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Posts Tagged ‘Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’’

Thursday, 17 August 2017

The workday began with optimism that we could get everything done in order to get Friday off to relax and to blog about Tuesday’s day trip.  The pressure was low; if the work spilled over on to Friday, that would not be a problem.

First thing: Delivering flowers to Don Nisbett Gallery, for Jenna to take to their guest condo, in which she is hosting a bevy of mermaids over the weekend.

Long Beach

I often remember the deadheading of the welcome sign just as we are about to drive past it.

deadheading cosmos

Allan looked over the top of the sign for this one.

front side.

back side with Allan trimming the tatty Geranium ‘Orion’, which will be replaced with Rozanne (like the one at right) this fall.

I had intended to water the Long Beach planters first and then see how much time was left for the beach approach garden.  Then, in order to dump our debris while the city works lot is open (to save having to wrestle with the big gate), I decided we should weed the beach approach and its planters first.  Kite Festival starts Monday so we want it to look good.

Someone had left this rock in a planter.

This week, someone had added a plant to the Lisa Bonney memorial planter instead of taking plants away.

This pansy is new. Thank you.

I got to pet three lovely bassets.

Later, we saw in town a license plate that read AGLBST.  It came to me that it meant Agility Basset, i.e. dogs who compete in agility courses.  I bet those bassets belonged to that car.  If you want to watch an unusual breed of dog compete in agility, have a look at this video featuring my cousin’s St Bernard.  I imagine bassets would also be endearing to watch.

Our friend John and his darling dog, Tippi, stopped to visit.

Someone had helped themselves to one of my circle of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’.

rather a large amount of trash, neatly boxed.

note to self: just remove these old bearded iris from this planter in fall. Planted by a volunteer years ago, they do not do well.

I’m pleased there will still be rugosa roses blooming during Kite Festival.

We then weeded and deadheaded Veterans Field.

Allan also weeded the little park behind Lewis and Clark Square, which is heavy on crocosmias, including the small red ones to the left.

Because a biggish event, Jazz and Oysters, will be at Vet Field this weekend, I suddenly got the notion to apply mulch to the corner garden in order to fluff it up.  We were shockingly short on buckets. They have made their way from the work trailer into the garden at home.  Fortunately, I was able to find a stack of buckets at city works to borrow.

adding mulch at Veterans Field

We then took another buckets-load of mulch out to a couple of low areas on the beach approach garden.

second load of assorted scavenged buckets (Allan’s photo)

The beach approach now looks relatively spiffing for Kite Festival.

Done with mulching at the beach approach, too tired to go back for an after photo.

It was close to four o clock when we started watering the main street planters.  We skipped watering the street trees this week because of last Saturday’s rain.  We might regret that.

My walkabout photos:

Gladiolus papilio and still blooming pink oenothera

a couple of gladiolus, saved from volunteer days in the planter we re-did this spring.

I don’t really liked the regular old glads in a planter because they look clunky when deadheaded.  There are some in the Ilwaco planters that someone else must have put in, because I didn’t.

Allan’s walkabout photos:

Fuchsia, probably Golden Gate

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and cosmos

Salvia viridis (painted sage)

Just when I felt everything was going swimmingly and we’d have no problem getting Ilwaco watered as well, I remembered that we had to water the seven planters along the Sid Snyder Drive beach approach.  We split up to each water, me the east end and Allan the west end.

on Sid Snyder approach

AND we had better check up on the Kite Museum because…Kite Festival is coming.  (How could I almost have forgotten that after that kite festival painted rock?)

My heel was plaguing me as I dragged myself and my sore foot over there from my last planter.

World Kite Museum

Our new planters look good. Note the little blue painted rock.

penstemon has gone a bit flopsy

I just need those plants to stay perfectly beautiful for ten more days!

By now, it was after six.  Allan rejoined me and said he had the energy still to water the Ilwaco street trees and planters.  In order to get Friday off, I was determined to match that energy and get the boatyard watered and at least slightly deadheaded and weeded.

Ilwaco

Allan untangled and set up our long hose for me.  I was feeling punchy, my dogs were barking, and I was utterly determined to get this done.

watering south of the gate

boatyard work (Allan’s photo)

By the time I had the south stretch of garden watered, a breeze had come up and I wished I had my sweatshirt.  I could see Allan at the very far end of the block with his water truck.  It was simply too far to go.

Allan is way down at the end of the chain link fence.

Things took a turn for the better when I found two hoses hooked up on the inside of the fence halfway and two thirds of the way down…and they were just lying ready for me instead of being hoisted up with the nozzle end going into a boat.

