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Posts Tagged ‘Billardia longiflora’

In real time, we interrupt the narrative flow to wish those of you who celebrate Christmas a happy day.  The blog still running five days behind is keeping it from going on winter hiatus.

Wednesday, 20 December 2017

I had a late start because of getting a solid eight hours of sleep for the first time in awhile.  By noon, the weather looked to be a windless 45 degrees and I decided I would do some weeding.

the rain gauge from last night

Skooter on the roof

Frosty was watching Skooter from below the arbour.

Frosty went up to the cat door platform and they exchanged looks.

This is part of Skooter’s route to and from the roof:

I clipped some catmint in the front garden.  That must have released some scent; all of a sudden both Skooter and Frosty converged upon it.

I thought to myself that I had made a mistake in leaving the much less sunny front yard for weeding now.  I’d be warmer if I had done the front garden during the milder days and saved the sunny south side for chilly days.

so much warmer back here where I already weeded

In Allan’s garden, a tall mahonia catches the sun.

In the front garden, east side, the big libertia is all of a sudden on the move.  I will dig up these smaller ones and take them to the droughty gardens at the port.  I might also remove the rather tatty large one and replace with a smaller one or replant somewhere in the back garden.

In different areas, I have four large swathes of epimedium that should be sheared back so the early flowers show.  Googling tells me I can and maybe should wait till February.

pieris backed with epimedium

OH, I see something that might interest Mr. Tootlepedal.

I don’t know much about such things, but that must be a lichen or a fungus…Maybe a lichen IS a fungus.  I am uninformed.  With a hardy fuchsia for good measure.

I was glad to be in the front garden when Seaside gardener Pam drove by, on her way to the port with her mom, Harriet. They stopped for a brief visit.

Pam and Harriet

After they left, I began weeding the shady part of the garden.  It wasn’t as hard as I had thought it would be.  My hands stopped hurting from the cold and I made great progress.

shady front garden, before

The bed to the right was a solid groundcover mass of baby dwarf fireweeds that peeled off in sheets.

Billardia longiflora

Billardia longiflora berries

As the sun set, I could feel the ground starting to freeze and the weeding became slightly more difficult.

after, with hands to cold to pick up the last of the debris

I went indoors at dusk. After hearing the sounds of raking, I looked out the front window. I do think that Allan had raked this path.

I was able to erase the front middle and east beds from the work list, especially since I downgraded the heading from “good weeding” to just weeding.  Now I can think about whether or not I am going to get a big pile of mulch.  (The problem with said big pile is that it will block the garage.)

Skooter had worn himself out with his roof escapades and/or a catmint high.  (Catmint, Nepeta, is not the same as catNIP.  It doesn’t make cats as high as catnip does for some, but they still enjoy it in a mild way.)

naptime

I got a most pleasing Christmas card from Jo and Bob, who you might remember as former clients of ours till they moved away last year.  I loved seeing their new house, on a lake.

Longtime blog followers may like to see this.

And I got teary-eyed over this photo of my good friend Coco.  I miss all three of them!

lovable Coco!

Tonight: The treat of the season finale of Survivor and some more Black Cat Bookshop mystery.

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Saturday, 14 October 2017

After attending the Cranberrian Fair, I got straight to my gardening mission.  Well.  Maybe I sat and read the news and Facebook for half an hour first.

Because Devery next door had told me she’d found frost on her vehicle this morning, I decided it was high time to get the tomatoes out of the greenhouse and put the tender plants in.

Before: Even though the tomatoes look sad, they are still producing.

There are still tadpoles in a tray by the greenhouse where I stacked the empty pots.  I swear the tadpoles motto is “I’ll never grow up, not me!”

Why won’t they become frogs?

A greenhouse review:

The lemon cucumbers were yummy but too hard to peel. Won’t grow them again.

Black Krim tomato: Only got two and did not much like them. Too mild and mealy.

Chocolate Cherry was my favourite.

Pineapple was tasty and prolific, unusual here for a larger tomato. Will grow this one again.

Better Boy gave me just a few red ones.

