Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Astoria Oregon’

Saturday, 12 August 2017

After the Astoria garden tour, we lingered so that Allan could see the Highwater Boat Parade which leaves the East Mooring Basin at 5:30.

DSC03763.JPG

The gators and I watched from the comfort of the van, while Allan walked about and took all the rest of the photos.

Allan’s research on the boats is shared in the rest of this post.

Highwater Boat Parade
Sponsored by Englund Marine Supply and Fishhawk Fisheries

Before the sun goes down, at high tide, gather with us all along the Columbia Riverfront for the annual Regatta Boat Parade!

DSC03673.jpg

Waiting for the boat parade behind the Maritime Museum.

DSC03675.jpg

Waiting

The Astoria is one of the pilot boats that deliver pilots to guide ships through the Columbia Bar.

DSC03676.jpg

Seamanship is a training vessel which is part of the Tongue Point Job Corps Center.

DSC03680.jpg

“PARTICIPANTS IN THIS CAREER PATHWAY WILL WORK TOWARDS CERTIFICATION AS AN ABLE SEAMAN WHOSE DUTIES INCLUDE STANDING WATCH ON DECK, WORKING ON EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE, AND PERFORMING MOST OF THE LABOR REQUIRED ON A SHIP.” The program is explained here.

DSC03681.jpg

Here is the royalty of the regatta on the bow of the Pilot ship.

DSC03686.jpg

This boat is where the parade judges were.

DSC03689.jpg

DSC03690.jpg

Below is “the boat with the bushes on it” according to the crowd above.

DSC03692.jpg

Participants are given one day free mooring at the West Basin Marina.

DSC03694.jpg

DSC03696.jpg

Looking downstream, here comes the rest of the parade.

DSC03698.jpg

Not looking downstream.

DSC03699.jpg

I think this was the winner in the sailboat class.

DSC03701.jpg

DSC03702.jpg

In case you don’t know: That is Washington State in the background.

DSC03706.jpg

The luckiest kid this weekend.

DSC03716.jpg

DSC03713.jpg

DSC03710.jpg

DSC03709.jpg

Half an hour later the boats all headed back to their docks.

DSC03729.jpg

 

 

Read Full Post »

Saturday, 12 August 2017

Astoria Garden Tour:

a benefit for the Lower Columbia Preservation Society

DSC03779.JPG

DSC03780.JPG

DSC03700.JPG

DSC03699.JPG

I have always loved this little rose garden.


DSC03703.JPG

in the garden, a dog that “loved to be held ALL the time”


DSC03643.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC03711.JPG

DSC03712.JPG

DSC03705.JPG

bachelor buttons and hops


DSC03706.JPG

glass art in the garden just for the day

DSC03708.JPG

DSC03709.JPG

hops and lilies


DSC03714.JPG

hops


DSC03707.JPG

Melianthus major


DSC03715.JPG

the ramp up to the upper floor of the pub


DSC03716.JPG

Jessica serving Fort George beer tastings


DSC03646.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC03648.jpg

DSC03717.JPG

a glimpse of the river


DSC03720.JPG

hops and compost


DSC03722.JPG

looking down from the ramp at Seaside Pam in the garden


DSC03725.JPG

My camera could not handle the bright sunlight.

DSC03727.JPG

DSC03729.JPG

looking down from the ramp


DSC03730.JPG

hops towering overhead


DSC03731.JPG

overlooking the melianthus

This had been the final garden.  We three were hungry and thought of having lunch at Fort George.  Because of a 45 minute wait (due to Astoria Regatta and a Fort George Block Party), we instead repaired to our favourite Blue Scorcher Bakery, in the lower corner of the same building.

DSC03747

DSC03732

By the way, the name Blue Scorcher refers to a bicycle craze:

bluescorcher.png

DSC03748.JPG

more sidewalk history outside the café


DSC03734.JPG

lunch at an outdoor table


DSC03655.jpg

breakfast burrito (Allan’s photo)


DSC03656.jpg

Pam’s salad and pizza (Allan’s photo)


DSC03652.jpg

Astoria Regatta celebrants passing by (Allan’s photo)

We were entertained by beautiful dogs whose people were at the next table.

dogs.png

DSC03657.jpg

Allan’s photo


DSC03659.jpg

friendly (Allan’s photo)

After lunch, we said goodbye to Pam and had a look at the rest of the plantings at Fort George Brewery.

DSC03750.jpg

DSC03751.JPG

DSC03753.JPG

DSC03754.JPG

DSC03756.JPG

Will West and the Friendly Strangers playing for the outdoor block party.

