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July 27, 2013

Gardens by the Sea tour benefits Clatsop CASA.

Garden three: Cornelia and Bill Dreverscraft garden

from the program: “Seeing the light of proper placement. A delight to behold, clean and crisp and even.”

It is indeed one of the cleanest gardens I have ever seen, rivaled only by one from last year.

approaching

approaching

closer....

closer….

through the arch

through the arch

To our left, the porch.

To our left, the porch.

"Cornelia's Cottage"

“Cornelia’s Cottage”

porch chairs

porch chairs

more porch seating

more porch seating

We encountered our friend and client Lorna of Andersen’s RV Park and Karen Clarke, another good gardener, again as they were entering and we were leaving this garden. I credit them with pointing out the interesting driftwood ball on the porch. (We also discussed how glads are getting so trendy but that they used to be strongly associated with funerals.)

driftwood ball

driftwood ball

Allan examined it and said it was built on a wire frame.

Allan examined it and said it was built on a wire frame.

Allan's closeup

Allan’s closeup

patio

patio

I think it was Karen who noticed the colour coordination between plants and chairs and the throw on the bench.

bench

bench

right across the street: the golf course

right across the street: the golf course

Lorna was very taken with the clipped boxwood in big pots.

pot feet

pot feet

I wonder: Do snails and slugs live more happily under pots raised up with pot feet?

good signage for garden trees

good signage for garden trees

beside the patio

beside the patio

Here we go around the side of the house….

side path

side path

back corner of house

back corner of house

Allan's photo, looking behind toward front garden

Allan’s photo, looking behind toward front garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

into the back garden

into the back garden

"Mind the steep path."

“Mind the steep path.”

behind the house

The path was indeed a bit steep because gravel can be slippy. We turned instead to the upper level gravel patio right behind the the house.

back wall of house

back wall of house

looking downhill at the garden

looking downhill at the garden

by the upper gravel patio

by the upper gravel patio

good ID sign for tree

good ID sign for tree

Stewartia

Stewartia

I so look forward to my own Stewartia getting big enough to bloom and have good bark. Just when the one at my old house first bloomed, we moved! And started again with a young tree,

view to a lower expanse of gravel

to our right: view to a lower expanse of gravel

steps to porch

ahead: steps to deck

porch stairs

deck stairs

deck view to upper patio

deck view to upper patio

deck railing display

deck railing display

for lounging....

for lounging….

...and reading

…and reading

deck planter

deck planter

looking straight down from back of deck

looking straight down from back of deck

and below, expanse of gravel

and below, expanse of gravel

deck view of a pool of Geranium 'Rozanne'

deck view of a pool of Geranium ‘Rozanne’

and steps doing down

and steps going down

Allan's view of steps going down

Allan’s view of steps going down…

with me (sore knee, dizzy, swollen eyelid!) for sense of scale

with me (sore knee, dizzy, swollen eyelid!) for sense of scale

back down the deck steps

back down the deck steps

Allan thinks this gate would be an excellent solution for our friends and clients Larry and Robert, who have at present a very wonky chicken wire arrangement for their dog yard!

We take the steps down to the lower gravel area.

into lower

I assume while there that the large expanse of gravel is because the garden owners have huge parties. Only later, I think when at Back Alley gardens, do I hear that the gravel is a garden in progress. So I gather now that there will be more plants added, perhaps like a scree garden. Like the other gardens we have visited so far, the owners are not there and so there is no one to interpret the garden for us. (How can they bear to not be there hearing our interest?)

below the deck

below the deck

smokebush

smokebush by base of stone and gravel stairs

seating on the gravel expanse

seating on the gravel expanse

I would love to know how much of this area is going to be planted up!

looking back up at the house

looking back up at the house

from further into the lower gravel area

from further into the lower gravel area

From the neighbours’ garden behind where I stood to take the above photo is a borrowed view of a pond. It looks like a hedge of trees has been planted that will block the view, but the sound of the fountain will still remain.

borrowed view

borrowed view

the pool of Rozanne

the pool of Rozanne

looking back

looking back

back

tree with tidy rock edges and circle

tree with tidy rock edges and circle

looking up the slope

looking up the slope

diving visually into the pool of Rozanne

diving visually into the pool of Rozanne

walking up the slope

walking up the slope (there is the back of the “mind the steep path” sign)

Again at the back wall of the house, we admire the green plantings along the edge…

baby tears

baby tears

and notice a baby in the baby tears!

face

green on green

green on green

Allan's view

Allan’s view

caged

caged

at back corner of house

Allan took the photo above at the back corner of the house. The Fuchsia looks like ‘Hawkshead’, white with pale green tips, perfect for the green theme.

a look back to the lower garden

a look back to the lower garden

at the side of the house

at the side of the house

the way out

the way out

As we come through the arbour into the front garden again, we notice a planted roasting pan.

The pig is a clever touch.

The pig is a clever touch.

