Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘cape disappointment state park’

Saturday, 22 August 2015

I woke to the smell of smoke in the air from the wildfires in central Washington; the wind had brought the smoke to us, and then the wind stopped and the smoke settled over us.

Our day began with the usual trip to the Ilwaco Saturday Market.

First stop, Pink Poppy Bakery, where we found Betsy buying a pie.

First stop, Pink Poppy Bakery, where we found Betsy (director of Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum) buying a pie.


the peach pie

the peach pie

I was there to buy cupcakes to take to an evening concert picnic.  Meanwhile, Allan bought some peaches.

at De Asis Farm and Produce

at De Asis Farm and Produce


our garden at the Port Office, with the hanging baskets from Basket Case Greenhouse

our garden at the Port Office, with the hanging baskets from Basket Case Greenhouse


and of course, a plug for our neighbours' business, Starvation Alley Farms.

and of course, a plug for our neighbours’ business, Starvation Alley Cranberry Farms.

We picked up the water trailer at the city yard for Allan to water the Ilwaco street trees and planters.  There was so much traffic that in order to get home, we swung up and over School Hill.  The view to the south showed the haze of smoke over Cape Disappointment, which would be our evening destination.

hazy smoky slightly eye burning atmosphere

hazy smoky slightly eye-burning atmosphere

While Allan watered Ilwaco, I watered the containers in our own garden and then worked on a blog post.  I had had a brainstorm that the lifting of the heavy battery onto the water trailer (which I had tried and failed to help Allan with) was the hardest part of using it, so I finally texted Nora’s grand daughter to ask if we could just park the trailer behind her gramma’s house.  Of course, she said yes, and now Allan can leave the battery on and charge it with a long cord.  I hope this will help protect his back.  That battery is ridiculously heavy.

the water trailer comes home to stay

the water trailer comes home to stay

So the day progressed toward an event I’d been looking forward since I heard The Winterlings play at the Music in the Gardens Tour back in July.

The Winterlings at Cape Disappointment

the closing concert of the annual summer series

the closing concert of the annual summer series


from The Winterlings Facebook page

from The Winterlings Facebook page

I had been smitten with this duo even before I heard them, based on this description of their music:

With songs as vivid as feature films, Seattle Alt-Folk duo The Winterlings take listeners on an unexpected journey through flooded barns and cedar forests, chemistry labs and ferries crossing Puget Sound.”

During the garden tour, I had not had time to stop and listen to more than two songs, although their song Long May You Live had brought tears to my eyes.  I think it is because life is feeling shorter every year and because I wish that the people I know, and writers I love, would all live such a very long time.

Garden Tour Nancy and Phil joined us at the park.  It had been Nancy’s idea to make the event a picnic.

Nancy and Phil

Nancy and Phil arrive

We found a good picnic spot at the base of a small cliff.  With half an hour to go before the show, I took a short walk to take some photos of the setting.

Our picnic spot was along this trail.

Our picnic spot was along this trail.


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo, showing the amphitheater seating


Allan's photo: gathering with Phil and Nancy

Allan’s photo: gathering with Phil and Nancy

The trail to the Cedar Circle, designed by Maya Lin, is inset with a chant by the Chinook tribe.

DSC07501

DSC07503

 It goes on to say:

We call upon the waters that rim the earth, horizon to horizon,

that flow in our rivers and streams,

that fall on our gardens and field, and ask that they

Teach us and show us the way.

We call upon the land which grows our food,

the nurturing soil, the fertile fields,

the abundant gardens and orchards, and we ask that they

Teach us and show us the way.

 You can read the entire Chinook blessing here.

The blessing trail ends at the cedar circle.

DSC07522

Maya Lin's Cedar Circle

Maya Lin’s Cedar Circle


walking back to our picnic spot

walking back to our picnic spot behind and to the north of the amphitheater

Meanwhile, Allan had gone on an exploration walk of his own.

campground road, where no campfires are allowed at all this summer.

campground road, where no campfires are allowed at all this summer.


just over a few grass-clad sand dunes: Waikiki Beach

just over a few grass-clad sand dunes: Waikiki Beach

DSC04202

While we could no longer smell smoke because of a breeze that had come up, a haze still hung over the sun.

