Towne

Our coffee get together was to make up for the one we missed when the power went off on Thursday.

Olde Towne mirror

Olde Towne mirror

After two hours, we exerted enough discipline to get back to work at Ann’s and made it almost all the way around the house weeding.

Ann's hydrangea...

Ann’s hydrangea…

and the upper terrace of the back yard

and the upper terrace of the back yard

When I get a chance to divide some plants at home, I am going to bring Ann some starts:  ‘Fireworks’ golden rod and a couple of different kinds of shasta daisies.  Along the east fence in the lower garden, below the enclosed kitchen garden, is a big pruning and pulling job for Allan to do when bulb hell begins and I am sorting bulbs for three or four days.

I like Ann’s idea of hanging her sunflowers in a tree and on the fence for the birds.

sunflower

sunflower heads

sunflower heads

She and Butch would have had a good living room window view of birds feasting on these.

At home, I noticed many more orb spider webs and finally got one photo that actually shows a spider.

against the house

against the house

Our moderately expensive new this summer Honda lawn mower still will not GO properly, so Allan mowed with the old electric Husqvarna that belonged to my mum.  It takes almost an hour longer.   Despite that, I would do the mowing and would be all for the rechargeable electric mower except that it just does not cut as low as I like a lawn to be.  The problem with not having bought the gas mower locally means that, under warranty, we have to take it to Astoria for repair….a big hassle to find time for two such trips.  Allan’s research still shows that the Honda he bought SHOULD have been the best mower for the price.

Sunday, October 6, 2013

A day off!  I could have slept till one, I was that tired…but the sun was out and I had garden plans.

The first thing I noticed upon going outside was the warm temperature, the second was wind.  Here’s another photo that does not show what I hoped it would:

leaves were blowing hard off the Bogsy Wood alders.

leaves were blowing hard off the Bogsy Wood alders.

The leaves were whirling the whole length of the garden.

on the lawn Allan mowed just last night

on the lawn Allan mowed just last night..

I had been inspired by the bayside garden I recently toured, whose owners had managed to clear, on their own, large wooded areas of salal.   I think I want to tackle  the salmonberry in the bogsy wood.

tatty looking salmonberry grove

tatty looking salmonberry grove

And yet, they are the first flowers for the hummingbirds in the early spring…and I can cut interesting paths through them.

a path through a grove...with a salmonberry springing back up

a path through a grove…with a salmonberry springing back up

It would be more interesting to have an assortment of shrubs.  But would be so much work.

I started cutting some canes down on the east side, then got distracted by the realization that horrible bindweed is coming through the fence from the gear shed neighbours.

bindweed crisis

bindweed crisis

After I had pulled some of the horrible vine, I realized the wind had gotten much stronger and that it would be foolish to stay under the trees.  Not only is the Danger Tree a big hazard but even the living alders have dead limbs that drop in the wind.

alder, a brittle tree

alder, a brittle tree

Danger Tree

Danger Tree

I am going to see about getting Danger Tree cut down soon.  If I have it cut, it will make far less of a mess than if it falls and its big root ball pulls up a section of garden.  Although that could create some interesting changes of elevation….Hmm…

an big limb that blew down last week

a big limb that blew down last week, one third of the way up the garden

I began to cut back the three big mixed garden beds in the back yard.  I lost my clippers, then found them, then thoroughly lost them again.

before they disappeared altogether

before they disappeared altogether

Clipperless, I started gathering in the milk crates that have been used for greenhouse shelving this summer but will soon be needed for bulb sorting.

into the garage they will go

into the garage they will go so they are good and dry for bulbs

I simply had to get back to clipping, so I got Allan’s hand clippers out of the van.  I hoped to get them put back away before he realized I had borrowed them.  (In the last two weeks, I have misplaced my blue handled clippers, my red ones, and the black handled ones and am now down to none.)

Meanwhile, Allan had tackled the forsythia between our house and Nora’s driveway.  We have to think ahead to someone maybe buying that house now that Nora is gone. We may need a path for dragging the big wheelie bin out for garbage day in case we will no longer be able to share her driveway.

forsythia before and after

forsythia before and after

That’s radical pruning, but was all my choice.  There is growth underneath that will rise up and can become a sort of hedge.  Meanwhile, the top growth still gives us some privacy.  When the lower growth gets taller, we will then cut the three remaining old trunks down.  I don’t even especially like forsythia and would probably be happiest if we could muster the strength to dig it out and plant something better.