This broken down patched old hose was a beautiful sight to me…

As was the hose at the far end.

I was so happy about the hoses that I swear my heel hurt less. I also realized that all day while working, in the back of my mind this chant was running over and over: No Trump, No KKK, No Fascist USA.  Clearly the news is always weighing on my thoughts.

viewing the garden from the inside, sweet pea success

It is frustrating to see deadheads from inside of the fence.

note to self: divide and make maybe two more clumps of this vigorous perennial sunflower (some sort of helianthus)

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ on both sides of the fence. I cut it back hard in early spring.

From whence did this boatyard buddleia volunteer blow in?  It’s a noxious weed.  I had mercy.

a boat with bikes on board

I had time to go to the outside of the fence and get some of the deadheads I had seen.

looking south

It was getting dark-ish when I found a broken bottle in the garden.  This photo below is to remind me of where it was, because I know there is still sharp glass there.

Note to self: Be careful next time.

Parts of the garden look bad with scrimmy horsetail no longer hidden by annual poppies.  I did not have time to deal with all of it.

a particularly sad spot

Other parts made me happy with beauty and interest.

I must stick more cuttings of the artemisia in the ground this fall. I do love it so.

This was my favourite spot today.

cosmos, looking lush but not many blooms yet

I keep thinking that when the last summer art walks roll around  (September 1), I should put up a sign at the boatyard reading “Gardening is the Slowest of the Performing Arts.”  I doubt I will have the energy to make that happen.

Meanwhile, Allan had the planters done.

watering planters till sunset

the one remaining big Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

Someone had sat on and smashed flat part of this planter.

Allan rejoined me just as it was almost too dark to see.  When he parked the water trailer at home, he found this hitchhiker.

My damnable right heel was plaguing me severely for the rest of the evening.  I wondered if it makes any sense at all to push so hard on a ten hour day just to get an extra day off.  And yet I do love a three day weekend.

Lest you feel achy with sympathy, I can report as I write this that I  experienced almost no foot pain on the two days off that followed, during which I only did some light watering at home, a tiny bit of planting, and a lot of news reading and blogging.  Allan’s much more interesting Saturday boat excursion will be tomorrow’s post.

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 9 February 2016

We again joined forces with Sea Star Gardening for the first clean up at the Port of Ilwaco boatyard.

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before (Allan’s photo)

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There’s Melissa, just getting started on the job.

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Allan’s photo

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The garden is three blocks long.

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before (Allan’s photo)

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Artemisias and Santolinas waiting to be clipped

 

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santolina before clipping

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Melissa likes to use hedge shears on the santolina.

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a santolina after clipping

Clipping back (which can be done even more sternly than above) keeps the santolinas (silver ones and green ones)  beautifully rounded instead of splayed open.

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The garden was carpeted with weeds mixed in with poppy seedlings.

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Allan’s photo

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A barrow fill of santolina and artemisia clippings Allan’s photo)

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As we worked, Mr. Magoo entered the boatyard from the water.

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Dave commented that he usually doesn’t find fish heads in a garden.

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Weeds didn’t stand a chance.  (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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rosemary in bloom

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finishing up the long stretch to the north of the gate

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Time to move to the other side of the gate

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From the gate looking north, I felt pleased with our results.

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a full load to take to the debris pile

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Allan installed his new signs.  Note that is is positively worded instead of a “DON’T” message.

Between the sections, Allan dumped load one of debris at the debris pile with a view.

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Allan’s photo

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It was an 80 degree day in Long Beach.  Fortunately for us, Ilwaco was a tad bit cooler.  (Allan’s photo)

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Allan returned to find us ready to start the south stretch of garden.  

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south of the gate, before weeding and clipping

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looking north from the historic railway sign

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Allan’s photo

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finishing up

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a job well done

Too bad that I know that soon big horsetail will be sprouting all along this garden.  Also too bad we can’t work with Sea Star all the time as it was awfully fun and productive.  However, we will be lucky to get them for a couple more spring cleanups before they are well immersed into their own round of jobs.

The sun was setting as we finished the job.

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Ginger’s Garden Diaries

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Ginger’s Garden Diaries

I am incorporating my mom’s garden journal from the 90’s into this 2016 journal.

February 9, 1998 (age 73)

[Robert, my spouse at the time, and I were visiting mom at her home near Olympia.]

Robert did a few minor jobs for me.  Then we all worked on bringing firewood up to the porch.  They emptied all the last year wood from the shed and brought up quite a lot from behind the shop.  Now that the shed is empty I will be able to put in there the cut up wood from all the branches (when I get them sawed up).

