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Posts Tagged ‘Bailey’s Café’

Monday, 24 September 2018

When we went garden touring down to Manzanita in late August with Pam and Prissy, we had been joined by Beth Holland and Ketzel Levine,  When they learned we gardened on the Long Beach Peninsula, Beth and Ketzel were eager for a tour.  So today they arrived at our house at ten AM for a tour that I had arranged.  (We were almost joined by Ann Amato from Portland but she could not make it, and Pam and Prissy, unlike us, were working instead of skiving off.)

I had been pretty socially anxious about arranging the tour, having long been an admirer of Beth’s gardening from Cannon Beach to Astoria and having read all of Ketzel’s gardening columns when she wrote for the Oregonian.

You’ve seen hundreds of photos of our garden and our work gardens, so we will zoom through those.

our garden

Ketzel meets Frosty (Allan’s [photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

You can imagine how pleased I was that they liked our garden.

Next, we drove past the boatyard and the Port of Ilwaco curbside gardens and then on to the garden at

The Shelburne Hotel.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

from the pub deck (Allan’s photo)

Candles had been hung in the laurel for a weekend wedding.

We continued on for a brief look at Fifth Street Park in

Long Beach.

Allan’s photo

Darmera had seeded itself into the top of the Fifth Street Park waterfall.

Fifth Street Park (Allan’s photo)

Beth, me, and Ketzel

Allan’s photo

Ketzel was taking photos for a talk she was giving the very next day at the Nehalem Garden Club.  (I would have done my best to attend this previous talk at that garden club if I had known about it back in February!)

Ed Strange’s garden

We next went to our good friend Ed’s garden in Tides West.  Beth and Ketzel expressed appreciation for being taken to a garden on a small city sized lot as well as to parks and grand estates.

Ed was there to greet us.  Ketzel liked meeting Ed’s sweet dog, Jackson.

The day was perfect faux summer weather for garden enjoyment, not so much for taking photos.

Ed had recently cut back the huge leaves on his gunnera.

He described how he gets many seedlings by just laying the long seedheads down on the soil.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

The placement and quality of Ed’s phormium was much admired. (Allan’s photo)

on the porch (east side of house)

agapanthus

between house and garage

Artistic upcycled plant stand

The back garden has recently turned from shade to sun from the cutting down of a substantial number of trees to the south.

south garage wall

west side of back garden

We then drove north toward Oysterville.  As we approached Nahcotta, everyone agreed that a lunch stop would be a treat. We were fortunate that one of the best cafés on the peninsula was open.

Bailey’s Café

Bailey’s, like the Depot Restaurant in Seaview, is housed in a former stop on the old Clamshell Railway.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

The art on the walls was given a close look before and after lunch.

The tuna pita wrap is my favourite sandwich on the peninsula.  I don’t have it often because we don’t often pass this way.

the best!

With a burst of energy, we returned to our tour and headed on to see two gardens in Oysterville.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Monday, 25 July 2016

My dear friend Patti J (she who has the loveliest Seaview garden and who was the originator of the local garden tour) had asked me if I would take her to see that most glorious garden in Oysterville.  When Allan and I visited Ocean Park Debby last Wednesday, that news had already reached her, and she asked if she could come along.  Well, of course!  Lunch was planned as well, and we all had looked forward to the afternoon.

THE Oysterville Garden

Before we entered the garden, Debby admired the view across the road.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo: Debby was planning to paint that tree.

THE Oysterville garden. The stakes mark a new beech hedge.

The front lawn and boxwood hedge

The front lawn and boxwood hedge

on the other side of the driveway, a brick path through to the neighbours

on the other side of the driveway, a brick path through to the neighbours

boxwoods and Hydrangea paniculata

boxwoods and Hydrangea paniculata

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I say it every time....

I say it every time….

....This part of the garden makes me weepy.

….This part of the garden makes me weepy.

the clipped contrasting with the exuberant

the clipped contrasting with the exuberant

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on the terrace with Patti

on the terrace with Patti

Debby and Patti

Debby and Patti

On the terrace. Patti marveled at the Aeoniums.

On the terrace. Patti marveled at the Aeoniums.

Aeonium.

Aeonium

The shadow on the floor shows how the backs of the chairs echo the shape of the window.

Aeonium and boxwood admiration was the intent of this photo, but the shadow on the floor (lower left) shows how the backs of the chairs echo the shape of the window.

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onward down the south side: a pittosporum with black stems, white rose, Melianthus major leaves

view from the terrace: a pittosporum with black stems, white rose, Melianthus major leaves

other side of driveway: Helenium, and I think that is Crambe maritima in the lower left corner

other side of driveway: Helenium in the center, and I think that is Crambe maritima in the lower left corner

Enough wheelbarrows for the gardener and his helpers, Melissa and David and sometimes Todd, to move mulch together.

Enough wheelbarrows for the garden creator and his helpers, Melissa and David  and sometimes Todd, to all move mulch together.

At this point in our tour, Patti expressed amazement at the garden and I said, “You haven’t seen my favourite part yet!”  “There’s MORE?” she asked.

We greeted the owner and creator of the garden, who was painting in the garage; I made introductions.

outside the garage door

outside the garage door

Then we went round the corner to the hornbeam and hydrangea allée.

at the center of the allée of Hydrangea 'Incrediball'

at the center of the allée of Hydrangea ‘Incrediball’

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Our Patti in the hydrangea allée

Our Patti in the hydrangea allée

Hydrangea 'Incrediball'

Hydrangea ‘Incrediball’

hornbeam arch at the far end of the allée

hornbeam arch at the west end of the allée

We explored the shade beds at the northwest area of the garden.

The lawn runs north south through the shade borders (Allan's photo)

The lawn runs north south through the shade borders (Allan’s photo)

Patti loved the size of the tree ferns in pots.

Patti loved the size of the tree ferns in pots.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

We all clustered to admire this glowing rhododendron.