I went back to clipping in the back garden (with Allan’s clippers!).  Smokey accompanied me throughout the day.

Smokey

Smokey

The wind had Frosty all excited and I saw him dashing back and forth in the bogsy wood.  I kept one eye on the trees and listened for cracking sounds and stayed out of the south end of the garden…most of the time.

smoke

When I noticed Smokey drinking from a frog bowl, I remembered another one way back in the woods. I did not want it to get broken by a falling branch and made a quick dash of my own to get it, feeling rather stupid.  Obviously, I survived.

I pondered, while cutting down some Shasta daisies, that garden writer Christopher Lloyd was said to be a stickler for cutting stems low enough so that one does not get stabbed by sharp old stubs when weeding the following year.

left: not good enough; right: probably good enough for Christopher Lloyd

left: not good enough; right: probably good enough for Christopher Lloyd

I think of that whenever I get into a garden bed and cut down the perennials.

Ann Lovejoy is a big believer in waiting till spring when the stems often break off easily.  I used to leave my gardens a wild tangle all winter long, following her example.  Somehow, in tidying up gardens for the cities and resorts, I’ve come to enjoy a sparser winter look.

I like to leave plants up that have a good architectural shape, and anything potentially spooky looking has to be cut down shortly before Halloween for our Corridor of Dead Plants (more on this as the month progresses).  If I cut the spooky things too soon, they might soften up.

One of my lobelia tupas is finally blooming!  I have to move it away from Geranium ‘Rozanne’ soon.

But it is sideways and rather pitiful.

It is sideways and rather pitiful.

Eupatorium rugosum ‘Chocolate’ is blooming, looks wonderful, and I remembered its name.  Also wonderful.

'Chocolate' Joe Pye Weed

‘Chocolate’ Joe Pye Weed with Euphorbia in front

Throughout the garden my large and sadly unlabeled collection of hardy Fuchsias still flowers profusely.

Fuchsias

some fuchsia or other

cheerful Helenium 'Sabin's Early'

cheerful Helenium ‘Sabin’s Early’

a late dahlia

a late dahlia

A white begonia reminds me of my friend Mary F. who had to move away for health reasons (to be closer to family).  Moving to a colder clime, she gave many of her plants to Peninsula friends.  A year after being told she was near death, she is still creating beauty all around her and has cancer beaten back.

Mary's white begonia

Mary’s white begonia

The cosmos in the boat are bravely blooming even though they have been sideways since recent winds.

the good ship 'Ann Lovejoy'

the good ship ‘Ann Lovejoy’

Over the roofs, I saw a blaze of red from Larry and Robert’s tree and telephotoed it so you can see it, too.

half a block to the west!

half a block to the west!

On the kitchen garden front, I got some more beautiful spuds out of the debris pile.

such pretty potatoes

such pretty potatoes

It just takes ruching around by hand to find these healthy tubers.

There’s plenty going on in the assorted squash patch by Nora’s driveway.  I have no idea when to harvest these or what to do with them!

big and green

big and green

I fooled Judy and even myself a couple of times with a glass gourd.  Now it has a real squash next to it.

real and fake

real and fake

I grew some zucchini, which I do not like, just because of the edible tour.  This round one might be ready for Judy to harvest (and she could get some little gold tomatoes out of the greenhouse, as well).

Oh, Judy...I can't tell if this little guy is ready or not.

Oh, Judy…I can’t tell if this little guy is ready or not.

Maybe a “zucchini squash” is not really a zucchini.

Another mystery squash...Is it supposed to turn orange, or what?!?