DSC03757.JPG

DSC03759.JPG

DSC03761.jpg

white cyclamen and hardy begonia

As we left, I saw a stand of sunflowers at the back of a parking lot across the street.  I am sure these are also Jessica’s work.

DSC03742.JPG

DSC03741.JPG

DSC03744.JPG

a garden right on the edge of a sunken lot


DSC03745.JPG

held up by boards


DSC03663.jpg

Allan’s photo

Near where we parked, Allan photographed some interesting Astoria architecture.

DSC03669.jpg

DSC03670

DSC03671.jpg

With the garden done, the day still held a treat for Allan: The early evening Highwater Boat Parade on the river.  That will be a bonus post, tonight.

Read Full Post »

Saturday, 12 August 2017

Astoria Garden Tour:

a benefit for the Lower Columbia Preservation Society

garden five: Lower Columbia Clinic

DSC03777.JPG

DSC03778.JPG

I have noticed this garden before when its Crambe cordifolia was in bloom—a plant I have been unable to grow since leaving my Seattle garden because here, the slugs and snails always get it.  So I have Crambe envy.

DSC03627.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC03662.JPG

Lower Columbia Clinic curbside garden

DSC03663.JPG

a bit closer

DSC03664.JPG

I used to have that lavish Buddleia in my old garden behind the boatyard.  I’m sure it is still there, growing by the sidewalk; I must go back this fall and get a cutting.

DSC03665.JPG

Pretty sure it is the same one I got from Heronswood once upon a time.

DSC03689.JPG

Here comes Pam!

There was much discussion, once Pam arrived, about the identity of this plant (below).  Osmanthus? We think Steve and John of the Bayside Garden have one.

DSC03666

DSC03693.JPG

Below is the Crambe cordifolia which fills me with envy.

DSC03667.JPG

Earlier, it would have been a cloud of white.

DSC03668.JPG

And it is spreading.

DSC03669.JPG

looking down the sidewalk

DSC03670.JPG

DSC03671.JPG

roses

DSC03672.JPG

rose hips

DSC03673.JPG

bamboo supports keeping the sidewalk clear

DSC03674.JPG

looking up from the parking lot

DSC03629.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC03676.JPG

a sit spot by the clinic parking lot

DSC03677.JPG

DSC03678.JPG

DSC03679.JPG

south side of parking lot

DSC03680.JPG

by the front porch

DSC03681.JPG

window box (and me)

DSC03682.JPG

DSC03683.JPG

window box decorated with poppy seed pods stuck in

DSC03684.JPG

pot decorated with elephant garlic, blue globe thistle and cardoon ( I think) stuck in

DSC03698.JPG

DSC03685.JPG

The windrows, as Jessica calls them, of composting debris are held up by bamboo poles.

DSC03686.JPG

DSC03694.JPG

composting

DSC03634.jpg

from below (Allan’s photo)

DSC03687.JPG

more Crambe cordifolia envy

DSC03692.JPG

that buddleia again

DSC03640.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC03695.jpg

curbside

DSC03696.JPG

apples

I enjoyed taking a close look at this garden which I had admired in passing in years past.

Read Full Post »

Saturday, 12 August 2017

Astoria Garden Tour:

a benefit for the Lower Columbia Preservation Society

garden four: a garden recreated after the 2007 storm

DSC03774

DSC03775

DSC03776.JPG

DSC03628.JPG

entering from the lower driveway

DSC03629.JPG

DSC03590.jpg

Allan’s photo.  Garden owner John is above.

DSC03600.jpg

Liatrus (Allan’s photo)

DSC03601.jpg

common name Kansas Gayfeather (Allan’s photo)

DSC03630.JPG

Stone steps lead up through the garden.

DSC03631.JPG

a patio surrounded by garden

By now, we were touring at the same time as our friend Pam Fleming, the Seaside, Oregon city gardener (who had brought us some plants from Xera Plants in Portland, to my delight!).  We were stumped at the identity of the shrub in the photo below. We and the owner had some discussion with the garden’s owner and decided it is a Rhus (sumac).

DSC03632.JPG

DSC03591.jpg

John, Pam and I

DSC03634.JPG

It will have bright berries later.

DSC03653.JPG

DSC03592.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC03595.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC03635.JPG

looking back at the stone path

DSC03636.JPG

a bright salvia at the base of steps going to a higher level

DSC03637.JPG

looking down at the brick patio

DSC03638.JPG

the sunroom

DSC03639.JPG

DSC03640.JPG

DSC03641.JPG

DSC03642.JPG

DSC03643.JPG

DSC03644.JPG

the patio and sunroom

I love that the garden owner had put out a selection of her favourite gardening books.