We all clustered to admire this glowing rhododendron.

Patti and I had a rest while Debby looked over the pumpkin patch.

Patti and I had a rest while Debby looked over the pumpkin patch.

sunburned hydrangea heads by the pumpkin patch

sunburned hydrangea heads by the pumpkin patch

Wayne was in attendance today.

Wayne was in attendance today.

I got to administer a belly rub.

I got to administer a belly rub.

Wayne

dear Wayne

around the corner to the big lawn

around the corner to the big lawn

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

on the north side

on the north side

the northern border

the northern border

Macleaya cordata (plume poppy)

Macleaya cordata (plume poppy)

front garden cardoons

front garden cardoons

Everyone loved the ruff of begonias in the big boxwood pot.

Everyone loved the ruff of begonias in the big boxwood pot.

Drumstick alliums have gone all purple now.

Drumstick alliums have gone all purple now.

looking north

looking north

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

pink roses against the exquisitely pale pink house

pink ‘Queen Elizabeth’ roses against the exquisitely pale blush pink house

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boxwood and roses

looking north again

looking north again

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purple verbena bonariensis

purple Verbena bonariensis

We have much to say about the glories of the garden.

Debby and Patti and I have much to say about the glories of the garden.

in the front border

lilies in the front border

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

our Patti (Allan's photo)

our Patti (Allan’s photo)

sarracenia and matching gold leaved pelargoniums

sarracenia and matching gold leaved pelargoniums

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Patti at the front gate

Patti at the front gate

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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front walkway

front walkway

Thank you and goodbye till my next visit to this ever changing garden.

Bailey’s Café

We repaired to Bailey’s Café in Nahcotta where we continued to talk about the Oysterville garden, garden tours,  and gardening in general.  Crowded when we arrived, the café became almost empty as we lingered till closing time over a delicious lunch.

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DSC03549

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

My favourite is the pita tuna sandwich.

My favourite is the pita tuna sandwich.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

after the lunch crowd

after the lunch crowd

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Patti bought three small Eric Wiegardt paintings.

Patti bought three small Eric Wiegardt paintings.

outside, a mountain of oyster shells and a view to the Port of Nahcotta

outside, a mountain of oyster shells and a view to the Port of Nahcotta

...and the old pilings from the railway line

…and the old pilings from the railway line.

We drove our gardening friends home to their gardens.

Debby's front walkway in Ocean Park

Debby’s front walkway in Ocean Park

Back at home in my own garden, I gardened on into the evening with many deep thoughts about boxwoods, while Allan watered and weeded at the Ilwaco Community Building.

 

 

 

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Friday, 3 July 2015

from Seaview to Surfside

I had a fun day planned, first some pre-tour visits to local gardens with Garden Tour Nancy, to help write up the descriptions for the tour ticket.  Our drive-around took us to four lovely gardens, and I took lots of photos.  Because of how far behind Real Time this blog is running, they wouldn’t be spoilers if I posted them today.  I think I’ll save some for the post-tour blog entries on each garden, though.  Here are some teasers:

a cutting garden

a cutting garden

deer fence

deer fence

digiplexus

digiplexus

hummingbird

hummingbird

hydrangea

hydrangea

and a waterlogue of the hydrangea

and a waterlogue of the hydrangea

signs

signs

whale

omsri1

Garden Tour Nancy and Somsri, one of the garden owners.

Garden Tour Nancy and Somsri, one of the garden owners.

This dog, at one garden, looks a bit fierce...

This dog, at one garden, looks a bit fierce…

but is so sweet and friendly, I could hardly tear myself away.

but is so sweet and friendly, I could hardly tear myself away.

We saw chickens at one garden...

We saw chickens at one garden…

I got to go right in the pen and take photos to send to an artist who is going to paint Henry, the rooster.

I got to go right in the pen and take photos to send to an artist who is going to paint Henry, the rooster.

Several artists are participating in the Music in the Gardens tour by creating plein air paintings in the gardens.  One, from out of town, needed a photo of Henry to work from.  I admire anyone who gets good photos of chickens, as they were constantly milling around.

In the background: That naked neck chicken is supposed to look like that!

In the background: That naked neck chicken is supposed to look like that!

We stopped by a bonus not-a-garden that will be on the tour.  It’s a wetland restoration project right on the bay.

on the shores of Willapa Bay

on the shores of Willapa Bay

I’m saving the rest of the photos of these gardens for the garden tour extravaganza.

After visiting the gardens, Nancy and I had lunch at Bailey’s Café.

It's right next to the Nahcotta Post Office.

It’s right next to the Nahcotta Post Office, in the same old house.

Bailey's Café

Bailey’s Café

local art

local art

We each had a turkey sandwich.

We each had a turkey sandwich with cranberry chutney.

Meanwhile, in Ilwaco

Allan tried out his new boat (acquired from MaryBeth) on Black Lake.

a cooling picnic table

a cooling picnic table

ducks

geese

the dock

the dock

water lily

water lily

Nature's grass-scape

Nature’s grass-scape

After puttering around in the garden, Allan and I had big plans to photograph the official Ilwaco fireworks show for the Fireworks at the Port page that we maintain.  He went down to the port before me to get some photos of the crowd.  I followed at dusk, on the path through Nora’s wildlife refuge next door.

path

out to the port parking lot

out to the port parking lot

At the Port, I got my favourite fireworks photography spot on a dock walkway where I can count on getting good reflections.

the crowd awaits

the crowd awaits

And then…I started to feel sick.  Quite digestively sick.  I had to abandon my perfect photo spot and hightail it for home JUST as the fireworks were starting.  I’ll spare you the details, except to say that the only fireworks I saw were the last few, from my back yard, over the greenhouse.

from the garden

from the garden

the final burst

the final burst

It was frustrating and mysterious.  (It was not from what I had been eating, as the previous night Dave and Melissa and Allan and I had the same dinner item, and today Nancy and I had the same lunch item, and all of them felt just fine.)  The only half an hour in which I was incapacitated just happened to be right during the fireworks show.

