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Posts Tagged ‘Basket Case’

I am determined to catch up, having fallen behind on the caterpillar emergency non-blogging day, and skipping a day has been exacerbated by the long hours of daylight.  You see, if I suddenly pop my clogs, Allan would know how to keep the business going just by reading the blog for 2013 and replicating the work!  It is the same every year, pretty much!

He would find three jobs had been quit this year, but there is plenty to fill in on the other jobs (thus the quitting).

So:  Friday and Saturday in Long Beach and Ilwaco.

Friday, we began with some deadheading at Larry and Robert’s garden half a block away.  No watering necessary due to blissful rain!

their garden boat

their garden boat

My dear friends Judy and Tom’s new car shows up pretty and red in this photo.

The empty new planters had been put in place in downtown Ilwaco (more on this later) but not in the best spots (more on THAT later) so Allan shifted two of them.  While we were parked for that task, our good friend and brilliant carpenter Bill Clearman stopped for a by-the-car visit.  Allan provided a bucket for a seat.

catching up with Bill

catching up with Bill

Bill is an inspiration to us, still working hard at 70 plus.

Bill's reaction on learning he was being photographed for The Blog

Bill’s reaction on learning he was being photographed for The Blog

We checked on The Depot Restaurant garden next.

at the Depot

at the Depot

Next we drove up to The Basket Case to get soil for the Ilwaco planters.  Because Basket Case closes for the season in mid July (having originally been mostly annuals and hanging baskets), we are glad to have the chance to help them sell more of their soil now.

Basket Case

I wish I had bought myself one of their yellow Shasta daisies!  I just was not quick enough with the realization that I want one.  Or two.

yellow daisies

“Banana Cream’ yellow daisies

Next:  Long Beach.  I will regale you with some photos of the planters downtown;  I walked around weeding and deadheading all of them while Allan went out to Bolstadt to weed the beach approach….a job we had planned to spend two days on but wind and rain intervened.  At least I did not have to water the planters!

northernmost planter, east side of street

northernmost planter, east side of street

Diascia and Sunbini

Diascia and Sunbini

Geranium 'Rozanne' and golden marjoram

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and golden marjoram

My goal:  to have two Rozanne in each planter.  I formulated this goal too late to add them this year, as I think good, damp planting season is over (and the planters are full of annuals).  Rozanne has surpassed my expectations as a good container plant.  I might buy some and hold for fall planting.

Note:  Plant Brodiaea 'Queen Fabiola' in Vet Field garden.  Great blue for early summer.

Note: Plant Brodiaea ‘Queen Fabiola’ in Vet Field garden. Great blue for early summer.

also...white and blue Nigella (love in a mist)

also…white and blue Nigella (love in a mist)…here in a planter near the LB pharmacy

The big planter by Lewis and Clark Square is a mish mash that I am not very happy about.  I have gone through phases in this planter.  The phormium phase…long gone.  The Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ phase.  Still pulling those as they come back.  I like the Erysimum.  Every time we tear into it to do it over, we manage to puncture some sprinkler hoses, thus not making parks manager Mike K happy.

what to do?

what to do?

I have tried to get rid of all the Lady’s Mantle and look how much has come back.  Oops.

Across the street from Home at the Beach, the painted sage is fabulous in a re-done planter.  Good, new soil has it thriving.

Salvia viridis about to pop

Salvia viridis about to pop

Kitty corner to that by an empty lot is a planter that continues to thwart me.  I keep thinning the yarrow, planted by a volunteer back in the day, in order to add more interest, and the yarrow keeps winning.  This is one that can only be fully changed by ripping out plants, soil and all and starting over.  It is pretty enough when the yarrow blooms….

kind of dull

kind of dull

The planter in front of Home at the Beach cheered me up again.

Agyranthemum 'Butterfly'

Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’

Calibrachoa 'Lemon Slice'

Calibrachoa ‘Lemon Slice’

I made it through all the planters and walked past City Hall to join Allan on the beach approach.

City Hall Astilbe (north side)

City Hall Astilbe (north side)

I love Astilbes and should plant more in LB.

The wind knocked my prize goatsbeard specimen over so badly that we had had to cut half of it back off the sidewalk earlier in the week!

city hall

Now, the beach approach.  The rugosa roses, which have taken over the whole garden pretty much, are glorious right now.

pink ones

pink ones

single pink

single pink

slightly double pink

slightly double pink

pink

white

white

single white (Rosa rugosa alba)

single white (Rosa rugosa alba)

Coreopsis and roses

Coreopsis and roses

I checked the planters all the way to the end, where the two westernmost ones (planted with horribly dense vinca by volunteers way back when) have practically merged into the dunes.

almost a lost cause

almost a lost cause..and that dratted vinca

the westernmost planter

the westernmost planter

The last planter is just feet from the Long Beach boardwalk.  It could be so much better but we would have to tear out ALL the soil because of the dratted vinca and start over.  This has been the case with a number of the volunteer planters.  We manage to redo one or two a year.

The beach approach garden itself, due to our lack of time this week, did not get done as well as we could have with an extra day….the day we went to a sheltered garden to work instead because of 30 MPH winds.   We (especially Allan) did, however, make a difference.

before and after

before and after

Then we had to leave to get those three Ilwaco planters done.  They had been languishing in semi-hidden neglected spots in private yards; the city crew had gathered and emptied them and placed them for us to fill with soil and plants.

First, we did one in yellows down by the Portside Café.

yellow enhancing yellow

yellow enhancing yellow

golden thymes and marjoram, Erysimum 'Fragrant Sunshine'

golden thymes and marjoram, Erysimum ‘Fragrant Sunshine’

I will now illustrate with buckets how we found the planters placed this morning at the intersection of First and Spruce, where big trucks and trailers sometimes swing wide.

Can you see the faint tire tracks?

Can you see the faint tire tracks?  southeast corner

You can definitely see the tire tracks on the northeast corner!

You can definitely see the tire tracks on the northeast corner!

looking southwest

looking southwest; bucket marks where planter WAS placed

The planters would have been wiped out there, so Allan had moved them inboard.

looking east

looking east down Spruce

adding soil

adding soil

That odd little planter is left over from when there used to be a café and antique shop on this corner, whose owner had put out several containers of plants.

one...

one…

The planters are mismatched because I could not find any more good Erysimums for centerpieces.

The Hebe is a good center so I wish I had gotten two!

The Hebe is a good center so I wish I had gotten two!

That Hebe is left over from when I thought I needed one for a spot at Andersen’s RV Park…and didn’t…

When this job was done at sunset Friday evening, we had the refreshing feeling that we now had two days off!

home to a beautiful sunset, blissful prospect of leisure

home to a beautiful sunset, blissful prospect of leisure

Perhaps our plan of a Saturday taking photos at Saturday Market and then the Doggie Olympic Games was not entire a prospect of leisure, and not my perfect day off at home in the garden…but when I checked my email I realized we had to do a bit of work Saturday after all.

