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Posts Tagged ‘Black Lake’

Sunday, 8 October 2017

Allan and MaryBeth sail on Black Lake

To confirm I was pretty caught up on projects, I thought I should use the day to take a boat out. To make it more leisurely, I would go out on Black Lake just a mile away. But, to put some challenge into it, I invited MaryBeth, the person who sold me one of her little kayaks, one so little that it fits inside the van with room to spare. She has conquered the tippy little kayaks but had never sailed.

(Below): Here is the Black Lake Yacht Club. Don’t let the pine needles and the grass piled about fool you, nor the fact that the two white boats haven’t budged all summer. It could be a happening place! I’m appreciative that I don’t have to drag my 150-pound green boat from home.

A small retirement community.

The first item is to clean out the needles and reinstall the plugs.

The sail is only half the size of what the boat was designed for.  It makes it very stable and not too overly thrilling. The winds only reached 11.5 mph which led to a relaxing day.

A free boat several years ago, it just needed a winter’s worth of hole patching, painting, new wood…($); but it works now. I’m now the owner of a graceful boat that was saved.  

I set up the red sailboat so that I could later abandon MaryBeth to her own adventures in either boat.

First we had to row out to clear water and then south to find some ripples.

Being cranberry harvest time, the lake was down about a foot.  The McPhail cranberry farm at the north end of the lake pumps water into the cranberry bog in order to float the berries for harvesting.

MaryBeth took the controls and we drifted downwind to the southeastern tip.  There was someone fishing off every dock but Marybeth carefully avoided all their lines.

Letting out the boom.

We saw a lot of these today, who were maybe attracted to the colorful sail (and each other).

This type of sailboat can head any direction except 45 degrees left or right of a headwind. Depending on the trees, hills, and weather,  the wind speed and direction changed a lot.

We paid attention to the wind vane. Here we are angling 45 degrees into the wind.

The black streamers indicate we’re heading into the wind and about to drift backward.

We did a lot of curlicues today. When tacking upwind, and changing from one direction 90 degrees to another heading, sometimes the boat just stops. It won’t complete the turn, it drifts and won’t steer. Swinging the rudder back and forth like a Venetian gondolier sometimes moves the boat just enough, as often you’re close to shore. There’s an official nautical name somewhere but the curlicue can get you going again. The wind pushes the sail, the boat speeds up, the rudder starts working again. The boat can complete the turn and you’re off again on another tack.

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A little extra distance but hey, this isn’t a race.

 

The breeze was light and we successfully tacked nearly all the way back to the north end.

The captain’s eyes are on everything

With the wind nearly gone I started rowing. Soon I heard voices and looked over my shoulder. We were all up in this fisherman’s business. Afterwards, we beached, folded up the sail and continued by oar.

We’re the only two boats on the lake and who do I bother?

Another fisherman, minding its own business, was near the northern shore. My telephoto got a few shots of this snowy egret before my splashing oars caused it to fly off.

patient and quiet

I did not get good photos of the snowy egret. However, a local wildlife photographer recently captured these beautiful images of the Black Lake egrets and has kindly allowed us to share them here.

photo by Jane Winckler Webb

photo by Jane Winckler Webb

photo by Jane Winckler Webb

photo by Jane Winckler Webb

We rowed back through the lily pads to shore. After we failed to wrestle the boat up the bank, MaryBeth came up with the idea to use the trailer hitch to help. It only snapped one rope but we succeeded in pulling it out. Next time I’ll bring a winch. 

Solo sail, eh? Next time. She can do it now or rent a sailboat on her own. An intriguing rental place is on Seattle’s Lake Washington. It rents the smaller affordable dinghies and kayaks which I hope to visit someday (Sail Sand Point). Portland has a sailing club and school for the bigger (way over 150  lbs.) sailboats at the Island Sailing Club.

This was plenty fun and totally relaxing for both of us.

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The stats

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Sunday, 12 April 2016

my day

The cold weather was my excuse for having no energy for anything but reading.

I barely managed to walk around the garden to apply some Sluggo, and did that only because the damage from snails is becoming severe.

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I had just three of this narcissi…

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all chomped!!

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back garden…so many weeds, nil energy

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lilies, so far pretty much escaping snails, and the flowers of Cox’s Orange Pippin apple tree

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the garden boat ‘Ann Lovejoy’

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I had intended to perform surgery on my dying flowering currant…

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Is the escallonia next to it also sick??

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Of course, the bindweed creeping in front next door is thriving.

I always fear a mysterious blight taking over the garden and was not happy to find another unhealthy plant, a fair ways distant from the flowering currant:

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my precious double file viburnum, dying from the top down?

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In better news, the potted plants that were so thirsty have revived.

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The old rhododendron in Allan’s garden…

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and the old golden apple tree are looking fine.

Ignoring the weeds and turning my back on potential garden disasters, I returned to reading and finished Icons of England, read the entirety of Men Explain Things to Me and The Checklist Manifesto, and started another book, Future Crimes.  The cats thought this was an excellent day.

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Until mid afternoon, I thought that Allan was going to be every bit as lazy as me, until he suddenly packed his little boat into the van and went off to nearby Black Lake for a paddle.

Allan’s day

It’s been nine weeks since my last float and the boats were getting dusty.

I launched from a small unofficial dock at the lower tip of the ‘boot’

Black Lake

Ilwaco’s Black Lake

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The cute little boat purchased last year from MaryBeth. Simply load it into the van, grab a flotation vest, paddle and go.

This should be  a good ducky hunting boat for next month’s event at Raymond. It’s near the Carriage Museum and by a kayak rental shop.

Kayak Day 2016 copy

Link to event and rentals here

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launching from the quiet southeast side of the lake

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A heron waiting for me to move on.

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A better fishing bench than picnic table.

After a very busy weekend of visitors in Long Beach, many here for the Clam Festival, Sunday evening was very quiet on the lake.

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The one visitor at the lake took off as I approached the east dock.

 

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A lake view of the southern end of Sandridge Way.

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Cat tails behind Ilwaco’s shed.

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looking south

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Sadly, the lovely Iris pseudacorus is a noxious weed.

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Duck’s eye view of the fishing dock

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Not a great discovery unless this was your bike.

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The dock and picnic site by the highway

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salal in the wild (where it belongs)

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Ferns and ‘wire grass’ also in the wild

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water lilies above…

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…and below water

Besides at least one heron, there is a hawk that lives on the southern shore of the lake.

It looks more like an osprey according to our friend Debbie Teashon. and after reading about it, I agree too.

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cormorants were also checking out the fishing

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A lazy but fun two miles and I checked out the entire shoreline.

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1995 (age 70):

April 10:  The replanted tomatoes sprouted real good under lights and on top of two new heat mats.

1998 (age 73):

April 10: Rainy   I was going to go to the store but I went to the [Nisqually Pines] office to pay dues and then came home and spent the afternoon planting Burpee tomatoes.  I also planted tiny “like dust” begonia seeds, some were from 1995 so I don’t expect much from them.  I’ve got to start planting seedlings but where will I put them?

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Sunday, 30 August 2015

Despite a forecast of wind, the weather was perfect for gardening, so I could not sit indoors all day and read Sue Grafton’s X!  That was a disappointment for a little while, till the gardening proved to be so very enjoyable.

Mary felt no such compulsion to go out.