So…You can see all of Allan’s photos over on the Our Ilwaco blog…  They came out well and will have to serve the page with half the number of photos as usual (by one person instead of two.)

Saturday, 4 July 2015

Due to high fire danger, Ilwaco had a ban this year on aerial fireworks other than the official show.  We were thrilled, as were all our friends, I think without exception (because that’s the kind of friends we have).  Last year, we found a rocket on our roof, and fireworks debris in our back yard and all the little dogs that we know were scared out of their wits.  This year, peace reigned all day long.  I was still feeling poorly, so I enjoyed a day mostly indoors working on my blog entries about the Hardy Plant Study Weekend.

The cats also had a lazy day.

The cats also had a lazy day.

frosty

Allan went to the Saturday Market to take some photos and to purchase dessert from Pink Poppy Bakery.

Madeline's Pink Poppy booth

Madeline’s Pink Poppy booth

flowers at the port office

flowers at the port office

De Asis Farm Produce

De Asis Farm Produce

Evelyn of De Asis Farm

Evelyn of De Asis Farm

the Mini Donut booth

the Mini Donut booth

I emerged from the house in the evening when Our Kathleen arrived for a little campfire evening.  And I mean little campfire.  The burn ban allowed only small fires in one’s own backyard, with a hose and buckets of water at the ready.  Our fire circle is by the bogsy woods, where the grass is still damp and cool.

lilies in the front garden

lilies in the front garden

hellebore at dusk

hellebore in evening light

Nicotiana langsdorfii

Nicotiana langsdorfii and Agastache ‘Summer Glow’

in the back garden

in the back garden

As we sat round the fire, we could hear from up Long Beach way the sound of, well, it sounded just like carpet bombing (as seen on telly).  Usually, the fireworks chaos here drowns out the even more overwhelming racket from up north, where a no holds barred free for all takes place (and where smoke filled Garden Tour Nancy’s house).  I gather that the chaos was much worse this year because of the 4th falling on a Saturday.  Afterwards, there was been much talk of the need to have some enforcement of the no camping on the beach and other laws that tend to be ignored on this holiday, as the revelers left an awful lot of garbage behind when they went home.

I was worried even this fire would be too big.

I was worried even this fire would be too big.

It burned down quickly.

It burned down quickly.

our quiet embers

our quiet embers toasting three ears of corn

Ilwaco had three sets of fireworks scofflaws, one to the south of us, one to the northeast, and one to the west, and a small fire was started by a rocket landing on a roof downtown. Compared to previous years, it was a deliciously peaceful and quiet evening (except for the fire alarm calling volunteers to fight the roof fire).

Sunday, 5 July 2015

Usually, I would have been up (too early for comfort) to do the volunteer post-4th of July beach clean up.  This year, I skipped it as I was still a bit poorly and needed to be close to the loo!  The beach was not the place for me.  I and several of our friends also have issues with the idea that the yobbos who leave trash are enabled by volunteers cleaning up after them, while said yobbos are still camped out on the beach setting off more fireworks.  The local merchants defend the overwhelming crowds’ behavior by speaking of their high volume of sales.  We want to know why their profits are not used to finance crews to clean up the mess.  The volunteers were overwhelmed.

From Washington Coastsavers:

Screen Shot 2015-07-13 at 10.28.03 PM

Here’s an article about 75 tons of trash being left on the beach just at Ocean Shores (north of the Peninsula).  And Bob Duke’s opinion column in the Chinook Observer eloquently expresses some of the concerns.

Here’s a photo from the Grass Roots Garbage Gang:

This was at just ONE of our beach approach roads.

This was at just ONE of our beach approach roads.

So, mainly because of my tummy, and partly because I wanted to avoid being around folks who were still setting off fireworks, I stayed home on the 5th and did gardening projects.  First, the east bed in the back garden:

back garden: east bed before

back garden: east bed before

before

before, looking south

getting ready to remove one daylily and spare another

getting ready to remove one daylily and spare another

This one can stay, for now.

This one can stay, for now.

after....doesn't look wonderful, but I will get some mulch for it soon.

after….doesn’t look wonderful, but I will get some mulch for it soon.

Then, I tackled the west bed.

This one does not, as client Jo would say, have enough bang for the buck.

This one does not, as client Jo would say, have enough bang for the buck.

Poor old thing...it's not hideous, just boring.

Poor old thing…it’s not hideous, just boring.

This siberian iris is too big, and is front and center and done blooming during the months when I have more time at home.

This siberian iris is too big, and is front and center and done blooming during the months when I have more time at home.

The iris’ roots were so tough that I called on Allan to help me.

Allan's photo: It required the big pick.

Allan’s photo: It required the big pick.

iris and daylily gone

iris and daylily gone

Then...to the front garden.

Then…to the front garden.

I pulled lot of annual poppies out, and found a shocking sight at the west end of the front…a zillion snails had taken up residence on my young Davidia tree.

They weren't eating the tree, just hanging out...and emerging to eat lily buds at night.

They weren’t eating the tree, just hanging out…and emerging to eat lily buds at night.

The snails all got a ride to the other side of the meander line ditch.  They have not returned…yet, at least not to that tree.  The iris and daylilies went out to our side of the meander line, where they are welcome to root themselves in the debris pile and re-grow if they so desire.

Next: work calls, and I must find time to get mulch to my own garden so I can plant all my new ladies in waiting.

 

 

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Monday, 1 June 2015

Allan’s day

Allan went back to the community building as he had not been able to finish the job before dark yesterday.  I feel bad that he is giving up days off to this job but have been unable to convince him to let it go.  His photos:

before

before

 

after

after

 

in progress

in progress

I sent a hardy fuchsia magellanica start with him from my garden.  How I would love to replace that salal in the above photo and yet what a pain to dig it up.