One of the port business owners wished to have her garden tidied, and while we did not need to jump to it, I did want to get it done for the fourth of July and especially for the Ilwaco sixth of July fireworks.  So in order to get it off the list, we did it Saturday late afternoon after Doggie Olympics.

hot and tedious work

hot and tedious work

but now it is done

but now it is done (too tired to straighten photo!)

We had a wonderful reward for doing that job when we did.  While dumping the debris out in the field at the east end of the port, we saw the Tall Ships set sail and were able to photograph them on their way to their Battle Cruise.  Cannons, sea shanties, climbing the rigging, and other delights awaited the passengers.  Well, the passengers were not made to climb the rigging, but I do believe they had to sing sea shanties.

We saw two ships go sailing out

We saw two ships go sailing out

Technically, they were motoring, not sailing, till they got farther out.

ships

ships

Avast, me hearties!

Avast, me hearties!

I reflected, as I often do, on what an amazing place Ilwaco is to live in.  Somehow, through a series of events that often seemed like mistakes, we ended up in this glorious place and with right livelihood.

ships

The Lady Washington and the Hawaiian Chieftan

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Our day started promisingly with a quick walk through our back garden to pick a bouquet for Queen La De Da’s Art Night event. I took a little time to admire some of the flowers.

I'm pleased to report that my California poppies reseeded in a nice mix of colours instead of reverting to plain orange.

I’m pleased to report that my California poppies reseeded in a nice mix of colours instead of reverting to plain orange.

California poppies

This tiny jewel of a Pacific tree frog on a rose made my morning happy.

tiny perfection

tiny perfection

(As I write this, I can hear the evening chorus of frogs that tells me many more are out there.)

"Maxine's rose" rambling

“Maxine’s rose” rambling

I even have a very few Eremurus (foxtail lilies) that, while not a patch on my friend Sheila’s, are the best I’ve ever managed to grow. (A thought: They would look excellent in the front garden where I like tall plants, so I must plant some there this fall.)

Eremurus

Eremurus

And Mary was looking cute and silly. (She came to us with that name.)

my Mary

my Mary

Next we checked the Ilwaco boatyard garden and saw some beautiful flowers and interesting boats.

a pleasant name

a pleasant name

Condor II

Condor II

Janice Ann

Janice Ann from Newport

boatyard garden

boatyard garden, looking north

toadflax

toadflax

looking south

looking south

reseeded California poppies

reseeded California poppies

a cheerful mix for a cheerful morning

a cheerful mix for a cheerful morning

We then weeded and removed dead bulb foliage from the garden by Queen La De Da’s Art Castle and Don Nisbett Art Gallery and the Port office to make sure they looked good for the art night scheduled for that evening.

looking west on Howerton

looking west on Howerton

Knautia 'Thunder and Lightning' at the Port office

Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’ at the Port office

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue', of course.

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, of course.

I pondered why two out of three of the Eryngiums from last year bloomed beautifully while one just sat there.

a non flowering year

a non flowering year

That was the only annoying bit of a pleasant morning, but the day would soon turn difficult.

At 12:30, we went up to Discovery Heights with the intention of spending seven hours on the gardens there, and so we did. But what a horrible mess they were. We simply have too many clients and this job, being one we do not drive by on our regular route, tends to get neglected during planting season. It consists of two very large and three medium sized planting areas, all of which require getting up onto a rock wall either high or low.

middle garden

middle garden

west end of middle garden

west end of middle garden

We both weeded along the front of the middle garden for awhile and then Allan went down to the lower garden while I tried to at least finish the front of the middle one. I took a before photo but did not have the heart to take an after.

before

before

The gardens are basically gorgeous, if I do say so, having planted them in late 2004 and then with Allan when he first moved here in 2005. The selections are deer resistant and have grown well together. The weeds in middle garden have always been a problem because bad soil was brought in (not my choice) containing much horsetail and rush. We were laid off for eight months or so in 2009 and during that year the weeds moved in fiercely. By the time we took the job back, the large time slot it had had was lost to other jobs, and we have never really managed to find time get the garden the way we like it to be. But that is not the main issue. I just am finding the job terribly hard as I get older, and I finally had a revelation that was right up there with the Great Revelation of 2007: to only do jobs that bring joy. I may only have another twenty years of active gardening IF I am as lucky in health as my mother. (She was able to retire at age 55, and that may have contributed to her being able to work in her garden till age 82.)

But it is hard to give up a garden that one has planted. I walked down to join Allan at the lower garden and sat for a moment in the car to eat a snack, gazing up into the garden where the sight of still more thick weeds met my eyes.

grass obscuring the garden

grass obscuring the garden

Did I weep? If I did, it would be unusual. Did we go up into this garden and weed for an hour? We most certainly did. Did I make a final decision? Yes. Before we even got back into the zone of cell phone coverage, I was composing a email of gradual resignation on my phone. I’ve tried to back off from this job before but have always been talked out of it by the owners. They deserve better, someone who has the time to weed thoroughly. I explained that the cities of Long Beach and Ilwaco and the Port of Ilwaco gardens have gotten more expansive every year and that those public gardens are my priority, but I think that one particular point that I made finally got the owners to agree to ask another local gardening business to begin to take over the weeding. I wrote that “the city jobs, to be quite frank, are MUCH more comfortable to do being on level ground and with, well, bathrooms! Climbing down off the rock wall and trekking off into the woods is no fun for a middle aged lady, let me tell you!” Ha! I should have used that VERY accurate reason for resigning before. Later when I told my friend Judy that I need jobs with three amenities: some shade, a chair or bench to sit on at lunchtime, and a bathroom, she said “No chair, no shade, no bathrooms, no Skyler!”

When we got home, I had to recover from all the emotion before going out again, so we did not get to Art Night till the last hour and missed the crowd of over sixty people who had attended. I was thrilled that the event had done so well and regret that I only got photos after the biggest crowd had gone.

Marie Powell's gallery

Marie Powell’s gallery

floral monotype in Marie's gallery

floral monotype in Marie’s gallery

Don Nisbett's gallery

Don Nisbett’s gallery

 

a Basket Case basket from inside Don's gallery

a Basket Case basket from inside Don’s gallery

outside Queen La De Da's

outside Queen La De Da’s Art Castle

evening music

art night guests outside the Port office

art night guests outside the Port office

From inside Queen La De Da’s, this piece of art spoke to me about the big decision of the day:

follow your heart

My heart says to only do jobs that bring us joy and to NOT do so many jobs that we have no time to spend in our own garden during spring through autumn. My perfectionism says that fewer jobs done well are better for our own satisfaction and that of the clients. My social conscience tells me that the most important jobs to me are the ones that benefit the most people: resorts, city gardens, art gallery gardens. The very most important jobs are the ones whose gardens benefit passersby of all classes and economic status, i.e. the city gardens. The very good sleep that I got that night told me that I had made the right decision.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I suspect that yesterday will have been the longest day of our work year, but maybe not, as garden tour month approaches and three of the gardens we have a hand in will be on the tour (on July 20th).

