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Posts Tagged ‘Captain Bob’s Chowder’

Friday, 1 March 2019

With midmorning weather a bit warmer than predicted, we headed out for a big rose pruning job in Long Beach.

On the way, I requested a sudden parking stop so I could pull a lopsided woody old Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ from an Ilwaco planter.

In Fifth Street Park, Allan pruned the good, healthy, floriferous Super Dorothy climbing rose in the SW quadrant while I pruned the pitiful, mildew-prune Dorothy Perkins in the NW quadrant.

Before

After

Before

Allan kindly wheeled the trailer over as if it were a wheelbarrow and picked up my pile of rose canes while I went on to pull loads of hesperantha (new name for schizostylis), a roving perennial that I loathe in spring and love when it blooms well into autumn.

After pulling loads of hesperantha, a tiresome task

Allan’s photos from his pruning:

Before dumping our full load of thorny debris, we took a break for delicious crab rolls at Captain Bob’s Chowder, conveniently located right behind the park.

At City Works, Allan bucketed up some river rocks to finish off the edge of the Heron Pond.

On the way home, we parked at Ilwaco’s First and Main intersection, where Allan yanked out four more old Erysimum.

Ilwaco planter clean up is on the work list. I am waiting to trim back the small perennials because we are supposed to have nights down to 28 degrees through early next week.

My great big plan is to replace the Erysimums with plants so drought tolerant that Allan will only have to water them once a week instead of every three days. Because of a limited budget, I am thinking of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and ‘Strawberries and Cream’, which I can get for free out of my own garden. I am a bit concerned that the deer will graze on them and that they will look bad for a little while after I give them their Chelsea Chop. A bonus is that they won’t need deadheading.

Perhaps some citizens will be grumpy that the planters might be less interesting than they were with purple-spiked Erysimum. I am reminded of the time when a local group (of ladies) informed me they would like to take on the Ilwaco planters so that all would match with the same plants (tricky when plants get stolen. Or chomped by deer). I responded sincerely that I would be thrilled to pass the planters on to them, and that they would need to take on watering them as well, with thirty five gallon buckets of water every three days. (This was before we had the water trailer.) I never heard another word about that volunteer plan.

I myself was grumpy (again) earlier this week when I heard that someone who had offered to “volunteer” on the Long Beach planters had been overheard to say that the planters did not “look nice.” To be honest, it hurts me feelers.

He was probably referring to the beach approach planters. We have already had a quick look at them in February (a drive by) during which I saw some empty holes where we had planted sea thrifts last autumn.

I look forward to three years from now seeing what someone else (whoever replaces us when we semi-retire) does with those planters. Meanwhile, I have little patience for the complainers because we are doing our absolute best with the situation. It is not my place to organize the bureaucratic rigamarole involved with allowing volunteer work, but it would be interesting even now to see how long a volunteer would take to become disheartened out on the beach approach.

When we got home, I was able to erase two items from the work board.

I opened a package that had come in the mail from old Seattle friends Maggie and Susan and found a lovely edition of a book, which I happily perused over my cup of Builders Tea. They had been thinning out their books and had thought of me.

We look forward to taking the weekend off. I hope that by next week the nights warm up to above freezing; as soon as that happens, the private gardens that need clipping back will each get a visit.

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Friday, 24 November 2017

I was determined to polish off the work list no matter what the weather.

First, we walked out into our garden to collect some red twig dogwood stems for decorating.

Damp and faded hardy fuchsias are still hanging on.

autumn colour on cotinus (smokebush)

another big branch down

Next door, the tarp had blown off the gear shed crab pot stack.

lots of little branch pieces lying about

As we departed, rain fell heavily.  My Dark Sky app said it would last for 15 minutes, and then we’d have forty minutes before it returned.

The Depot Restaurant

We sat in the parking lot, waiting out the squall.

The building in view is Oceanside Animal Clinic.

Our mission was, in part, to remove the annuals from the north side window boxes and barrels (expertly planted by Roxanne of The Basket Case Greenhouse).  They are still blooming. It is fully autumn now, and I am tired of summer annuals.  The roof overhang keeps them dry even when it rains, so they have be checked on at least once a week.  I want something spare and seasonal and no maintenance for the winter.

before

before; note the wide roof overhang

after

Just a bit of red twig dogwood decor. It would be even better if I had some pine cones.

Allan pruned the Lonicera ‘Baggeson’s Gold’ and the escallonia.

before

after (escallonia not shown here)

autumnal garden, north side of dining deck

We did some general tidying and some pruning around the house next door that serves as the Depot office (a tree with branches that were hitting the side of the building, and some pulling of an old patch of crocosmia).  We recommended that Chef Michael hire Sea Star Gardening for a more extensive pruning of the tree.