Mary felt no such compulsion to go out.

Smokey did wake up and follow me outside.

Smokey did wake up and follow me outside.

Allan and I spent part of the day cleaning up the mess...

Allan and I spent part of the day cleaning up the mess…

I was glad we'd taken the little tables in from the fire circle.

I was glad we’d taken the little tables in from the fire circle.

Our friend Annie stopped by and hefted some branches.

Our friend Annie stopped by and hefted some branches.

Annie just moved back to Ilwaco.  We used to occasionally garden for her when she used to live here and had a darling garden up on the hill.

lots of branches down

lots of branches down

later, with branches picked up and lawn mowed

later, with branches picked up and lawn mowed

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I felt all inspired to garden again because of the change in the weather so did some edging and weeding.

edging a garden bed ((Allan's photo))

edging a garden bed ((Allan’s photo))

even did some bed expansion

even did some bed expansion

a slightly widened bed

a slightly widened bed

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apples (Allan's photo)

apples (Allan’s photo)

Cripp's Pink (Pink Lady) apples that had blown off our tree. (Allan's photo)

Cripp’s Pink (Pink Lady) apples that had blown off our tree. (Allan’s photo)

extra delicious Cox's Orange Pippins that fell

extra delicious Cox’s Orange Pippins that fell

I was surprised to find some late strawberries. Critters had eaten most of them.

I was surprised to find some late strawberries. Critters had eaten most of them.

The big greenhouse tomato harvest begins.

The big greenhouse tomato harvest begins.

Monday, 31 August 2015

I decided to delay going to fluff up all the storm-swept gardens by one day, just to give out clients a break on the August bill.  We will start up again tomorrow, Sept. 1st.  This day off was brought to us by so much rain that we did not have to water any planters today.

Did I read Sue Grafton’s X like I wanted to?  I am sorry to say only half of it so far, as it is the monthly billing day for jobs.  Since I had to boot up the computer for that, I decided to catch up on this blog and so…here we are.

Allan’s Black Lake walk

In the evening Allan felt that he really should DO something, so he went for a walk around Black Lake.  This, he figured, would help him limber up for two kayak events that he hopes to attend next weekend.

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You are here. Later we’ll be past the high school at the bottom and back around on Josh’s trail.

A proper walk around the lake that includes Josh’s and Salamander Trail would be about 2.6 miles.  ‘bobcat’ at oregonhikers.org gives a serious 455 word review of this trail if you wish to read it. I risked the casual approach instead.

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Humor in the boat launch sani-can ( No way could they spell that well).

The water level has dropped due to a lack of rain as shown on these pilings,

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and the new muddy beaches.

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The long spring and summer drought shows on the shoreline.

looking at the south east corner where once stood the former Johnson sawmill (as described in bobcat’s article).

However, there also used to be another sawmill on the northern shore as described in a paragraph at historylink .  And, another article from wikipedia describes a long gone cranberry warehouse on the west side the and also confirms the northern sawmill.

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Benches of mystery

Walking past the sawmill site with a dock I’ve seen other boaters launch from, and past the school’s athletic field, this is where I found myself in Ilwaco.

There have been cougars sighted behind Black Lake.

There have been cougars sighted behind Black Lake.

up on School Hill, the prettiest house in town

Walking a block more, the road ran past the prettiest house in town

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Then I went back to the trail where I met the same bicyclists I’d waved at outside my house when I left. It’s a small town thing.

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I’m sure the local high school uses these trails to train their cross-country team just as I got to do, back in the day, in Seattle.

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Piled up sticks on the left redirects people around one of the large trees

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A bad pruning job or a stump with new growth.

The trail came out to an old logging road that could bear more exploring as it’s several miles long.

cranberry bogs north of the lake

cranberry bogs north of the lake

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one of our native slugs

One of our native slugs almost at the end of the trail, discovering Ilwaco.

Tomorrow, we will go out to assess the storm damage at our various jobs.

 

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 25 August 2015

We might have quit TOO many jobs, as it seems that all of a sudden we just did not have any work to do today.  That did not seem like a bad thing.  We had intended to stay home, but when I got a text from Melissa that she and Dave (Sea Star Landscape Maintenance) were working at an old job of ours, we could not resist going to have a look.

Steve’s Garden

Melissa had asked if we could come tell them where the garden beds used to end, what plants might be missing after two years of the garden going back to weeds, and so on.

The pond was low because of drought.

The pond was low because of drought.


The recirculating waterfall has been turned off for now.

The recirculating waterfall has been turned off for now.

That waterfall had become completely overgrown with weeds when Mel and Dave took over the job a couple of months back.

The dry creekbed that recirculates water from the stream has also almost dried up, something I never saw in years of working there.

This had also been covered with weeds!

This had also been covered with weeds!

The dryness has given our friends the opportunity to really get in there and clear the area.  On the right side, we were able to find salvageable Japanese and Siberian Iris that they can dig and relocate to more manageable areas.

Primula vialii and Iris sibirica along the stream

Primula vialii and Iris sibirica along the stream, way back in 2007

Below: a screen shot from my 2007 blog, showing the stream and path as it was.  Joanne was Steve’s wife, who had died of cancer the previous year and who had worked with us to create this garden.

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Today: Melissa and Dave's great progress on the streambed

Today: Melissa and Dave’s great progress on the streambed


Allan's photo of a weeding session along the stream in 2013, possibly the last day we worked there.

Allan’s photo of a weeding session along the stream in 2013, possibly the last day we worked there.  It had gotten to be too much for us as the Long Beach and Ilwaco jobs got bigger and bigger.


looking for lost iris (Allan's photo)

looking for lost iris (Allan’s photo); They’ve been mowed (not by any of us) but we found them.


a big job well done

a big job well done

The reason the recirculating system is turned off is because the lake that provides the water has gotten too low for the pump.

I've never seen the lake this low.

I’ve never seen the lake this low.


the garden as it was in 2009 (from the house deck)

the garden as it was in 2009 (from the house deck)

On the way out via the long driveway, we stopped to say hi to the horses.  We used to bring them treats, but it has been so long that they do not remember us.  Or maybe it is a new set of boarded horses.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

horses

horse

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Our day off fell by the wayside when we decided to do our work at two jobs that were on our way home, thus making the rest of the week easier.

The Red Barn and Diane’s Garden

At The Red Barn

At The Red Barn, strong winds had been hard on the barrel planters.


Diane's roadside garden

Diane’s roadside garden


containers in back yard

containers in back yard


more containers

more containers


My good friend Misty gets a belly rub.

My good friend Misty gets a belly rub.

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Just look at that dear face.

Ilwaco

With that little bit of work done, we drove back to Ilwaco and visited Todd at a garden where he is currently clearing out lots of brush and beautifying the landscape by tidying up sword ferns and shrubs.

beautifully pruned sword fern (Allan's photo)

beautifully pruned sword fern at Todd’s job (Allan’s photo)


Allan's photo: I'm pretty happy with all the time off we've been having.

Allan’s photo: I’m pretty happy with all the time off we’ve been having.

When we left there, deer were wandering the high school parking lot.

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And they wandered to right outside the garden where Todd was working.  Later, he told us that they had joined him for tea.

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At home, as I passed time puttering, I heard the shop vac outside.  When I looked, I thought Allan was vacuuming his garden.  No, he was blowing rhododendron leaves off the ground at the back of his garden.