We had much to do yesterday, and our main goal was to get many jobs done and get to Andersen’s RV Park by five to do a lot more weeding before the Sisters on the Fly group starts to arrive this weekend.

Larry and Robert’s garden

We began just down the street at Larry and Robert’s garden with the continuation of changes to their back yard.  

before and after

before and after

We added an Azara microphylla (an excellent small tree with fragrant winter blooms) and some pea gravel and river rock and some edging from materials that were on the property.  I have in the past had an aversion to scalloped edging.  Now I cannot remember why, because I think it looks just grand here.  Now we need some more river rock for against the house and some sort of plant to fill in the narrow border there that is somewhat resistant to three small dogs (nothing too delicate).

Ilwaco intermission

We then planted an Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ in our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco Post Office.

Ilwaco Post Office

Ilwaco Post Office

As we headed out of Ilwaco, the man who sells firewood on 2nd SW waved us down and gave us two hollow rounds of wood that could be used as planters, he said in appreciation of our volunteer work in town.  I told him we do get paid to care for the planters and the boatyard (although the latter did start out as a volunteer project years ago) and that the post office is our only volunteer garden now.  He still insisted we should have the planters.  (He has them for sale sometimes over at 2nd SW and Eagle.)

a garden gift

a garden gift

Might I add, those things are very heavy!

Diane’s garden

Next, we stopped at Diane’s garden and The Red Barn Arena (next door to each other): Allan fertilized the whiskey barrel planters at the barn and Diane’s containers while I deadheaded and weeded along the road.

at Diane's

at Diane’s

That roadside garden clearly needs more plants.  I’ll add some of the inexpensive Dianthus from the Basket Case next time we go there.

Anchorage Cottages

After Diane’s, we went to The Anchorage Cottages where we were requested to prune a branch off of the Ceanothus so that the parking sign for cottage one would show.  The shrub was thick with bees.

Ceanothus

Ceanothus (California Lilac)

Ceanothus (California Lilac)

Even though the bees were gentle, they got pretty agitated when I tried to lop a large branch, so I settled for quickly cutting one small piece and then scampering well back while they swarmed toward me…then…whew!!…resettled on the flowers.

The number one just barely showing.

The number one just barely showing.

Plant emergency of the morning:  thrips on a lily!  Doused it with a cup of mild dish soap well diluted with water.  Fingers crossed.

cured, I hope

cured, I hope

I was reminded of this New Yorker cartoon, long a favourite of mine.

 

george-booth-aphids-on-the-heliotrope-new-yorker-cartoon

Anchorage center courtyard

Anchorage center courtyard

New Dawn rose

New Dawn rose

We did not spend as long there as I would have liked because our mission remained to get to Andersen’s by five.  Our next stop was The Basket Case to pick up some plants for Andersen’s garden shed border which I felt had looked a little bare after the previous evening’s weeding there.  I also got two Lobelia tupa for Sheila as she and Harold are coming to visit us soon!

at the Basket Case, what a deal!

at the Basket Case, what a deal!

Wiegardt Studio Gallery

Next we went all the way up to Nahcotta/Ocean Park to the Wiegardt Gallery where again we went round the garden in haste but I hope effectively.

at Wiegardt Gallery with manager Christl

at Wiegardt Gallery with manager Christl

Allium schubertii

Allium schubertii and albopilosum

Wiegardt

Alliums white and purple

Alliums white and purple

Allium albopilosum and Allium moly 'Jeannine'

Allium albopilosum and Allium moly ‘Jeannine’

front walkway

front walkway

west side of gallery

west side of gallery

It occurs to me that next time we are there, I will take you inside!  Eric Wiegardt is a renowned artist and the gallery is beautiful.

Ocean Park intermission

We were doing well as it was only three o clock, so we had time to stop at Jack’s Country Store for what we call “Jack’s snacks”.   Of such tiny luxuries are happy moments made.

Bliss:  The Jack's Snacks Cooler and my potato salad in the car

Bliss: The Jack’s Snacks deli cooler and my potato salad in the car

I think this is the first time since the beginning of May that we have had time, when at the north end, to stop for a treat.

Next up:  the small entry garden at Oman Builders Supply.  But first, we did a U Turn to get a better look at a garden near Jack’s that is looking fine.  Garden tour next year?

an Ocean Park garden

an Ocean Park garden

driftwood and toadflax

driftwood and toadflax

lupines

lupines and foxgloves

a work in progress

a work in progress

Doing another U turn to get back to OBS, we saw that the poppy garden behind Jack’s is still there.  Jack himself started it, or his wife perhaps, and it is being carried on.

east wall of Jack's

east wall of Jack’s

Oman Builders Supply

After those distractions we got to Oman Builders Supply garden.

OBS garden

OBS garden

Mainly I wanted to make sure that the Eryngiums ‘Jade Frost’ and Lobelia tupa that we had planted last week had no transplant shock.  They were fine.  We could have spent quite awhile deadheading the Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ but more work called to us to keep moving.

The remaining deadheads can wait till next week.

The remaining deadheads can wait till next week.

hebe flowering at OBS

hebe flowering at OBS

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We pulled into our parking area at Klipsan Beach Cottages at a quarter to four.  Still on track for our day’s plan.  I knew the garden would be in good shape and that we could get it done in an hour.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

Klipsan Beach Cottages fenced garden

Allium albopilosum (Star of Persia)

Allium albopilosum (Star of Persia)

Allium schubertii

Allium schubertii

Rose 'Jude the Obscure'

Rose ‘Jude the Obscure’

The names of some of the roses are lost to us!

The names of some of the roses are lost to us!

rose

Last year this one did not open well but this year it looks fine.

Last year this one did not open well but this year it looks fine.

Last year Mary brought back some choice shrubs, and the one below is still in a pot because we have not found the perfect spot for it.  I think it is some kind of callistemon but if I am wrong, perhaps someone will enlighten me.

a recent acquisition

a recent acquisition

One of the two cats put on a charming show for me in the garden.

Sarah, who did get a belly rub

Sarah, who did get a belly rub

The foxgloves are restricting the view of one of the entry signs.

No one can bear to cut them down.

No one can bear to cut them down.

We would have left, as I had planned, by 4:45, but owner/manager Mary and I got into a conversation about Nora’s funeral, and life, and death, and afterlife or not, and walked up to the cottages and back, and so Allan and I did not leave till a little after five.