DSC04204

DSC04206

driftwood forts

driftwood forts

DSC04211

DSC04208

DSC04209

DSC04216

DSC04220

fishing off the jetty

fishing off the jetty


in the background: the concert area

way in the background toward the mid-right: the concert area


returning to the concert area

returning to the concert area


the setting (Allan's photo, looking southeast)

the setting (Allan’s photo, looking southeast)

Meanwhile, back at our picnic spot:

Nancy and her delicious pasta salad (Phil's recipe)

Nancy and her delicious pasta salad (Phil’s recipe)


vermicelli noodles, chicken, and other yumminess

vermicelli noodles, poached chicken breasts, and parsley and basil

A park ranger came around and gave each audience member a charming little lyrics book.

I love that the lyrics are this important.

I love that the lyrics are this important.

kite

More folks arrive from the beach.

More folks arrive from the beach.


audience (Allan's photo)

audience (Allan’s photo)

winter

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


ocean backdrop

ocean backdrop


the hazy sun (Allan's photo)

the hazy sun (Allan’s photo)


Dave and Melissa arrive (Allan's photo)

Dave and Melissa arrive (Allan’s photo)


our picnic nook

our picnic nook


Dave and Melissa

Dave and Melissa

dog

sweet dog in the audience (Allan's photo)

sweet dog in the audience (Allan’s photo)


"Puppies!" said Allan. Mel and I stood up to look.

“Puppies!” said Allan. Mel and I stood up to look.

pups

winterlings

(Allan's photo)

(Allan’s photo)  Nancy and me in the background; Phil is sitting on the rock.


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

The Winterlings asked us all to stand up and make the letter W with our arms and then took this photo:

photo courtesy The Winterlings

photo courtesy The Winterlings


the cliff behind us (Allan's photo)

the cliff behind us (Allan’s photo)


clifftop viewers

clifftop viewers


up and up like agile monkeys

up and up like agile monkeys


Someone else's elaborate picnic (Allan's photo)

Someone else’s elaborate picnic (Allan’s photo)


foreground: our friend Christl who managed the Eric Wiegardt Gallery, and her sister

our friend Christl who manages the Eric Wiegardt Gallery, and her sister (Allan’s photo)


dessert time! Pink Poppy Bakery peach and vanilla cream cupcakes.

dessert time! Pink Poppy Bakery peach and vanilla cream cupcakes, after the Phil and Nancy pasta salad and fruit bowls brought by Mel and Dave


ocean haze and ship

ocean haze and ship


glowing sunset over the trees

glowing sunset over the trees

The Winterlings

last

branches

playing under the moon

playing under the moon

Nancy and Phil had to leave at dusk to pen up their dear chickens. The crowd dwindled after sunset because of a rising cold wind. (The Winterlings said it was the windiest concert they had ever played.)

I found it well worth staying till the end.

end

end2

Their music affects me deeply, this time especially a song called All of the Good Things. Later, at home, I got equally misty eyed watching the video of the song.

Although I want to believe in something after death, I find it hard to visualize that possibility.  I am moved when someone else does in a way that makes some sense to me.  I am thinking of someone I knew who is very ill and of all the many good things about my grandmother and of a second chance to communicate with my mother (because I now remember more good things than bad) when I read these lyrics:

All of the Good Things

We will live again
light and shining
family of friends
truth unwinding

You’ll wear the dress I made
I’ll try your wings
we will remember
all of the good things

Writing letters
prayers and wishes made
we will understand
all of it someday

But in the meantime, love,
I choose to sing
I choose to remember
all of the good things

Flowered climbing vines
blooming toward the light
you left suddenly
we were all surprised

I heard your voice today
in this old machine
it made me remember
all of the good things

Copyright Amanda Birdsall, 2008

Later, I learned from Amanda that she wrote this song as “comfort for her grandfather when his dearest lifelong friend passed away” and that the photos in the video are of her family.  That made the song even more precious to me.

This duo does play around the Seattle area and probably in Portland, too.  Do try to find them.

The Winterlings website

The Winterlings Facebook page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Saturday, 27 December 2014

Allan made a breakfast of fresh egg from Garden Tour Nancy’s flock of hens.

subtle and lovely hues

subtle and lovely hues

Nancy had acquired a new chicken for Christmas!

Nancy had acquired a new chicken for Christmas!  (Nancy’s photo enhanced by Waterlogue)

Scrambled, the eggs were rich in colour.

Scrambled, the eggs were rich in colour.