 

 

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Saturday, 21 February 2015

As I left four work, the cat family of mother and two brothers was hanging out by the south window.

Frosty, Smokey, and Mary

Frosty, Smokey, and Mary

Ilwaco planters

The Ilwaco boatyard garden was today’s target.  Allan got started on it straightaway.  I digressed to one block of planters and street trees that had not had their first check up of the year yet.  The planters looked good with narcissi blooming, and some chickweed and little grasses needing to be pulled.

trailing rosemary, as I look east down Main Street

trailing rosemary, as I look east down Main Street

looking southwest at the Portside Café

looking southwest at the Portside Café

Ornamental pear street tree in bloom

Ornamental pear street tree in bloom

The Portside Café recently acquired new new owners.  One of our neighbours was leaving there with two family members while I weeded under a street tree.  and told me that the food was so wonderful that she gave the chef himself an extra tip.  I’ve always loved the exterior; now I need to find time to give the food a try.

I put some of the pale orange and purple violas in the container closest to the café.

I put some of the pale orange and purple violas in the container closest to the café.

Map My Walk of working the First and Main intersection

Map My Walk of working the First and Main intersection

Closer to the boatyard, at First and Eagle, passing deer have nipped the tulips in the planter.  There are certain deer crossroads, like one intersection in Long Beach, where they eat more than they do elsewhere in town.

tulip neatly nipped off

tulip neatly nipped off

Here they reached underneath other plants and chomped away specifically on the yummy tulips.

Here they reached underneath other plants and chomped away specifically on the yummy tulips.

I won’t be planting tulips in those planters next fall.

At the corner of First and Eagle, I’ve been watching one street tree slowly lean.  There is nowhere to stake it, as it is in a small square surrounded by concrete (and is too big to stake anyway).

first

a sunken hole at the base of the trunk

a sunken hole at the base of the trunk

Allan pointed out that it is solidly in position and does not budge at all when pushed.

In the course of the one block of planters, I picked up this much trash in the grass next to the sidewalks:

trash

Does this mean no other walkers pick up trash on their journeys?  (My noble plan to do trash walks this past winter was thwarted by my overwhelming desire to just stay home.)

Finally, after an hour and a half, I was done with the six trees and eight planters that had been on my agenda and joined Allan at the boatyard garden.  As I got down to work, the Life Flight helicopter flew over the oil tanks kitty corner from the boatyard and I wished the best to whoever was having a scary awful day.

oil

Meanwhile, I was fortunate enough to be having a pleasant day at work next to a boatyard full of interesting sights.  A radio played country music, which I at least  find preferable to classic rock.

boat

Steel Breeze

Fear Naught

Fear Naught

Ankeny Street (named after a street in Portland, Oregon)

Ankeny Street (named after a street in Portland, Oregon)

Steve, who lives on a sailboat in the marina came by with his dog Aleutia (a certified search and rescue dog).

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan had already made some progress.

before:  Allan's photo when he started

before: Allan’s photo when he started

boatyard

An hour and a half later, I join the boatyard weeding at 0ne PM.  

 

spot

I came along behind, clipping santolinas and Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’:

half an hour later

half an hour later

Allan's photo, looking south, before

Allan’s photo, looking south, before

after

after, Allan’s photo

 

Santolina and Artemisa, before clipping

Santolina and Artemisa, before clipping

after: clipped so they will be roundish and not splay open in late summer

after: clipped so they will be roundish and not splay open in late summer

See that stem of Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ on the ground toward the bottom of the photo?  If I clipped it short and stuck it in the ground, it would probably root and make a nice new plant.  Same with the clippings from the Santolina.  I get overwhelmed with armloads of clippings and don’t have time to make a santolina cutting nursery.  I have started a lot of them right in the ground, though, over time.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

What have we here?

What have we here?

We’d noticed earlier, on drive-bys, that the center (slightly wider) section of the garden had a smashed down rosemary and flattened Stipa gigantea.  I tried to imagine what had caused it.  I forgot to take an after photo, although this one, looking back, shows it looking tidier:

The center point is where the fence goes in to a gentle V.

The center point is where the fence goes in to a gentle V.

By now, it was 3 PM and I was concerned that we would not get to the end of the boatyard before dark.

4:35 PM:  Had finally crossed the gate to the south section of the garden.  Here, looking north.

3:35 PM: Had finally crossed the gate to the south section of the garden. Here, looking north.