Although it had rained, Allan bucket watered the first third of the Ilwaco planters.  Rain does not get in to planters put together with what Ann Lovejoy called “the principle of stuffage”.  In fact, it is a rare planter that readily absorbs rain, in our experience.

He looked for a place in the boatyard to fill buckets with water...

He looked for a place in the boatyard to fill buckets with water…

 

The Kathryn I was one the move; fortunately, he picked a faucet that turned out to not be the slip for which she was heading.

The Kathryn I was one the move; fortunately, he picked a faucet that turned out to not be the slip for which she was heading.

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After that chore, he checked on the tadpoles in the meander line pools at the south end of our property.  Behind Nora’s and Mary’s back yards, they were still thriving in the ditch water.

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But our ditch pool had tragically dried up.  We hope they wriggled into the next area of standing water.  Next year, we will be poised for a rescue mission.

But our ditch pool had tragically dried up. We hope they wriggled into the next area of standing water. Next year, we will be poised for a rescue mission.

my day

garden tour sneak peeks

Garden Tour Nancy picked me up at 11:30 to go swanning about on a garden tour sneak peek excursion.  I operate the Music in the Gardens Tour Facebook page and took many photos to tantalize folks with images of the gardens they will see on this year’s tour.  This means, though, that I cannot yet share most of the photos here, not the ones that show too much of the gardens.  These will appear later along with the gardens on tour day…July 18th, 2015.

We went straight up to Nahcotta to Marla’s garden.

edge

outside the garden, right across the road from Willapa Bay

It has come along beautifully since we visited this young garden last year, and is now ready to show how very much can be accomplished in just a couple of years.

outside the fence

outside the fence

Elly, who has grown along with the garden, hurries to greet us.

Elly, who has grown along with the garden, hurries to greet us.

a glimpse of the fascinating porch

a glimpse of the fascinating porch

and a driftwood gate

and a driftwood gate

Elly got so excited that she had to go in the fenced next door yard before she knocked someone over.

Elly (still a pup) got so excited that she had to go in the fenced next door yard before she knocked someone over.

There are chooks....

There are chooks….

and lots of them!

and lots of them!

Alliums by the wrap-around porch

Alliums by the wrap-around porch

Marla, me, and Ed Strange were the three lucky people to get one of these signs from the Basket Case Greenhouse.

Marla, me, and Ed Strange were the three lucky people to get one of these signs from the Basket Case Greenhouse.

Marla’s garden sign was a gift from Ginger next door, who owns the Charles Nelson Guest House, which will also be on the tour with its garden which is quite possibly half an acre large.

peeking over the north gate

peeking over the north gate

Chooks live here, too!

Chooks live here, too!

and two adorable and friendly dogs.

and two adorable and friendly dogs.

dog2

dogs3

old fashioned roses

old fashioned roses

stone

You'll want to see the view of this little formal pond from the deck.

You’ll want to see the view of this little formal pond from the deck.

I wondered if this is Cornus controversa variegata...the wedding cake tree?

I wondered if this is Cornus controversa variegata…the wedding cake tree?

A Waterlogue of the front of the Charles Nelson Guest House

A Waterlogue of the front of the Charles Nelson Guest House

We left the B&B garden to have lunch at Bailey’s Café just a bit up the road.

Bailey's Café

Bailey’s Café

Sambucus 'Black Lace' at Bailey's door

Sambucus ‘Black Lace’ at Bailey’s door

inside

inside

tortilla soup and tuna in pita bread

tortilla soup and tuna in pita bread

Just during the course of lunch, we saw Anchorage Cottages manager Beth and Shelly of Flowering Hedge Design.

and this cutie pie

and this cutie pie

On the way to our next sneak peek garden, way up as far north as you can get in Surfside (without entering the northernmost private estate), we saw a promising garden that we WISH would be on the tour.

a good planting over the raised septic system

a good planting over the raised septic system

a promising garden, from the street

 promising garden, from the street

across the way, the Surfside canal

across the way, the Surfside canal

Next, we found Sam’s garden, which will be on the tour.

Sam's garden, from her driveway

Sam’s garden, from her driveway

I soon recognized some of Sam’s touches must also be in the garden we had admired down the street, and she said that yes, she does help out with that one, as well.

Sam's garden, sneak peek

Sam’s garden, sneak peek

Acanthus in Sam's garden

Acanthus in Sam’s garden

artful use of driftwood throughout the garden

artful use of driftwood throughout the garden

white Centaurea and driftwood

white Centaurea and driftwood

Sam, originally from Thailand, has an assortment of interesting plants including some unusual specimens.  I wish I could show you more, as I took many photos, but they would be spoilers for the garden tour.  I plan to publish them along with the actual tour day photos.

She pointed out this handsome fellow whose perch is in a tree on the ridge to the east:

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After our departure from Sam’s garden, Nancy and I drove by a house on the corner that has a lovingly maintained landscape:

another Surfside garden

another Surfside garden

And we then drove back south where we had just a look from the outside at a pocket garden in Tides West, one that will be featured for its artful use of containers.

Tides West garden

Tides West garden

 

Tides West garden vignette

Tides West garden vignette

With that, our pre-tour ended with three gardens unseen, one on the bay, one in Klipsan Beach, and one that was not confirmed till after our drive-around.

at home

Mary was snoozing in her new favourite spot, a temporary plant holding bench on the back patio.

Mary was snoozing in her new favourite spot, a temporary plant holding bench on the back patio.

I had a gardening mission which had come to me when I looked out my window this morning.  I had realized that when I look south down one path that passes the center bed, I can see the edge of the garden bed that lies under the former danger tree.

looking south

looking south

But when I sight down the other path, I can’t see the bed that is under the east side alder tree.

looking south down the other path

looking south down the other path

I could bring the alder tree shade bed forward from the east side, giving me room for more of the ladies in waiting!

the bed in question

the bed in question at 4:46 PM

and at 6:49 PM

and at 6:49 PM

 

with a bed of ajuga pulled and last week's weeding debris picked up

with a bed of ajuga pulled and last week’s weeding debris picked up

Now I need to get all the way to the back in weeding along there, and I need a yard of soil.