In the kitchen window, the paperwhites had grown so tall that they were hidden behind the lacy valance.  I moved them down to sink level.

paperwhites

paperwhites

I spent the day blogging about Lisa’s party.  One more event was scheduled for the month: music at the Sou’wester Lodge on Saturday evening.

event

We drove up to the lodge past vintage trailers with holiday lights.

We drove up to the lodge past vintage trailers with holiday lights.

in the living room of the lodge

in the living room of the lodge

Allan's photo.  The room filled till every seat was taken.

Allan’s photo. The room filled till every seat was taken.

Allan's photo:  We were offered (and accepted) tasty little chocolate tarts.

Allan’s photo: We were offered (and accepted) tasty little chocolate tarts.

Sean Ogilvie

Sean Ogilvie

Allan's photo of a CD by Sean and friends

Allan’s photo of a CD by Sean and friends

Sean quietly sang maritime stories of fog, rivers, sails, waves, lighthouses, mariners.  He spoke of how he has been writing songs with his best friend since age 14 and he now has a fifteen year old daughter.  It’s too bad, I thought, that Montana Mary and I did not continue our 14-year-old musical collaboration.

Laura Gibson listens to a song about Sean's childhood.

Laura Gibson (right)  listens to a song about Sean’s childhood.  To the left sat Sean’s daughter and a friend.

Laura Gibson

Laura Gibson

Laura sang more gentle folk songs.  She said, “I don’t have very many upbeat songs so I have to strategically place them”.  She referred several times to The Gambler as being one of her favourite songs, one she might sing later that evening at the karaoke bar just down the block.  I was grateful she did not sing it at the Sou’wester as it is possibly my least favourite song.  She spoke of playing Cards Against Humanity with some young “whippersnappers” and how that had segued into a serious talk about senility (because part of the game was a joke about senility, to go along with jokes about rape, racism, and the Holocaust).  I wondered if she Laura felt the sense of despair about humans that I feel every time I hear that someone likes that game.  My sense of humour, and I do have one, so does not work that way. The usual wave of baffled disheartenment about the game’s popularity distracted me from the next song.  Even though I heard a couple of enthusiastic audience murmurings of “I LOVE that game”, I comforted myself with the realization that most of the gentle readers of this blog (all twenty of you!) would likely share my reaction.

audience

I was glad we had stirred ourselves out of the house to sit in the comfortable old lodge, and we intend to go back for more shows in 2015.

Sunday, 28 December 2014

A Facebook message reminded me that an imaginary friend was visiting the Peninsula, about to make the transition to being a “met in real life” friend.  Thus another social outing presented itself, having dinner at the Depot with Sonya and her friend Paul.  I had met Sonya online in gardening forums and email lists, probably including the old Rainyside Gardeners forum.  We now knew each other through Facebook and would finally meet over dinner at the Depot Restaurant.

First, I decided it was time for Christmas at home to be over.  Allan heartily agreed, saying “I’m ready to move on.”

Ed Strange dropped by for a visit and said he was on his way home to also put away Christmas.

Ed Strange dropped by for a visit and said he was on his way home to also put away Christmas.

It was a relief to have the tree put away and access to my gardening books restored.

It was a relief to have the tree and ornaments and wreaths stored away and access to my gardening books restored.

The only hint of Christmas left indoors was Garden Tour Nancy’s chicken Christmas card (too cute to put away yet) and the beautifully decorated Joy Cup candy that was sent to us by Allan’s Aunt Dorothy and Uncle Hal.

joy

joy2

Allan took some sunset photos from the back garden.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

With the house restored to cozy everyday life, we departed for the Depot.

Sonya and Paul

Sonya and Paul

Over 30 years ago, Sonya and I frequented many of the same places such as the old Monastery all ages dance club in Seattle.  We conversed about the present day, having gone over the old days when we first met online.

Among our selections of delicious dinner fare:

Allan and Paul had the salmon special.

Allan and Paul had the salmon special.

I had a whole delicious bowl of Udon prawns to myself.

I had a whole delicious bowl of Udon prawns to myself.

Allan's espresso chocolate pot de creme.  (The rest of us had eggnog flan.)

Allan’s espresso chocolate pot de creme. (The rest of us had eggnog flan.)