Just then is when we re-encountered Lorna and Karen, who were about to go around into the back garden. Lorna pointed out to me something I had missed….

girl with marbles

girl with marbles

So I told her to be sure to look for the baby face in the back garden. Later we encountered her again at another garden and she told me they had looked for it for fifteen minutes and it was well worth the search, but that she wished the garden owner had been there to answer questions.

In all this extraordinarily, large, well kept garden, I saw only one weed, a small dandelion sneaking impudently up between pavers in the front patio and showing one audacious yellow flower. Perfection reigned throughout.

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29 July, 2012, a benefit for Clatsop County CASA

formal patterns

formal patterns

The fifth garden we visited was supposed to be garden six, which would have bracketed the tour with green and white gardens.  But we wanted to end up at Back Alley Gardens nursery, so we switched the order.  The programme says of the garden of  David Hopkins and Rick Young:  “The strength of this beautiful green and white landscape is laid out in a pattern you will not soon forget.”

palm planter by front fence

palm planter by front fence

palm planter detail

At one side of the front yard, a tidy work area

At one side of the front yard, a tidy work area

In the work area, a potting bench and woodshed

In the work area, a potting bench and woodshed

looking back to the garden from the work area

looking back to the garden from the work area

 

Next to the area with potting bench and woodshed stood the most exquisite guest house, which was open for tour guests.

guest house

guest house

inside...perhaps a Murphy bed?

inside…perhaps a Murphy bed?

inside, showing door to back deck

inside, showing door to back deck

Garden tourists kept poking around the guest house, peering through side windows to try to figure out whether or not a Murphy bed hid behind the tall doors. One gentleman said, “It looks like storage back there.”  Perhaps some sort of rollaway bed is deployed?

 

 

 

On the shelf atop the cupboards (right), a photography book was on display.  We were not sure if the choice of photograph had been selected by the owners, or had it been opened by a tour guest, and in what way was it a glimpse into the lives of the couple who had opened their garden and guest house to our inquiring minds?

from this book

from this book

 

 

 

 

 

the photo book

the photo book

the bathroom

the bathroom

and out the back door to a secret deck

and out the back door to a secret deck

I love the simple, sandy path that runs along the back of the guest house.  So beachy!

path from deck to potting bench

path from deck to potting bench

and from potting bench back to deck

and from potting bench back to deck

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the main house from next to the guest house

the main house from next to the guest house

boxwood circle

boxwood circle

On the other side of the guest house from the work area the formal intricacies of the garden began again with a boxwood circle, Lutyens bench, and clipped backdrop.

Next to and behind the house the strong white and green theme probably takes some dedicated upkeep to be so pristine.

 

 

white on white patio

white on white patio

around to the back

around to the back

garden tower

garden tower

back garden

back garden

Around the main house we strolled...

Around the main house we strolled…

passing a fountain that I imagine is viewed from a dining table.

passing a fountain that I imagine is viewed from a dining table.

an elegant view

an elegant view

returning to the front garden....

returning to the front garden….

boxwood in a box

boxwood in a box

Allan took a close up lawn shot for lawn expert Tom Hornbuckle.  And then we were off to the final garden of the day.

Interlude:

window?box

window?box

I loved this windowbox on a hour across the street.  Wait, it is not a windowbox without a window, is it?  A planter then.  I want to get some little trees and do an offset design like this.

After the formality of the green and white garden, I found it differently pleasant to gaze upon an unlandscaped scene of trees and floats.

 

tree floats

tree floats

the old red house

the old red house

Driving, we took a wrong turn and saw the back of the old red house I had remarked upon earlier in the day, that it might be an affordable Gearhart house, but probably not.  The lot does not go all the way through as I had imagined.

We stopped the car to take photos of a beautiful house and a garden that I liked best of all, even though I did not get to enter it.

a dreamy garden

a dreamy garden

detail of dreamy garden

detail of dreamy garden

A neighbour caught me lurking outside the fence on this dead end street and just said, “Liking the garden?” as he walked by with his dog.

veg patchBack in the car, we drove to the final garden, right across the street from our destination nursery, and next door to the tour garden, we admired this geometric landscape.

Next: the last tour garden of a very good day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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29 July, 2013: Gearhart Oregon, a benefit for Clatsop County CASA.

outside the garden

outside the garden

front courtyard

front courtyard

After a happy chance interlude in a non-tour garden just up the block, we began the official Gardens by the Sea tour in Ron Stefani’s garden, described in the programme as having “Masses of hydrangeas and sweeping tall grasses surround the front yard seating and in the back, a deck that makes your heart sing.”   A soothing garden, it consisted of boxwood, Hydrangeas, and Miscanthus.

front gate

front gate

front porch with hydrangeas

front porch with hydrangeas

back garden: boxwood

back garden: boxwood

It is a tidy, clipped garden. I could do this for a client. In fact, we had a client who wanted this sort of garden and we succeeded. ‘Twas very soothing. But I need to go wild to be a happy gardener!!  I enjoyed this garden very much but would not have the discipline to stick to the three plant scheme.