I also liked the usual Sweet 100 and a small yellow pear tomato, cherry sized.

I kept ruining a big spider’s day.

Frosty stayed near me while I worked.

after…and oh! my back hurt by the time this was done.  I had Allan move the last two pots for me; I simply could not.

The spider went up onto the door frame in despair.

I was glad I noticed and gently moved it out before shutting the door tight for the night!

Todd had visited to pick up some pieces of aruncus (goatsbeard) and brought two more of his dad’s special zucchinis.  He and his father, Dobby, have now given away 2050 zukes.  I normally do not like zukes, but these are a special variety with no peel and have a much better flavour.

While cleaning up around the front of the greenhouse, I found some rocks that had been displaced by the compost bins.  I loaded them up for tomorrow’s project.

last harvest, including one of the thin skinned zukes from Todd

In the evening, we went out to the Sou’wester for an event that irresistibly intrigued me.

Vintage trailers at the Sou’wester

vintage trailers with windows aglow

Allan’s photo

the Sou’wester sunporch shop (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

in the lodge living room. The picture on the wall is always out of focus, and I do not understand it.

The host, Libby Werbel of Portland Museum Of Modern Art, introduced the event with a good speech about how we were all sad these days. “This is a sad time; we encourage you to be sad with us.”  A fellow named Michael Hurley who had inspired the event was unable to be there. The DJ, Eric Isaacson of Mississippi Records, played the first of the five sad songs: Is That All There Is? by Peggy Lee.  He said he had listened to it over and over when he was ten.

The first singer was skilled and mellifluous.

Allan’s photo

Even though her music was good, I did not find most of the songs to be as sad as I had expected.  Mostly the theme was lost love, whereas I think my sadness is much more wide ranging as I have become older.

One song memorably stood out, about driving the Oregon coast highway and imagining going over the steep side into the ocean.

The second recorded song played by Eric Isaacson,  Reaping What I Sow,  did live up to what I thought a sad song should be.  I can’t find it now because I can’t remember who performed it.

His third choice of sad song, This Bitter Earth, was from a film called Killer of Sheep. You can see it in the film right here.

A man read a story, which he accurately said was scary rather than sad.  Its title, French Exit, refers to leaving a party without saying goodbye.

Allan’s photo

After the story,  I succumbed to feeling old (usually the crowd is mixed in age; tonight, I swear I was the old old lady) and so tired, and uncomfortable because I was sitting alone in a crowd, and yet not sad enough, except for being sad about being old and tired. I longed to be home.  Allan (who had been standing at the back) agreed to leave, so unfortunately, I don’t know what the last two saddest songs were.  We made a French exit. Somehow I had expected MORE cathartic sadness and did not get what I was seeking, which is no fault of the event.

At home, we had a dinner including our own harvest.  I love what Allan did with the pineapple tomato and the cherry tomato.  The cucumber (a straight cucumber, not the lemon cucumber) was too bitter to eat.  Google tells me that the plant may not have gotten watered often enough, or might have been too hot (perhaps from growing it in the greenhouse instead of outside).

We are watching the final season of Girls, a show that I love for a number of reasons, and I’m sad to have it end.

Sunday, 15 October 2017

I had spent the earlier part of the afternoon reinforcing the undersides of the fence all the way round so that my neighbor dog, Royal, can play zoomies along the garden paths.  He is an escape artist, nicknamed Houdini at the animal shelter from which he came.

places where he could slip under the fence patched with rubble

more escape routes patched with bricks, rocks and pottery

I had been wishing for a park bench for my new clearing in the bogsy woods.  Perhaps, thought I, I might buy one, and yet normal park benches are too long for the new space.  When I had looked out my window this (late) morning, I had seen this:

morning view

little park bench!

I had walked by that little bench on West Willows Loop so many times.  Someone had given it to us, broken and full sized, and Allan had refurbished it into a short park bench.

I dragged it inch by inch back to the bogsy woods spot.

Two days ago, when we had laid some sod bits on the lawn to raise a low area, Allan had tried out our old rusty roller and found out it no longer works.  He had the brilliant notion to cut the handles off and turn it upright for a plant stand.