I had many, many more santolinas to clip.  I lost count.  I have two different kinds of silver ones, and green ones, and “Lemon Fizz’, the gold one that loves to revert to green.

looking south: still lots of creeping sorrel and shotweed to remove

looking south: still lots of creeping sorrel and shotweed to remove (and, happily, lots of poppy seedlings): 3:30 PM, still at least two hours till dusk.

Moving right along at 4:30 PM

Moving right along at 4:30 PM.  That’s Euphorbia characias wulfenii in bloom

By now, Allan had already made one trip to dump a full cart of debris.  I had removed, with a pick, some goldenrod that someone had planted during the dark years when the garden was not mine.  (The other thing that got planted then was a long row of pampas grass, which soon blocked half the sidewalk!  It got removed, by backhoe, when I got the garden back.)  I’d left the goldenrod for years and it had stayed somewhat well behaved; now it is running and had to go. The goldenrod roots I bagged up to throw in the trash, because I don’t want it to get started elsewhere.  (I still use Solidago ‘Fireworks’ because it stays in a polite and well-behaved clump.)

Brief history of the boatyard garden:  I started it as a volunteer in 1997 when I had a shady garden behind the boatyard; I wanted to improve the town and also to have a place for sunloving plants.  In 2003, a new electrical line was laid, which required the digging up of the whole garden.  I had many gardening jobs by then and the garden had become a burden to me, so I did not mind letting it go.  Also, there was a scary man who had a boat in the yard at that time.  He was known to be…disturbed…and he would mutter, from  behind the fence,  the most horrible things to me like “They knew what to do with people like you in Nazi Germany.”  It made me not want to go there to work on the garden.  (The demented fellow is gone now…thank goodness.)  In 2011, the port hired me to bring it back the garden back thing of beauty, and here we are.

5 PM: the end is in sight.

5 PM: the end is in sight.  Allan is clipping the ornamental grass at the very end.

looking back

looking back

I am sure the weeding was less thorough as we rushed to get to the end before dark.  Allan made another run to the debris field while I did the last of the weeding.

5:45 PM: at last, the end!

5:45 PM: at last, the end!  The rest is lawn, running to the viewing bench.

done!

done!

Unfortunately, big old horsetail lurks under the garden and will start popping up soon and then we will have to deal with that.

the viewing bench at the south end of the boatyard

the viewing bench at the south end of the boatyard

As we finished up, boats were coming in and out of the harbour.

boat

rocky

The Rocky B going out

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo (compressed via telephoto)

I used Map My Walk again today and the app says I walked 3.83 miles on this job.  The visible route, as usual, does not quite line up with reality, as all of it took place outside the boatyard fence:

satellite view of the workday

satellite view of the workday

map2

See the trees in the lower left, above?  That’s where our old house is, the original Tangly Cottage Garden.

Around the curve of the road, where it turns into Howerton, just past the lower right corner, we have a curbside garden yet to weed.

 

At home, even though dusk was softening up the outlines, I took a photo of our pink tree to show its form.  Tomorrow, we are said to be due for 40 mph east wind and we may lose some blossoms.

home

I thought I was going to get the deep satisfaction of erasing Ilwaco from the February work list…till I remembered there are still two planters unchecked over on Spruce Street.  Drat!  And the Port of Ilwaco remains on the list till we get the last two garden sections cleaned up along Howerton Way.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Friday, 10 October 2014

I awoke to an excellent weather day after all and tried to think of where we could work. Perhaps we could do some more fall clean up on the Long Beach berms or LB city hall. But wait! I remembered that on Monday I had not gotten the whole boatyard garden done. So that is where we went.

One of the first things that struck me was the ever annoying line of river rock along the back of the garden. Years ago, I had created the boatyard garden as a volunteer project. A few years later, it had to be torn out so the port could put in new streetlights and repair the chainlink fence, and I decided to not replant it as by then my work schedule had gotten too full to allow time for a volunteer project of that size. The port put down landscape fabric and river rock, a poor solution as the fabric did not reach to both sides so the “garden” had a two lines of weeds bordering it, and the river rock was thin on the ground so the fabric showed. Some years later, I was pleased to be given the job of bringing the garden back to its original beauty and the port staff tore out the horrible fabric. Some of the river rock remained at the back and made for tough weeding.

a messy line, as you can see

a messy line, as you can see

I’d had enough of the difficult back edge so today was the day to take all the river rock out! Some of it we moved down to a couple of areas where landscape fabric pokes under the fence from behind and shows; I hate having the underwear show. (The port staff put some fabric under the boatyard gravel to try to control the horsetail; of course, the horsetail pokes right through it.)

river rock repurposed to hide a hump of landscape fabric

river rock repurposed to hide a hump of landscape fabric

We weeded the whole south end of the garden and collected the rock in buckets to use elsewhere at the port.