Even though we’d had more non-rainy time than Dark Sky had predicted, the weather looked damp again as we headed to…

The Anchorage Cottages.

A windy rain squall greeted us there, and made the first fifteen minutes of work challenging.  I had thought it would be time to cut back the chrysanthemums by the office window.  No, they had barely begun to bloom, so this will not be our last visit of the year.

office window

Allan had begun by pulling some cosmos in the south courtyard.

before, valiant cosmos still trying to bloom

after. (Allan’s photos). Next year, a pool of some sort of bright and well behaved ground cover (hakonechloa maybe?) might look better around that Japanese maple.

I almost gave up on finishing the garden tidying because of the cold windy rain.  A brightening sky gave me hope, and the weather cleared.

Allan trimmed the lady’s mantle and geraniums along the front of the bed near the office.

before

after (Allan’s photos)

Even though I was trying to be merciless, some annuals still looked too good to pull.

center courtyard after today’s big tidy[/caption
Anchorage window reflection:

Captain Bob’s Chowder
At almost dusk, we rewarded ourselves and celebrated the start of staycation with a late lunch at Captain Bob’s, behind Fifth Street Park.

[caption id="attachment_132999" align="aligncenter" width="500"] a Renee O’Connor crab sidewalk tile in the park (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Cathy of Captain Bob’s was down to just one crab roll.  Allan kindly let me have the crab roll and ordered fish and chips instead.  Cathy thought that the last of the crab salad did not make for a big enough crab roll, so she gave me a piece of delicious fish on the side.

crab roll

Allan’s fish and chips

Fifth and Pacific intersection after our meal

Half a block south, we admired the lights of the Herb ‘n Legend Smoke Shop, complementing the city’s decorations.

At home, It was too dark to offload the trailer load of compostable debris that we’d acquired at today’s jobs. I was able to erase The Depot from the post frost clean up.  There’s nothing left there that frost would make look bad.  All that is left on the work list is the post-frost go-round…if frost arrives.  Or a pre-Christmas go-round if we don’t get frost.  That won’t take more than two days, probably only one and a half.  Unless some special request from a client arrives, and unless Long Beach gets a pile of mulch that needs applying, we are now off work till the end of January, giving me plenty of time for my list of home garden projects.

I stopped counting the weeks to staycation when my best cat, Smoky, got sick.  I’m not as ecstatic at having this time at home as I usually am.  The other three cats will enjoy the company … not as much as Smoky did, and I will miss him during my reading days.  I have a blog post memorial to him planned, with photos through the years…when I can manage it.  Meanwhile, our first week of staycation should be busy enough to provide some blog fodder, a week that culminates in Ilwaco’s Crab Pot Tree Festival.

event poster by Don Nisbett

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Thursday, 24 August 2017

We skipped deadheading the welcome sign (south of town), firmly reminding ourselves to remember it on the way home.  I was eager to get out to the kite festival again.  Today’s events featured an exhibition of handmade kites.

Washington State International Kite Festival

this year’s festival poster

The judging was still ongoing when we got to the beach, and because we had much watering still to do, we didn’t actually see many of the handmade kites.  However, here are a couple of old photos of kites from the 1993 festival that still are strong in my memory.

flying colours kites by George Peters

Aztec Calendar by Michael Alverez

Today:

booths along the Bolstad beach approach road

a big sand shovel being carried to the beach (Allan’s photo)

A “rescue” Great Dane (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

“Beach Books” booth

one of several booths featuring fair food (Allan’s photo)

wind chimes

banners for sale, made by Above it All Kites

at the South Pacific County Humane Society booth

In the World Kite Museum tent, an eclipse flag was being raffled.

volunteer fire fighter at the ready (Allan’s photo)

koi banner out on the beach

giant kites

Not enough wind to get the giant rings and large animals flying.

rings and creatures on a previous year and windier day

Kite fliers and teams set up their “territories” on the beach.

Allan’s photo

stunt kites waiting to fly

a man….

…and his kite

kite flyer (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

On this same day, a talented local photographer shared this stunning kite:

photo by Janelle Hux

Walking back to town along the approach garden, I was so pleased to see roses still blooming.  This garden gets no supplemental water.

Rosa rugosa alba

Back in town….

Long Beach City Hall

fuchsias overhanging the fence in Coulter Park, where we park for kite festival.