Another large patch of ajuga, gone.

Another large patch of ajuga, gone.

Next to go will be this bed of golden creeping jenny...

Next to go will be this bed of golden creeping jenny…

and more ajuga must go!

and more ajuga must go!

I have gone off groundcovers, it seems.

Tomorrow, we must begin a busy four day work week.  I am determined that on one of those days, I will manage to fit in getting my yard of soil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Monday, 19 May 2014

annuals planting time day eleven

It’s the birthday today of the late Joey Ramone and my former partner, Robert.

And we are rapidly approaching the end of annuals planting he….  time.

We began at Mayor Mike’s garden, just weeding the front beds a bit and adding some white and blue painted sage, a six pack of cosmos, and a Dianthus ‘Fancy Knickers’ (frilly and white!) in keeping with the mostly blue and white theme of his garden.

Last fall, we planted tall alliums (Purple Sensation and Everest).

Last fall, we planted tall alliums (Purple Sensation and Everest).

They are a good focal point at the corner of the front garden.

They are a good focal point at the corner of the front garden.

Mike and his partner must have been doing some weeding or there would have been more work for us.

Mike and his partner must have been doing some weeding or there would have been more work for us.

looking across to Cheri's house...was bright yellow, now red.

looking across to Cheri’s house…was bright yellow, now red.

The above photo tells me that white is a colour that will look good with that red, and also yellow, and clear, not purple-y blues.  The pinky mauve of most cosmos would NOT look good there now.

Cheri and Charlie seem to be doing well with their garden without us having had time to show up to help them!  Cheri did tell me once that she would pave it over if we ever quite…and I have no intention of quitting this one, as it is nice and level and quite easy.

They've replaced some lawn with bark...

They’ve replaced some lawn with bark…

and they have a nice pile of mulch...

and they have a nice pile of mulch…

and new raised boxer-dog-proof veg beds.

and new raised boxer-dog-proof veg beds.

We had forgotten to pay our accountant, which I usually do the minute she finishes our taxes.  A pause at her office to pay did not result in the usual greeting from Helen, who was fast asleep.

no belly rub today

no belly rub today

Next, The Basket Case, where we bought oodles and scads of plants for the 12 whiskey barrels at Casa Pacifica tomorrow.  We will be all set up to go there first thing on Tuesday.  It takes a lot of plants to fill a whiskey barrel full of colourful annuals, and they really look  best with 9 or even 12 trailies around the edges.  Once, I planted fewer trailies and Dan saw us downtown a couple of days later and asked if we had planted up the barrels yet.  So impact, quick and impressive, is key.

flower basket maker extraordinaire Nancy Aust and me at the Basket Case on the previous visit.

flower basket maker extraordinaire Nancy Aust and me at the Basket Case on the previous visit.

I shop in the back employees-only greenhouse to avoid decimating the stock in the front, public greenhouses.

I shop in the back employees-only greenhouse to avoid decimating the stock in the front, public greenhouses.

basket cat

basket cat

Allan prepares to load the van

Allan prepares to load the van with many plants for Casa Pacifica

We saw Charlene at the Basket Case; it is common to encounter friends shopping there.  Allan told me later that she got herself a nice shrub, and when he described it I knew it was the excellent Sambucus ‘Black Lace’.

And while Allan went off to Marilyn’s to weed and prep for annuals planting there, I swanned off with Garden Tour Nancy on a prearranged garden tour diversion.

As usual, a delicious lunch was part of the deal.  (I hope there is a garden tour expense account for her!)  Generously, she came up with the idea of the lunch treat in thanks for me skiving off work for a few hours.

We went to Bailey’s Cafe in Nahcotta.

Bailey's Cafe, with a Sambucus 'Black Lace' in a big pot at the front door.

Bailey’s Cafe, with a Sambucus ‘Black Lace’ in a big pot at the front door.

Next door to the café in the same building is the post office, with a little lending library.

Next door to the café in the same building is the post office, where Nancy showed me the little community lending library….

and just a few post office boxes for such a small town (which has no mail delivery).  Sometimes there is a waiting list for a box.

and just a few post office boxes for such a small town (which has no mail delivery). Sometimes there is a waiting list for a box.

inside Bailey's Café

inside Bailey’s Café

baileys2

I had the tuna sandwich in pita bread, my favourite Bailey’s fare, and Nancy and I shared a most scrumptious golden beet soup with a spicy kick to it; Jayne is such an amazing cook.  I could have eaten a vat of that soup.  I knew Allan would find out about our yummy meal by reading today’s blog, so we sweetened the deal by getting him a chocolate chip cookie.  While we ate, Nancy and I solved the world problems, or at least some of our own.

on the wall at Bailey's

on the wall at Bailey’s

After lunch, Nancy and I drove across Oysterville Road and went a little bit past our turn off and ended up almost to the beach.

the beach approach road

the beach approach road

and on our way to the garden; the deer is probably on its way to a garden, as well

and on our way to the garden; the deer is probably on its way to a garden, as well

Nancy needed a few back up gardens for this year’s tour, and I suggested one I remembered from years ago.

Jonathan and Vicky's garden

Jonathan and Vicky’s garden

The gorgeous house was designed and built by Jonathan.  If his is not on the tour this year, it should be next year and he will welcome visitors in to see the inside of the house, which is as interesting as the outside.

over the garage

over the garage

Inside the house, he had a hoya climbing all around the dining nook windows.  I flashed back to my grandma’s hoya plant and how as a child I would taste the drop of honey on each flower.  I must have one!

Hoya; our old house would have been too cold for it.