Allan at the southernmost end digging out some wild lupines at my request.

Allan at the southernmost end digging out some wild lupines at my request.

I walked the length of the garden taking photos to ponder later. You can walk with me from south to north, if you like. The plants in this garden are fairly drought tolerant, deer resistant and hold up well to wind.

Cosmos and Santolina

Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’, Cosmos and Santolina

one of those TOO late blooming cosmos, carex, santolina

one of those TOO late blooming cosmos, carex, santolina

cosmos backed with an ornamental grass that I quite like but can't identify, given to me years ago by a Seattle friend.

cosmos backed with an ornamental grass that I quite like but can’t identify, given to me years ago by a Seattle friend.

Origanum 'Herrenhausen'

Origanum ‘Herrenhausen’

'Herrenhausen', my favourite ornamental oregano

‘Herrenhausen’, my favourite ornamental oregano. The blue is Geranium ‘Rozanne’ pooled around a drainage ditch.

Bare soil was filled with poppies.  Note how much better the back looks without the rocks.

Bare soil was filled with poppies. Note how much better the back looks without the rocks.

santolinas and lavenders

santolinas and lavenders

Euphorbia characias wulfenii

seedheads of Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, Euphorbia characias wulfenii. Catananche (cupid’s dart), green santolina and behind the railroad history sign is a bronze fennel whose reseeding we rigorously control.

cosmos and carex and linaria purpurea (toadflax)

cosmos and carex and linaria purpurea (toadflax)

California poppies, santolina, lavender

California poppies, santolina, lavender

This is a blah spot now because we cut down the spent goldenrod.

This is a blah spot now because we cut down the spent goldenrod.

Santolina, lavenders, blue oat grass

Santolina, lavenders, blue oat grass, Origanum ‘Herrenhausen’

The rocks mark the garden edge; Allan weeded and tidied all the way to the gate.

The rocks mark the garden edge; Allan weeded and tidied all the way to the gate.

past the gate, the north stretch of garden

past the gate, the north stretch of garden (pink painted sage, chartreuse Nicotiana langsdorfii, and some catmint and Calif. poppies)

green and silver santolinas and Verbascum bombyciferum (Giant Silver Mullein)

green and silver santolinas and Verbascum bombyciferum (Giant Silver Mullein)

In summer, the gaps are all filled in with corn poppies, California poppies, and Shirley and Iceland poppies.

Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies, Verbascum and santolinas

Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies, Verbascum and santolinas

Last year, I cut the santolinas hard in the fall, here and along Howerton Way. Then we had a very cold winter and the ones along Howerton all died, although these survived. So this fall I am cutting only the most floppy ones.

spent Solidago 'Fireworks' (a nicer clumped look untrimmed than the tall goldenrod) and rosemary

spent Solidago ‘Fireworks’ (a nicer clumped look untrimmed than the tall goldenrod) and rosemary

bronze fennel, cistus, lavender, California poppies

bronze fennel, cistus, lavender, California poppies, Stipa gigantea

More uselessly late blooming cosmos (wish I knew which cultivar) and a clump of Solidago 'Fireworks'

More uselessly late blooming cosmos (wish I knew which cultivar) and a clump of Solidago ‘Fireworks’

Nepeta (catmint0 and santolina

Nepeta (catmint0 and santolina

Cosmos and Artemisa 'Powis Castle'

Cosmos and Artemisa ‘Powis Castle’ underlaid with yarrow

Echinops ritro  (blue globe thistle, second bloom after being cut down)

Echinops ritro (blue globe thistle, second bloom after being cut down)

Aster 'Harrington's Pink'

Aster ‘Harrington’s Pink’

Persicaria 'Firetail' in a spot that tends to get hose dribblings.

Persicaria ‘Firetail’ in a spot that tends to get hose dribblings.

the dried flowers of a pink yarrow

the dried flowers of a pink yarrow

cosmos and bronze fennel

cosmos and bronze fennel

Artemisia 'Powis Castle' and cosmos

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ and cosmos

Euphorbia 'Portuguese Velvet', some sort of Helianthus, cosmos

Euphorbia ‘Portuguese Velvet’, some sort of Helianthus, cosmos

fennel, santolina, gaura

northernmost end of boatyard: fennel, santolina, gaura, California poppies

Since we planted many of our gardens years ago, having fallen in love with bronze fennel at Lucy Hardiman’s Portland garden, this fennel has crept onto the noxious weed list so I don’t recommend it anymore even though it is statuesque and beautiful. It’s a class b noxious weed so I make sure to not put any of its debris in any of our dump sites, and I have the intention of trying to eliminate it in the garden although its taproot makes it a bugger to remove.