DSC03645.JPG

DSC03646.JPG

DSC03647.JPGDSC03649.JPG

DSC03650.JPG

DSC03651.JPG

I wish I had carefully photographed this entire article:

DSC03652.JPG

Oh, but look! I found it online, and you can read it here.

(I usually remove garden owners’ surnames from tour posts; it’s ok if the names are in a newspaper article.)

DSC03648.JPG

at the edge of the patio

Jan said her daisies looked perfect until our recent 95 degree day.

DSC03654.JPG

golden foliage by the house

DSC03657.JPG

the delectable sunroom

DSC03655.JPG

Columbia River view from the front yard

DSC03659.JPG

I spy Pam Fleming talking with garden owner John far below.

I saw some other guests, too, and pointed them out to Allan who was much closer to them.

DSC03606.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC03608.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC03614.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC03618.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC03619.jpg

DSC03620.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC03621.jpg

The deer decided to go to the Astoria Column road. (Allan’s photo)

By now, I had made my way down to the lower level.

DSC03660.JPG

a woodsier garden below

The Astoria regatta parade had finished, resulting in a steady stream of traffic up the hill.  I figured out an alternate route to get back to the flatland for the last two gardens.

DSC03623.jpg

looking back at the tour house after successfully crossing the road

Next: a delightful small semi-public garden

 

Read Full Post »

Saturday 12 August 2017

Because we are fortunate to know Jessica, the gardener for the excellent third garden on the Astoria garden tour, we were given permission to look at her garden project across the street.  The owners had said it could be on the tour were it not for the difficult accessibility of steep front stairs.  Jessica said it is an interesting challenge to mulch the front slope.

DSC03550.jpg

Allan’s photo from across the street

DSC03617.JPG

the curbside meadow

DSC03618.JPG

looking across at the garden we just toured

DSC03619.JPG

DSC03585.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC03620.JPG

DSC03621.JPG

DSC03623.JPG

You can get one of these signs for $25 from The Xerces Society.

I could not face coming back down the steep stairs which are the only access to the garden.  I asked Allan to go up and take photos to give me an armchair tour of the garden.

DSC03616.JPG

Allan’s photos:

DSC03562.jpg

DSC03563.jpg

 

DSC03565.jpg

DSC03566.jpg

DSC03567.jpg

DSC03568.jpg

DSC03569.jpg

DSC03570.jpg

DSC03571.jpg

DSC03573.jpg

DSC03574.jpg

DSC03575.jpg

DSC03576.jpg

DSC03577.jpg

DSC03579.jpg

DSC03580.jpg

DSC03581.jpg

More bonus photos of gardens nearby, all by Allan:

 

DSC03545.jpg

Daliahs line a driveway nearby.

You may recall that the official tour garden we had just seen was called the “Bye bye deer” garden, having been fenced to keep them out.

DSC03540.jpg

at the next intersection uphill

DSC03541.jpg

DSC03542.jpg

The low stone wall was no barrier.

The parking strip garden that the deer passed by:

DSC03587.jpg

DSC03588.jpg

a bench nearby:

DSC03544.jpg

a bench nearby, with dandelions

Here are some words of wisdom about a dandelion garden’s benefit to pollinators.

Next: back to the official Astoria garden tour!

Read Full Post »

Saturday, 12 August 2017

Astoria Garden Tour:

a benefit for the Lower Columbia Preservation Society

garden three: Bye Bye Deer

Note again that the garden description includes credit to the designers and caretakers. We admire and appreciate that so much.   I was especially excited to see this garden because one of its caretakers and plant designers is Jessica Schleif, who has been an inspiration to me ever since I saw her ad many years ago that read “Hand Tool Gardening”.

DSC03625.JPG

The sidewalk garden beds

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

the stairs up into the garden

Allan got a photo from across the street, from a garden which he was able to visit even though it was not one of the tour gardens.  (A bonus post, next!)

Up the stairs I went.

at the top of the stairs

to my right at the top of the stairs

I was drawn forward by the sight of a patio on the east side of the house.

informative material from The Xerces Society.

patio plantings

 

I backtracked to the front garden.

south side of house

Allan noticed the little ornamental pepper plant.

Allan’s photo

I continued to explore the front garden.

looking west

looking south: Jessica also works on the garden across the street.

Allan’s photo

I walked past the east side patio to the back garden.

another look at patio containers

in the shade of the back garden

view to the north of the Columbia River

looking northwest

You can see the Astoria bridge.

Allan’s photo

shady north wall bed with lilies yet to bloom

north side of house

Allan’s photo

back garden, looking east

the serpentine path

west side of house

white agapanthus

returning to the front garden; there is Jessica her ownself.

southwest corner of the garden

the front garden again

We walked round the garden again with Jessica.