Another mystery squash…Is it supposed to turn orange, or what?!?

a pitiful harvest of sweet and delicious corn

a pitiful harvest of sweet and delicious corn

The day’s results:  After clipping out the unattractive old stems of shasta daisies and such, and the too tall, sideways falling stems of Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’, there is a little more definition in the big east side bed.

results

results

I did lots of cutting of daisies, Lemon Queen, and blue globe thistle stems, and pulling of volunteer nasturtiums in the west bed.  The rather warm wind was still whipping so I had to avoid the area closer to the trees.

west bed, before

west bed, before

The red drawer was planted for the edible garden tour with some old kale seeds.  I might as well have just stuck the label in and not planted the seeds.  They turned out to be no longer viable!  I got a fall crop of kale in two out of four drawers but don’t know what to do to make it tasty other than fry it up with bacon.  That would seem to defeat the purported health benefits of the kale.

after

after

I couldn’t haul the debris to the west side debris pile because it is way back past Danger Tree.

piles of debris on west path...for when the wind stops.

looking south at piles of debris on west path…for when the wind stops.

The new debris pile is almost all the way to the south end of the fence.

through a west gate: the autumn garden

through a west gate: the autumn garden

My latest plan is to put the Gearhart Garden tour inspired scree garden to the right, next to the garden boat.  Or maybe a pond!  But then where will the scree garden go?  Such a dilemma.

I stopped before dark.  The wind was getting pretty annoying.  I got Allan’s clippers back into the van and I don’t think he realized I used them.  The truth will come out tomorrow when I have to use his back-up clippers for work.

south window view

south window view

Allan does his own thing on days off, which today had something to do with the lawnmower being drained, and the hood of the van being open while he did something about the engine, and some sawing noises, and the putting up of the Halloween lights!

spider lights

spider lights

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Aug 22, 2013

On our compost-bucket-switch stop at Olde Towne, we walked right in, noticed the nice sign for lentil stew, switched buckets and were leaving when Luanne asked if we had seen the new sign.

inside

inside

outside

outside

I hadn’t looked up! (If you look to the right above, you will see our new van next to Chester and Allan.)

by local signpainter Chris Jacobsen

by local signpainter Chris Jacobsen

And then….Andersen’s, since we had not gotten there yesterday.

Payson Hall at Andersen's

Payson Hall at Andersen’s

still some poppies

still some poppies

Staffer Al was giving Chewie a bath in nice warm water from the outdoor shower hose.

Chewie

Chewie

such a face!

such a face!

Next, back down to north Long Beach to the Anchorage Cottages garden. I re-thought a thought that I had had the previous week there. For some reason I had got it into my head that we would cut down the Virburnums under the window of cottage 8 . Had I been mad? I had not liked it when the rhodo was cut down by the cottage window to the left, and have said it must be allowed to grow up and make a green dappled light inside that room again. Surely the guests prefer to look our their window and see green Virbunum instead of the car park!

What was I thinking?

What was I thinking?

I still like my new idea I had of putting ferns on the right side of the walk where there is a mishmash of plants. The problem of overwork means we often just weed and prune and water without having time to really think about the less important areas of various gardens. I’m having a little more time to think now that it is the slightly slower time of August.

I think limbing up the viburnums is a better idea than taking them down and letting them grow back thicker and short!

I would much rather be behind rhododendron foliage than have a view out  one of these windows...(unless it were a window facing toward the sea.)

I would much rather be behind rhododendron foliage than have a view out one of these windows…(unless it were a window facing toward the sea. Which is not the case here.)

green is better...

green is better…although the number 8 has gotten hidden again!

Anchorage window boxes

Anchorage window boxes

Next, we watered some of the Long Beach planters…

a clear yellow Tigridia (Mexican Shell Flower)

a clear yellow Tigridia (Mexican Shell Flower)

and walked briefly out to the kite festival booths. By the time we got there, the kites were all down from the sky so we didn’t go all the way to the beach. I was hoping to find the vendor from last year who had very inexpensive reading spectacles. Did not find her but did find total confirmation that the Rugosa rose takeover of the Bolstadt beach approach garden is indeed about the only thing that would hold up to kite festival foot traffic.

looking west

looking west

space

a newly worn path

a newly worn path

This wasn't bare last week.

This wasn’t bare last week.

That's what happens.

That’s what happens.

What happened here?

What happened here?

Rugosa roses standing up for themselves.

Rugosa roses standing up for themselves.

Gaura lindheimeri 'Whirling Butterflies'

Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’

When we work on the beach approach garden in late summer, we often get asked if the rose hips are tomatoes. One of the common names for Rugosa rose is the Tomato Rose.

good for rose hip tea, rich in Vitamin C

good for rose hip tea, rich in Vitamin C

just a very few flowers left

just a very few flowers left…The leaves are rugose (wrinkled, corrugated)

While walking through the vendor area, not only did I meet our friend Donna M, but I also got a thrilling phone call from Golden Sands, informing me that the courtyard garden sprinkler system had been repaired: Raymond Millner from The Planter Box had found and fixed the leak!