back deck, container with Euphorbia

back deck, container with Euphorbia

other side

Boxwood and Hydrangeas

The other side of the back garden continued with the clipped boxwood, banks with white hydrangeas, and then a gently sloping mound topped with Miscanthus.

white Hydrangeas, Miscanthus

white Hydrangeas, Miscanthus (Ornamental grass)

Interlude

next door

next door

As we walked on to the next garden, a few blocks west, we passed several gardens that inspired me to get out the camera.  Just east of the Stefani garden, the neighbours had a simple, beachy landscape (left) with some bags of soil set out but not yet applied.  Up the block and just next to Roger’s fabulous garden, an exuberant cottage garden contained a white and green variegated member of the mint family that  I used to have, and no longer do, but I could not and cannot remember its name.  (below, right)

cottage garden

cottage garden

Sheila thinks the mystery plant is a variegated Agastache and she might be right!

Walking on....a pretty, simple driveway garden

Walking on….a pretty, simple driveway garden

Could this be a Gearhart house that we could afford?

Could this be a Gearhart house that we could afford?

Like Cannon Beach, but moreso, Gearhart is an expensive town with a reputation for exclusivity.  Even the rare derelict house probably costs a fortune.  But oh, what I could do with the one above…and look at all those windows!

beachy arbour and driftwood

beachy arbour and driftwood

wildlife habitat

wildlife habitat

Walking on, and almost to the second tour garden, we passed a house with such a beachy, weathered arbour.  Judy’s friend Liz observed that, in the photo above, the driftwood piece by the gate looks like a sea lion balancing a yellow beach ball on its nose.  On the fence, a sign (left) informed us that the garden is an official wildlife habitat.

Directly across the street from the second tour garden, a newly planted landscape (below) caught our eyes.  Later in the day of touring we learned that it had been installed by Steve Clarke, from Seaview, former owner of an excellent Willapa bayside nursery called Clarke’s that we had frequented often back in the day.  He has now gone mostly into creating gardens and while touring, we met a nice fellow who works with him.

a Steve Clarke garden

a Steve Clarke garden

detail, Clarke garden

detail, Clarke garden

Now at last, after much distraction, we turn our attention across the street to tour garden number two…

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beehives

While the beehives near the parking area for garden six were interesting, I was more pleased to see a sanican.  A note that I made on my Facebook album of this tour:  One restroom option is NOT enough for ten gardens.  This says to me there might have been ten, rather than seven, gardens on this tour, and that perhaps we found three completely forgettable.

materials

A pile of materials (ingredients!) at the entry to garden seven managed to look artful.

From the foot of a formal stairway, Sheila and  other garden tourists admired a meadow’s vertical accents.

punctuated meadow

stairs detail

This garden was in the process of design by Maurice Horn from Joy Creek Nursery.  My companions and I felt very satisfied with the fifth and sixth gardens, but later at Joy Creek I mentioned to Maurice that we had overheard grumblings about most of the gardens not having enough cool and collectible plants.  I found it commendable for a plant purveyor to say, as he did, that this garden was about structure, not plant collecting.  I gathered he had perhaps taken a couple of complainers gently to task about this, and was glad I had phrased my remark in such a way that I sounded (correctly) like an admirer, not a critic, of garden number six.

further up the steps

and further…

Wide open spaces set off spaces crammed with plants.

I remember once attending a lecture by Ann Lovejoy back when she told a story about gardener Kevin Nicolay.  He visited one of her early gardens and made a pithy comment about how a garden is better if there is at least a bit of room to step back and admire it.

Ah…a delicious cold beverage and cookies were on offer.  The day had turned quite warm for a coastal dweller.

thank you

Past the formal stairs and patio, a casual lawn offered a view of the meadow with its verticality…

meadow view

…a verticality that was strongly featured in the formal beds just behind us.

verticality

(I now feel an urgent need to buy more Ilex ‘Sky Pencil”.)

We learned that the plan was to change the look of this area;  either move toward or away from the look (above, lower left) of individual plants inside the boxwood squares.  Oops, I can’t recall which it was to be….or perhaps the boxwood was to be done away with altogether.

scree

We moved on into an area of scree plantings and then down a wide, formal steps stairway.

stairs down to meadow

Picky though I might be, I have no objection to a garden where part of the design is brand new; I’m just frustrated when most of it is brand nw.

As in garden five, mown paths through meadows enticed the garden tourists to explore….past a billowing garden bed and off into the prairie.

returning from a grassland adventure

Above, you can see in the background the island bed photographed below:

garden bed by an outbuilding

But as usual, we had no time to sit and had to hustle on to have time for a plant buying frenzy at Joy Creek Nursery.  Only two and half weeks remained till both Laurie’s and my mother’s gardens would be on the Peninsula garden tour, and each still had spaces that could be filled with especially choice plants.  My mother’s garden in particular was all about plants.  She did not like boxwoods or any other things of foliar garden structure, so her tour day would be ALL about the colour and flowers.

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