Allan and I shook off the holiday Kite Festival feeling and parted ways to water, with Allan doing the planters on the south end of downtown and me doing the north ones.

still my favourite planter

Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’

trolley passing by shuttling folks to Kite Festival (art by Don Nisbett)

the first chrysanthemum blooms by NIVA green

As I watered, a woman approached and asked “Do you do the gardens at KBC?”  She stays at Klipsan Beach Cottages once a year, where Mary had given us credit for our gardening work there.  She works at Swansons, my favourite Seattle nursery of yore, and specializes in trees and shrubs and loves conifers.  We had a good long talk.  I recommended that she look up the posts here about the Bayside Garden, the home of a “conifer man” (John).  “I’m a conifer woman!” she said.

Here’s a link to a tour of Steve and John’s garden that showcases conifers, rhododendrons, and more.

I wish my planters had more cutting edge collectors plants.  I mostly make do with what I can get around here.

Both Allan and I found the evidence of someone flower-picking their way through town without a responsible adult saying no.

These flowers came from more than one planter and from under one of the trees.

Allan’s photo

Despite that bit of flower scattering, the workday was a pleasant one.  Kite Festival always seems to draw the happiest crowd of any Long Beach event.

a kite painted rock

Allan’s photo

Gladiolus papilio (Allan’s photo)

Gladiolus papilio (Allan’s photo)

We met up in Fifth Street Park and did some garden tidying (Allan more than me because he got there first).

NW quadrant

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and Chelone (pink turtlehead)

Rose ‘Super Dorothy’ before deadheading (Allan’s photo)

We felt that we were making good time and so rewarded ourselves with crab rolls at Captain Bob’s Chowder, which is temptingly located behind the park.

at Captain Bob’s

Sid Snyder planters needed watering next.

The trail ride horses were being gathered up to go home.

Westernmost Sid Snyder Drive planter (Allan’s photos)

The water is still turned off in this one.

gazania

Feel quite accomplished to be done with Long Beach before five o clock, we headed south to water in…

Ilwaco

Allan left me at the boatyard to water while he got the water trailer and did the street trees and planters.

Allan’s photo

At the boatyard, this pretty salmon colored four o clock reminds me of Lorna and Andersen’s RV Park.  When we gardened for her there, we acquired salmon, apricot and peach coloured flowers for her.  This was from  a seed packet, most of which got planted at Andersens.  Lorna lives in Seattle now.  She might bring her grandchildren to see our garden this weekend.

Mirabilis jalapa ‘Salmon Sunset’

Pennisetum macrourum from behind the fence

Miscanthus and Stipa gigantea

Joy! Hoses were again available to water the north end of the garden from the inside.

I had time to weed and deadhead almost the entire north stretch of the garden.

looking north, about 1/3 of the garden

blue skies, not too warm, almost windless

Unfortunately, half way through my weeding, I suddenly remembered: WELCOME SIGN.

Allan’s photo: the fire station planter

When we reunited, we drove home to leave the trailer behind.

our neighbour Jeff from two doors down was taking his boat for an outing.

Long Beach (again)

We did find many a deadhead when we returned to Long Beach’s welcome sign.

As a consolation for driving north again, we treated ourselves to dinner at

The Depot Restaurant.

I had three of my favourites from the summer menu:

Asian salad

gazpacho

 

We shared Carne asada.

clam chowder for Allan

We sat at the end of the bar.

It wasn’t till later that I realized we had treated ourselves twice today, once to reward ourselves for allegedly getting done with Long Beach early, and once to comfort ourselves because we had forgotten an important work task.

I took this photo in the dark as we left, to show the colour echo of green on Petunia ‘Pretty Much Picasso” and the chartreuse sweet potato vine in a container planted by Basket Case Roxanne.  For some reason, I like its blurriness.  YMMV.

Now…three days off.  I thought it would be four, but with 70 degree weather all weekend, we can’t leave the next watering day till Tuesday.

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 18 February 2017

Long Beach

I had big plans to get four things crossed off the work list.  We started with the tree that has pesky rugosa roses and with the planter nearest to it.

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planter yesterday

After cutting out the poky thing by the bench, I felt inspired to remove as much hesperantha and tired old ornamental grass as possible.

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Allan helping with the biggest grass

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during

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after

Meanwhile, Allan went after the annoying patch of volunteer rugosa roses, roots and all.  (Because they are pesky and the roots run like fury, we will have to watch for returning sprouts.)

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before

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a thuggish rose

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after

Next, we wanted to polish off the first spring clean up of Fifth Street Park.

Allan started with the hydrangea in the southeast corner.

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before

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Allan’s photos: before

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after

I wanted the right hand one a little more upright.  Easy to fix later.

It was a busy day because of a three day weekend.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

My first project was the patch of hesperantha (formerly schizostylis) by the restroom.