Hoya; our old house would have been too cold for it.

Outside, the laburnum and rhodos were in full bloom.

laburnum

rhodos

The tuteur in the middle of the boxwood features glass fishing floats of which he found in over a hundred one day years ago on the beach in Oregon.

floats

We only had the one garden in Surfside to look at, so Nancy dropped me off at Marilyn’s garden where I joined Allan hard at work.

He had weeded this area...

He had weeded this area…

and was working his way around the house.

and was working his way around the house.

hours later, weeded and with cosmos and painted sage planted

two hours later, weeded and with cosmos and painted sage planted

much better!

much better!

The sun felt terribly hot although 642weather.com says it was only 60.  It had to have been more like 70 at Marilyn’s.

The giant miscanthus is on its way to hiding the neighbours' garage.

The giant miscanthus is on its way to hiding the neighbours’ garage.

The privacy planting at the south end is finally filling in, with a shrubby lonicera being the best doer.

The privacy planting at the south end is finally filling in, with a shrubby lonicera being the best doer.

By the backyard swale, Siberian iris were at their peak.

By the backyard swale, Siberian iris were at their peak.

I usually miss this moment!

I usually miss this moment!

I should add some white ones, as well.

I should add some white ones, as well.

Allan went next door to retrieve a long tendril of Akebia vine that had fallen off of its host, an old dead tree trunk, and got a different view of the garden from the driveway to the west.

IMG_1370

IMG_1371

the view from my passenger seat; every time we work here, I'll be looking to see how tall the garden gets

the view from my passenger seat as we leave; every time we work here, I’ll be looking to see how tall the garden gets

Since it was only five, and since I had forgotten to plant a few painted sage at the Wiegardt Gallery last week, we went there on our way south.  We mustered up an hour of energy to weed, mostly on the neglected north side.

before, north side of Wiegardt Gallery

before, north side of Wiegardt Gallery

after; somewhat improved

after; somewhat improved

Allium schubertii in the front garden

Allium schubertii in the front garden

and knautia macedonica

and Knautia macedonica

When we arrived home at seven (quite early compared to recent days), I decided I would feel so good if I could count my OWN annuals among the ones planted; I managed to get the cosmos and painted sage and a few container plants in the ground and into the garden boat and even got six Sweet 100 tomatoes potted up in the greenhouse (and two cukes in a pot on the patio; I had good luck with them last year, enough to share with a friend).

The board now looks like this with only ONE annuals job left.  Why, that is so great that I’ve started making the next set of lists: Weeding and Projects, tasks I deeply enjoy.

a joyous sight

a joyous sight

We still have several flats of perennials to plant here and there, but they are not as pesky and exhausting as the endless parade of annuals during Annuals Planting He—  Time.

 

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Thursday, 24 April 2014

Ah…rain. Wednesday had been a rainy day off during which a number of things (like business paperwork) kept me from just reading all day, so I was very pleased to see more rain at 10:30 AM:

south window, blissful rain

south window, blissful rain

And then…out came the sun.

east window half an hour later!

east window half an hour later!

We still had plants in the van so were quick to get ready to go to work.

By our driveway, an allium emerging

By our driveway, an allium emerging

and chives taking on the sun

and chives taking on the sun

We made a quick stop at Olde Towne Café to switch compost buckets; while we were there, a patron told us about a bright spot of tulips near the old high school, so on our way north, we detoured down School Road to have a look.

colour in the distance

colour in the distance

tulips2

tulips3

tulips4

Kudos to whoever planted these. I am surprised wandering deer don’t eat them, as our client Ann’s garden is just uphill to the south and is continually plagued by deer.

We deadheaded and weeded at the Depot Restaurant, where the tulip and narcissi show is almost over. I won’t be planting annuals till after Mother’s Day so there will be a bit of a gap. We planted some Nicotiana langsdorfii and a pineapple sage and an Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’.

Tulip 'Green Wave' is coming on still.

Tulip ‘Green Wave’ is coming on still.

My first plan had been a bit of planting on Long Beach, but instead we decided to drive straight on to Klipsan Beach Cottages. We had not been there for two weeks.

on the entry lawn at KBC

on the entry lawn at KBC

big old rhodos, visible from the highway

at KBC: big old rhodos, visible from the highway

plants to go in at KBC

plants to go in at KBC

Above, Nicotiana langsdorfii, Jackman’s Blue Rue, Agastache ‘Sangria’ and ‘Cotton Candy’, and an Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ to replace one that died, and a Lobelia tupa (which is so hard to get results from but when one does, it is spectacular). Later I added a Zaluzianskya capensis (‘Night Sceneted Phlox’).

Allan planted and weeded while I deadheaded narcissi and weeded. Below, I lift some leaves to show you some mice jumping headfirst into the ground.

Arisarum proboscideum (mouse plant)

Arisarum proboscideum (mouse plant)

By the mouseplant, mossy steps lead up to the pond.

By the mouseplant, mossy steps lead up to the back of the pond.

looking south across the pond

looking south across the pond

By the driveway, Mary has planted up the old fountain with sedums.

lady fountain all planted up.

lady fountain all planted up.

I went over to the A Frame garden to pick many and many the dead narcissi.

The A Frame woods

The A Frame woods

narcissi

 

narcissi2

narcissi3

narcissi4

 

They are my favourite flower.