To the east of the arch, I admired the signs for the new coffee shop which will feature treats by the delectable Pink Poppy Bakery.

It just occurred to me to Google the meaning of Akari:  "light" or "glimmer"

It just occurred to me to Google the meaning of Akari: “light” or “glimmer”

The Starvation Alley folks live next door to us and produce organic cranberry juice from their cranberry bog (which is not next door to us!). Pink Poppy Bakery is associated with the gorgoeus Pink Poppy Farm. The new place will be a pleasant stop on Long Beach workdays if I follow my resolve to actually take breaks.

Back downtown, I returned to watering. I admired one of the four Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’ planted in two planters near the Cottage Bakery and Funland. Four Knautia in all, two on the outer edge of each planter….

Knautia 'Thunder and Lightning'

Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’

But wait!! Where one of the four should be, there is nought but a creeping succulent…

NOOOOOO!

NOOOOOO!

Finger blight has struck and I did not even notice the theft till the sedum had filled back in. (I have to plant low things on the inner edge of this particular planter because, being next to Funland, it gets seriously sat upon.) I cannot even find more of the Knautia to plant a replacement this fall, and that makes me mad.

One of the remaining Knautias mingling nicely with a California poppy.

One of the remaining Knautias mingling nicely with a California poppy.

After watering, home….

I tried to get a good photo of the mysterious looking hardy gladiolus papilio…

looking up from underneath

looking up from underneath in the garden boat

further back by the bogsy wood...pink turtlehead

further back by the bogsy wood…pink turtlehead

My Nicotiana langsdorfii is still going strong!

My Nicotiana langsdorfii is still going strong!

At almost all my jobs, the Nicotiana is dried and not blooming much….I credit my high water table, great soil, and lots of supplemental water because of being on a garden tour…

August 23, 2013

First thing the next morning: Because I thought Larry and Robert’s garden had gotten a bit too dry earlier, Allan went down the block to water it while I tried to get me arse in gear for work. I followed him down there after awhile and had the pleasure of walking past Tom and Judy’s garden.

¯

Hornbuckle garden, looking west along the fence

Hornbuckle garden, looking west along the fence

and further west

and further west

Judy's poppies

Judy’s poppies

When I joined Allan, I told him something had happened to my resolve about work. The previous day I had noticed on Facebook that Jane and Dirk of the English Nursery were off to the county fair…

Hmmm...

Hmmm…

And then this morning, our client Ann had posted “Heading out to the Pacific County Fair and just found out it is Senior Citizen Day!! I get in FREE!!” Huh. Could we be missing something? The fair was an annual event in the town of Menlo about 26 miles away. We had a nice new van for a comfortable drive. I had never been to it and started to think we should go, and Allan agreed. But we would have to hustle to get some work done first.

At the Depot Restaurant garden, I finally got around to planting the rosemaries and garlic chives in the herb garden behind the kitchen. Allan went down the block to give Crank’s Roost garden another splash of water to hold it till its (soon to be former) owner returned home.

The Depot flower garden

The Depot flower garden

Depot:  Cosmos backed with hops

Depot: Cosmos backed with hops

The garden idea is to attract people’s attention from the main highway half a block west to the Depot…

More bright dahlias would be good at the Depot.

More bright dahlias would be good at the Depot.

Solidago (goldenrod) "Fireworks' is just starting to explode behind the Cosmos.

Solidago (goldenrod) “Fireworks’ is just starting to explode behind the Cosmos.

We deadheaded the Long Beach welcome sign and then went back to Ilwaco to weed Ann’s garden. I had planned for us to spend several hours there, but instead we spent an hour and a half.