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before

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after

By pulling a lot of the hesperantha, and getting its annoying self out of the other plants (like Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, which Allan clipped after the above photo), we will still have plenty for next fall while having a tidier garden bed now.

I did the same to the nearby street tree garden:

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before

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after

In a nearby planter, I found…

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a tiny painted rock

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and emerging tulip foliage.

The northwest quadrant of the park also got a hesperantha going-over.

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before

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after

summer.jpg

Here’s what it looks like on a good summer day. (This was in 2014.)

Allan had joined me before I finished.  We’d got caught in a torrent of rain but had an escape at hand.

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inside Captain Bob’s  Chowder

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looking out: clean up abandoned for half an hour

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delicious fish tacos (before applying a yummy creamy tequila sauce)

As the rain intensity decreased, my Dark Sky app was accurate about it stopping in 15 minutes.  The prediction of drizzle for the following hour was, happily, inaccurate.

IMG_0125.PNG

By the end of the rain squall, I knew we would only get two out of four planned projects done today.  The temperature had dropped and a chilly wind kicked up.  We went to the two northernmost blocks and finished the planters and street trees.

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crocuses and iris reticulata (Allan’s photo)

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Iris reticulata ‘Clairette’

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Iris reticulata

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crocuses

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more crocuses

In the last planter of the day, we cut back the escallonia. Why a volunteer, back in the day, planted Escallonia ‘Pink Princess’ in two of the planters is beyond me.  It would like to be at least 15 feet tall.  By chopping it hard now, I won’t have to be clipping it all summer long.

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halfway done

and I did NOT see that piece of trash till I looked at this photo!  (Later: Allan says he saw it and disposed of it.)

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done… The green santolina on each end also got clipped.

Before we dumped our full load of debris, I popped into NIVA green (my favourite shop).  Almost a month ago I had taken some photos for its Facebook page.  Every time I chose photos to post, I could not bear to post one of a copper clad “stump” because I wanted it for myself.  It was a bit pricey and yet it had haunted me. Would it still be there a month later?

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in mid January

Yes! Twice,  people had put holds on it and then not come back to pick it up.

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It is mine now!  (It’s hollow copper clad aluminium, I’m told, so probably not for outdoors.)

Just after we dumped our debris, as Allan was locking the gate of the city works yard, the rain returned.  Perfect timing.

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At home, I got to erase two items but not the pond and popouts.  Maybe tomorrow, or maybe not with wind and rain predicted.

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Thursday, 11 August 2016

I woke at eight, after five fitful hours of sleep, with huge anxiety about our cat world.  Would Skooter adjust? Would he run away?  How can he bear to be kept indoors for a week to bond with the house?  Will the other cats and he get along ok?  (Will anyone start spraying in the house?)

Frosty meows outside the bedroom door, not happy that his tunnel is blocked off. (Allan's photo)

Frosty meows outside the bedroom door, not happy that his tunnel is blocked off. (Allan’s photo)

I asked for advice on Facebook and got some excellent ideas over the course of the day, including not letting the cats pick up on my stress about the whole thing.  I hope to have the patience to follow Geni’s advice:  “I have a protocol for new cat introductions that has served me very very well. We isolate New Cat in a room with food, water, litterbox and a comfy place to sleep (and we visit often). The door on the room has a small screen section at the bottom, which we cover with a towel for the first week or so. When they can sniff noses through the towel and not growl and snarl, then we roll the towel up so they can see one another. Then we slowly introduce the existing cats, one at a time, to New Cat’s room under close supervision. When they can either interact peacefully or ignore one another, then we start allowing New Cat supervised access out into the house. Only when that is fairly peaceful do we allow the door to be opened when we’re not there. It takes two or three weeks, but it’s the abrupt introduction of a new rival that causes most of the issues; slow and steady wins.”

I’d been planning to skip The Red Barn and Diane’s garden this week, just from sheer laziness and the fact that the good rain meant we did not have to check on watering.  On the way to work in Long Beach, Allan pointed out that there were no doubt daisies to deadhead, so we went after all.

The Red Barn

shasta daisies (Allan's photo)

shasta daisies (Allan’s photo)

Helianthus 'Lemon Queen' (blooming low because of not getting the amount of water that makes it tall) Allan's photo

Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ (blooming low because of not getting the amount of water that makes it tall) Allan’s photo

Diane and a horse shoer. Misty is eating hoof shavings.

Diane with a farrier at work. Misty is eating hoof shavings.

two blond dogs at the Red Barn (Allan's photo)

two blond dogs at the Red Barn (Allan’s photo)

Diane’s garden

Diane's roadside garden

Diane’s roadside garden

Sedum 'Autumn Joy' and the heather that inspired the roadside garden.