Cosmos and Artemisia 'Powis Castle'

Cosmos and Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ and santolina

and walking back, a pretty picture

and walking back, a pretty picture

When I got back to the van at the south end of the garden, the Marine Travelift so poised to bring up a boat, so we decided to take a work break and watch while munching our sandwiches.

waiting (but not for that little boat)

waiting (but not for that little boat)

how it relates to the south end of the garden

how it relates to the south end of the garden; that bench is for folks to watch the boats come out, but we leaned on the fence

Here it comes.

Here it comes.

2

3

lots of muscle work keeping the boat lined up

lots of muscle work keeping the boat lined up

One guy operates the engine.

One guy operates the engine.

5

Those straps are what will lift the boat...even the really huge ones.

Those straps are what will lift the boat…even the really huge ones.

 

It's a slow process tightening the straps.

It’s a slow process tightening the straps.

Up it comes.

Up it comes.

telephoto:  Ilwaco Landing in background

telephoto: Ilwaco Landing in background

up2

up3

Note the guy to the right looking to see the boat is high enough.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

on the move

on the move

rolling

rolling

past the garden, heading towards the yard

past the garden, heading towards the yard

Allan got some views of the action from a different angle:

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with me taking the other set of photos

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Then, even more excitingly, Nicki and her guy came walking by.

I'm all excited to see Nicki.

I’m all excited to see Nicki…

and to get her picture

and to get her picture.

Nicki

Nicki

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She's a sweetheart.

She’s a sweetheart.

walking

With the Discovery all squared away, we went back to work at the gardens at the west end of Howerton Way. In front of the old Harbour Lights hotel (vacant now), a river rock landscape is short on rocks so that the underwear is showing.

fabric showing around the edges

fabric showing around the edges

and some fabric showing in the "garden" itself

and some fabric showing in the “garden” itself

This must not stand!

This must not stand!

So we put all the extra river rock from the boatyard over the visible fabric, and it looks much better although it could use more rock. The way to prevent the unfortunate showing of the underwear would have been for the landscaper who did this job (wasn’t us) to place a layer of pea gravel to completely obscure the fabric and then put the larger decorative rock on top of that.

We weeded and groomed the westernmost garden beds and then the port was all ready for Cranberrian Fair.

before

west

Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies'

Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’

Allan got us a treat: some delicious calamari salad for me and some herring in wine sauce for him from OleBob’s Café nearby…the only lunch spot open on the port now.

delicious snacks

delicious snacks

home

We had absolutely no intention of going out again, but when we arrived at home, I got a call from Heather of NIVA green asking her to join her, Allison and David at [pickled fish]. That was irresistible (because of the company). First, I walked around the bogsy woods cleaning seeds off of some Linaria that I’d picked at a job.

linaria before, looking dull

linaria before, looking dull

You gently rub the papery husk and it comes off on both sides, dropping the seeds and making the dried plant into a beautiful thing for a vase indoors.

after

after

Smokey walked all around with me.

Smokey walked all around with me.

The hardy fuchsias are still so fine.

fuchs

fuchsias

fuchsias3

I think that cleaning up the center bed will be my next project, but not tomorrow as we intend to go the the Cranberry Museum to watch the harvest.

an autumnal center bed

an autumnal center bed

Pickled Fish

[pickled fish] Restaurant is on the top floor of the Adrift Hotel at the end of the Sid Snyder beach approach road.

Adrift Hotel

Adrift Hotel

pickled

I love the restaurant lighting.

I love the restaurant lighting.

Allison and Heather

Allison and Heather

Since the Starvation Alley owners live next door to me, I had to have a cocktail with their organic cranberry juice.

Since the Starvation Alley owners live next door to me, I had to have a cocktail with their organic cranberry juice.

and calamari

and calamari

Allison's tender kale salad

Allison’s tender kale salad

burgers for me and Allan (his was vegetarian white bean) with lots of greens

burgers for me and Allan (his was vegetarian white bean) with lots of greens

pizza for Allison and Heather

pizza for Allison and Heather

David and Allan having a droll moment

David and Allan having a droll moment. They have much to discuss on the subject of motorcycles.

We had a good two hours to visit before nine o clock when live music, Paul Mauer and his band, began to play. Our companions lingered through several songs and then departed.