Butch's nice new entry arbour dressed up with bamboo

Butch’s nice new entry arbour dressed up with bamboo

As I entered the back garden, a hustle and bustle of swiftly moving animals skittered from Ann’s garden into the yard of the neighbours to the west.

next door

next door

baby

next door

Before I pulled the bindweed, I just had to photograph more wildlife:

tiny baby Pacific tree frogs

two tiny baby Pacific tree frogs

small

so very small

looking over Ann's veg garden, deer proof

looking over Ann’s veg garden, deer proof

sunflowers

sunflowers

While the veg and raspberries are protected from deer, we must choose deer resistant plants for the open flower beds. I intend to bring some starts of Shasta daisies to add to the bed below, and run the golden marjoram all along the edge.

bed

The clay soil has been vastly improved with Soil Energy mulch and dairy manure but needs another application of a couple more inches of mulch to help new plants along.

After removing three wheelbarrows of weeds from Ann’s front and back flower beds, I left her a note on her porch saying that, sadly, SOMEONE had influenced us to go to the fair. I added that we would be back next week (little knowing that stormy weather would intervene)…. and in the midafternoon, we skived off work and headed north to Menlo.

Next: evening at The Pacific County Fair!

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Back to work, and determined as ever to thoroughly document the work year, here is a run down of the first two days of the week.

Monday, July 22

While I keep saying we will not do on- off plain old hard slog weeding jobs, I cannot resist the yellow cottage on top of Ilwaco’s School Hill whose owner, Robin, asked us to weed last fall and then again about a month ago.  We finally got round to it.  This cottage used to be in the Ilwaco boatyard (before it was the boatyard) and along with two other cottages was moved.  One of those three cottages became the original Tangly Cottage, my residence from  1994 through fall of 2010.  Like this one, it was tiny.  Robin told me when the yellow cottage was moved, the old woman who lived in it was asked if she wanted to move to its new location.  She said “I’ve always wanted to live in the hill!”  Later, the cottage was dwelled in by a gardener who since had to go to assisted living, and there are just remnants of her garden left.  If I am remembering correctly what Robin told us last fall, the gardening tenant used to own Ilwaco’s Sunset Tavern (which is no more).   I heard from someone else that she was a kind woman who would feed meals to poor retired fisherman and let them take a shower in a bathroom above the tavern.

I just like to be around this yellow cottage on School Hill.

I just like to be around this yellow cottage on School Hill.

garden bed west of the cottage, noon

garden bed west of the cottage, noon

five forty PM

five forty PM

a little pond, at noon

a little pond, at noon

and at five forty PM

and at five forty PM

also weeded and excavated shells and rock in this area

also weeded and excavated shells and rock in this area

the west side of the cottage

the west side of the cottage

looking south from west side of cottage

looking south from west side of cottage

When we are in the yellow cottage garden, I feel that if I owned it and lived there, and also owned the enormous field to the west and the vintage Spartan trailer therein, my life would be perfection!

looking west...in my dreams...

looking west…in my dreams…and tsunami safe

former deer-proof garden

former deer-proof garden

still to do....

still to do….

By the south side of the cottage is another remnant of the former tenant’s garden:

lilies

lilies

I would like just a little start of this bulb...

I would like just a little start of this bulb…

As we drove away, we were amused by the deer-pruned trees just south down the hill…

deer topiary

deer topiary

Tuesday, July 23

Tuesday, we finally got back to Ann’s School Hill garden after sorely neglected it to get three other gardens ready for the Music in the Gardens tour.

Ann and her husband, whom she fondly called "The Finn", care for the veg garden.

Ann and her husband, whom she fondly called “The Finn”, care for the veg garden.

garden below the house, 12:15 PM

garden below the house, 12:15 PM

4:45 PM

4:45 PM

The creeping buttercup comes out of the clay soil like butter now that we have mulched with Soil Energy and Cow Fiber.  I hope to apply another layer this fall along with starts of some more deer resistant perennials.

The old windows around the veg garden are from the old high school, I believe.

The old windows around the veg garden are from the old high school, I believe.

the front garden, weeded

the front garden, weeded

Then, after spending the day on School Hill, we went home to our own garden.