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and the heather that inspired the roadside garden.

I did get rid of the horribly rusty Lavatera ‘Barnsley’ at the corner of the house.

the diseased debris in our trailer (me not happy about putting it in there)

the diseased debris in our trailer (me not happy about putting it in there)

the still healthy lavatera by the road

the still healthy lavatera by the road

driveway view without the lavatera at the corner of the house

driveway view without the lavatera at the corner of the house

our good friend Misty

our good friend Misty

Long Beach

In Long Beach town, we started with city hall.  Lots of people will be walking by next week during Kite Festival, which begins Monday.  Then came the watering of the Long Beach planters while Allan watered the street trees.  The rain had saved us an entire day of work by making it so that the planters only needed watering once this week.  We’d had the sort of good hard rain that gets down underneath the foliage.

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Allan’s photo

Our watering days have now been shifted to Mondays and Thursdays, with Fridays off.  Even though I’ll miss going to the Friday farmer’s market, it will work out well because  Fridays will be extra busy in town for the next four weeks.

reflection in Funland window

reflection in Funland window

rugosa rose hips under one street tree where the roses just appeared and took hold. (Allan's photo)

rugosa rose hips under one street tree where the roses just appeared and took hold. (Allan’s photo)

Somebody bent the verbascum (Allan's photo)

Somebody bent the verbascum (Allan’s photo)

a Basket Case Greenhouse basket (Allan's photo)

a Basket Case Greenhouse basket (Allan’s photo)

painting and last weekend's sand art in Fish Alley

painting and last weekend’s sand art in Fish Alley

Fish Alley

Fish Alley

Fish Alley

Fish Alley

beach town supplies at Stormin' Norman's

beach town supplies at Stormin’ Norman’s

the planter that got run into last week

the planter that got run into last week

I had not realized it was this badly cracked. (Allan saw it after it happened.)

I had not realized it was this badly cracked. (Allan saw it after it happened.)

Gladiolus papilio in Fifth Street Park (Allan's photo)

Gladiolus papilio in Fifth Street Park (Allan’s photo)

After finishing with the main street planters and deadheading and weeding Fifth Street Park, I felt so in need of a break that I suggested we have delicious crab rolls at Captain Bob’s Chowder despite also needing to get all the work done.  Allan readily agreed.

scrumptious and refreshing

scrumptious and refreshing

After lunch, we simply had to get some bucket water onto the four westernmost planters on the Bolstad approach.  After filling at Coulter Park, each planter got two buckets full.  There will be no possibility of watering out there when the Kite Festival booths are in place.

Bolstad approach planters: pretty sad with just occasional bucket water

Bolstad approach planters: pretty sad with just occasional bucket water

on the way to the beach (Allan's photo)

on the way to the beach (Allan’s photo)

I was about to call Long Beach done except for watering the Sid Snyder beach approach planters when I remembered we also needed to groom the tiny pocket garden at the World Kite Museum because…Kite Festival.

Kite Museum pocket garden

Kite Museum pocket garden

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The cosmos are doing well because gift shop manager Patty keeps them deadheaded and watered.  We just had to do a little touch up.

just west of the Kite Museum (Allan's photo)

just west of the Kite Museum (Allan’s photo)

On the way to Ilwaco (where Allan still had to water), he remembered that we had to deadhead the Long Beach welcome sign.

welcome sign with Echibeckias at their best.

welcome sign with Echibeckias at their best.

echibeckias

echibeckias

Just like last year, now that they are blooming I wish I had planted more, more, more Echineckia all over the place.

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Echibeckias

Echibeckias

the back of the sign

the back of the sign

Ilwaco

We took a break to test out new dangly elastic string cat toys we’d bought at Dennis Co today.  Jackson Galaxy (My Cat From Hell) recommends them to defuse cat tension.  I realized I just don’t PLAY with my cats.  They usually entertain themselves.

Smokey and Frosty notice the toy.

Smokey and Frosty notice the toy.  Frosty was the one who responded the most. (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

The toy had a profound effect on Frosty, who had been acting scared since Skooter entered the house (even though they have not met yet).  He had refused to be petted or touched for two days.  After this playtime, he was back to his usual affectionate and confident self.

Allan still had to go out and water the Ilwaco planters.  While he did, I went to Mary and Jeff’s garden two doors down and pulled out the landscape fabric from the front garden (at her request; I’m not just blithely imperializing the garden).

sorry for the blur. I was giddy at the joy of removing landscape fabric, which is fine under a path but loathsome in a garden bed.

sorry for the blur. I was giddy at the joy of removing landscape fabric, which is fine under a path but loathsome in a garden bed.