Over appetizers (oysters, crab mac, and carne asada), Sonya showed me the photos she had taken today whilst she and Paul took a long bike ride on the Discovery Trail through the dunes from Long Beach all the way to a walk up to the North Head Lighthouse.  She says I can share them with you.  Here’s a breath of fresh air, much needed since I’ve been mostly staying home reading.

photo by Sonya Reasor

photo by Sonya Reasor

North Head Lighthouse, photo by Sonya Reasor

North Head Lighthouse, photo by Sonya Reasor

photo by Sonya Reasor

photo by Sonya Reasor

photo by Sonya Reasor

photo by Sonya Reasor

photo by Sonya Reasor

photo by Sonya Reasor

"Fantastic sunset - we spent the day riding bikes along the Discovery Trail. Some of the most beautiful ocean views I've ever seen. "  photo by Sonya Reasor

“Fantastic sunset – we spent the day riding bikes along the Discovery Trail. Some of the most beautiful ocean views I’ve ever seen. ” photo by Sonya Reasor

photo by Sonya Reasor

photo by Sonya Reasor

Monday, 29 December 2014

Cold weather and a good book kept me indoors again.

bright cold sun cast strong shadows on the porch across the street

bright cold sun cast strong shadows on the porch across the street

I’ve been turning into such a night person, and have had increasing insomnia, with reading till 4 AM and not being able to sleep till 6 AM, so I am not seeing much daylight.

rustia shadows

rustia shadows

This schedule simply must change in January, as I have garden clean up to do at home before work begins anew in February.  Meanwhile, I have stacks of books to read and the wee morning hours are the most peaceful time.  In the last few days and nights, I’ve read these excellent books:

echo

widow

lydia

small

Despite it being so well written, I don't think I loved this one as much as friends hoped I would.

Despite it being so well written, I don’t think I loved this one as much as friends hoped I would.

Tuesday, 30 December 2014

While I read The Signature of All Things, Allan took down the most Christmasy of the exterior lights (icicles and strings of multi coloured bulbs).  We will leave some plain white and some purple lights up for special occasions all year.  It was so cold out (just below freezing, which is cold by our standards) that he had to take several breaks.  He did notice with interest that I had a clematis in bloom on the west side of the garage.  It is ‘Freckles’, and it is normal for it to bloom in winter.

Freckles

Freckles

photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Wednesday, 31 December 2014

Once again, as the year closes, and as I have done many times this year, I wrote a long thing (dirge? sludge? mortification? revelation?) about emotions, friendship, the changing of the year, and more and then deleted it because, well, I suppose this is a gardening blog, after all.  This time, I saved it all to a draft while I consider publishing it or not.  Instead, here is an excellent post by a friend of mine on her own revelations about having to give up the dream of a perfect white picket fence family.  This paragraph, about friends lost through divorce, especially spoke to me:  “Some people are lifelong friends and some are not AND THAT is OK. … Maybe I should add on my to-do list: lift less weight.  Or drop the bars, turn the page and start writing a new story. Change the characters, develop a better plot, think through the hero’s crux with more purpose, and seek positive resolution. Good writers abandon dead end plots and sequences to invent newer, more bold and brave context to draw in the audience. I am officially discarding the text with no purpose and intentionally interacting with my tale with nothing but LOVE and LIGHT.”  

Meanwhile, the rest of today will consist of this:

I thank Kathleen for recommending it as the first 50 pages are utterly gripping .  500 to go, and it's due on Friday!

I thank Kathleen for recommending it as the first 50 pages are utterly gripping . 500 to go, and it’s due on Friday!

My plan is to next share a garden visit that is planned for New Year’s Day, as our big plans for New Year’s evening involve watching a movie (Baraka: A World Beyond Words), followed by the Seattle fireworks on telly.  As the New Year begins, I hope to share some of my favourite passages from the books I’ve been reading.  Wishing you the best possible 2015.

 

 

Read Full Post »

iconic beach house

iconic beach house

Continuing our summer of weekend camping trips, off we went again in June, this time to the Long Beach Peninsula, where I was completely smitten with the area. I had not been there since age 18.  The last I had been here, I had taken the photo at left, in awe of this beautiful weathered beach house that my friend Mary and I had happened upon when we got a bit lost looking for a dune trail to town from the beach.   I had a copy of this photo tacked to my wall for the next 20 years to remind myself that I had then formed a dream of living on the “North Beach Peninsula” as it was then known.  But it had become just a nice photo on the wall, not a dream that inspired me to do anything about it.