Friday night: Allan grinds off the old handles.

new area, to be refined more tomorrow

I went back to patching the fence.  The most difficult part was the east side between us and the gear shed, where access is difficult. I shoved in some boards from our side and, where the shrubbery was too thick, rocks and cement chunks from the gear shed side.

Allan had spent his afternoon putting up our Halloween lights, a mission complicated by the usual problems of finding strings that did not work.  Lights that were marked purple on the package disappointingly turned out to be red.  My only way to cope with that was to remember that blooooooood red is a colour for Halloween.  (Halloween gore is the part I don’t like.) And red will also work for Christmas.

lights with the berries of Billardia longiflora (Allan’s photo)

The billardia berries, in full shade, are amazing this year.

As Allan finished, I got his help for the last ten feet of fence patching with cement chunks.  The sun was setting and I was beat.

With the great fence accomplishment done, I craved our last package of spicy sausages and built a fire.  This may be the year’s final dinner campfire.  We have enough wood saved for one more fire on Halloween eve, if the weather permits.  Tony and Scott are inviting people to our house for the Ilwaco trick or treat extravaganza and Tony thinks they would enjoy a fire.

campfire dinner

Monday, 16 October 2017

In the afternoon, Allan decided to go out on a quick boating trip (tomorrow’s post).  When he moved the van out of the garage, he found two zucchinis that Todd had put on the windshield on Saturday.  I had forgotten to fetch them in.  This means that those zukes rode ten blocks last night to and from the local market for milk without Allan noticing them.  I found that hilarious.

Today’s mission was to clear out the third compost bin and acquire some rough mulch for the bogsy woods, to back up some of the under fence rubble patches.

before

I would have to pile the first and second bin high.

40 minutes later

one wheelbarrow load rough mulch

bins piled high, wish we had placed them further to the side and fit in four!

rubble edge in SE corner of garden

Future mulch will make it harder for escape artist Royal to move the rubble.

added more driftwood to west end of bogsy swale

Planting of some new ladies in waiting followed.

Barberry ‘Pow Wow’

transplanted some shady plants (hardy begonias, something lost-taggii from Todd, and a painted fern) into the new sit spot area.

I love this bench and the old roller as a table!

Should I paint the bench, and if so, purple, or blue, or ??  Or every slat a different colour, or??

That might have to wait till spring.  It was hellish hard to move so can’t get it back to a dry space for painting.

Arum italicum in Allan’s garden, will move some to woods

Other plants I can divide out for woods: epimidiums and pulmonarias.  I want to take some of those to a shade bed in neighbour Mary’s garden, too.

I ended my gardening day with a frenzy of weeding (finally!), totally filling up the big wheelie bin.  The weeding is still far from being the “good weeding” that has been on my home work list since early summer.

looking southeast into the autumnal garden

Kniphofia ‘Earliest of All’ is over; I somehow missed its pre-final stages.

How very much I love Sanguisorba ‘Korean Snow’.

I found a Halloween spot, for dead flower bouquets, for MaryBeth’s twin black urns.

Allan, back from his boat trip, hung some more Halloween lights in the last of daylight.

evening sentinal Skooter (Allan’s photo)

These two lazy old men had spent the day indoors.

The only sad thing today was Devery and I did not have a chance to test Royal out playing zoomies inside the fence.  We were afraid to try it in the evening because if he found a way out, chasing him in the dusk would be hard.

our front porch (Allan’s photo)

spider lights over the gate (Allan’s photo)

purple and the red that was supposed to be purple (Allan’s photo)

The J’s were down for the weekend and got their lights up, too.

One punkin is burned out.

Tomorrow is predicted to bring rain, and Wednesday more rain.  Not sure when we will be able to work.  The plan for tomorrow is to get the garage all set up for bulbs which are incoming this very week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Spam of the day:

“I was wondering if you ever thought of changing the page layout of
your website? Its very well written; I love what youve got to say.

But maybe you could a little more in the way of content so people could
connect with it better. Youve got an awful lot
of text for only having one or 2 images. Maybe you could space it out better?”