Corokia cotoneaster

Corokia cotoneaster in late afternoon light

Andersen’s RV Park

At last, we got to Andersen’s at five fifteen.  While Allan planted the new perennials in the garden shed garden, I weaseled out of my least favourite garden task (planting) to discuss with the staff what to do with one of those free planters we had been given in Ilwaco earlier in the day.  Jan came up with a good spot for it, and we waited for Al to return from walking his dog in order to suggest it, because it involved an area for which he had been seeking a design solution.

Al and Chewie return from the beach

Al and Chewie return from the beach

He liked the idea but since his shift was over, another staffer and Allan ended up doing it.   I hope Al was not disappointed the next morning to find it done, because he does like to have a project.  Jan’s idea was so good that it couldn’t wait till morning!

the round hollow wood

the round hollow wood

I snagged three gazania out of planters on the east side of the house where they closed up in the afternoon for lack of sun.

Till eight thirty, Allan and I weeded like mad in the beds behind the office, where the pernicious quack grass had returned; I walked the other beds and planters removing dead bulb foliage.  The results were satisfactory and now, on Monday, all we have to do is a light weeding from one end of the gardens to the other and all will be perfect…at the same time!  This is rare, because as you can probably tell, we have too many jobs to reach that state of glory very often on our larger garden jobs.

behind the office

behind the office

Having time to deadleaf as well as deadhead really makes a garden look perfect.

Buddliea 'Black Night' before...

Buddliea ‘Black Night’ before…

and after picking off yellowed leaves

and after picking off yellowed leaves

If an RVer who is also a gardener camps here, s/he must be pretty impressed with the beauty of the gardens at this time of year in evening light.  Tired though we were, we lingered to take some pictures in the late evening.

poppies and Payson Hall

poppies and Payson Hall

Baptisia (false indigo)

Baptisia (false indigo)

Stipa gigantea, my favourite ornamental grass

Stipa gigantea, my favourite ornamental grass

Stipa and Payson Hall

Stipa and Payson Hall

gold spangles

gold spangles

sunset light

sunset light

On the way out, we swung by the garden shed so I could see the new plants in.  It does look more filled out with the addition of a couple of Gaura ‘So White’, a Cistus, a Phygelius ‘African Queen’ and…something else…I forget what!

garden shed garden

garden shed garden

Al had, earlier in the day, made the gravel path at the very far end look spiffing but it does not show in this photo.

An emergency

Finally we could go home!  As we drove south through Long Beach, I checked my messages on Facebook to get an update from my gardening neighbour (four doors down), Judy.  As I read her fairly reassuring message about her visit to the cardiologist, another message popped up from a client at a commercial establishment.  There were caterpillars all over a shrub, having stripped the leaves, and looking horribly unsightly right next to a venue for an event on Saturday.  Could we come tomorrow (Saturday morning) and cut it down?  I won’t name the business because no one wants to think about horrid caterpillars.  It was on our way home, and Saturday morning was fully booked with events (Saturday market, visiting friends, cash mob) so we had to make an emergency detour with loppers and a chainsaw and cut the shrub (a Leycesteria formosa) to the ground at dusk-thirty.  I felt terrible because a hummingbird was feeding on the flowers; every leaf was gone, but the flowers remained.  One on the other side of the building (away from the next day’s event) was still leafed out, although a bit chewed, and I think the hummer could find it.

In my own garden I would have left the shrub alone to leaf out again, but at a business such ugliness cannot stand, especially if caterpillars are dropping onto customers!

We could not haul the debris.  Nay, would not.  No caterpillars allowed in our work trailer or at the site where we dump.  Fortunately there was a place we could stash the branches till the infestation is gone.

By then it was far too late to blog about such a long day so I made a placeholder entry via my iPhone on the way home…where we collapsed in front of the telly and had a comforting dinner quickly whipped up by Allan and watched Master Chef.  Just before that, as I did the evening spreadsheet on my computer, Allan came in to my office to show me this riding on his shirt.  If anyone knows caterpillars,  perhaps they can tell me what this horrid creature will become.  Nothing nice, I bet.  I shudder to think how many hitched a ride on our clothes.

a garden pest

a garden pest

I am hoping for no more days this long unless they are that long…in my own garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Today at the Ilwaco Post Office, the Lollipop Asiatic lilies have popped open.  It is actually not my favourite lily, but I got them for free somewhere, a good price for a volunteer garden.  I will be donating my one remaining Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ because I realized this morning that the post office is lacking one.

Ilwaco post office

Ilwaco post office

We went to Basket Case to pick up three Erysimum for the Ilwaco planters, an Azara microphylla for Larry and Robert, a Lobelia tupa for our own garden, and some Dianthus for Jo’s garden.  I sorted out the Sanvitalia situation.

Sanvitalia, a favourite annual

Sanvitalia, a favourite annual

Sunbini and Aztec Gold

Sunbini and Aztec Gold

Of the two cultivars offered at the Basket Case, I think Sunbini is a little tougher and can hold up better in the truly challenging conditions of the Ilwaco street planters.

Next time we go to the Basket Case, I hope to have room to finally get two hanging baskets for our garden, now that we will have a little more time to water them.  (Who am I fooling? With three gardens to get ready for the garden tour, when will that extra time be?)

Petunia 'Pink Lemonade'

Petunia ‘Pink Lemonade’

Here are the plants I wish people would go buy because they need to be in the ground!  First, ALL the Agastaches would love to have their roots in the soil.  Then, the lovely Sidalcea is getting so tall it is bending over!

Sidalcea...a favourite of my grandma

Sidalcea…a favourite of my grandma

The Lobelia tupa is an exciting plant that it seems no one but me is buying because it is not flowering yet.  The two Brunnera, Looking Glass and Jack Frost are excellent for shade.

Brunneras

Brunneras

There are still some hardy geranium ‘Rozanne’ available.  It has won the Royal Horticultural Society award for plant of the century!  Inspired by Adrian Bloom’s  photo of his river of Rozanne, I now have my own Rozanne river in my garden.  I think one of the reasons I moved to our sunny lot was just so I COULD have a river of Rozanne.

Adrian's Rozanne river, my Rozanne river

Adrian’s Rozanne river, my Rozanne river

His is curving and I like the effect of the grasses so much that, now that I look at his photo, I think I might add some grasses on either side of mine.

On to work!  We had dithered away the morning with sleeping late because of rain, waiting for rain to stop, and shopping.  We had two big projects to accomplish today at Andersen’s RV Park.

At last, on the east side of the house semi-shade bed, my weeding project:

before

before

and after

and after

The west side of the house behind the office was Allan’s project:

before

before

after

after

Allan's before and after set

Allan’s before and after set

There is some newspaper under the mulch to try and keep the pernicious quack grass from coming back too quickly.  Both projects were mulched with Cow Fiber (dairy manure) from The Planter Box.

Meanwhile, energetic park staffer Al was looking for a project, too, so I showed him an awful place in the garden shed garden.  A trench had been dug last year for some sort of plumbing or electrical fix, and had never been filled in because I was never sure the fix-it project was done.  Now we were running out of time to get it looking nice by summer.  I suggested it could be covered with rock, not made back into a garden, and in an amazingly short time Al fixed it.