Allan watered until dark…

the planter at Peninsula Sanitation Building (Allan's photo)

the planter at Peninsula Sanitation building (Allan’s photo) with painted sage, diascia, violas

The reward for the long day will be having the next three days off.


ginger

1995 (age 71):

August 11: Burned all the papers in barrel.  Dave was right—the ugly blue color burned off.  Put the determinate tomatoes back into greenhouse under lights to see if I can get some paste tomatoes to dry.  Replanted “late” begonias into baskets already on both porches.  Was in the shop (her late husband Bruce’s haven for puttering and building things) looking for a large S hook and it was sad seeing his notes etc.

1997 (age 73):

August 11:  2:00 to 7:45 with time out to eat  After Don left I went back to work planting more seeds.  I’ve done most of them, probably one more day.  Don brought me some Walla Walla onions from the plants I gave him.  We just visited—too hot to do any chores.

1998 (age 74):

August 11:  HOT  At 7:30 AM I wanted to get up so I could get more strawberry plants planted but rolled over and went back to sleep until 9:00 again.  I planted seedlings along the front porch and in the patio, being sure to keep in the shade.  I even went after my dinner (cottage cheese with fruit) and planted up until almost dark.  Applied lots of slug bait.

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I invite you to come with us through a whole work week in two posts, so I have some hope of getting closer to the present day.  Work is repetitive now, mostly watering and deadheading.

Monday, 3 August 2015

Ilwaco Post Office garden

Ilwaco Post Office garden

Long Beach

We've stepped up the deadheading of the welcome sign to twice a week.

We’ve stepped up the deadheading of the welcome sign to twice a week.

Echibeckia is a real do-er although I'm not sure if the colour is good here.

Echibeckia is a real do-er although I’m not sure if the colour is good here.

The godetia is almost over at the curb.

The godetia is almost over at the curb.

There is a geocache hidden in this wall. Hint: look above the cigarette butt.

There is a geocache hidden in this wall. Hint: look above and to the right of the cigarette butt.

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Sometimes people dig at the end of the garden looking for this.

Downtown: The shasta daisies in the Fifth Street Park planter, chosen and planted by a volunteer years ago, have got to go.  For now, they are trimmed.

before

before

after: They are a surprisingly thirsty plant. Water twice a week is not enough to keep them from looking crispy.

after: They are a surprisingly thirsty plant. Water twice a week is not enough to keep them from looking crispy.

This sweetheart's name is Fred, waiting for his person who was in the Long Beach Tavern.

This sweetheart’s name is Fred, waiting for his person who was in the Long Beach Tavern.

A gaura reseeded on the curb of a planter.

A gaura reseeded on the curb of a planter.

reseeded from this one

reseeded from this one

Why is this cosmos wilting??

Why is this cosmos wilting??

Because someone pulled it out and it was sitting on the top of the soil. Too dry and warm to transplant it...it was a loss.

Because someone pulled it out and it was sitting on the top of the soil. Too dry and warm to transplant it…it was a loss.

POPPED into NIVA green, my favourite shop, for some photos.

POPPED into NIVA green, my favourite shop, for some photos.

DSC03543

Brass Ops, a military band from Portland, played cheerful tunes at Veterans Field.

Brass Ops, a military band from Portland, played cheerful tunes at Veterans Field.

Brass Ops

Brass Ops

an appreciative audience member

an appreciative audience member

I got awfully hungry, and pondered the nearby food establishments.  I did not feel I had time to stop for food when there was a sandwich in our lunch box in the van.

Hungry Harbor Grille....

Hungry Harbor Grille….

Pizza and hot dogs...all tempting... I made it to the van for the sandwich.

Pizza and hot dogs…all tempting… I made it to the van for the sandwich.

Allan's photo of the planter by the pizza slice and hot dog place.

Allan’s photo of the planter by the pizza slice and hot dog place.

Allan's photo: Hungry Harbor planter (perhaps too many reseeded California poppies

Allan’s photo: Hungry Harbor planter (perhaps too many) reseeded California poppies

Allan's photo: so crowded in town that there was a line outside Castaways

Allan’s photo: so crowded in town that there was a line outside Castaways

Allan's photo: Zoltar waiting to tell your fortune

Allan’s photo: Zoltar waiting to tell your fortune

at Stormin' Norman's kite shop

at Stormin’ Norman’s kite shop

Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies' in Fifth Street Park

Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’ in Fifth Street Park

On the deer trail, Seventh South, planter nasturtiums are getting nibbled.