Hahaha!

Saturday, 16 August 2014

I immediately defeated my goal of two days off without leaving the property by deciding to go to Olde Towne Café for breakfast at ten AM. I did not feel like bugging Allan to do the Saturday Market photos instead of me, so I would have to leave the house anyway. And I had another small mission: to get a photo of John and Cheri’s lovely garden over by Spruce Street.

I told Smokey and Mary that I wasn't going to work and would soon be spending the rest of the weekend with them.

I told Smokey and Mary that I wasn’t going to work and would soon be spending the rest of the weekend with them.

I set out, with my cane although I did not feel especially gimpy today.

mission one accomplished:  John and Cheri's garden

mission one accomplished: John and Cheri’s back garden

Strolling along Spruce, I admired Jenna's plantings at Queen La De Da's new location.

Strolling along Spruce, I admired Jenna’s plantings at Queen La De Da’s new location.

At Olde Towne, I had a latte and oatmeal and was lucky to arrive at a quiet time so that Luanne was able to sit and visit for awhile.

a good table for two

a good table for two

(I forgot to take her a bouquet of flowers for the weekend; later in the day, Allan took one over for me.)

Next, a walk down First Avenue to the Market. A stop at Robert’s Antique Gallery gleaned some more photos for the Facebook page with which I help Larry and Robert by providing photos.

I especially liked these duck dishes.

I especially liked these duck dishes.

On I walked, past the boatyard garden where I averted my eyes from the occasional horsetail and dandelion.

south end of boatyard garden, with Clamshell Railroad historic sign

south end of boatyard garden, with Clamshell Railroad historic sign

On my walk to the market, Kathleen Shaw had pulled her car to the side for a confab; she was on her way home to her cottage after going to the market herself. She told me about a husky puppy named Aragon at Nate’s ice cream shop so I made sure to walk by there.

Aragon: so cute

Aragon: so cute

and cuter

and cuter (and sweet and friendly, too)

The market was bustling and my knee had started to hurt a bit so I only covered about two blocks.

market

Of course, I got a treat at Pink Poppy Bakery: two chocolate chip cookies and two scones to share with Allan.

Of course, I got a treat at Pink Poppy Bakery: two chocolate chip cookies and two scones to share with Allan.

Bonnie, an Olde Towne regular, had just bought a potted lily.

Bonnie, an Olde Towne regular, had just bought a potted lily.

plants from The English Nursery

plants from The English Nursery

To get home, I cut through the gear shed property (shhhh) to the east back gate and was met with a terrible shock. I knew some bindweed lurked back there and my weekend project was to pull it out of the southeast corner of the bogsy woods. I did not expect to see this horror from the outside of the fence!

a wall of bindweed from the gearshed side

a wall of bindweed from the gearshed side

I went inside and sat for awhile to gather strength. Then:

later....

later….

I also tackled the back corner of the bogsy wood and made some progress. Hauling the debris out will be the most tiresome part.

before

before

after: a space for a hydrangea aspera

after: a space for a hydrangea aspera

I think I’ll load it all into the trailer to go to the dump on Monday, since we can’t have a three day weekend because Long Beach planters will need watering.

A strong wind had made it a little anxious to work under the trees in the bogsy woods. The gusts were at least 20 mph. As the sun began to descend, I was glad to go inside.

Smokey flopped down in front of me, creating a moving obstacle course all the way to the front door.

Smokey flopped down in front of me, creating a moving obstacle course all the way to the front door.

Meanwhile, Allan had begun installing our new Pink Poppy Farm inspired sprinkler set up.

more details on this later

more details on this later

He then went sailing on Black Lake to reward himself:

“Almost a 30 degree tilt and good speed but rowed back after not making much headway north past the dock. Was getting stuck as the vegetation made the lake only about half the width it appears. Fog came in, last two pics from Sandridge Road”

P8160005

P8160009

P8160025

P8160027

P8160028

Earlier in the day, Allan had photographed a spider outside the back door. I didn’t post it at the beginning as did not want to scare off any arachnophobes.

a big one!  size of a quarter, Allan said.

a big one! size of a quarter, Allan said.