Al accomplished this in one hour.

Al accomplished this in one hour.

This is a good spot to be graveled because sometimes a rig is parked by here and has to hook up to electric and cable.  I could put a pot here if we ever need a plant in this area.  It was a wonderful quick fix to a very unsightly area, full of quack grass that would have taken back over with a vengeance had I tried to weed it and plant it.

Al also weeded a raised bed with three blueberries in it and has cheerfully agreed to add liquid fertilizer every ten days when it is his shift to water the assorted planters.

Here are some beautiful things:

Allan's photo of Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Allan’s photo of Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

I don’t know the name of the perennial poppy, below, that I got from Joy Creek nursery but it is just the sort of colour that Lorna most likes.

poppy

poppy

The picket fence garden today

The picket fence garden today

the poppy field, with Al walking by the back

the poppy field, with Al walking by the back

by the office

by the office

Agyranthemum 'Butterfly' and Petunia 'Pink Lemonade'

Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ and Petunia ‘Pink Lemonade’

A quite heavy rain came along at seven, so we went to dinner at the Depot Restaurant.  I had been anxious to see the garden, because I had been told that Susie of the Boreas Inn has taken Ciscoe by there to see it!  We had not checked on it over the weekend because our car was out of order, so I hoped it had looked good.  It did…till I got to the corner by the front door and found a big dead branch on the Cistus.  Oh no!   Allan lopped it off, and here it is, a great embarrassment, in our trailer.

It was really bringing down the tone.

It was really bringing down the tone.

Next Wednesday the Sisters on the Fly club will be at Andersen’s, and now that we have ALL the big clean up projects done at last, we just need one day to weed from one end of the gardens to the other and it will look spiffing.

Even more important, my friends Sheila and Harold will be staying at the park next month on garden tour weekend, and I want the gardens to be impeccable for that happy occasion!

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Rain blessed us today.  I thought we were somehow going to have to manage to water the Long Beach planters tomorrow, the day of Nora’s funeral, either before or after the service.  But as we left for work a heavy mist fell and became progressively more of a drizzle.

I changed up the plans in Long Beach when I realized we would not have to water the planters after all.  Instead of just weeding two park areas, Allan weeded parks while I walked around town and checked on the weeding and deadheading of the planters (much quicker without hoses involved).

Fifth Street Park

Fifth Street Park

Baptisia backed with Phlomis fruticosa, Fifth Street Park

Baptisia backed with Phlomis fruticosa, Fifth Street Park

After that park, Allan moved up to Coulter Park.  I nipped into a local hardware store because I had heard they had a few Eryngiums for an amazingly low price in their plant section.  Oh my, those poor sea hollies were stressed.  This is why I prefer to buy my plants from a nursery like The Basket Case where the plants are in good condition.  This Eryngium was too sad for me even to consider buying it as a rescue:

poor baby

poor baby

With Coulter Park weeded and the planters checked, we went on to The Anchorage Cottages.  The first thing I noticed was that the beautiful Hydrangea petiolaris was pulling its driftwood trellis over!

trouble brewing

trouble brewing

Mitzu helped us check out the situation

Mitzu helped us check out the situation

Mitzu!

Mitzu!

While the manager, Beth, her dog Mitzu, and Allan figured out what to do about the trellis, I dealt with nasty scilla foliage in the middle courtyard garden.  When I took on this job, Calla lilies and Scilla had taken over the garden there.  I have beaten back the Callas in order to add more interesting plants, but the Scilla returns every year.

courtyard corner, before and after

courtyard corner, before and after

Allan fixed the hydrangea by driving a fence post into the ground behind the trellis and tying the trellis to the post.

all better

all better

One little thing bugged me:  ONE center cosmos died out mysteriously in a window box, throwing off the matched set.  If both had died, or if I removed the other center one, I could claim I had left the center empty so people could see out!

mismatched

mismatched

As we left for our next job, I was so very happy to see the rain continuing to fall because if we could get through enough jobs, we could have Saturday and Sunday off with the assurance that no watering was needed.  I wondered if perhaps the rain was falling all the way up the Peninsula.  Allan suggested I call Steve and Great Day Café in Surfside.  Great idea!  Steve said it was misty there, then changed his assessment to drizzle.  Joy!  This meant we would not have to go all the way up there to water Marilyn’s!

blissful drizzle

blissful drizzle

Next, at Andersen’s RV Park, we had planned to only spend half an hour to an hour doing the most necessary tasks.  But I could not stand to see the six whiskey barrels still looking paltry.  The unseasonal winds had been hard on them.  Allan nipped over to Basket Case to get more Sanvitalia and I added three to each barrel.  I do hope they settle in with no transplant shock as I won’t be back till early next week.

fluffed up

fluffed up

Andersen’s is a very dog friendly park, just not on the two green lawns where people sit and kids play.

Allan got the narcissi foliage out of the area we cleaned up and planted earlier this week.    The rain had stopped.  I was wishing it would continue.

better

better

I feel fairly pleased with the Payson Hall planters.  I did not plant them as thickly this year so that the plants get better air circulation but they still look moderately lush.

Payson Hall

Payson Hall

Staffer Al had hung up the cutest RV birdhouse by the office.

RV birdhouse

RV birdhouse

Al and Chewie

Al and Chewie

Chewie

Chewie

The staff use golf carts to get around the park; when I first started working there, they all used mopeds!  It was probably more exciting but much less practical.

There are still three serious weeding projects at Andersen’s, but…when?

corner behind office needs weeding....

corner behind office needs weeding….

garden heading to clam shed needs weeding and mulching!

garden heading to clam shed needs weeding and mulching!

and the east side of house garden needs weeding and mulching!

and the east side of house garden needs weeding and mulching!

I despair of catching up, and by the time we do, the picket fence garden will need a thorough weeding, although I have kept up on it a bit each week.

picket fence garden

picket fence garden

There’s an RV Club called Sisters on the Fly coming on the 19th and I am determined to have all these projects done by then.  Can perfection be attained just once, please?

Meanwhile, we had to check on gardens further north, starting with Klipsan Beach Cottages.  There, we have not only Mary, part-owner and manager, to help but also some gardening by Luis and Josephina, so no areas are in dire need.  We just go through and tidy and fluff and make the gardens better, and never have to leave feeling a sense of pressure of things undone.

As we pulled into our usual parking spot, Allan saw the battery symbol was showing on the dashboard.  I worried for a minute but then focused on the garden.

Klipsan Beach Cottages fenced garden

Klipsan Beach Cottages fenced garden

cottages viewed from garden

cottages viewed from garden

After three or four years of being distressingly small, it looks like the Tetrapanax ‘Steroidal Giant’ might finally grow tall this year!  The leaf size is giving me hope that it might decide to leap up.