On the deer trail, Seventh South, planter nasturtiums are getting nibbled. If I had been as hungry as before  I’d had my sandwich, I might have been tempted to eat them myself.

The deer in question (Allan's photo)

The deer in question (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo, tourists following the baby deer while their mom is in the background

The mother parked her babies in some brambles and took a walk. (Allan's photo) Maybe seeking some peace and quiet.

The mother parked her babies in some brambles and took a walk. (Allan’s photo) Maybe seeking some peace and quiet.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Blue on blue, Agastache 'Estella Indigo' and Geranium 'Rozanne'

Blue on blue, Agastache ‘Estella Indigo’ and Geranium ‘Rozanne’

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

While I was still watering, Allan deadheaded the Super Dorothy rose in Fifth Street Park.

before

before

after: Did he go too far?

after: Did he go too far?

Allan suggested we take a break and have crab rolls at Captain Bob's Chowder, so we did.

Allan suggested we take a break and have crab rolls at Captain Bob’s Chowder, so we did.

I was so hungry still that I scarfed the delicious food down with no photo.  It’s a good looking crab roll, too.

Penttila’s Chapel

We finally found time to weed the Penttila's Chapel garden.

We finally found time to weed the Penttila’s Chapel garden.

The sprinkler system is not working well. Physocarpus (the dark leaved shrub) is proving to be drought-resistant like a champ.

The sprinkler system is not working well. Physocarpus (the dark leaved shrub) is proving to be drought-resistant like a champ.

The weeds were not growing much in dry soil. We got this many.

The weeds were not growing much in dry soil. We got this many, mostly horsetail.

Tuesday, 4 August 2015

Today was a somber day because we learned that former port manager Jim Neva had died of cancer.  He was a visionary about the Ilwaco gardens and initiated and supported our bringing back the boatyard garden to its former glory and remaking the Howerton Avenue gardens.  Outside of our small world of gardening, he’d been determined in his work to get funding for port dredging and other local needs, even after he had “retired”, and on top of that he was a lot of fun.  I felt saddened all week that he had just retired as full-time port manager in late 2013 and did not get to enjoy years of beachside life with his beloved wife, Jet, in Hawaii.

Mayor Mike’s garden

We got more cllmbing rose out of Mike's pine tree. Looks more like a tree now.

We got more cllmbing rose out of Mike’s pine tree. Looks more like a tree now. (right side)

ongoing project: clipping some of the old growth from the climbing rose

two weeks ago: last time we were there

There is still one thick stem of old growth that I am inclined to leave.

There is still one thick stem of old growth that I am inclined to leave.

Mike's garden is clearly getting enough water to be happy.

Mike’s garden is clearly getting enough water to be happy.

Mike's front garden

Mike’s front garden with Geranium ‘Rozanne’

lilies and Geranium 'Rozanne'

lilies and Geranium ‘Rozanne’

The Ilwaco Boatyard

We spent the rest of the day on the Ilwaco boatyard, with Allan and me both weeding and pulling out annual poppies.  Suddenly it looks like a garden of shapes instead of a wildflower garden.

My somber mood about Jim’s death led to not many photos.

The shapes of the santolina and lavenders and catmint show up now.

The shapes of the santolina and lavenders and catmint show up now.

Toward the end of the day, Allan watered the Ilwaco planters and street trees while I watered the boatyard garden.

tonight's watering obstacle course

tonight’s watering obstacle course

 

 

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Thursday, 9 July 2015

The Depot Restaurant

watering and weeding the Depot garden

watering and weeding the Depot garden

north side of deck

north side of deck

depot2

Dierama (Angel's Fishing Rod)

Dierama (Angel’s Fishing Rod)

Dierama is the star of the show right now.

Dierama is the star of the show right now.

dierama

Dierama and Nicotiana langsdorfii (backed with Lonicera ‘Baggeson’s Gold’

further admiration

further admiration

the front with planting by Nancy of Basket Case Greenhouse

the front with planting by Nancy of Basket Case Greenhouse

Long Beach 

the welcome sign

the welcome sign, front: Cosmos ‘Sonata’, Bidens, Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’

from the sidewalk

from the sidewalk (godetia in foreground)

I hope Parks Manager Mike has noticed the godetia; he likes it.

I hope Parks Manager Mike has noticed the godetia; he likes it.

welcome sign, back

welcome sign, back: Cosmos ‘Sonata’ and white bacopa

We knew that an art show would be held in the Coulter Park historic train depot over the weekend, so Allan pulled the birds foot trefoil out from among the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ there.

This area is tricky to get into because of the new railing, so we've let the Crocosmia totally take it over.