IMG_0663



Sunday, 17 August 2014

For some reason, I woke up with the notion that today would be a good day to cut down salmonberry at the front side of the bogsy wood. What came over me, I do not know; I was filled with happy energy.

Here's the first area, before.

Here’s the first area, before.

and after

and after

I thought above removing the clump to the right, then realized it would just reveal too much of the green metal wall of the next door gear shed. Now there is a sense of mystery…you can glimpse the blue hydrangea and might want to walk back for a closer look.

The second part of the project was to move the pile of campfire wood to make a new planting area along the front.

Firewood (fallen alder) had been piled all along the front.

Firewood (fallen alder) had been piled all along the front.

I had an absolute stroke of genius and used two old chairs (not safe for sitting, given to use by our client Jo) to stack the firewood on.

two chairs plus an oyster basket of bark and kindling

two chairs plus an oyster basket of bark and kindling

Allan seemed unimpressed with this, but I still hold that it is genius, as it will keep the wood up off of the always damp ground back here.

The stubby stumps of salmonberry are still in the area I cleared. Later, Allan will go in with his little chainsaw and cut them flush with the ground; then we will just clip or even use the weedeater to keep any sprouts down.

That’s what we did with another area that was pure salmonberry:

the salmonberry tunnel

the salmonberry tunnel

The entire bogsy wood was a rough mess when we began the garden.

what our woods looked like in Oct. 2010 when we bought the place

in October 2010

If we don’t keep up with clipping any sprouts, the salmonberry will creep back in, like it did in the area below:

My third project of the day, before

My third project of the day, before

It took only about one hour to bring that area back to this.

It took only about one hour to bring that area back to this.

I’ll never get all the salmonberry out of the bogsy wood, so I just like to make paths and tunnels in it. It is the first flower for the hummingbirds (so I have read) and, later, berries for all the berry eating birds. That’s my excuse, and it’s a good one.

Between today’s and yesterday’s clearing, I have a view now of the blue hydrangea back in the woods.

clearing

Don’t you just want to walk back there?

I can even see the blue of the hydrangea all the way from my bedroom window.

and maybe the hydrangea looks back; this is what it would see,

and maybe the hydrangea looks back; this is what it would see,

Looking south over the river of Geranium ‘Rozanne’, the edge of the bogsy woods looks more clearly defined.

view2

My eye is drawn to how much better the fuchsia shows up.

My eye is drawn to how much better the fuchsia shows up.

Now i need a yard of Soil Energy to build up the former wood pile area so that I can plant some of my other new fuchsias there.

Speaking of unplanted plants, here’s the sad story of one of my ladies in waiting. I had two ‘Orange Pillar’ barberries when garden touring on Whidbey Island in June. I have decided they will go in the front garden after I have moved two big thirsty sanguisorbas to the back garden. That can’t be done till fall, so the barberries wait in pots. One was hidden at the back of the ladies in waiting benches and got missed:

the good

Here’s the happy one that was toward the front…

and the terribly sad one; it got well soaked yesterday and I hope it puts out new leaves.

and the terribly sad one; it got well soaked yesterday and I hope it puts out new leaves.

At the end of the day, I especially admired a few things (and judged one thing):

admired white lilies in the back garden

admired white lilies in the back garden

and...Lily 'Anastasia' still blooming, towering over Leycesteria 'Golden Lanterns'

and…Lily ‘Anastasia’ still blooming, towering over Leycesteria ‘Golden Lanterns’

and another pink lily has joined Anastasia; they must be eight or more feet tall.

and another pink lily has joined Anastasia; they must be eight or more feet tall.

and the gorgeous berries of Billardia longifloria on the front garden arbour

and the gorgeous berries of Billardia longifloria on the front garden arbour

at northeast corner of house

at northeast corner of house

The judgement: I think I may have way too much Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, and this daylily has got to go:

I think it will find a new home at Andersen's RV Park.

I think it will find a new home at Andersen’s RV Park.

Allan took a photo of how the “dead” camellia trunks in the back garden, painted purple two years ago, are sprouting new leaves!