Immediately upon our arrival in town, Robert and I ate at My Mom’s Pie, a quaint café housed in a double wide trailer along the roadside.  Here we had some glimpses

Robert, van camping

Robert, van camping

of incompatibility.  Robert had insisted on dropping acid (which he probably got from Matthew) on the drive down.  This terrified me.  While I did not judge the use of recreational drugs, I did not personally enjoy them.  I implored him to at least wait til we got to our destination, but he popped the tab into his mouth somewhere around South Bend.  I remember looking across the table at him in the café; he was a little high and exuberant and I felt worried, but suppressed it.  He was so witty, so creative, so much fun, and we all have bad habits, don’t we? Also, he was awfully cute.

We camped at Fort Canby State Park, (now Cape Disappointment State Park) and being by the ocean was lovely as it always is.

campsite

campsite

Robert with our camp stove

Robert with our camp stove (and my Ramones t shirt)

our campsite at Fort Canby

our campsite at Fort Canby

beach bouquet on the picnic table

beach bouquet on the picnic table

Benson Beach at the campground, with North Head Lighthouse

Benson Beach at the campground, with North Head Lighthouse

sand in our shoes

sand in his shoes

me on the beach

me on the beach

dunes of the Long Beach Peninsula

dunes of the Long Beach Peninsula

The next morning we drove through Ilwaco and did not even go into the town because it did not grab our interest.  But as soon as we got to the town of Long Beach, I remembered the dream of moving there.

the Long Beach Arch, 1991

the Long Beach Arch, 1991

Long Beach Boardwalk

Long Beach Boardwalk

(Then and now, I did not like seeing cars on the beach.)

looking from the boardwalk back to town

looking from the boardwalk back to town

Of course, if I could have seen into the future, there would be a garden along that road with me weeding all the way along it.  Where you can just see a line of posts to the west side of the arch, above,  is where the beach approach garden is today.

in Long Beach

in Long Beach

And again, a time machine ride to not so distant future would have seen shown planters evenly spaced all along the downtown street, below, and me and Allan taking care of them.

fun rides downtown

fun rides downtown

Marsh's Free Museum

Marsh’s Free Museum

Marsh’s Museum even then was famously the home of Jake the Alligator Man.

Near downtown, I fell in love with this little pink house…which 21 and a half years later is pretty much derelict and the garden has disappeared.

pink house

pink house

The garden below also caught my fancy and is another that slowly disappeared over the years.

1991

1991

With a time machine, I could have seen this:

2013

2013

(“Gardening is the only art form that dies with the owner.”  Or something like that.)

We took a drive up to Ledbetter Point State Park and walked from the bay to the ocean.

Willapa Bay

Willapa Bay

bay grass

bay grass

Leadbetter wild flowers

Leadbetter wild flowers

It started so well, our walk to the ocean.  But what a long, long walk it was, guided by the sound of ocean waves.  We got off the main trail (which I later learned was common then; some time after we moved here, there was a project to get the trails better marked to save tourists from getting lost.)    We seemed to be on a small deer trail, trying to find our way west.ocean beach at Leadbetter

The ocean beach, when we finally got there, was isolated and private and had no cars and we found many sand dollars and then decided to return to our starting point by the bay.  We had seen bear scat on the way across, and some yanked up little shrubs, and Robert said, “That’s a hungry bear.”   So we tried to cut back across the dunes and avoid the woods, and then got thoroughly lost.  I later realized we had crossed at the widest point.  The mosquitos were fierce and we had to wade through little sloughs.  The sun was threatening to set and I was SO happy to see the bayside at last.

the curve of Willapa Bay at Leadbetter Point

the curve of Willapa Bay at Leadbetter Point

On our way back down to the park, we stopped at a little Seaview pub called The Heron and Beaver.  Wet and cold from wading through the sloughs we had a soothing warm drink and a sandwich and then collapsed back at our campground.

next morning: a kite flyer on the beach

next morning: a kite flyer on the beach

Our misadventure did not sour me on the beach life at all.  The next morning we had a last walk on Benson Beach and headed out…only to have our clutch cable break in Long Beach where we had sidetracked looking for coffee.  Rain had begun.  Robert walked down to Peninsula Auto Repair and was lucky to get a VW clutch cable, and installed it lying under the van by the highway.  And that was our VW van repair for that trip.

Back in the city, I dreamed of the beach, but had not yet gotten to the point of bringing real estate pamphlets home with me.

Read Full Post »