Paul Mauer

Paul Mauer

After our companions departed, I felt we should move to a smaller table. We switched to a two top where our view of the band was through a couple talking and then dining.

folks

I’m not used to watching bands in a venue like this. I like to pay strict attention to the music but felt that I was perforce staring at the couple, even though my gaze was really past them to the band, so I got uncomfortable and instead looked around the room, again pondering how much I like the lighting and wondering how to recreate it at home.

table

Coincidentally, the Starvation Alley folks and friends were at the next table. I thought about how they know the woman who did the interior design for the restaurant and hotel and parts of their own house, and wondered about asking her for advice.

lights, quite lovely, eh?

mason jar lights, quite lovely, eh?

Our friend Heather also knows how to make these, but the idea of somehow making a strip of wiring daunts me.

Tomorrow: cranberry harvest!

 

 

 

 

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August 13, 2013

We began at the Depot Restaurant garden, where an errant bindweed taunted us with white flowers way up on top of the wall of hops.

Allan undaunted

Allan undaunted

Solidago 'Fireworks' will soon burst into golden flames.

Solidago ‘Fireworks’ will soon burst into golden flames.

Persicaria 'Firetail' at the Depot

Persicaria ‘Firetail’ at the Depot

Then we tackled the Bolstadt beach approach garden in Long Beach.

looking east from the west end of the garden

looking east from the west end of the garden

Unlike the huge and days-long spring weeding of the garden, all we wanted to go was get big weeds out and grassy sections improved.

and cut back old flowers from santolina...

and cut back old flowers from santolina…

and cut some of the more unsightly lupines...

and cut some of the more unsightly lupines…

The set up for the weeklong Kite Festival would begin the following Sunday.  Kite Festival is singularly responsible for our choosing to change this garden from a carefully cultivated long bed of beautiful flowers to a pretty much monoculture of rugosa roses…the only thing that will stand up to what used to be days of garden trampling.

The first year after planting a few experimental rugosas, even they got trampled to blackened mush.  Now they are strong enough to hold their own.

roses with hips

roses with hips

I noticed new banners on the poles, and am not thrilled about them.  I have much sympathy for anyone who for economic reasons may have joined the military for educational and job opportunities.  I especially think they need support after returning home.   However, I think a nice kite banner might be more appropriate for happy, strolling tourists than this fierce eagle.  (I can think of plenty of political type slogans that could be on banners:  Feed the Hungry, Stop Violence against Women, House the Homeless, none of which would be perfect for a beach stroll, in my opinion.)

banner Downtown seems like a better place for this banner than on the beach approach.  (It could distract, perhaps, from the hotel whose gift shop flies, and I am not kidding, a confederate flag.)  There is a way that the Peninsula supports the troops:  Specials for Service Members.   I walked along weeding and thinking about war and its consequences on drone-bombed civilians and on my veteran friends with PTSD and was not in as cheerful a mood as I had started out in.

Anyway.  We got to the last section of the garden and I decided the rugosa roses needed to be cut back to make plenty of room for kite festival crowds.

during and after

during and after

We always get lots of questions about what the rose hips are…Some folks think they are tomatoes (which is why the one of the rose’s common names is The Tomato Rose).

I had sort of thought about trying to water the beach approach garden until I realized it had been so long, over a year, since I had done so that the water sources (faucets under metal plates in the lawn) were so overgrown with lawn grass that I could not find them without a metal detector.  This certainly proves that the roses are drought tolerant.

rose hips

rose hips

and just a very few late roses

and just a very few late roses

We then dumped a trailer load of rose debris at city works.  Allan took a trailer full of buckets of water out to water the Bolstadt planters while I began the task of watering all 37 of the main street planters (and six whiskey barrels and the two planters at Veterans Field).

northernmost planter on east side of Pacific

northernmost planter on east side of Pacific

Tigridia (Mexican shell flower)...held for the photo because of wind

Tigridia (Mexican shell flower)…held for the photo because of wind

Fortunately, the broken bottle in this planter showed well enough so that I did not stick my hand into it while grooming the plants.

???!! why?

???!! why?

When I got to the two planters at the Veterans Field stage, I would have been deeply mystified at their newly mismatched appearance….

left: with Salvia patens (blue) in the center.  right: No Salvia patens.

left: with Salvia patens (blue) in the center. right: No Salvia patens.