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clever clean up method


Allan's photo: leaves smothering some delicate plants

Allan’s photo: leaves smothering some delicate plants


Allan's photo: leaves blown out onto the grass path.

Allan’s photo: leaves blown out onto the grass path.

The Depot Restaurant

For weeks, I have been anticipating my old friend Carol’s arrival for a three day visit to the beach.  She drove down from her hotel in Long Beach to pick me up and I treated her to a scumptious dinner at the Depot.

scallop appetizer

scallop appetizer


house salad

house salad


Steak Killian (mine); love those potatoes. Carol had Mediterranean Prawns, and my photo of that dish was a fail.

Steak Killian (mine); love those potatoes. Carol had Mediterranean Prawns, and my photo of that dish was a fail.

Although Allan and I do have to work tomorrow, I will see Carol again for dinner Wednesday and then all day on Thursday.

While Carol and I enjoyed ourselves at dinner, Allan watered the Ilwaco planters, because it had to be done. His photos from the watering session:

seen while filling the water tank at the boatyard

Other folks at work, seen while filling the water tank at the boatyard

After watering, he took a tour around the town.

Black Lake.

low water level at Black Lake


at the curb

at the curb


low tide at the port

low tide at the port


a fishing pun

a fishing pun


the marina

the marina


the south parking lot hoist

the south parking lot hoist

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south parking lot boat ramp with Cape Disappointment Coast Guard Station across the water


south parking lot

south parking lot


sunset

sunset

 

 

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Friday, 3 July 2015

from Seaview to Surfside

I had a fun day planned, first some pre-tour visits to local gardens with Garden Tour Nancy, to help write up the descriptions for the tour ticket.  Our drive-around took us to four lovely gardens, and I took lots of photos.  Because of how far behind Real Time this blog is running, they wouldn’t be spoilers if I posted them today.  I think I’ll save some for the post-tour blog entries on each garden, though.  Here are some teasers:

a cutting garden

a cutting garden

deer fence

deer fence

digiplexus

digiplexus

hummingbird

hummingbird

hydrangea

hydrangea

and a waterlogue of the hydrangea

and a waterlogue of the hydrangea

signs

signs

whale

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Garden Tour Nancy and Somsri, one of the garden owners.

Garden Tour Nancy and Somsri, one of the garden owners.

This dog, at one garden, looks a bit fierce...

This dog, at one garden, looks a bit fierce…

but is so sweet and friendly, I could hardly tear myself away.

but is so sweet and friendly, I could hardly tear myself away.

We saw chickens at one garden...

We saw chickens at one garden…

I got to go right in the pen and take photos to send to an artist who is going to paint Henry, the rooster.

I got to go right in the pen and take photos to send to an artist who is going to paint Henry, the rooster.

Several artists are participating in the Music in the Gardens tour by creating plein air paintings in the gardens.  One, from out of town, needed a photo of Henry to work from.  I admire anyone who gets good photos of chickens, as they were constantly milling around.

In the background: That naked neck chicken is supposed to look like that!

In the background: That naked neck chicken is supposed to look like that!

We stopped by a bonus not-a-garden that will be on the tour.  It’s a wetland restoration project right on the bay.

on the shores of Willapa Bay

on the shores of Willapa Bay

I’m saving the rest of the photos of these gardens for the garden tour extravaganza.

After visiting the gardens, Nancy and I had lunch at Bailey’s Café.

It's right next to the Nahcotta Post Office.

It’s right next to the Nahcotta Post Office, in the same old house.

Bailey's Café

Bailey’s Café

local art

local art

We each had a turkey sandwich.

We each had a turkey sandwich with cranberry chutney.

Meanwhile, in Ilwaco

Allan tried out his new boat (acquired from MaryBeth) on Black Lake.

a cooling picnic table

a cooling picnic table

ducks

geese

the dock

the dock

water lily

water lily

Nature's grass-scape

Nature’s grass-scape

After puttering around in the garden, Allan and I had big plans to photograph the official Ilwaco fireworks show for the Fireworks at the Port page that we maintain.  He went down to the port before me to get some photos of the crowd.  I followed at dusk, on the path through Nora’s wildlife refuge next door.

path

out to the port parking lot

out to the port parking lot

At the Port, I got my favourite fireworks photography spot on a dock walkway where I can count on getting good reflections.

the crowd awaits

the crowd awaits

And then…I started to feel sick.  Quite digestively sick.  I had to abandon my perfect photo spot and hightail it for home JUST as the fireworks were starting.  I’ll spare you the details, except to say that the only fireworks I saw were the last few, from my back yard, over the greenhouse.

from the garden

from the garden

the final burst

the final burst

It was frustrating and mysterious.  (It was not from what I had been eating, as the previous night Dave and Melissa and Allan and I had the same dinner item, and today Nancy and I had the same lunch item, and all of them felt just fine.)  The only half an hour in which I was incapacitated just happened to be right during the fireworks show.

So…You can see all of Allan’s photos over on the Our Ilwaco blog…  They came out well and will have to serve the page with half the number of photos as usual (by one person instead of two.)

Saturday, 4 July 2015

Due to high fire danger, Ilwaco had a ban this year on aerial fireworks other than the official show.  We were thrilled, as were all our friends, I think without exception (because that’s the kind of friends we have).  Last year, we found a rocket on our roof, and fireworks debris in our back yard and all the little dogs that we know were scared out of their wits.  This year, peace reigned all day long.  I was still feeling poorly, so I enjoyed a day mostly indoors working on my blog entries about the Hardy Plant Study Weekend.

The cats also had a lazy day.

The cats also had a lazy day.

frosty

Allan went to the Saturday Market to take some photos and to purchase dessert from Pink Poppy Bakery.

Madeline's Pink Poppy booth

Madeline’s Pink Poppy booth

flowers at the port office

flowers at the port office

De Asis Farm Produce

De Asis Farm Produce

Evelyn of De Asis Farm

Evelyn of De Asis Farm

the Mini Donut booth

the Mini Donut booth

I emerged from the house in the evening when Our Kathleen arrived for a little campfire evening.  And I mean little campfire.  The burn ban allowed only small fires in one’s own backyard, with a hose and buckets of water at the ready.  Our fire circle is by the bogsy woods, where the grass is still damp and cool.

lilies in the front garden

lilies in the front garden

hellebore at dusk

hellebore in evening light

Nicotiana langsdorfii

Nicotiana langsdorfii and Agastache ‘Summer Glow’

in the back garden

in the back garden

As we sat round the fire, we could hear from up Long Beach way the sound of, well, it sounded just like carpet bombing (as seen on telly).  Usually, the fireworks chaos here drowns out the even more overwhelming racket from up north, where a no holds barred free for all takes place (and where smoke filled Garden Tour Nancy’s house).  I gather that the chaos was much worse this year because of the 4th falling on a Saturday.  Afterwards, there was been much talk of the need to have some enforcement of the no camping on the beach and other laws that tend to be ignored on this holiday, as the revelers left an awful lot of garbage behind when they went home.

I was worried even this fire would be too big.

I was worried even this fire would be too big.

It burned down quickly.