Below where Jessica is sitting in the following photo is the garden debris area, and a planted slope which I wish we had walked around the block to see.

Jessica in the northeast corner of the garden

the debris area (Allan’s photo)

the planted slope (Allan’s photo)

Years ago, when Jessica first told me about her gardening, I loved that that she informed new clients that she would not haul debris away.  I thought at the time that her reason was because hauling is difficult, time-consuming, and requires a truck or trailer.  Today I learned that one of the main reasons is that she wants to encourage people to compost on site.

One last look at the front garden before we go:

looking west

Tonight, a bonus post for avid garden tourers.  We got to look at the garden across the street, another project of Jessica’s, even though it was not on the tour.

Read Full Post »

Saturday, 12 August 2017

Astoria Garden Tour:

a benefit for the Lower Columbia Preservation Society

garden two: a hillside garden

I try to remove the owner’s surname and address from the program, which leads to some awkward deletions at times.  I want you to see, though, how thoroughly the program covers the garden features.  Also, take note of how the garden designers and workers are given credit throughout the program.  This is unusual and much appreciated.

DSC03770.JPG

DSC03772.JPG

DSC03548.JPG

DSC03516.jpg

Allan’s photo

 

DSC03541.JPG

DSC03544.JPG

DSC03543.JPG

Note the rubber ducks.  The box is the Little Free Library, making it clear people are welcome to walk into the garden. There is even a drinking fountain on the left by the chairs, and it works.

DSC03542.JPG

DSC03518.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC03520

The  public drinking fountain is this side of the free library on the left.

DSC03522.JPG

Little Free Library

DSC03526.jpg

Allan’s photo

Allan found a garden map and plant list on the lower patio.  I completely missed it.

DSC03519.jpg

DSC03521.jpg

DSC03520.jpg

DSC03546.JPG

Looking up; the beloved banana is to the right.

DSC03547.JPG

rocks along the sidewalk

I carefully plotted out a knee brace and cane and sore foot accessible path.  I figured I could go up the gravel path and come to a resting point on a terrace halfway up, where I could see a woman standing, and then walk back down the sidewalk on the north side of the garden.

DSC03523

DSC03521.JPG

DSC03524.JPG

getting closer

When I got up next to the middle terrace, I ran into a problem that could be so easily solved. I knew I could not do the railingless stone steps.

DSC03527

railingless stone steps going in two directions (Allan’s photo)

To my right was a jumble of rocks between me and the lawn.  I couldn’t go back down the slippy gravel, couldn’t go up the steps, and couldn’t step over the low pile of rocks to the lawn.  I was stuck. My only solution was the impolite move of stepping into the garden and then getting a hand from the woman on the lawn to get me over the rocks.  That makes them sound mountainous.  They were low, but with no way through for a disabled person.  Just moving one rock to make a clear passage to the middle terrace would be better for old folks.  There’s nothing like navigating a garden with a cane to make one think of easy fixes like that.

 

DSC03525.JPG

safely over the rocks and standing on the terrace

DSC03526.JPG

Columbia River view looking northeast from the middle terrace

DSC03528.jpg

Allan telephotoed the view.  You can see Tongue Point.

DSC03528.JPG

looking up

DSC03529.JPG

and down

DSC03530.JPG

DSC03532.JPG

Someone asked for an ID on the Liatris (Kansas Gayfeather)

I walked over to the north sidewalk and was easily able to access the upper lawn terrace and look down from the top of the stone steps.

 

DSC03534.JPG

DSC03538.JPG

looking down

DSC03532

Allan’s photo, looking up. The third step up is where to turn right and take more steps down to the grass of the middle terrace.

DSC03537.JPG

Deer have browsed as high as they can reach.

The patio behind the arborvitae is this garden’s garden retreat.  Garden writer and designer Lucy Hardiman would call the welcoming hillside garden a “garden advance”.

DSC03539.JPG

DSC03533.jpg

the patio (Allan’s photo

DSC03534.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC03535

Allan’s photo

DSC03537.jpg

looking down to the middle terrace (Allan’s photo)

DSC03535.JPG

the view from on high

Another garden guest was able to make her way up the north sidewalk to the upper garden.

DSC03529

attaining the middle terrace (Allan’s photo)

DSC03538.jpg

Allan’s photo

DSC03539.jpg

deer proofing (Allan’s photo)

DSC03540.JPG

looking from the north sidewalk to the lower patio

I appreciate the generosity of this grand gift to the street.

Next: a garden by Jessica which was my favourite of the tour.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »