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Posts Tagged ‘azara microphylla’

I suspect that yesterday will have been the longest day of our work year, but maybe not, as garden tour month approaches and three of the gardens we have a hand in will be on the tour (on July 20th).

We had much to do yesterday, and our main goal was to get many jobs done and get to Andersen’s RV Park by five to do a lot more weeding before the Sisters on the Fly group starts to arrive this weekend.

Larry and Robert’s garden

We began just down the street at Larry and Robert’s garden with the continuation of changes to their back yard.  

before and after

before and after

We added an Azara microphylla (an excellent small tree with fragrant winter blooms) and some pea gravel and river rock and some edging from materials that were on the property.  I have in the past had an aversion to scalloped edging.  Now I cannot remember why, because I think it looks just grand here.  Now we need some more river rock for against the house and some sort of plant to fill in the narrow border there that is somewhat resistant to three small dogs (nothing too delicate).

Ilwaco intermission

We then planted an Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ in our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco Post Office.

Ilwaco Post Office

Ilwaco Post Office

As we headed out of Ilwaco, the man who sells firewood on 2nd SW waved us down and gave us two hollow rounds of wood that could be used as planters, he said in appreciation of our volunteer work in town.  I told him we do get paid to care for the planters and the boatyard (although the latter did start out as a volunteer project years ago) and that the post office is our only volunteer garden now.  He still insisted we should have the planters.  (He has them for sale sometimes over at 2nd SW and Eagle.)

a garden gift

a garden gift

Might I add, those things are very heavy!

Diane’s garden

Next, we stopped at Diane’s garden and The Red Barn Arena (next door to each other): Allan fertilized the whiskey barrel planters at the barn and Diane’s containers while I deadheaded and weeded along the road.

at Diane's

at Diane’s

That roadside garden clearly needs more plants.  I’ll add some of the inexpensive Dianthus from the Basket Case next time we go there.

Anchorage Cottages

After Diane’s, we went to The Anchorage Cottages where we were requested to prune a branch off of the Ceanothus so that the parking sign for cottage one would show.  The shrub was thick with bees.

Ceanothus

Ceanothus (California Lilac)

Ceanothus (California Lilac)

Even though the bees were gentle, they got pretty agitated when I tried to lop a large branch, so I settled for quickly cutting one small piece and then scampering well back while they swarmed toward me…then…whew!!…resettled on the flowers.

The number one just barely showing.

The number one just barely showing.

Plant emergency of the morning:  thrips on a lily!  Doused it with a cup of mild dish soap well diluted with water.  Fingers crossed.

cured, I hope

cured, I hope

I was reminded of this New Yorker cartoon, long a favourite of mine.

 

george-booth-aphids-on-the-heliotrope-new-yorker-cartoon

Anchorage center courtyard

Anchorage center courtyard

New Dawn rose

New Dawn rose

We did not spend as long there as I would have liked because our mission remained to get to Andersen’s by five.  Our next stop was The Basket Case to pick up some plants for Andersen’s garden shed border which I felt had looked a little bare after the previous evening’s weeding there.  I also got two Lobelia tupa for Sheila as she and Harold are coming to visit us soon!

at the Basket Case, what a deal!

at the Basket Case, what a deal!

Wiegardt Studio Gallery

Next we went all the way up to Nahcotta/Ocean Park to the Wiegardt Gallery where again we went round the garden in haste but I hope effectively.

at Wiegardt Gallery with manager Christl

at Wiegardt Gallery with manager Christl

Allium schubertii

Allium schubertii and albopilosum

Wiegardt

Alliums white and purple

Alliums white and purple

Allium albopilosum and Allium moly 'Jeannine'

Allium albopilosum and Allium moly ‘Jeannine’

front walkway

front walkway

west side of gallery

west side of gallery

It occurs to me that next time we are there, I will take you inside!  Eric Wiegardt is a renowned artist and the gallery is beautiful.

Ocean Park intermission

We were doing well as it was only three o clock, so we had time to stop at Jack’s Country Store for what we call “Jack’s snacks”.   Of such tiny luxuries are happy moments made.

Bliss:  The Jack's Snacks Cooler and my potato salad in the car

Bliss: The Jack’s Snacks deli cooler and my potato salad in the car

I think this is the first time since the beginning of May that we have had time, when at the north end, to stop for a treat.

Next up:  the small entry garden at Oman Builders Supply.  But first, we did a U Turn to get a better look at a garden near Jack’s that is looking fine.  Garden tour next year?

an Ocean Park garden

an Ocean Park garden

driftwood and toadflax

driftwood and toadflax

lupines

lupines and foxgloves

a work in progress

a work in progress

Doing another U turn to get back to OBS, we saw that the poppy garden behind Jack’s is still there.  Jack himself started it, or his wife perhaps, and it is being carried on.

east wall of Jack's

east wall of Jack’s

Oman Builders Supply

After those distractions we got to Oman Builders Supply garden.

OBS garden

OBS garden

Mainly I wanted to make sure that the Eryngiums ‘Jade Frost’ and Lobelia tupa that we had planted last week had no transplant shock.  They were fine.  We could have spent quite awhile deadheading the Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ but more work called to us to keep moving.

The remaining deadheads can wait till next week.

The remaining deadheads can wait till next week.

hebe flowering at OBS

hebe flowering at OBS

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We pulled into our parking area at Klipsan Beach Cottages at a quarter to four.  Still on track for our day’s plan.  I knew the garden would be in good shape and that we could get it done in an hour.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

Klipsan Beach Cottages fenced garden

Allium albopilosum (Star of Persia)

Allium albopilosum (Star of Persia)

Allium schubertii

Allium schubertii

Rose 'Jude the Obscure'

Rose ‘Jude the Obscure’

The names of some of the roses are lost to us!

The names of some of the roses are lost to us!

rose

Last year this one did not open well but this year it looks fine.

Last year this one did not open well but this year it looks fine.

Last year Mary brought back some choice shrubs, and the one below is still in a pot because we have not found the perfect spot for it.  I think it is some kind of callistemon but if I am wrong, perhaps someone will enlighten me.

a recent acquisition

a recent acquisition

One of the two cats put on a charming show for me in the garden.

Sarah, who did get a belly rub

Sarah, who did get a belly rub

The foxgloves are restricting the view of one of the entry signs.

No one can bear to cut them down.

No one can bear to cut them down.

We would have left, as I had planned, by 4:45, but owner/manager Mary and I got into a conversation about Nora’s funeral, and life, and death, and afterlife or not, and walked up to the cottages and back, and so Allan and I did not leave till a little after five.

Corokia cotoneaster

Corokia cotoneaster in late afternoon light

Andersen’s RV Park

At last, we got to Andersen’s at five fifteen.  While Allan planted the new perennials in the garden shed garden, I weaseled out of my least favourite garden task (planting) to discuss with the staff what to do with one of those free planters we had been given in Ilwaco earlier in the day.  Jan came up with a good spot for it, and we waited for Al to return from walking his dog in order to suggest it, because it involved an area for which he had been seeking a design solution.

Al and Chewie return from the beach

Al and Chewie return from the beach

He liked the idea but since his shift was over, another staffer and Allan ended up doing it.   I hope Al was not disappointed the next morning to find it done, because he does like to have a project.  Jan’s idea was so good that it couldn’t wait till morning!

the round hollow wood

the round hollow wood

I snagged three gazania out of planters on the east side of the house where they closed up in the afternoon for lack of sun.

Till eight thirty, Allan and I weeded like mad in the beds behind the office, where the pernicious quack grass had returned; I walked the other beds and planters removing dead bulb foliage.  The results were satisfactory and now, on Monday, all we have to do is a light weeding from one end of the gardens to the other and all will be perfect…at the same time!  This is rare, because as you can probably tell, we have too many jobs to reach that state of glory very often on our larger garden jobs.

behind the office

behind the office

Having time to deadleaf as well as deadhead really makes a garden look perfect.

Buddliea 'Black Night' before...

Buddliea ‘Black Night’ before…

and after picking off yellowed leaves

and after picking off yellowed leaves

If an RVer who is also a gardener camps here, s/he must be pretty impressed with the beauty of the gardens at this time of year in evening light.  Tired though we were, we lingered to take some pictures in the late evening.

poppies and Payson Hall

poppies and Payson Hall

Baptisia (false indigo)

Baptisia (false indigo)

Stipa gigantea, my favourite ornamental grass

Stipa gigantea, my favourite ornamental grass

Stipa and Payson Hall

Stipa and Payson Hall

gold spangles

gold spangles

sunset light

sunset light

On the way out, we swung by the garden shed so I could see the new plants in.  It does look more filled out with the addition of a couple of Gaura ‘So White’, a Cistus, a Phygelius ‘African Queen’ and…something else…I forget what!

garden shed garden

garden shed garden

Al had, earlier in the day, made the gravel path at the very far end look spiffing but it does not show in this photo.

An emergency

Finally we could go home!  As we drove south through Long Beach, I checked my messages on Facebook to get an update from my gardening neighbour (four doors down), Judy.  As I read her fairly reassuring message about her visit to the cardiologist, another message popped up from a client at a commercial establishment.  There were caterpillars all over a shrub, having stripped the leaves, and looking horribly unsightly right next to a venue for an event on Saturday.  Could we come tomorrow (Saturday morning) and cut it down?  I won’t name the business because no one wants to think about horrid caterpillars.  It was on our way home, and Saturday morning was fully booked with events (Saturday market, visiting friends, cash mob) so we had to make an emergency detour with loppers and a chainsaw and cut the shrub (a Leycesteria formosa) to the ground at dusk-thirty.  I felt terrible because a hummingbird was feeding on the flowers; every leaf was gone, but the flowers remained.  One on the other side of the building (away from the next day’s event) was still leafed out, although a bit chewed, and I think the hummer could find it.

In my own garden I would have left the shrub alone to leaf out again, but at a business such ugliness cannot stand, especially if caterpillars are dropping onto customers!

We could not haul the debris.  Nay, would not.  No caterpillars allowed in our work trailer or at the site where we dump.  Fortunately there was a place we could stash the branches till the infestation is gone.

By then it was far too late to blog about such a long day so I made a placeholder entry via my iPhone on the way home…where we collapsed in front of the telly and had a comforting dinner quickly whipped up by Allan and watched Master Chef.  Just before that, as I did the evening spreadsheet on my computer, Allan came in to my office to show me this riding on his shirt.  If anyone knows caterpillars,  perhaps they can tell me what this horrid creature will become.  Nothing nice, I bet.  I shudder to think how many hitched a ride on our clothes.

a garden pest

a garden pest

I am hoping for no more days this long unless they are that long…in my own garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Our day began with a brief stop at the Basket Case to buy three plants to fill spaces in Long Beach planters.  Of course, we bought a flat of plants once I had walked through a couple of times, including another Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’, so now there are but three left!

Of other plants that I feel are treasures of which only a few are left, you can see (below) on the left, an Azara microphylla, beautiful little tree (one left!) with vanilla or chocolate scented flowers in late winter, and on the right, Thalictrum ‘Black Stockings’ (only a couple left) and a wonderfully crisp looking white Phygelius.

choice selections

choice selections

We then met Nancy, garden tour organizer, at one of the 2013 gardens to get some teaser photos for the Music in the Gardens tour Facebook page, and I was deeply impressed.  I don’t want to give too much away but:

sneaking a peak!

sneaking a peak!

It is one of my favourite kinds of gardens, with room after room, each with a different feel.  It is the sort of garden I especially admire (ironic because of my business!), where all the work is done by the owners.

We tore ourselves away reluctantly.  Allan went to work at Andersen’s RV Park while Nancy and I went south to see two other gardens that would be on the tour.  She was impressed with both.  While at the first garden (Jo’s), I got some birds for Mr. Tootlepedal.

a baby?

a baby?  It could fly.

a hummingbird.  I need to learn how to change the shutter speed on my simple digicam.

a hummingbird. I need to learn how to change the shutter speed on my simple digicam.

Nancy and I then went to the nearby Boreas Inn so I could show her our deer resistant west side garden beds there, and I took the opportunity to show off the inside of the inn, as well.  It is an honour to be associated with such a gorgeous place.  This gave me some different views of the garden.

looking at entry garden from upstairs

looking at entry garden from upstairs (through impressionist screen)

the best west window view, all the way to the ocean

the best west window view, all the way to the ocean

That’s the tree featured in our post about having to clean up after other garden services!  I would drop a couple of feet off the top of it so one is not always fighting it for the view.  Or I would, shockingly, cut it down and plant another Eucalyptus off to the side.  They grow fast and I do love them.

After this pleasant hour or more of goofing off, I rejoined Allan at Andersen’s and we both worked on weeding the big west side garden.

west garden

west garden, 2:28 PM

I had three brainstorms while there.  The first was to widen a path to make it more inviting to walk past the blowsy poppies to the bench, moving rocks and replanting some small poppy seedlings further in to the bed.

in progress

in progress

The second was that the area around the big piece of driftwood should turn back into lawn.  The plants there are infested with couch grass, and it is the last place we get around to weeding.

2:28 PM, a big "before" mess

2:28 PM, a big “before” mess

The very energetic Al is a staffer there who is always looking for a project.  All I had to do was mention my idea to him, and he was off to get the big weedeater.

2:33 PM, "No Sooner Said Than Done" Al.

2:33 PM, “No Sooner Said Than Done” Al.

3:12 PM

3:12 PM

3:23 PM (Payson Hall is in the background)

3:23 PM (Payson Hall is in the background)

I also made a straight rather than curved line at another edge of the west garden, to eliminate a dull and weedy area that would better off as mown grass.

more sensible

more sensible

I hope I am getting older and wiser and not just older and lazier, but it makes sense to remove a few difficult spots in order to put more attention on the beautiful parts of the garden.

west bed, 3:37 PM

west bed, 3:37 PM

Payson Hall planters

Payson Hall planters

picket fence garden

picket fence garden

We made a quick trip to the Planter Box to get one plant (a red Geum) that I needed to balance a Long Beach planter, and while we were there, we picked up some annuals for an area that the inimitable Al had weeded for us earlier that day.  That was so wonderful because the weeding had been on my list of projects and I did not have to do it!

two hardworking Allans

two hardworking Allans

Al hung some floats on the fence that used to be on the driftwood around which he had weedeated, while Allan planted the annuals and I weeded a sweet pea area.  Those two are the two hardest working people I have ever known.

My original plan had been to do Klipsan Beach Cottages and Wiegardt Gallery as well as Andersen’s, but at almost five o clock I decided we should save them for tomorrow and head back south to do the Anchorage Cottages garden….

Anchorage courtyard

Anchorage courtyard

…and plant the rest of the Long Beach plants so I can call that planting project done for 2013!  What an accomplishment.  Every space in every planter is now filled, or so I believe.  I had time to check the block and half of tree and planter gardens that I skipped yesterday so we could go nursery shopping.

under a street tree:  This looks like a conifer, but it is Hebe 'Boughton's Dome'

under a street tree: This looks like a conifer, but it is Hebe ‘Boughton’s Dome’

There are a few street trees under which I would like to add more perennials, perhaps hardy fuchsias.   The tree gardens are a pain to water, so I may have missed the time frame when the plants would easily establish and not need coddling.

7:18 PM, a planter glows with golden marjoram

7:18 PM, a planter glows with golden marjoram

Finally, we weeded the streetside garden at Time Enough Books, long overdue for the removal of tiny grasses.   The difficult to work in light of late evening brought the day to a close….

Time Enough garden, 8:11 PM

Time Enough garden, 8:11 PM

light over the boat storage yard

evening light over the boat storage yard

Home at last, Allan mowed some lawn while I dealt with tomorrow’s plants (for Gene’s garden) and picked up some of the empty flowerpots strewn around the garden.  If we can get Gene’s planting, weeding at KBC and Wiegardt Gallery, and a brief stop at Golden Sands done tomorrow, we can have the next day off!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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