It burned down quickly.

our quiet embers

our quiet embers toasting three ears of corn

Ilwaco had three sets of fireworks scofflaws, one to the south of us, one to the northeast, and one to the west, and a small fire was started by a rocket landing on a roof downtown. Compared to previous years, it was a deliciously peaceful and quiet evening (except for the fire alarm calling volunteers to fight the roof fire).

Sunday, 5 July 2015

Usually, I would have been up (too early for comfort) to do the volunteer post-4th of July beach clean up.  This year, I skipped it as I was still a bit poorly and needed to be close to the loo!  The beach was not the place for me.  I and several of our friends also have issues with the idea that the yobbos who leave trash are enabled by volunteers cleaning up after them, while said yobbos are still camped out on the beach setting off more fireworks.  The local merchants defend the overwhelming crowds’ behavior by speaking of their high volume of sales.  We want to know why their profits are not used to finance crews to clean up the mess.  The volunteers were overwhelmed.

From Washington Coastsavers:

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Here’s an article about 75 tons of trash being left on the beach just at Ocean Shores (north of the Peninsula).  And Bob Duke’s opinion column in the Chinook Observer eloquently expresses some of the concerns.

Here’s a photo from the Grass Roots Garbage Gang:

This was at just ONE of our beach approach roads.

This was at just ONE of our beach approach roads.

So, mainly because of my tummy, and partly because I wanted to avoid being around folks who were still setting off fireworks, I stayed home on the 5th and did gardening projects.  First, the east bed in the back garden:

back garden: east bed before

back garden: east bed before

before

before, looking south

getting ready to remove one daylily and spare another

getting ready to remove one daylily and spare another

This one can stay, for now.

This one can stay, for now.

after....doesn't look wonderful, but I will get some mulch for it soon.

after….doesn’t look wonderful, but I will get some mulch for it soon.

Then, I tackled the west bed.

This one does not, as client Jo would say, have enough bang for the buck.

This one does not, as client Jo would say, have enough bang for the buck.

Poor old thing...it's not hideous, just boring.

Poor old thing…it’s not hideous, just boring.

This siberian iris is too big, and is front and center and done blooming during the months when I have more time at home.

This siberian iris is too big, and is front and center and done blooming during the months when I have more time at home.

The iris’ roots were so tough that I called on Allan to help me.

Allan's photo: It required the big pick.

Allan’s photo: It required the big pick.

iris and daylily gone

iris and daylily gone

Then...to the front garden.

Then…to the front garden.

I pulled lot of annual poppies out, and found a shocking sight at the west end of the front…a zillion snails had taken up residence on my young Davidia tree.

They weren't eating the tree, just hanging out...and emerging to eat lily buds at night.

They weren’t eating the tree, just hanging out…and emerging to eat lily buds at night.

The snails all got a ride to the other side of the meander line ditch.  They have not returned…yet, at least not to that tree.  The iris and daylilies went out to our side of the meander line, where they are welcome to root themselves in the debris pile and re-grow if they so desire.

Next: work calls, and I must find time to get mulch to my own garden so I can plant all my new ladies in waiting.

 

 

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Sunday, 24 May 2015

I repeated yesterday’s day off in a way:  I worked on catching up on this blog for much longer than I had planned.  At least I got outside…without my camera…at 3 PM instead of 5.  Weeded like mad in the back garden till almost 8 and dug out a surprising amount of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (way too much of a good thing) and a sickly looking Centaurea montana (rather a shame).  The latter might have come back if I had just cut it back hard but I suddenly was in a frenzy to dig it out completely.  (Now I will miss its spidery blue flowers.  Todd informs me that there are new cultivars in blue that are better than the old one that I had.)

Centaurea montana...bye bye

Centaurea montana…bye bye

BLACK Centaurea montana

pretty sure I still have the cool BLACK Centaurea montana in the front garden

Allan’s productive days

On a drive to Long Beach to get some gutter fittings, Allan took some photos of Black Lake.  His hope was to go boating on Monday.

Black Lake, Ilwaco

Black Lake, Ilwaco, a popular place on a holiday Sunday

Black Lake dock

Black Lake dock

After buying his supplies at Dennis Company in Long Beach, Allan took this photo of the carriage ride going by the flowers at Long Beach City Hall.

mainly featuring lambsears and sea thrift

mainly featuring lambsears and sea thrift

His project: to fix a rotten board at the top of our garage.  This has bothered him for years; other projects have taken priority before now.  He was inspired by his desire to put another downspout for another rainwater collection bin, and he photographed the project as it went along.

I don't even notice it anymore.

Side: I don’t even notice it anymore.

front

front

In the dark, with misty rain falling, and lots of progress showing.

In the dark, with misty rain falling, and lots of progress showing.

Monday, 25 May 2015

Allan’s garage repair project continued.

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new wood spliced to old solid wood, replacing old rotten wood

all painted, with no seam showing....I am impressed.

all painted, with no seam showing….I am impressed.

new downspout installed

new downspout installed

Allan rewarded himself with a boating excursion on Black Lake…coming up after I regale you with some garden (and PUPPY!) photos.  (There will be a bird in Allan’s set of photos.)

Monday in the garden

the poppies by our driveway

the poppies by our driveway

As I was doing some weeding in the front garden to make room for planting the last of the six packs of cosmos, our friend Ed Strange drove up, bringing my nephew Jackson for a welcome visit.

Jackson weighs 20 pounds now!

Jackson weighs 20 pounds now!

That face! That paw!

That face! That paw!

Jacks in motion

Jacks in motion

sit and shake hands

sit and shake hands

What a good boy!

What a good boy!

Then the back garden became much more interesting than Ed and a treat.

Then the back garden became much more interesting than Ed and a treat.

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an enormous treat for me

an enormous treat for me

Ed left for a gardening job, while I got back to my weeding and planting.

back garden in progress

back garden weeding in progress

After removing six or more huge Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, I sheared the rest.  I picked up most of the clippings; leaving them lie there leads to a veritable grove of Autumn Joy.

Did you know its original name is Sedum 'Herbstfreude'?

Did you know its original name is Sedum ‘Herbstfreude’?

Removing some of the sedums gave me space for new plants.

Removing some of the sedums gave me space for new plants (my new Agastaches and Sanguisorbas).

Some accomplishments and failures in the garden this weekend:

This area had been thick with weeds, and snails and slugs had eaten a Shasta daisy to the ground.  Weeded: check!

This area had been thick with weeds, and snails and slugs had eaten a Shasta daisy to the ground. Weeded (pretty much): check!

where on Saturday, I removed a sickly, sprawling Centaurea montana.

where on Saturday, I removed a sickly, sprawling Centaurea montana.

Two huge sedums removed, making room for two small plugs of Panicum 'Northwind' instead.

Middle bed: Two huge sedums removed, making room for two small plugs of Panicum ‘Northwind’ instead.

Rosa moyesii and Stipa gigantea

Middle bed: Rosa moyesii and Stipa gigantea

did not get the end of the middle bed weeded: fail.

did not get the end of the middle bed weeded: fail.

end of east bed, before

end of east bed, before

after.  Weedy sedge dug out.  Check!

after. Weedy sedge dug out. Huge Autumn Joy removed.  Dwarf fireweed pulled. Check!

southeast shade bed: weeding not done, and what was done not picked up.  Fail!

southeast shade bed: weeding not done, and what was done not picked up. Fail!

Mary expected a better job.

Mary expected a better job.

the garden left in chaotic condition....

the garden left in chaotic condition….