They are my favourite flower.

deadheads:  the making of zombie bride bouquets

deadheads: the making of zombie bride bouquets

The foliage has to be let die down naturally, but it helps the bulb to pick the dead flower so no energy goes to making seeds. Or so I have read. I cling to what Ed Hume (northwest gardening personality) said in a lecture, that one can cut the foliage down three weeks after the flower blooms. I just need to do that because we have so many public gardens that look terrible with floppy old bulb foliage.

in the deer fenced garden

in the deer fenced garden

Tulip 'Jackpot' safe from munching deer

Tulip ‘Jackpot’ safe from munching deer

more tulips

more tulips

almost done

almost done

stunning foliage, including the purple-y Thalictrum 'Elin'

stunning foliage, including the purple-y Thalictrum ‘Elin’

cat

outside the fence, windblown Meconopsis cambrica (Welsh poppy)

outside the fence, windblown Meconopsis cambrica (Welsh poppy)

clematis

clematis

Pieris and the lawn border with new fountain

Pieris and the lawn border with new fountain

The most exciting thing I saw was that Mary’s Cardiocrinum giganteum (a tall stately “lily” that takes years to bloom) is reaching for the sky and has a bud. I forgot to photograph that, of all things.

The saddest thing was to learn that my dear friend Riley had died over the weekend. I will miss him.

my friend Riley, February 2005 - April 19 2009

my friend Riley, February 2005 – April 19 2009

We are going to pause now for The House Dog’s Grave by Robinson Jeffers, so brace yourselves:

I’ve changed my ways a little: I cannot now

Run with you in the evenings along the shore,

Except in a kind of dream and you,

if you dream a moment,

You see me there.

So leave awhile the paw-marks on the front door

Where I used to scratch to go out or in,

And you’d soon open; leave on the kitchen floor

The marks of my drinking-pan.

I cannot lie by your fire as I used to do

On the warm stone,

Nor at the foot of your bed: no, all the nights through

I lie alone.

But your kind thought has laid me less than six feet

Outside your window where firelight so often plays,

And where you sit to read – and I fear often

grieving for me –

Every night your lamplight lies on my place.

You, man and woman, live so long it is hard

To think of you ever dying.

A little dog would get tired of living so long,

I hope that when you are lying

Under the ground like me your lives will appear

As good and joyful as mine.

No, dears, that’s too much hope: you are not

as well cared for

As I have been,

And never have known the passionate undivided

Fidelities that I knew.

Your minds are perhaps too active, too many-sided…

But to me you were true.

You were never masters but friends. I was your friend.

I loved you well, and was loved. Deep love endures

To the end and far past the end. If this is my end

I am not lonely. I am not afraid. I am still yours.

************************************************************************

We got a grip on ourselves and went on with the work day.

Oman Builders Supply garden, Ocean Park

Oman Builders Supply garden, Ocean Park

When we got to Bailey’s Café in Nahcotta, I had to tell Jayne that when our job at Wiegardt Gallery ends, we will no longer be doing our small sessions of weeding at Bailey’s because it will be too out of the way.

Bailey's Café and old Clamshell Railroad timetable

Bailey’s Café and old Clamshell Railroad timetable

We saw oystering out on Willapa Bay.

We saw oystering out on Willapa Bay.

lilacs blooming at Wiegardt Gallery (where we continue to do some garden care till Eric's gardening brother arrives)

lilacs blooming at Wiegardt Gallery (where we continue to do some basic garden care till Eric’s gardening brother arrives)

I thought we might go to Andersen’s RV Park next to deadhead narcissi. Then we decided to check Golden Sands Assisted Living on the way, assuming that would mean we would not have to return there next week. Oops….because the visit was spontaneous, we did not have our string trimmer for the center lawn, so we will have to return next week anyway.

I hope to eventually have this all turn into moss spangled with little flowers.

I hope to eventually have this all turn into moss spangled with little flowers.

The beds need lots more weeding, anyway.

The beds need lots more weeding, anyway….although they are not bad and are full of promise.

I toyed again with the idea of just deadheading narcissi at Andersen’s RV Park, then thought how frustrating it would be to AGAIN have to leave without much time to weed. It was already five o clock. Deciding to give Andersen’s a longer session tomorrow, we drove right on by, heading south to the Long Beach tasks that I had originally planned to start the day with.

We deadheaded Narcissi in front of Dennis Co.

We deadheaded Narcissi in front of Dennis Co.

added plants to the planter by the arch

added plants to the planter by the arch

deadheaded city hall, where the Aruncus (goatsbeard) is growing rapidly

deadheaded city hall, where the Aruncus (goatsbeard) is growing rapidly

hosta echoes rhodo flowers in Peggy's Park, east side of city hall

hosta echoes rhodo flowers in Peggy’s Park, east side of city hall

Peggy's Park...a memory garden

Peggy’s Park…a memory garden

Allan put in a new rosemary where an old mostly dead one had come out by the police station and I deadheaded the Veterans Field white narcissi.

Tulip 'Flaming Parrot' at Veterans Field, Allan's photos

Tulip ‘Flaming Parrot’ at Veterans Field, Allan’s photos

We added a lavender to balance this planter where one had died.

We added a lavender to balance this planter where one had died.

And then, with the sun low in the sky, we replaced another lavender down at Time Enough Books at the port.

clouds over the boat storage yard, Port of Ilwaco

clouds over the boat storage yard, Port of Ilwaco

I even had a little time to sort out and move around some of the stash of unplanted plants at home. I dream of time this weekend to plant them. Tomorrow, I do hope for some good enough weather to put in a satisfying weeding session at Andersen’s RV Park.

today:  Ilwaco to Klipsan Beach to Ocean Park to Nahcotta to Long Beach to Ilwaco

today: Ilwaco to Klipsan Beach to Ocean Park to Nahcotta to Long Beach to Ilwaco

 

 

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Thursday, 20 March 2014

After loading yesterday’s fuchsia trimmings into the trailer, and Allan digging the last two clumps of the ones I wanted to transplant, we were faced with this…

rain

We wisely presevered and drove on to Peninsula Landscape Supply to dump the debris.

Debris pile will be ground for compost.

Debris pile will be ground for compost.

The rain cleared and left the pile of oversized river rocks gleaming.

rocks

morerocks

It sure would be wonderful to have a dump truck delivered of those huge river rocks.