KBC's Tetranpanax

KBC’s Tetrapanax

lily and hardy fuchsia

lily and hardy fuchsia

Having totally forgotten, an hour later, that the battery symbol had popped up on the car’s dashboard display, and having poked at the ground at KBC and wondered if it had not rained as much on the north end of the Peninsula as on the south, I decided we needed to water Marilyn’s after all.  If we did not get back till Monday and the new plants were distressed, I would be so sorry.

It turned out the plants were still fine, but watering surely benefited them and since they are going to be on the garden tour they need to be at their best.

the path at Marilyn's

the path at Marilyn’s

By now it was about 6:30 PM and we did not have time for much weeding.  I planted two Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’ and Allan did a little bit of edging.  We must get back here next week for a very thorough weeding of the middle and back of the garden.

We skipped our other two north end jobs, Wiegardt Gallery and Oman Builders Supply gardens, because both got done well last Saturday, and we had two more things to do on the way home.  I would rather have time for everything…but there is not enough time.

Back in Long Beach, we cut and pulled more spent bulb foliage and pulled horsetail out of the welcome sign garden.

welcome sign

welcome sign

It has such a horrible horsetail problem that if we did not constantly groom it, it would look like this end down by the faucet:

hideous horsetail

hideous horsetail

Even if we dug out all the soil and put down the strongest landscape fabric, the horsetail would pierce through and return from ground level, so it is a dilemma how to deal with this problem.

We left the sign at 7:40 and I was well pleased that we still had time to weed the garden down by the Ilwaco Port Office so it looked good for Saturday Market.  And then….by Black Lake, coming in to Ilwaco, the speedometer and probably other dashboard indicators on our car completely died.  Allan said something about how we were running just on battery.  I wondered if we would make it ten more blocks home, and to my great relief we did.  But the car was inoperable.  

Allan hopefully put the battery on the charger while I kept up work momentum by taking a bucket and hand tools and walking to the port to doggedly finish out the day.   The port office garden just had micro weeds, but as I worked there and on one of the Howerton Street curbside gardens I pondered that we have quite a lot of work in walking distance of our house!  While sorting out the car problem (and even buying a used new-to-us one is a problem in a small town), we could take the bus to Andersen’s for a day…but it would be so tiresome to do.  (The buses do not run frequently here.)

I headed home at 8:20, a beautiful hour for the Howerton gardens.

on Howerton

on Howerton

During my two block walk home a friend and client called on a gardening matter and offered us use of one of his cars for the time being, but I declined the kind offer because that seems like a huge responsibility.  From the symptoms I described, he said it was likely to be the alternator.  I got home and pretended I had been thinking about the car and diagnosed the problem as the alternator.  Allan had come to the same conclusion, but did not fall for my story and said “You’ve been talking to someone.”

I picked a bouquet of flowers and left them on the back porch of Nora’s house for her grand daughter to find.

We will rent a cargo van on Monday to get us through the days, just a few I hope, till the part can be shipped and the car fixed.  If only it had waited till after Nora’s funeral tomorrow….or till we had time to actually find and buy a used van…but it would have been far far worse had it happened during annuals planting hell or garden tour last minute prep week.

And that’s why it was just an almost successful day.

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The day started with a sudden inspiration that instead of going to Andersen’s RV Park and weeding the east side as I planned, we should get the cow fiber to mulch the newly planted edges of the Marilyn garden.  Since we would be going by Oman Builders Supply on the way to M’s, we first went to Basket Case to get a couple of Eryngiums for that garden.

Basket Case cat

Basket Case cat

and a gorgeous basket

and a gorgeous basket

With Eryngiums in the car (and a few other irresistable plants to fill in along the repaired-after-weedkiller-damage edges at Marilyn’s) we went up and over and down a block to The Planter Box and got loaded up with two scoops of manure.  I picked out some more edging plants and one more six pack of Cosmos (for the Boreas Inn, if I can find time to get it planted there!).

my flat of plants being totaled at Planter Box

my flat of plants being totaled at Planter Box

With the addition of manure and more plants, Marilyn’s is beginning to look right again.

before and after

before and after

before and after

Mulch makes such a difference!

Mulch makes such a difference!

One of my gorgeous variegated Miscanthus there is reverted to green, really a shame and something I have not seen before with this grass:

half and half

half and half

Next week, we should have time to go down the middle of the garden and weed and then will just be in a holding pattern till tour day (July 20th).

the need to weed!

the need to weed!

If we had not had to spend so much time lately fixing the edges of the garden, the center would be well weeded by now.  I don’t dread the job, as I will find it so satisfying.  The hard part is we have to haul away all the debris.

The mulching and planting took less time than I thought it would;  I’d thought we might end up with extra cow fiber and my back up plan was to take it to Golden Sands.  But we had the perfect amount.  Since we had run into Andersen’s owner Lorna at the Planter Box, and she had there expressed a desire for some more small ornamental grasses, we figured our extra time could be spent fulfilling that request.

On the way we planted two Eryngiums and a Lobelia tupa at Oman Builders Supply, talked to them about the need to start watering regularly, and admired the size of the Alliums in the little garden.

Alliums schubertii and albopilosum

Alliums schubertii and albopilosum…very large

Then back we went to The Basket Case and got almost all their little grasses.  This is a boon for them because it is not a year round nursery, and when they sell out of plants, they will close for the rest of the summer and fall (probably in mid July)!

Here’s when the day got hard.  The area at Andersen’s where Lorna craved small ornamental grasses and some flowers was the barren end of the poppy bed, where poppy seedlings just do not “take” like they do at the other end.  This is not through lack of watering by the staff, and the bed has been mulched, but the other end is just moister.  We had not gotten round to weeding it and it was a mess of beach grass and couch grass, both with hugely running roots.  It was…just…hard work.  The kind of weeding job where you pull long long grass roots and know that only regular policing will keep the bad grass from coming back and swamping the desirable grass.  Worse yet, it has wild beach lupine whose roots are like iron.

before and after

before and after

A wheelbarrow full of plants went in.

little grasses and some flowers

little grasses and some flowers

Deer wander this garden so the non grass plants were Lobelia tupa (one, to try it out), Lavender, Catananche, Gaura ‘Whirling Butterfiles’ and ‘So White’, and Coreopsis ‘Baby Sun’.

It doesn’t look that different, yet, but should fill in well.

potential

potential

You can see where after the patch we weeded, all of a sudden the poppies are spectacular.  Dare we say we think it has something to do with the septic field?

Unfortunately, we still have three unweeded areas and might not get to them till next week.  One is the shade bed east of the house (our original plan for today) and two are near the office back door.  Oh, when?

still just befores!

still just befores!

This is one reason I am going to try to quit a job tomorrow by passing it on to a competent gardening friend who may be willing to take it over.  We’ll see.  I cannot stand being so overbooked and always running behind.