However, I had already gotten a message from my friend who organizes the Jake the Alligatorman Birthday Party and its events the previous Saturday on this very stage.  She had written, “I feel bad the beautiful pot to the right of the stage got squished. It was a local who was drunk and him and a friend were throwing themselves around aggressively and one landed in the planter. Missy got him out and gave him a scolding.”  I replied, “ARGH! Drunks! Oy! Well, these things happen, and it will probably revive. We will check it on Monday!  What can ya do!  Tell Missy awesome for giving him a scolding. Do you have a pic of that moment? Would be great for me blog.”  She wrote, “Darn no pic! Everyone was just kind of disgusted he was an ass. Should have snapped a pic, he was slumped with a cig in his mouth.”  I can picture the scene from similar ones in my punk rock background.  Let me reassure Wendy again that the Jake event does very little damage to the plants and flowers.  (The broken bottle in a planter was nothing new or particular to that weekend.)  The more “genteel” crowds at the kite festival do FAR more damage (or used to, before the Rugosa Rose Solution) than the Jake crowd ever has, as do the Rod Run sitting-on-planters-and-watching-cars-go-by people on the second weekend in September.

While Allan watered some of the south end of downtown planters, he took a nice photo of someone on the Benson’s Restaurant porch indulging in an old fashioned pastime.

the reader

the reader

And a funny bumper sticker:

newfie

After Long Beach, we went back to finish weeding the boatyard garden.  Blues and Seafood would take place Friday and Saturday night at the Port of Ilwaco, and Art Night would be Thursday, resulting in many passersby.  Our lives are scheduled by festival preparation year round.

at the boatyard...I love Geranium 'Rozanne' mingling with Artemisia 'Powis Castle'.

at the boatyard…I love Geranium ‘Rozanne’ mingling with Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’.

gorgeous 'Hopley's Purple' oregano

gorgeous ‘Hopley’s Purple’ oregano

four o clocks reseeded from last year, with cosmos

four o clocks reseeded from last year, with cosmos

and on their own

and on their own

After the boatyard was weeded well enough, we fluffed up the gardens to the south and north sides of the Port Office.

on north side of Port Office along Howerton (looking east)

on north side of Port Office along Howerton (looking east)

south side of port office

south side of port office

Agastache 'Navajo Sunrise' and Knautia 'Thunder and Lightning'

Agastache ‘Navajo Sunset’ and Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’

The marina was like a mirror…

marina

and the angled light at the late hour made it hard to keep working, which made a good excuse to go home and have a wander through my own garden.

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Having gotten away from lawnmowing, I immersed myself in gardening.  Robert worked with me sometimes but also had a sideline of doing odd jobs:  carpentry, roofing, house painting, and so on.  He certainly pitched in when a creative gardening job needed doing, and taught me much that I had never thought about, especially that THINGS (birdbaths, paving stones, edging) looked so much better when they were level.

Maxine’s Garden

In 1996, our good weekly client Maxine, my very first client on the Peninsula, had some trees removed in her driveway and we created for her a circle of silver:

Maxine's, before

Maxine’s, before

the silver circle, fairly newly planted, with Lady

the silver circle, fairly newly planted, with Lady

the silver circle, well filled in by late summer

the silver circle, well filled in by late summer

Maxine taught me a number of things.  I had never heard of Godetia till she gave me a packet of seeds to plant in her garden, and she showed me how to pinch back  Cosmos to make it bushier and more floriferous.  We continued to garden for her until she moved to Tacoma to be closer to family; after that, we took care of her dog, Lady, till Lady passed away, and we continue to this day to garden for her daughter, Jo, in a beautiful Long Beach garden.

And how’s this for an accomplished woman (even if it does leave out her years living in Seaview):

Maxine Elizabeth Daly
1915 – 2010 Maxine Daly passed away peacefully at the age of 95 on November
17, 2010. She was born October 7, 1915 in Springfield, Oregon to John &
Hattie (McQuinn) Fredenberg. She spent most of her life in Olympia, moving
to Tacoma in 1997 to be near family. Maxine’s career included Industrial
Relations with Association of Washington Business and the Department of
Labor & Industries. She was appointed Commissioner of Employment Security
under Governor Dan Evans in 1967, one of the first women in our State to
hold a cabinet position. She went on to become Regional Director for U.S.
Dept of Labor and was listed in “Who’s Who in American Women”.

Plants for Maxine’s silver circle:

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’

silver Santolina (lavender cotton)

Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s ears)

some sort of blue salvia

Erysimum ‘Bowles’ Mauve’

Nepeta (catmint) ‘Six Hills Giant’

Arrhenatherum elatius bulbosum ‘Variegatum’ (variegated bulbous oat grass, which is lovely but wants to revert to green eventually)

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