Some Todd plants found...Triumph!

Some Todd plants found…Triumph! And Sluggo cast all about to protect them…

Despite wishing I had gotten more weeding done, I felt pleased that I had gotten about 20 of my ladies in waiting planted and was able to enjoy an evening stroll around the garden.

a fragrant old rose (moved from my other garden, lost the ID on the way)

a fragrant old rose (moved from my other garden, lost the ID on the way)

This rose used to live at the Wiegardt Gallery...back when the building was pink and the garden undiscovered by the deer.

This striped rose used to live at the Wiegardt Gallery…back when the building was pink and the garden undiscovered by the deer.

Iris siberica

Iris siberica

Patio still laden with the last of work Annuals (and Perennials) Planting Time

Patio still laden with the last of work Annuals (and Perennials) Planting Time

Allan boating on Black Lake

Allan rewarded himself for a job well done with a late afternoon excursion to Black Lake, which, though small, is only a few blocks away.

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Black Lake rhododendron

Black Lake rhododendron

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an interpretive sign

an interpretive sign

Our local paper just had this interesting article about local youth making Josh’s trail better.

ready to launch

ready to launch

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from the water

 

Allan was able to quietly float up to this heron.

Allan was able to quietly float up to this heron.

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Allan felt sorry when his presence annoyed the bird into flapping out of the water.

those annoying humans

those annoying humans

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the built-up side of the lake revealed

the built-up side of the lake revealed

The bird came back to fish some more, and allowed another photo, my favourite:

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Allan tested out his new waterproof camera by actually putting in under water to photograph the weeds that can make this lake feel shallow for boating:

water weeds

water weeds

We had both worn ourselves out with our weekend extertions.  Fortunately, our next work week would be only four days  long as Allan has another boating expedition planned for next Saturday.  I am thinking that three day weekends make life much more pleasant than twelve day work weeks.

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My hope was that, while I went to the Sylvia Beach Hotel, Allan would also have four days off to do whatever he pleased. It was not to be as the promised rainy weather turned hot and sunny instead and he had to do some watering. Other than that…

He watched new ferns (from Todd Wiegardt) unfurl in his garden:

fern

18 September

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18 September

fern3

21 September

18 September

18 September

Above:

Southern maidenhair fern (Adiantum capillaris-veneris) (from Todd)

Uses

This plant is used medicinally by Native Americans. The Mahuna people use the plant internally for rheumatism, and the Kayenta Navajo use an infusion of the plant as a lotion for bumblebee and centipede stings. The Kayenta also smoke it or take it internally for insanity.

Clockwise from upper left: Lady fern, Oak fern & Hart's Tongue fern & an out of focus Tatting fern

Clockwise from upper left: Lady fern, Oak fern & Hart’s Tongue fern & an out of focus Tatting fern

And he picked up fallen apples.

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before

after

after

And observed a bird:

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Life is pretty exciting with me gone, apparently.

On September 18th, J9 came over to pick some rocks from our neighbour’s guest cottage across the street. Terri wants the river rock gone so she can plant a lawn. J9 took one small bucket full.

J9 picking rocks

J9 picking rocks

Allan says: “J9 also accepted some tomatoes and we ate some raspberries.” He also reports:

“Backing up the water trailer for traffic creased the bumper a few days ago. Sanded & filled but the color I had was a bit off.

more excitement: before and after

more excitement: before and after

Fortunately, his long weekend got more interesting. Thursday the 18th included a trip across the river, not just watching ferns grow. Allan writes:

Stopped in Chinook to look at the boat launch on the way to Astoria. All quiet except sounds of exhaling air which was coming from this seal. I stood still, it approached the dock, didn’t quite climb up then swam east towards another dock about the time a local artist {Leslie Lipe, she of the sock monkey album covers!] came by to look at the docks too. There is a lighted crane working the river in the last shots.

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seal

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birds

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An excursion upriver netted Allan a new boat and a (all the way to Portland!) a roof rack to put it on.

They had a used boat like my green one that was complete so I could copy the parts I made onto Christmas wrapping paper.

Allan: “They had a used boat like my green one that was complete so I could copy the parts I made onto Christmas wrapping paper.” Me: ???? Ok, he used the Christmas paper like tracing paper.

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New boat, weighs only 60 pounds

New boat, weighs only 63 pounds; the Force 5 weighs 145 pounds.

On Saturday the 20th, the temperature was about 90 degrees, so Allan had to water.

Our volunteer post office garden:  droopy cosmos getting watered.

Our volunteer post office garden: droopy cosmos getting watered.

hot!

hot!

(It was hot down in Newport, as well, but I did not leave the hotel during the day!)

The cosmos was hanging its head in Larry and Robert's garden boat, as well.

The cosmos was hanging its head in Larry and Robert’s garden boat, as well.

Larry and Robert's garden, east side

Larry and Robert’s garden, east side

Larry and Robert's, Echinacea 'Green Envy'

Larry and Robert’s, Echinacea ‘Green Envy’

Others folks who had a day off enjoyed the Black Lake, as I had so hoped he would get to do.

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He then went on to water the Long Beach and Ilwaco planters, which I had so hoped he would not have to do.

But it had to be done!

But it had to be done!

Lady's mantle doing what it does best: showing off water droplets.

Lady’s mantle doing what it does best: showing off water droplets.

"This dog was jumping up on the planter & gulping the hose. I was too busy not scaring the dog with an eyeful of water but this was it after outside the bakery . "He loves the hose" the owners said during the play."

“This dog was jumping up on the planter & gulping the hose. I was too busy not scaring the dog with an eyeful of water but this was it after outside the bakery . “He loves the hose” the owners said during the play.”

Fish Alley barrels

Fish Alley barrels

In Ilwaco, by the boatyard, the deer are eating the nasturtiums.

In Ilwaco, by the boatyard, the deer are eating the nasturtiums.

watering till after dark

watering till after dark

You can see a pedestrian in this photo. Allan says: “While taking a pic of darkness, (8:00) a visitor with a blown tire from cutting the corner at Ed’s Bait can be seen approaching. We fixed it.”

On Sunday, he finally got his day off and of course, took out the new boat. First, he took some photos of the CranMac cranberry bog north of Black Lake getting flooded for the upcoming harvest:

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Water is being pulled out of the lake, whose level drops slightly.

Water is being pulled out of the lake, whose level drops slightly.

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Workers will wade in to collect the cranberries as they float to the top.

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He went out on the lake with his new boat on Sunday the 20th.

He had so much fun, he only took this one photo.

He had so much fun, he only took this one photo.

And now…back to some mutual work days, more than two this coming week.

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Sunday, 14 September 2014

After all the walking on yesterday’s cottage tour, my knee and calf were both playing up, so almost all I did was sit and blog about the tour. Garden Tour Nancy came over with a large piece of salmon which her hunter/gatherer spouse, Phil, had caught in his secret fishing place. (I cannot tell.)

Feast your eyes on that, caught six hours earlier.

Feast your eyes on that, caught six hours earlier.

At least I had some flowers to offer in return.

At least I had some flowers to offer in return.

Fortunately for this blog entry, Allan rowed around Black Lake for awhile and took some photos.

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A fisherman (a 'Superfisherman') arrived and told of the trout he had caught, eagles that watch the lake from the surrounding trees and confirmed that I had seen otters as he'd seen them swimming in the weeds north of the dock.