At home, I am so pleased to finally have acquired and grown well a Dichora febrifuga!

soon to be a beautiful blue!

soon to be a beautiful blue!

lilies in front garden at home

lilies in front garden at home

lilies in back garden

lilies in back garden

east side bed, back garden

east side bed, back garden

Clematis 'Etoile Violette' still going strong

Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’ still going strong

I never could quite figure out what to do with the kale I grew (from the plants Nancy Allen kindly gave me), and the leaves got too big and bitter, so I chopped them.  Also, they had caterpillars, and I found that disturbing.  By the time I chopped them, the caterpillars seemed to have moved on.  It is working, getting new little leaves, which may make them last till the Edible Garden Tour on August 11!

kale experiment (and some cilantro in foreground pot)

kale experiment (and some cilantro in foreground pot)

Finally, look at the size of this lily!  I have several so they must be from a Costco bag.

enormous lily flower

enormous lily flower

just one petal next to a kitchen spoon!

just one petal next to a kitchen spoon!

There is great charm in spending two days gardening only in Ilwaco!

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Today will be mostly befores and afters, due to lack of writing time.  The days are long, and we are often out in the garden till dusk.

So:  At Larry and Robert’s, the beginnings of a project and a tidying of the garden.

Allan digs out an azalea that Larry wanted transplanted...

Allan digs out an azalea that Larry wanted transplanted…

new area to be planted by back porch

new area to be planted by back porch

azalea installed

azalea installed

Allan gets the call from Box K Auto repair and runs for the bus which leaves the port in five minutes!

Meanwhile, I do the tidying on the existing garden, especially the removal of annoying Scilla foliage:

before, east side garden

before, east side garden

after

after

the garden boat

the garden boat

next door, Tom and Judy's lupines highlighted against purple foliage

next door, Tom and Judy’s lupines highlighted against purple foliage

The lupines were past their peak, but what a great effect!

Walking home to meet Allan and the car, I saw:

over the fence:  Judy's Eryngium 'Sapphire' Blue'

over the fence: Judy’s Eryngium ‘Sapphire’ Blue’

This plant is known as “LB” because I had intended it for there, but Judy wanted it so much.  (We got more for Long Beach later.)

Judy's Dianthus

Judy’s Dianthus

My garden looks pretty bright when you walk toward it from the west.  I planted that corner in the brightest colours so Nora could see it easily from her window.  Walking by the window where Nora often sat and waved and smiled at me is now a poignant moment.

a spot of colour from one lot away

a spot of colour from one lot away

With the car retrieved, we went to Olde Towne to celebrate getting it back;  the Peninsula Quilt Guild was there as well, including Ann for whom we were about to go garden.

Quilt Guild

Quilt Guild

Then on to Ann’s.  More befores and afters:

before

before

after

after

before

before

after

after

before

before

after!

after!

Ann has some new garden art from her friend in Spokane.

art

art

And gorgeous plants as always:

Siberian Iris

Siberian Iris

hostas

hostas, oxalis, and ferns

another must-have poppy

another must-have poppy

a peek into an enchanted garden

a peek into an enchanted garden

We then went to the port to finish the weeding where I left off yesterday.

Howerton Street garden outside Marie Powell Gallery

Howerton Street garden outside Marie Powell Gallery

I have totally gone off New Zealand flax (above) anywhere near a sidewalk (for one thing, it is too poky), so this is the only garden along Howerton that still has them.  I would imagine that Marie and Randy Powell are fond of them because they (the Powells) go the New Zealand in the winter!  So we try to keep these trimmed back rather than proposing their removal.

Howerton Street garden by Port Office

Howerton Street garden by Port Office

The gardens we have totally replanted at the port are more like the above:  small plants, clear sightlines for traffic, and no river rock to roll around while weeding. The plant that gets the most comments is Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’.

Sapphire Blue sea holly

Sapphire Blue sea holly

sea holly

evening light

evening light

On the other side of the Port buildings:

a boat called Summer Rose

a boat called Summer Rose

(left) the Rumrunner

(left) the Rumrunner

part of the charter fleet

part of the charter fleet

That view is a good one to end the workday with, as well as this one where we dump weeds down at the east end of the port.

nature

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I had one major thing on my mind today, that I learned this morning that my best local friend and neighbour gardener, Judy from four doors down, had a small heart attack yesterday. Apparently not too bad because she is home again. We visited her at the hospital in our small town before we went to work and of course I thought of her all day long.

Work did get done because work must be done barring complete emergencies (like me or Allan having a heart attack! I have been through that when my former partner, Robert, had one in 2002, and he got well enough to work as a gardener again even though he did not take nearly as good care of himself as he could have. His was worse as they kept him for at least three days. Six weeks later he had a clean bill of health except for taking Lipitor. So take heart (sorry) if you are reading this, my dear friend Judy!)