This area is tricky to get into because of the new railing, so we’ve let the Crocosmia totally take it over.

the birds foot trefoil is as beautiful as the crocosmia, too bad it is seen as a weed here.

the birds foot trefoil is as beautiful as the crocosmia, too bad it is seen as a weed here.

such a pretty weed

such a pretty weed

after: now more acceptable to the public

after: now more acceptable to the public

after2

more Crocosmia down the block

more Crocosmia down the block

Next, some weeding at Long Beach City Hall.

looking west

looking west

Gladiolus nanus

Gladiolus nanus

gladiolus nanus

gladiolus nanus

west side, Gene and Peggy's planting of Crocosmia

west side, Gene and Peggy’s planting of Crocosmia

rosemary and lavatera

rosemary and lavatera with Nicotiana langsdorfii (lower right)

a different gladiolus nanus

a different gladiolus nanus

Allan's photo: deadheading Armeria maritima (sea thrift)

Allan’s photos: deadheading Armeria maritima (sea thrift), before

after

after

The tragic thing was that I was going to pull that whole clump out, as it is infested with creeping buttercup and is rather old and tatty…but I forgot till he had already deadheaded it, so I left it alone.

Next: watering the city planters.

dog

a Basket Case basket

a Basket Case basket

Resolved: redo and improve the planter by my favourite shop, NIVA green, next year.

Resolved: redo and improve the planter by my favourite shop, NIVA green, next year.  It is blah.

Kudos to Scoopers ice cream for making this planting by the sidewalk.

Kudos to Scoopers ice cream for making this planting by the sidewalk.

I want the NIVA planter be more like this one.  It is, however, less sheltered than this one.

I want the NIVA planter be more like this one. It is, however, less sheltered than this one.

Cosmos 'Sonata' with Agastache

Cosmos ‘Sonata’ with Agastache

Cosmos, Agastache, Fuchsia 'Golden Gate', blue bacopa

Cosmos, Agastache, Fuchsia ‘Golden Gate’, blue and white bacopa, Salvia viridis

same planter from the sidewalk

same planter from the sidewalk

Fuchsia 'Golden Gate'

Fuchsia ‘Golden Gate’

Not so nice: the tree garden outside Dennis Co was trampled in some way.

Not so nice: the tree garden outside Dennis Co was trampled in some way.

It still has one good side with a helianthemum.

It still has one good side with a helianthemum.

Heather from NIVA green came strolling up the street with her little dog, Buzz.

Heather from NIVA green came strolling up the street with her little dog, Buzz.

I admired my favourite planter from the other side of the street.

I admired my favourite planter from the other side of the street.

didn't have time to sit a spell at NIVA green...

didn’t have time to sit a spell at NIVA green…

Allan's photo: tigridia by the carousel

Allan’s photo: tigridia by the carousel

I relished the increasingly cool, grey weather.

I relished the increasingly cool, grey weather.

outside Captain Bob's Chowder

outside Captain Bob’s Chowder

We did a quick weeding and fluffing of Fifth Street Park and then heading south to water in…

Ilwaco

I watered the boatyard garden and then did some weeding there, while Allan watered the street trees and planters in town.

at the boatyard...

at the boatyard…

...a departure

…a departure

...and the Marine Travelift just squeaks by where Allan is parked filling up the water trailer.

…and the Marine Travelift just squeaks by where Allan is parked filling up the water trailer.

Allan's photo as the travelift eases by.

Allan’s photo as the travelift eases by.

I have to water from behind the fence, which is frustrating when I see weeds.

I have to water from behind the fence, which is frustrating when I see weeds.

in the boatyard

in the boatyard: the watering obstacle course

looking north from the boatyard gate

looking north from the boatyard gate

south end of boatyard garden

south end of boatyard garden

Horsetail and bindweed are the curse of this garden.  The rose campion does not like the dry soil.

Horsetail and bindweed are the curse of this garden. The rose campion does not like the dry soil.

Santolinas are poised to be the stars of the garden when I pull the poppies.

Santolinas are poised to be the stars of the garden when I pull the poppies.

santolina, rose campion, achillea, poppies

santolina, rose campion, achillea, poppies

blue catananche

north end

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

santolina and pink achillea (yarrow)

santolina and pink achillea (yarrow)

The Cove Restaurant

At seven thirty, we met Dave and Melissa of Sea Star Landscape Maintenance for our tradition, which now includes catching up with them on a week’s worth of happenings in the garden.

Allan's noodle bowl

Allan’s vegetable stir fry with chicken

Dave's lomo saltado

Dave’s lomo saltado

my ahi tuna

my ahi tuna

Dave and Allan dig in.

Dave and Allan dig in.  Melissa had the delicious Prawns solo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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