Allan writes: A fisherman (a ‘Superfisherman’) arrived and told of the trout he had caught, eagles that watch the lake from the surrounding trees and confirmed that I had seen otters as he’d seen them swimming in the weeds north of the dock.

Ready to row the sailboat hull from the Yacht Club.

Ready to row the sailboat hull from the Yacht Club.

a couple taking wildlife pics

a couple taking wildlife pics

two kayakers who had launched from a dock by the school

two kayakers who had launched from a dock by the school

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The dock by the highway turn off was a gull hangout.

The dock by the highway turn off was a gull hangout.

A lot of feathers gathered downwind.

A lot of feathers gathered downwind.

The kayakers meanwhile had pulled out and a couple of kids were swimming by another dock.

The kayakers meanwhile had pulled out and a couple of kids were swimming by another dock.

Meanwhile I had found out with our wrapped up car GPS that I can row about 3 mph, top out at 4 .3 mph, and can't row and take pictures at the same time. The other photographer on the lake had a paddler too as her equipment was not a modest pocket camera.

Meanwhile I had found out with our wrapped up car GPS that I can row about 3 mph, top out at 4 .3 mph, and can’t row and take pictures at the same time. The other photographer on the lake had a paddler too as her equipment was not a modest pocket camera.

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I loaded up the boat, strimmed the grass where it had been, and loaded it on the vertical cart .

I loaded up the boat, strimmed the grass where it had been, and loaded it on the vertical cart at home.

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home for repairs; the purpose of the vertical cart is to move the boat through narrow garden paths.

home for maintenance; the purpose of the vertical cart is to move the boat through narrow garden paths. (Parked temporarily on Nora’s lawn)

We postponed eating the salmon for one day, as I had it strongly in mind to have a fire (with sausages) that night while the weather was still hot and not windy. Warm, still evenings are rare here (or have been in past summers; that may have permanently changed). If we could acquire a fire ring grill top, we could cook salmon and other delicacies outdoors but for now we are limited to food that can be toasted on a campfire fork (sausages and buns, and marshmallows for Allan).

starting the fire

starting the fire

Allan managed to start the fire with no paper at all; I usually use wads and wads of newspaper before I can get one going.

Allan's photo:  "NO paper, NO starters, just cedar and a lighter"

Allan’s photo: “NO paper, NO starters, just cedar and a lighter” (and alder wood)

garden in evening light

garden in evening light

Smokey was happy to join us near the fire.

Smokey was happy to join us near the fire.

Stipa gigantea, my favourite grass.

Stipa gigantea, my favourite grass (backed with river of Geranium ‘Rozanne’).

Tomorrow, I would have to do extensive watering as the garden had become distressed in the heat.

Persicaria 'Firetail' lying almost flat

Persicaria ‘Firetail’ lying almost flat

honeysuckle looking sad

honeysuckle looking sad

The fire burned bright and clean with no smoke.

The fire burned bright and clean with no smoke.

We wished that Kathleen had not had to go back to the big city, as last week when she came for a campfire, we had gotten rained out. This particular fire was the most perfect one of the summer.

the perfect fire

the perfect fire

and the experience we had hoped to share with Kathleen of watching the coals burn out

and the experience we had hoped to share with Kathleen of watching the coals burn out

Monday, 15 September 2014

We have become slackers, me more than Allan as he still goes out to do the necessary Ilwaco watering on a weekend. Having spent a day at the cottage tour, I felt a strong need for two days at home so declared Monday a day off. That will make this another TWO day work week for me as I am leaving Thursday, fate willing, for a trip to the Sylvia Beach Hotel.

The day began shockingly hot again. I was thrilled when it soon cooled down and I could see fog in the distance.

the delicious sight of fog at the east end of Lake Street

the delicious sight of fog at the east end of Lake Street

a pause to admire Azara microphylla variegata by the front porch

a pause to admire Azara microphylla variegata by the front porch

It was a workday for our friend J9, who stopped by after work for a visit and to get some vegetables.

sent her home with some tomatoes and some Yukon gold potatoes...and a little piece of fresh salmon just right for her dinner.

sent her home with some tomatoes and some Yukon gold potatoes…and a little piece of fresh salmon just right for her dinner.

Allan went out to water Larry and Robert’s garden, our volunteer Post Office garden, and the Ilwaco planters, all of which are one-person jobs.

cosmos at the post office

cosmos at the post office

He marvelled:  "A planter with new soil and next to a field hit with Round Up still manages to get  a dandelion & a chickweed"

He marvelled: “A planter with new soil and next to a field hit with Round Up still manages to get a dandelion & a chickweed”

(The vacant lot downtown is treated with Round Up by its owner, which we think is a shame as it used to grow wild beach peas.)

This was the planter that was vandalized in later summer, then moved and replanted.

This was the planter that was vandalized in later summer, then moved and replanted.

the planter by Larry's Antique Gallery Too! with vigorous nasturtium

the planter by Larry’s Antique Gallery Too! with vigorous nasturtium

My big garden plan for the weekend had been to chop up some of the garden debris pile and put it into the compost bins. We have decided to no longer collect kitchen compost from a nearby café for several reasons, one being that the compost bins stink up the garden in hot weather, one being that the amount of time spent collecting and processing takes more work hours than the cost of a load of dairy manure, and another being that a neighbour had….RATS…and the cats brought in a rat the other day, an ominous sign. With four plastic bins of kitchen compost, three of which could be breached by a determined critter, we were perhaps asking for trouble.

The first day was too hot to do the garden debris project and the second day I was just too darn lazy.

After watering, Allan made a delicious salmon dinner with Phil’s salmon, and some of our Yukon Golds and tomatoes (and storebought everything else).

I try to eat a bit of sauerkraut every day as it is supposed to be healthy.

I try to eat a bit of sauerkraut every day as it is supposed to be healthy.

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My mission: to not leave the property until we return to work.  A blessed drizzle all night Thursday night meant that we could probably put off watering the Long Beach planters until Tuesday.

Friday, 22 August 2014

Allan volunteered to swing the pick and get the salmonberry stumps out of the newly cleared bogsy wood edge.

He made quick work of this hard task.

He made quick work of this hard task.

I am so pleased with how this is coming along...

I am so pleased with how this is coming along…

a newly clear tunnel runs south to north.

a newly clear tunnel runs south to north.

Even though I had planned to wait for a rainier season to put my new plants in the ground, I could not resist planting a few.

plants

I still wonder if I should or should not remove the easternmost clump.

I still wonder if I should or should not remove the easternmost clump (to the left).

In the early evening, we began a fire to burn up some odd twiggy bits from the old woodpile.

a twiggy pile

a twiggy pile

I texted Olde Towne Café’s Luanne that we were about to make fire, not expecting her to really show up, but she did, with a small bag of paper to burn that helped get the fire going.

destiny

such a pleasant evening

such a pleasant evening

Luanne has to leave at dusk as she rises so early to open the café; we enjoyed the fire on into the dusk.

loving the new garden bed behind the smoke

loving the new garden bed behind the smoke

Saturday, 23 August 2014

Just as I was about to go into the garden in late morning, I got a text from our friend and client Jo asking if she could bring some family over.  Although she was in the midst of a family reunion of 35 people, she only brought two….and my good friend Coco.