Even though we were plenty tired after this, at 7 PM we went to our last job.  I knew we absolutely had to water the Ilwaco planters now that the rains have stopped.  As has happened before, we were perhaps one day too late and in several of the planters the little sanvitalias were drooping flat on the soil and shriveled up.  I could not bear to photograph this.

The Ilwaco planters are round cement and the soil in them just bakes.  We bucket water them, or rather Allan does.  We do have a water truck but it takes an hour longer to water with it.  An hour extra would be more strain on the city budget and at the end of the day we do not have that extra hour.

Some of the sanvitalias were fine.  The stressed ones, eight in all,  I cut back hard, hoping they would put out more roots as the tops grew back, and I resolved that I cannot use this choice and cute little plant in the Ilwaco planters next year.  I had forgotten that it is more sensitive to dryness than Diascia or even Calibrachoa.  And dryness is the curse of the Ilwaco street planters.

As we watered and groomed the Ilwaco planters (in a wind so cold I put on a winter scarf), I became obsessively worried that the Sanvitalia in the Long Beach planters had suffered the same fate.  So after watering, at 8-exhausted-15 PM we drove back up to LB and cruised the car up and down the main street.  Ah, thank heavens above, the Sanvitalias were fine, perky, and pretty.  The LB planters are much larger and do not get dry as quickly.  They should hold until Wednesday, the day we plan to begin their regular watering.  (With a quick connect hook up and a short hose for each planter, no buckets for the ones on the LB main street I am glad to say!)

Here is a happy Sanvitalia in my garden tonight;  I hope the LB ones stay this happy until Wednesday.  Gardening can be such a big worry.  Times like the last half of today are not the jolly side of this business.

Wish they were all this happy.

Wish they were all this happy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This was not the final day of planting.  There are still some cosmos to plant in Ann’s garden, a very few plants (about ten!) that I want to add to Long Beach, and quite a few plants for my own garden.  But the big planting jobs are all done now. What a relief.

So as we headed to first job, we got our mail and there was a catalog for….bulb planting hell!

bulb catalog with the last big batch of annuals

bulb catalog with the last big batch of annuals

Bulb hell has its own quality, but is easier.  My clients, who have all become friends, and I go in together for bulbs from Van Engelen, and then there are hundreds of bulbs in my garage while I sort out everyone’s order.  And plant them.  With annuals, we keep having to go out to get more, and more, and more, and although plant shopping is enormously fun, it is time consuming and not very lucrative (because it is hard to charge for the time accurately, since much is spent schmoozing about plants, and we don’t resell the plants at a profit because we want all our clients to get the best plants possible and the biggest amount for their budgets!).  Bulbs hell includes the anxiety of getting them all in the ground, despite weather, by early December.

Saturday, we first we planted at the Ilwaco boatyard in increasing drizzle.  Here is another lesson in Round Up weedkiller damage.  A few weeks back the boatyard crew sprayed behind the fence with weedkiller, trying to kill the horsetail.  While the horsetail is still happy as can be, some of the boatyard plants are still blighted by drift.  (The crew boss promises this will not happen again.)

yellowed poppy foliage, happy horsetail

yellowed poppy foliage, happy horsetail

blue globe thistle was hit

blue globe thistle was hit

I feel fortunate at so little damage.  When I have time I will prune out the bad parts.  If the weedkiller had caused as much damage as it did at Marilyn’s garden, where a one foot or more strip on each side of a path was affected by someone spraying Round Up (Am I still brooding about this?  Kinda.), the long, narrow boatyard garden would have been a goner.

The annual poppies seemed particularly susceptible (and you can see how, in this section we have not yet weeded, the horsetail just brayed with laughter and had no damage at all).

 Poppies are a delicate flower.

Poppies are a delicate flower.

The garden looks fine overall.  We planted the newer areas with cosmos and painted sage, and left the center area, three years old, to perennials and reseeded poppies.

newest section

newest section

Our plans to also weed the middle section were thwarted by heavy rain, so we went to Olde Towne Café for lunch and hoped for the weather to lighten.  It didn’t.

weather view from Olde Towne

weather view from Olde Towne

I have set for myself an enjoyable obligation of photographing the Saturday Market for the Discover Ilwaco Facebook page.  Lately, because we have been working Saturdays, Allan has helped by taking photographs, too.  We feel for the market vendors as this is the second bad weather Saturday in a row!  In three previous years of photographing the market (only missed two Saturdays due to garden events!), I don’t remember two dire weeks back to back.

Allan took this from the Port Office deck.

Allan took this from the Port Office deck.

Japanese maples for sale, and Portside Café booth.  (That's the yellow café in whose street planter we plant yellow flowers.)

Japanese maples for sale, and Portside Café booth. (That’s the yellow café in whose street planter we plant yellow flowers.)

a line up of flowers in stone vases

a line up of flowers in stone vases

Allan and I both photographed the spectacular lupines at the Marie Powell Gallery.  His photo is much more clever.

my photo

my photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Those sea thrift (pink, foreground) are a bugger to deadhead later in the year but I love them.

After a wet walk through the market, it was back to work.   We got perhaps the last batch of cosmos for work at The Planter Box, where the tomatoes were irresistibly healthy looking (so I got three):

Planter Box tomatoes

Planter Box tomatoes

They have dozens of quite a few interesting varieties, so get ’em!

At The Basket Case, we picked up some Armeria (sea thrift) to fill in any spaces we might find in the Bolstadt beach approach planters.

Here are three more perennials that I did not mention in my rave review of Basket Case perennials:

Helenium (Helen's Flower)

Helenium (Helen’s Flower)

Basket Case has at least two kinds of Helenium, a tall mid to late summer plant with warm tones of daisy-like flowers.  I got me one of this new one.   These might not even bloom before Fred and Nancy close in midsummer, so only the discerning buyer will realize how great a plant this is.

Eupatorium 'Gateway'

Eupatorium ‘Gateway’

This Joe Pye weed is a little shorter than the others, claiming to grow “only” to five feet, with great big fluffy pink flowers that butterflies love.  My opinion is that it likes lots of summer water.  I adore this plant and bought one even though I probably already have it (but my Joe Pye gets taller than five feet! which might be just because it is mulched with cow fiber!).

There were only a couple of these left yesterday!

Helianthemum

Helianthemum

This orange Helianthemum is ‘Ben Nevis’.  These plants are great for growing on a rock wall.  I have found they do not bloom all summer, but the trailing foliage remains good.  Also comes in pink and yellow; not sure which other cultivars Basket Case has in stock.  I believe The Planter Box also has some cultivars of Helianthemum (rock rose).  Don’t be confused because Cistus (an excellent shrub which Basket Case also carries) is also called rock rose.