So imagine through this whole day in the back of my mind I am just thinking about Judy.

We went to Ann’s garden after the hospital visit to pop in a few baby calendula from my garden, and I photographed the Siberian iris that I admired yesterday, and some peonies.

pink peony

pink peony

red peony

red peony

Siberian iris

Siberian iris

Just through oversight, I have ended up with no peonies in my new garden even though I had two in my old one. I must remedy this as I like their foliage and their flowers.

After the stop at Ann’s we went to Olde Towne for a brief coffee break. I needed some as had taken a sleeping pill the night before (worried about Judy!) and that always has a regrettable result the next day. Our friends there all had reassuring stories about people doing very well after mild heart attacks. Allan took this interesting photograph looking toward a mirror at the back of the café that was showing the front window.

at Olde Towne

at Olde Towne

We had a big project to do at the Boreas Inn: removing a big pile of junk. Famous NW gardener Ciscoe Morris will be staying there Sunday night after giving a talk to benefit the Peninsula Boys and Girls Club (see end of post for details) so we really could not have junk as the backdrop of the western garden beds.

looking toward garden from lower entry...

looking northwest from lower entry…

looking sout from garden; Allan getting ready to tackle the pile.

looking south from garden; Allan getting ready to tackle the pile.

before...

before…

The pile went deeper into a hollow than we thought it would, contained most of an old shed, and turned out to weigh 900 pounds!

pile offloaded at the dump

pile offloaded at the dump

I didn’t get a photo of it in our little trailer because a backhoe was running back and forth next to our car at the dump and I couldn’t get out for a bit.

It all fit in here with Allan's expert loading.

It all fit in here with Allan’s expert loading.

We then went to the Basket Case to get some plants to fill in along the edges at Boreas. That was my excuse for riding along to the dump. I think the real reason was I was fretting about Judy and did not want to stay behind at the Boreas weeding all alone.

At the Basket Case, their last (I think) Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ was starting to colour up:

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

(The Basket Case may soon be out of this plant, but the Planter Box also has some.)

We put a nice edge on three of the lawn beds at Boreas and filled in around the edges with some little Dianthus, some Portulaca, and added a Helianthemum ‘Dazzler’, a Helenium, and a Phygelius ‘African Queen’ to make the beds more full.

looking east

looking east

looking southwest...trash pile gone!

looking southwest…trash pile gone!

nice crisp edge

nice crisp edge

west, evening

west, evening

The ocean is at the end of that path through the dunes.

I took a quick walk to show you how pretty the inn is looking.

west side

west side

deck, southwest corner

deck, southwest corner

east side

east side

new sit spot, east side

new sit spot, east side

The new sit spot on the east side (main entrance to inn) was created when a big pine was removed. Our good friend, local gardener Ed Strange (who mows the Boreas lawn) facilitated the job and provided the lovely pots of bamboo that make such an excellent backdrop.

One last satisfying view as we left:

no trash pile!

no trash pile!

And so my outdoor workday ended. Allan did the tedious and back-straining round of bucket watering the Ilwaco planters while I worked on my belated May billings, interspersed with messages to and fro with Judy’s friends. Kathleen S, Patt, and I, Ann from up the hill, Luanne and Chester from Olde Towne, Fred and Nancy from The Basket Case, Jenna from Queen La De Da’s Art Castle, and Judy’s dear friend Liz from way down in Nevada (Judy’s former home) are all thinking of her.

**********************************************************

details re the Ciscoe talk:

  • Sunday, June 9th, Gardening with Ciscoe!
    • The Kiwanis Club of Long Beach is hosting, “Gardening with Ciscoe,” June 9th. All proceeds will go towards the Boys & Girls Club! We are so excited!
    • This special fundraiser will take place Sunday, June 9th, at the Long Beach Elks Lodge, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. with activities, including book sales and signing, and photo opportunities, beginning at 12 p.m. We will have plants for sale that were planted, and being taken care of by the kids thanks to The Planter Box!
    • Tickets are $20 each and are for sale at Peninsula Pharmacies, Inc. (Long Beach), Adrift Hotel & Spa, and Coastal Eye Care – Long Beach Office

 

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