Coco

Coco

Let off the leash (because our yard is safely fenced), Coco relished running around the entire garden.

She discovered a cat (Smokey)...

She discovered a cat (Smokey)…

and was closely observed by Mary and Frosty.

and was closely observed by Mary and Frosty from their high cat door perch.

Jo was very taken by the Chelone (pink turtlehead) and asked "Why don't I have one of these?"

Jo was very taken by the Chelone (pink turtlehead) and asked “Why don’t I have one of these?”

Jo will have pink turtlehead in her garden next year!

Jo will have pink turtlehead in her garden next year!

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo; her niece makes a heart to show how much Jo loves that plant!

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

As we strolled around, we saw a frog on a Cox's Orange Pippin apple.

As we strolled around, we saw a frog on a Cox’s Orange Pippin apple.

Allan got a better side.

Allan got a better side.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I did set foot off the property, but only onto the front sidewalk to demonstrate the peanut butter scent of the Melianthus major (a big hit as always).  I think Jo should have some of that in her garden as well, since I learned that she has a nephew or grandson who adores peanut butter.

After they left, I contemplated what task to tackle first.

looking east from driveway

looking east from driveway

have not had time to deadhead my own painted sage, and it may be too late to bother.

have not had time to deadhead my own painted sage, and it may be too late to bother.

I dragged a big planting tub away from the front porch area to give Allan room for one of his new ferns, and because I wanted a shady place to plant my Asarum ‘Shell Shocked’ so I don’t lose it in the wilds of the garden.

I dragged a big planting tub away from the front porch area to give Allan room for one of his new ferns.

a new space for Allan

and a new spot for the planter

and a new spot for the planter

I decided to dare to dig out the blue Geranium which was taking up too much room in Allan’s garden.

'Amy Doncaster' or...??

‘Amy Doncaster’ or…??

I replanted it in the back garden with lots and lots of water.  (Two days later, it is fine.)

The next day, he asked if a dog had been digging in his garden (forgetting I had showed him the dug up plant).

The next day, he asked if a dog had been digging in his garden (forgetting I had showed him the dug up plant).

While weeding in an area that caught my eye while planting the geranium, I saw a big apple on my young Pink Lady apple tree.  It came off with a twist.  Then some internet research told me I had probably picked it too early and that the real name of the apple is Cripp’s Pink.  Cripp’s Pink is the cultivar name, and Pink Lady is a trademark name; that is something I had recently been reading about in a book by Plant Delight’s Tony Avent.

It is so large and came off so easily.

It is so large and came off so easily.

There are a few more apples on the tree to make up for having picked one too early.

There are a few more apples on the tree to make up for having picked one too early.

Meanwhile, Allan went to the Ilwaco Saturday Market to get produce and some photos for Discover Ilwaco.

some of Allan’s Saturday Market photos:

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Suzy Q's Magical Glass

Suzy Q’s Magical Glass

from the port office deck

from the port office deck

De Asis produce

De Asis produce

De Asis produce

De Asis produce

De Asis produce; we had peaches for dessert

De Asis produce; we had peaches for dessert

returning via the gearshed next door...

returning via the gearshed next door…

He came in the east gate

he came in the east gate

Still with plenty of energy, he went to Black Lake and sailed around for awhile:

“Couldn’t get out of the yacht club’s harbour in the yellow boat before it hit a snag & capsized. Easily righted. I had a row boat in tow which I walked over to and towed it all back. Last shot is from the green boat under sail with the fog coming in on the south shore. Pretty fun overall.”

tipped!

tipped!

rescue boat in tow

rescue boat in tow

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fog

fog

He had been thinking of taking his newly painted “picnic cooler” boat up to Island Lake but decided to save that for another time.

the "cooler" boat

the “cooler” boat on Nora’s lawn

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His dad used to take Allan out in this boat when Allan was little.  It was from Sears and quite economical at that time.

Allan built that narrow boat moving..thingie…in order to move his boats in and out of the narrow paths in our garden (paths that I may have made too narrow in the area where he wants to store the boat).

Sunday, 24 August 2014

I am ever so pleased at the four sprinklers Allan has set up, which cover almost the whole back garden.  I did not try them out yet as Allan would be wanting to mow the lawn.

We got the idea from Pink Poppy Farm, and Allan put ours on taller posts to cover our large garden beds.

We got the idea from Pink Poppy Farm, and Allan put ours on taller posts to cover our large garden beds.

True, overhead watering is not as good as an in ground sprinkler system.  However, this will work well for us for now; maybe when we retire, we can get fancier.  I do find that I move plants around a lot and in my experience that makes an in ground sprinkler system a problem.

I had spent some time yesterday weeding under the former danger tree in the back garden, where the blue bottles hung from an old branch on the tall trunk that we chose to have left behind by the tree cutter.  Today, I found the bottles on the ground…right where I had been weeding.

a close call

a close call

later:  Allan rehung them on the west arbour

later: Allan rehung them on the west arbour

I spent the afternoon planting all of my new Fuchsias, three in big pots and the rest in the shade beds by the alder trees.

loving the new bed by the fire area

loving the new bed by the fire area (and the lawn is now mowed)

Allan watered the Ilwaco planters (thus not really having a four day weekend):

the planter with the new free begonias

the planter with the new free begonias from Basket Case

and a bit of sightseeing at the port

and a bit of sightseeing at the port

Monday, 25 August 2014

I placed my bulb order!  That is a huge deal, as I tend to put it off till Labour Day or (last year) even later.  It hangs over my head and causes much anxiety till I force myself to do it.  I went over budget, as always, so the extras will end up in my garden or perhaps I can flog a few to friends.

Then weeding absorbed my day.  I thought Allan might go boating; instead, he started on a project involving our rain water barrels.

project underway

project underway

More weeding while I tried out the new sprinklers (worked fabulously well) led to more admiration of my new shade bed.

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A little delight awaited me when I weeded a shade bed on the east side:

Bletila 'White Pearl' from Todd Wiegardt

Bletila ‘White Pearl’ from Todd Wiegardt

I added to my bowl of poppy seeds that Jacob Moore is collecting for Madeline.

poppies....all sorts

poppies….all sorts

Devery came by to pick some raspberries.

Devery came by to pick some raspberries.

Allan demonstrated how the new rain barrel will collect water from the roof.  Rainytime water feature!

Allan demonstrated how the new rain barrel will collect water from the roof. Rainytime water feature!

The water is now accessible; it used to be way back behind plants in the corner so this source rarely got used.

The water is now accessible; it used to be way back behind plants in the corner so this source rarely got used.

In the greenhouse, the tomato plants look miserable with lots of yellow leaves…

They get watered daily, I think not too often.

They get watered daily, I think not too often.

Despite their sad appearance, the tomato plants produce a bounty every day.

Despite their sad appearance, the tomato plants produce a bounty every day, enough to share with friends.

the transplanted blue geranium, happy (always a risk transplanting in dry weather)

the transplanted blue geranium, happy (always a risk transplanting in dry weather)

Allan demos the new rain barrel by spraying some water into the gutter.

Allan demos the new rain barrel by spraying some water into the gutter.

I will want to stand here in the rain and watch.

I will want to stand here in the rain and watch.

He rigged up two barrels instead of one in the driveway where we need water the most (to fill buckets to take to work with us).