While I don't really want the camellia to come back, I am impressed.

While I don’t really want the camellia to come back, I am impressed.

Life would be just perfect if we had a three day weekend; unfortunately, the Long Beach planters simply must be watered tomorrow. Allan had to water the Ilwaco planters today, so he did not even get a two day weekend.

 

 

 

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9 October, 2013: north end jobs

I don’t know when I switched to the writing “Oct 9” instead of “9 Oct”.  As a longtime Anglophile, it is time I get back the the Anglo/European date style even if it looks odd to some.

After an inspirational tour of Lisa’s new garden, we went on to three north end jobs, with a stop at Peninsula Landscape Supply to pick up three more buckets of river rock for the Larry and Robert garden.

at Peninsula Landscape Supply

at Peninsula Landscape Supply

At Eric Wiegardt’s gallery, I pulled some cranesbill geraniums and weeds here and there while Allan cleared an area that was ALL pesky cranesbill ‘A.T. Johnson’ and just a bit of ajuga, leaving…just a bit of ajuga.

before and after

before and after

The geranium is especially pointless in this garden because deer eat off the haze of insipid pale pink flowers.

cute Coreopsis 'Flower Tower' by the front door

cute Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’ by the front door

I may not love the BadAster, but the bees sure do.

I may not love the BadAster, but the bees sure do.

Next, we drove north to Marilyn’s garden.  Something odd had happened on the south end of the garden.  A path, like something had been dragged, went through to the next yard and a Barberry ‘Helmond’s Pillar’ was knocked right over!  Allan righted it again while I pulled some spent Cosmos and painted sage.

What have we here??

What have we here??

The garden is tall and jungly now...

The garden is tall and jungly now…

Miscanthus plumes

Miscanthus plumes

On the way back to Ocean Park, we stopped and had a look at a rental possibility for our friend J9, who hopes to move back to the Peninsula.  Perhaps the block we looked at is not for her…

"We are a gun toting neighbor watching Hood!"

“We are a gun toting neighbor watching Hood!”

Two houses shared the same sentiment.  Back to the rental quest!

Two houses on the block shared the same sentiment. Back to the rental quest!

Onward to Klipsan Beach Cottages for more fall cleanup.  I personally would choose to leave Thalictrum ‘Elin’ (below, left) up all winter.  I love the colour of the stems and the structure.  I have come to realize that not everyone sees the architectural beauty in dormant plants, so I cut it back.

before and after

before and after

Allan cut down some ferns and I pruned a buddleia and while I did some other work, Allan cut down a whole passel of Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ behind the bench.

before and after

before and after

I worked in the area to the south of the greenhouse (just east of the bench spot), tying up some flopped Melianthus major and Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’, weeding and pulling out dead-ish foliage.

This area has two different Melianthus and a lovely rose (not blooming today).  It used to be all raspberries.

before

before

after

after

The garden still has much beauty to offer.

Billardia longiflora

Billardia longiflora

Of course, this pretty pale purple aster does not spread thuggishly!

Of course, this pretty pale purple aster does not spread thuggishly!

Agapanthus and aster

Agapanthus and aster

roses

roses

sunlit hydrangeas in the A Frame's garden

sunlit hydrangeas in the A Frame’s garden

Artemisia 'Guizhou'

Artemisia ‘Guizhou’ by the greenhouse

I hope guests can see the beauty in the tawny stalks of Artemisia ‘Guizhou’, because i am not ready to let it go.

Sedum 'Autumn Joy' truly was this bright in evening sun.

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ truly was this bright in evening sun.

On the way to Marilyn’s garden, the van had started to make an odd noise…a grinding sound.  All the way from Marilyn’s to Klipsan Beach Cottages, Allan was listening and trying to diagnose it.  It seemed to be coming from the undercarriage.  When I would ask for his theories or how serious it might be, I was admonished to “Listen!”  Leaving KBC, more listening ensued and some slight speeding up, slowing down, and brake work.  Could it be a brake shoe?  The universal joint?  I questioned whether we might have to take it into the shop, and if so, when, and would we be able to get across the river to pick up our lawnmower from the Astoria repair shop (without realizing my ultimate fear of breaking down on the bridge), and did the Saturn still work? (The Saturn shifter is getting stiffer and more problematic.)  These questions were spread out over seventeen miles, but…”Listen!”  One thought crossed my mind…could it be as simple as a…but…”LISTEN!”  I thought to myself about what a difficulty it would be to take the van in for repair, and wondered again if it could be as simple as a br…. “LISTEN!”