Our mission of the day was to do a bit of planting in Surfside and Klipsan Beach. On the way we decided a quick check up on the Bailey’s Café garden in Nahcotta was in order.

in front of Bailey's Café

in front of Bailey’s Café

The garden still looked excellent.

camellia against the café wall

camellia against the café wall

camellia2

Allan's photo of fallen blossoms

Allan’s photo of fallen blossoms

The Bailey's rosemary had come through the winter well.

The Bailey’s rosemary had come through the winter well.

The very low tide gave us an opportunity to walk far out to take photos of the pilings where once upon a time the Clamshell Railroad backed up and reversed its direction.

road to the bay

road to the bay

road

oystershells

oyster shells, low tide on Willapa Bay

looking north to Nahcotta

looking north to Port of Nahcotta

nahcotta

cloud

My Canon camera is defunct at the moment and I just had my iPhone, so I called Allan to walk out, partly to see the wonderful views and partly because I knew he would take good photos, as follow:

looking west toward Bailey's, from the bay road

looking west toward Bailey’s, from the bay road

I believe these are the old railroad dock pilings.

I believe these are the old railroad dock pilings.

wall

At high tide, the water could be up to that wall.

pilings3

looking west toward Bailey's

looking west toward Bailey’s

oyster baskets

old oyster baskets

the big pile of shells

the big pile of shells

Enough of the work intermission; we had not yet begun to apply ourselves, so we drove northwest to get to Marilyn’s garden and plant two big clumps of Fuchsia magellanica. They are naturalized in many unfenced gardens in the Pacific Northwest. I will be interested to see if the deer leave them alone.

at Marilyn's

at Marilyn’s; by summer the neighbours’ garage will be hidden.

at Marilyn's: Fritillaria meleagris speared through a leaf.

at Marilyn’s: Fritillaria meleagris speared through a leaf.

Next, south and east to the Wiegardt Gallery at the verge of Ocean Park and Nahcotta. Some say it’s in Ocean Park and others say it’s in Nahcotta. The address say Ocean Park, but the mailing address for Surfside also says Ocean Park, so it’s rather confusing.

I think it’s time to put the Peninsula map in here again!

PeninsulaMap13

wiegardt

Wiegardt Studio Gallery

The rosemary here has come through the winter well, unlike mine that died.

The rosemary here has come through the winter well, unlike mine that died.

On the west side of the gallery, Ilex 'Sky Pencil' is not making a big impression yet.

On the west side of the gallery, Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’ is not making a big impression yet.

We got the front and side garden weeded. The back will have to wait for another time. Once, to save money on materials, I mulched the back beds with free horse manure. Oh how I rue the day, as a horsey grass now infests the beds, just as it did my own (former) garden when I made the same mistake in the same year.

Washed dairy manure does not create weed grass.

Washed dairy manure does not create weed grass.

Today, we needed to get on down the road to do more jobs. We stopped at Oman Builder’s Supply to trim a lavender that we had not gotten to last time. Just a few blocks north, we paused to admire the narcissi behind Jack’s Country Store. You would think people would know to not pick the flowers. Apparently not.

narcissi

an all too familiar problem

an all too familiar problem

Here's our little garden at Oman Builder's Supply

Here’s our little garden at Oman Builder’s Supply

with some two or three year old tulips returning, with smaller flowers than the first year.

with some two or three year old tulips returning, with smaller flowers than the first year.

Our last job was at Klipsan Beach Cottages where Allan planted more Fuchsia starts in the A Frame garden and a line of Hellebores in the lawn border. I completely forgot to photograph the Hellebores once they were planted.

wheelbarrow of Hellebores and Fuchsia starts

wheelbarrow of Hellebores and Fuchsia starts

The Fuchsias went in this area.

The Fuchsias went in this area.

I spent my time pruning the old stalks of the hardy Fuchsias here and there, quite a lot of them, and as I did I happily realized that several large Fuchsias grew outside the deer fence garden and have not been bothered.

at Klipsan Beach Cottages

at Klipsan Beach Cottages

cabins

Pulmonaria, one of my favourite early spring bloomers

Pulmonaria, one of my favourite early spring bloomers

Ann’s garden should have some of these, as clearly they are deer proof!

Pulmonaria backed with Euphorbia

Pulmonaria backed with Euphorbia

Ribes sanguineum (flowering currant), also deer resistant

Ribes sanguineum (flowering currant), also deer resistant

inside the fenced garden

inside the fenced garden

Euphorbia characias wulfenii is safe from deer outside the fence.

Euphorbia characias wulfenii is safe from deer outside the fence.

in the fenced garden

in the fenced garden

a quick solution for an empty pot from which a Phormium was removed

a quick solution for an empty pot from which a Phormium was removed

Here once stood a might Phlomis fruticosa (Jerusalem sage)

Here once stood a might Phlomis fruticosa (Jerusalem sage)

vanquished by our cold winter

vanquished by our cold winter

Mary and Denny gave me the most charming birthday present:

prez

We are not working till sundown these days; the air gets quite cold by 5 PM. I thought how nice it would be to go to Mexican Fiesta Night at the Lightship Restaurant and get the guacamole that is made at tableside. The realization that is was Thursday, not Wednesday, sent us straight home. I made one quick venture into the back garden to show you the tulips that are starting to bloom next to the garden boat.

tulips

The west bed where I chopped and removed some big Fuchsia clumps now needs a yard of soil.

west bed

west bed

The middle beds Geranium ‘Rozanne’ river has begun to emerge.

It will bloom from June to October.

It will bloom from June to October.

In the east bed, Leycesteria ‘Golden Lanterns’ and Euphorbia glow in the evening sunshine.

east

I would like to have clipped the dead ends off of the Leycesteria but was just too tired.

I forgot to share one birthday present from Allan in my show and tell so am adding it here. I’d found these two most darling pictures at the Ilwaco Antique Gallery and had hinted about them quite well. Here they are back then in the Gallery, soon to be on our wall:

pretty things at the Antique Gallery

.

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