He rigged up two barrels instead of one in the driveway where we need water the most (to fill buckets to take to work with us).

We have room for one more rain catcher here...a spot I did not even notice had a downspout till recently.

We have room for one more rain catcher here…a spot I did not even notice had a downspout till recently.

In the front garden: the crab pot fence proved to be a good spot for displaying broken off alliums.

In the front garden: the crab pot fence proved to be a good spot for displaying broken off alliums.

Scruphularia variegata (more nicely known as figwort) has good flowers as well as good green and white foliage.

Scruphularia variegata (more nicely known as figwort) has good flowers as well as good green and white foliage.

figwort

figwort

What a perfect long weekend.  I am so spoiled now that I do not want to go back to work tomorrow, even though I am concerned at how thirsty the Long Beach planters may be.

a last garden look with fog obscuring the hill southwest of us

a last garden look with fog obscuring the hill southwest of us

and nasturtiums outside the west gate

and nasturtiums outside the west gate

The last thing Allan did was straighten the cat door platform.  Here it is from earlier in the weekend:

cats

and here it is all evened out.

and here it is all evened out.

I am not thrilled that my wall quotation is blocked:  “A garden without cats can scarcely be called a garden at all” (Beverly Nichols); Allan says the wood is only a three quarters of an inch wide….I will have to examine this in person!  (I was firmly in the house by the time Allan took that photo.) I could move the quotation higher if need be.

on the porch, violas with faces

on the porch, violas with faces

And then in for the evening to blog and then rest my brain with a couple of Gordon Ramsay shows.

Books

Meanwhile, I’ve been reading some of the gardening books that I saw on our Bloggers Fling visit to Timber Press.

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Decoding Gardening Advice and The Anxious Gardener’s Book of Answers each had useful information and would be especially helpful to beginning gardeners.  So You Want to Start a Nursery  by Tony Avent of Plant Delights fame was fascinating to me in parts.  I do not want to start a nursery so I skipped some of the chapters on the business and equipment side of things, but I deeply enjoyed the chapters on subjects such as new plant introductions, and Tony’s information on the difference between trademark names and cultivar names was a revelation and cleared up some mysteries that had been bothering me.  I strongly suggest you turn to his excellent online article on the subject here.  This passage explains why I have an apple called ‘Pink Lady’ whose REAL name is ‘Cripp’s Pink’:

The rose industry seems to have been the first to use nonsensical, non-conforming names for plant cultivars, while the bedding plant industry completely thumbed its nose at the Code by not even bothering to come up with any cultivar names for most of their introductions. One of the most famous roses in horticulture is one that everyone knows as Peace. Surprisingly, there is no such plant as Rosa ‘Peace’. The plant we grow under this name is actually Rosa ‘Madame A. Meilland’. The trade name Peace was coined by Conard Pyle Nursery, and used to market Rosa ‘Madame A. Meilland’ after World War II to capitalize on the post-war sentiment. The plant became known in the public’s mind as the Peace rose.

Some of the larger nurseries soon realized that regardless of the cultivar name of the plant, they could come up with their own proprietary (trademarked) marketing name and use these names to promote plants which already had valid cultivar names. The idea was to convince the public that the company’s marketing name was actually the name of the plant. ”

Read on to fully understand the scandal!  I was fascinated.

My favourite so far of the new-to-me Timber Press books is one that I purchased because our local library did not have it.

babbs

I was smitten as soon as I read her introductory words:

babbs

I learned a new word from a lovely passage about an evening garden:

word

Vespertine!

All 136 pages of the book were immensely pleasing to me.  I learned that the city of London has working farms (and the book has an index of where to find them).  Ms. Babbs would be a wonderful friend with whom to explore horticultural London and I would so love to have joined her for a mint-muddled cocktail on her rooftop garden.  I do hope she continue to write autobiographical books.

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Sunday, 3 August 2014

my day

Having completely blown off gardening the day before…I don’t think I even walked around the garden when Kathleen Shaw visited in the late afternoon on into the evening!…I really had to get some weeding done. I think I was suffering from a post-garden tour malaise, so well described by Dulcy Mahar:

from Back in the Garden with Dulcy

from Back in the Garden with Dulcy

I have no desire for a formal green garden; in fact, the formal green gardens on the tour (one here, one in Seattle, none in Portland) were the ones I did not especially like. However, I am perhaps feeling the lack of a gravel garden, of coloured stucco walls, and of fabulous expensive water features with some Little and Lewis columns..

Allan had been working on his garden the evening before while Kathleen and I visited in the house.

Allan's garden

Allan’s garden

I have turned this area over to him, as well.

I have turned this area over to him, as well.

and this, sort of, well, except for the plants I already have in there.

and this, sort of, well, except for the plants I already have in there.

I have encouraged him to rip out all but one special cranesbill geranium. (I want to protect ‘Amy Doncaster’ and move her in the fall; I thought I had lost her, but she has popped up and bloomed in Allan’s garden…or one just like her! Maybe I have a great new plant as she is blooming now, and the Amy I used to have bloomed only in spring! I had better take a photo…soon.)

I have ALL these plants to plant, but the weather is too dry now.

I have ALL these plants to plant, but the weather is too dry now.

I set to weeding in the back garden. I kept at it for a few hours, pausing only for a garden tour walk when Ed Strange came over with his friend Irene. Something odd happened there; maybe due to a burst of social anxiety at meeting someone new, I said “Irene was my mom’s name” and really believed it for over an hour before I suddenly recalled, after they left, that my mother’s name was Ginger and my aunt was Irene. Is this impending dementia???

no before photos to prove that this area was a mass of weeds, especially dwarf fireweed

no before photos to prove that this area was a mass of weeds, especially dwarf fireweed

However, that is a wheelbarrow COMPLETELY hidden with weeds with another pile on the path beyond.

However, that is a wheelbarrow COMPLETELY hidden with weeds with another pile on the path beyond.

The whole garden has become a crisis when I look closely.

Good things:

white Echinops

white Echinops

Echinops ‘Arctic Glow’ reseeded since last year; I did not know what it was going to be, so I pulled a lot of the seedlings thinking they might be a common thistle. They looked much coarser than the blue Echinopes (blue globe thistle). Now I wish I had transplanted some of them at the boatyard. I’ll know better next time.

Irene was gratifyingly impressed with my tall lilies.

Irene was gratifyingly impressed with my tall lilies.

Anastasia, I believe

Anastasia, I believe

Allan’s day

Meanwhile, Allan went sailing on Ilwaco’s Black Lake and here’s his report:

“Borrowed a fellow Black Lake Yacht Club member’s boat with plenty of time & a 20 mph wind. Flooded & too windy to figure out how to get back. Paddled to dock, hiked back, rowed & towed it back.”

Chris's boat with too much water!

Chris’s boat with too much water!

towing it back

towing it back

Rowed to south end, spotted a nest & boys fishing off a dock.

nest

nest

boys on dock

boys on dock

Water lilies at north end & a pic of a ‘rescue’ boat that was offered if I got stuck and couldn’t get the yellow boat home. I installed a set of oars on the white magenta one like my dad’s to be sure to have a way home.

water lilies

water lilies

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P8030034

P8030036

For the first time, actually ‘sailed’ upwind successfully back to the dock. Only needed the oars when I slammed onto the shore a few times. (Still need practice.)

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