When we stopped in front of Larry and Robert’s house to drop off the river rock buckets, Allan looked underneath the van.  He popped back up and suggested I do the same.  There indeed was a BR…ANCH! caught in the spare tire which (kind of oddly) is located underneath the vehicle.

looking under the van by Larry and Robert's house

looking under the van by Larry and Robert’s house

In our own driveway half a block away, Allan obligingly got a better photo.

tire branch

tire branch

I hope this was the cause of all our van trouble today.

small but very noisy

small but very noisy

I had just enough daylight to drag most of Sunday’s debris to the new debris pile.

debris pile at sunset

debris pile at sunset

Sometimes, WordPress informs me,  readers will have to view an ad at the bottom of a post (unless I pony up for a more expensive blog).  So here’s one of my choice.  Water Music Festival is this weekend and is the event for which Music in the Gardens tour is a fundraiser.  Both benefit music programs in the schools.  We hear the Saturday evening concert is sold out, but the other two performances will be excellent and as I post this, seating is still available for those shows.

WMF

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Allan had actually worked while I toured with garden club on August 7, watering, weeding and trimming the Long Beach street tree gardens and the beach approach planters.  He also….bought a van from the owners of The Basket Case!   Now we will be able to buy lots more plants…but it would be a couple of weeks before we would have it ready for work with a trailer hitch installed.  While leaving the car insurance office in Long Beach he overhead the call of “Hey! Ho!  Let’s go!” and followed the sound to Veterans Field where a very youthful band was performing Ramones songs.

These young men had excellent taste in music.

These young men had excellent taste in music.

August 8

On August 8th, we had a normal work day, beginning with a stop at Olde Towne Café to switch the compost pail.  (We take the coffee grounds and fruit and veg trimmings home to enhance our compost production.)

at Olde Towne

at Olde Towne

We stopped at The Planter Box on a small errand, to get some barley to keep our square water boxes clear.

At The Planter Box, a shy little sunflower

At The Planter Box, a shy little sunflower

Then, work.  I felt like I had been slacking, but it was only going to get worse with the edible tour coming up.  We began up north at Klipsan Beach Cottages.  Last year’s dahlia had finally bloomed after just sulking the previous summer.

grown in a very big pot to help protect it from snails

grown in a very big pot to help protect it from snails

at KBC: berries of Billardia longiflora

at KBC: berries of Billardia longiflora

lilies

lilies

the blues:  Agapanthus and Strobilanthes

the blues: Agapanthus and Strobilanthes

I have always found it difficult to get a good photo of the hardy Strobilanthes atropurpureus and it is also hard for me to remember the name of both of these plants.  I now remember Agapanthus as “a mystery…Agatha Christie…Agapanthus” and “bright blue and white…strobe light…Strobilanthes.”

Strobilanthes backed with Agapanthus with a blue globe thistle to the side.

Strobilanthes backed with Agapanthus with a blue globe thistle to the side.

strobilanthes atropurpureus...Hardy Persian Shield from the Himalayas in Northern India

strobilanthes atropurpureus…Hardy Persian Shield from the Himalayas in Northern India

The Tetrapanax ‘Steroidal Giant’ has so not lived up to its name at KBC.  This year it is finally putting on some height.

not very steroidal nor giant

not very steroidal nor giant

Some of the Alliums have broken or fallen over so I stuck the stems firmly into an ornamental grass.

a good way to display

a good way to display old Alliums (better yet, spray paint them!)

another lily

another lily

inside the fenced garden

inside the fenced garden

and outside, with sweet pea success

and outside, with sweet pea success

After KBC, we spent an hour watering at Golden Sands because…surprise (not!), the oscillating sprinklers for which I long had not been installed yet.