Dianthus 'Raspberry Swirl' and 'Fancy Knickers'

Dianthus ‘Raspberry Swirl’ and ‘Fancy Knickers’

Cute names, gorgeous plants.  “Pinks” are not always pink!  These are nice big healthy Dianthus.   I’m getting myself two more Raspberry Swirls if there are any left next time!

The rain continued to fall and we made the decision that we could not finish the weeding at Andersen’s RV Park this weekend.  We feel that to work in rain, with dripping raincoats, just makes vacationing guests feel sad for us and brings down the jolly weekender feeling!   We hope the guests there will see the pretty things (all the planters and containers are looking great, and plants well outnumber weeds in the garden beds).  I am too tired to give up my two days off because of not meeting the Andersen’s goal that I had set for us.

Allan also said he felt it was more important to check on the beach approach planters because more foot traffic walks by them, so we did.  We quickly used up the perennials we had bought for the Bolstadt approach planters (six Armeria, two Santolina ‘Lemon Fizz’) and found space for about eight more tough perennials which we will buy and add later this week.

Allan weeding the Lisa Bonney memorial planter

Allan weeding the Lisa Bonney memorial planter

One of the planters surprised me with this beautiful columbine!

One of the planters surprised me with this beautiful columbine!

not as miserable a job as it looks because the weather was not cold...

not as miserable a job as it looks because the weather was not cold…or windy

The beach approach garden is weedy again, of course!  But when we get around to doing it again, it will not be as miserable a job as the first weeding of the year.

beach approach, west end

beach approach, west end

Adorably, the Armeria (sea thrift) has reseeded at the end of the lawn.  I have read that it grows wild on the sea cliffs in Wales.

sea thrift

sea thrift

approach garden looking west

approach garden looking west

looking east; rugosa roses about to bloom

looking east; rugosa roses about to bloom

rugosa roses in bud

rugosa roses in bud

The rugosa roses are thuggish and a pain to weed around, but they will earn their keep from now till frost, first with flowers of pink, magenta, or white, and then with big orangey red hips.  They are also known as “The Tomato Rose” because of the size of the hips (about which some tourists ask us, “Are those tomatoes?”) and “The Salt Spray Rose” because they can take beachy conditions.

Dianthus in a beach approach planter, at least seven years old.

Dianthus in a beach approach planter, at least seven years old.

and a hardy geranium

and a hardy geranium

rain brings the colours out

rain brings the colours out

I wish the volunteers, back in the day, had not planted chocolate mint in the easternmost planter.

why?

why?

It has choked out the other plants, except for dog daisies.  Someone in passing commented to me last year how lush and wonderful the planter used to be.  Well…yes, before someone stuck the mint in there and it got well established.  The Nepeta (catmint, not a mint, not invasive) is buried with just one flower showing.

mint vs. catmint: no contest

mint vs. catmint: no contest

With about fifty of these planters to care for, we redo poorly planted old ones at a rate of maybe two a year.  We might eventually get to this one, which would involve having to dig it out, soil and all, and start over…or we might just decide the mint is fragrant and has a pretty flower and just let it be mostly one thing.

We were still in the rain as we left the beach approach for our next job.

the Long Beach arch

the Long Beach arch

We had some plants for the tiny World Kite Museum garden on the Sid Snyder Beach approach.  While Allan weeded it, I walked the approach and weeded the seven planters along its north side.  I must admit some of the weeding was just cosmetic because we had much still to do and it was six o clock.

Kite garden with Cosmos 'Cutesy', painted sage, one one sanguisorba added to the remaining perennials.

Kite garden with Cosmos ‘Cutesy’, painted sage, one one sanguisorba added to the remaining perennials.

There seems to be a big fail in the volunteer mowing, in that it does not include weed-eating, apparently!   We are not really in the weedeating business, but last year after declining to hand weed all along the shrub border, below, we did weed eat it a few times.  I think we will have to step up to weed eat around our little garden, as well.

the shrub parking lot border, which we most decidely do not have time to weed.

the shrub parking lot border, which we most decidely do not have time to weed.

The soil in the tiny flower garden was weird in spots.  When we redid it last year, we mulched with some bagged soil amendments.  Over the winter, it has turned into a weird rooty sawdusty substance in some areas and despite the rain was very dry.  Where are the roots coming from?  They are definitely roots, not fungi.  It is odd.  I pulled some out to have a good look.

weird and unsettling

weird and unsettling

Surely the escallonia on one side or hebe on the other could not be encroaching with this many roots?

We hope to take a yard of cow fiber up to Marilyn’s garden soon to mulch the edges where we had to replant (due to round up, blah blah blah!) and I will save out a few buckets full for this garden.  It could take about a half an inch of mulch.

Next we went back down to Ilwaco.  We stopped at the boatyard to photograph some boats for Discover Ilwaco, and I pondered the amount of horsetail in the middle area where we have not yet weeded.

oh dear, oh dear

oh dear, oh dear

One hopes the two well weeded ends of the garden will keep passersby happy.

in the boatyard

in the boatyard

We finally did the last of Saturday’s planting at the Port of Ilwaco office garden with some Cosmos ‘Cutesy’, since we want the flowers to remain short in order to show off the Basket Case baskets that hang above.  Or maybe I should still add a very few salpiglossis.

port office garden

port office garden

There are some tiny little seedling that we are leaving in the garden till I figure out what they are.  I usually can identify seedlings….but these look like painted sage, which is unlikely as I had never planted it here, nor do I ever find it to re-seed this prolifically.

my favourite perennials, Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue', in the port office garden

my favourite perennials, Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, in the port office garden

Basket Case plants above and below

Basket Case plants above and below

just south of Port Office garden

just south of Port Office garden

Rain had stopped!  The gardens on the Howerton side of the office glowed with California poppies.

Howerton gardens

Howerton gardens (photo taken earlier in the day)

Finally, at 8 PM, we weeded the gardens at the east end of Howerton.  What had caught my eye when driving past earlier were the dead leaves (now picked off) on the Eryngium there.

bad leaves now plucked!

bad leaves now plucked!  This was caused by the hot spell around Mother’s Day.

Howerton by Queen La De Da's Art Castle

Howerton by Queen La De Da’s Art Castle

The Howerton garden that was most recently done (below) is the very westernmost one;  it was filled in with plants divided from other areas, and they will size up to fill the space but maybe it needs a little something more to be added.

perhaps a few more wind tolerant perennials...

garden to right….perhaps a few more wind tolerant perennials…

Along with Andersen’s RV Park, we did not get to the weeding at the Howerton garden section at the very west end of the street.  And both will have to wait because, having caught up with this blog, I am about to commence on two days off.  (I can feel that Howerton Street weeding project tugging at me, but I will try to resist.)

When I get my own cosmos and painted sage, container plants and perennials,  planted in my own garden, I will officially declare Annuals Planting Hell 2013 over!

I have worked 18 days in a row and Allan has worked 20.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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