At Golden Sands, a dahlia

At Golden Sands, a dahlia

one of the pretty, twirly, expensive but fairly useless sprinklers

one of the pretty, twirly, expensive but fairly useless sprinklers

We still, due to hand watering needs, had no time to weed or cut back….’

messy

messy

An Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ surprised me by putting out a new flower (pale blue than its earlier ones).

a nice surprise

a nice surprise

The maintenance man had been moving the pretty twirly sprinklers around to help them reach more areas.  Unfortunately, he is not a plants person.

oops

oops

After Golden Sands, Andersen’s RV Park got some time weeding and deadheading.

west side poppy garden

west side poppy garden

And then, Long Beach, for watering the main street planters.

evening light on a planter

evening light on a planter

Geranium 'Rozanne', Coreopsis 'Jive', ornamental oregano 'Hopley's Purple'

Geranium ‘Rozanne’, Coreopsis ‘Jive’, ornamental oregano ‘Hopley’s Purple’

The bench is still gone in that planter (northernmost one on west side).

wondering if the curry plant in that planter will ever brown off so I can cut it back!

wondering if the curry plant and lavender in that planter will ever brown off so I can cut it back!

horses heading for the beach past Long Beach's main street

horses heading for the beach past Long Beach’s main street

We watered Gene’s garden because he had gone out of town for a few days on a trip which was later written about in our local paper.

from an article in The Chinook Observer

from an article in The Chinook Observer

And then home in time to put the barley into the water by our patio.

the barley solution to still, murky water

the barley solution to still, murky water

August 9

Friday was my big day planned to get the garden perfect for Sunday’s edible garden tour.  I did accomplish a lot….perfect weeding in the bogsy wood, deadheading and more weeding all around….and was so busy the only photos that I took were of Smokey being irresistibly cute on the patio.

Smokey and his rock pillows

Smokey and his rock pillows

Smokey

Smokey

He is wearing his BirdsBeSafe collar.

There may have been a bit of sitting and visiting with Judy during the day, which just may be when I noticed Smokey’s cute pose.  Allan did a superb job of mowing the lawn but we decided the edges did not need another go-round with the strimmer.

I had planned to have Saturday off to prepare, as well, but it had transpired that part of the day would be taken up with an edible garden pre-tour.  I decided to relax and go with it as I had heard that at least one of the other gardeners was not aspiring to perfection.  However I still thought that since I would probably have the fewest “edibles” I had darn well better have a perfect garden.

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Why is Klipsan Beach Cottages my favourite place to work?  We love other  clients and gardens, but KBC offers the perfect combination of wild garden areas and a more formal deer-fenced area, clients who appreciate unusual plants and who are willing to buy the good topsoil and amendments that it needs, a budget to buy interesting plants,  guests who appreciate the garden, and often the offer, from owner Mary, of delicious drinks and snacks.

Inside the deer-proof garden, the wilder blue bench corner and the formal center. Next year I hope Tetrapanax papyrifer will make a striking tall statement behind the bench.

The deer are faced with a daunting fence and can only nibble rose shoots from the outside.  The Billardia longiflora has gorgeous purple-blue berries and grows alongside one of the four gates.

You may recall that we cut back all the fern fronds around the ponds; now all have filled out lushly.  One of the bright sun coleus is still going strong in the blue pot. We often sit on that bench to eat our lunch.

Ever since I have worked there Mary and Denny have always had cats and good dogs that like to join us in the garden.  We fondly remember the two big white Great Pyrenees, Misty and Debby, and black labrador Raven who used to help on cottage cleaning days by carrying the big set of keys.  Now handsome Doberman Riley likes to come out and keep us company, and if we are very lucky, Mary can get some time off from managing the place and come out to visit while gardening with us.  On days when rain surprises us, we often end up sitting at the round dining room table with cookies and hot chocolate. We have every intention of working at KBC until Mary and Denny themselves retire…

[2012 note:  In 2010 I made a Facebook page on which I regularly update photos of their gardens.]

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