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Posts Tagged ‘Cathy Peterson’

 

In May or June, I took a road trip with Mary from Klipsan Beach Cottages.

Joy Creek Nursery, Scappoose

We stopped at Joy Creek Nursery, of course…

Joy Creek 2001

Joy Creek 2001

Joy Creek border

Joy Creek border

Lake Oswego (and a sad story)

Mary and I stayed at Sharon’s new townhome on the edge of Lake Oswego near Portland. In her divorce case, her  soon to be ex claimed the arbour Robert had built for her, on commission, purchased with her money. It was attached to the house porch railing with two screws, which made it part of the household.  She had to buy it from him for the same price that she had originally paid to Robert, so she bought it twice!   (I had remembered Robert having to build her a second one, but no, she just repurchased the original.)  She was still sad about losing the wonderful garden we had made at her former home on the bay.  Her new rented home had little space for gardening. I had testified at the trial that all the plants had been purchased with Sharon’s money, so she was allowed to take some, most of which took refuge in my garden and the gardens at China Beach Retreat and Klipsan Beach Cottages.  The ex had then sprayed the garden area (still with many plants and bulbs) with Casaron and then covered the area with landscape fabric and river rock.  Goodbye to all the lilies, tulips, alliums and narcissi.

Sharon's double price arbour

Sharon’s double price arbour

Lucy Hardiman’s garden in Portland

Sharon wanted to show me the Hawthorne neighbourhood in Portland so the three of us went there for an afternoon.   I remembered that Lucy Hardiman (from whom Sharon and I had taken three workshops over the past couple of years) lived near there, and we found her address through the phone book.   Such garden celebrity stalkers we were!  Sharon, Mary and I were nosing around Lucy’s well known sidewalk garden (she calls it a “garden approach” rather than “a garden retreat”) when she saw us from her upstairs window and invited us in.

Below, we walked around the side of the house…

entering the garden

entering the garden

and the garden is revealed.

Lucy's back garden

Lucy’s back garden

looking to the house from the arbour

looking to the house from the arbour

Lucy had a VERY sweet dog.   You may be disappointed if you click to enlarge the photo;  unfortunately, my scans appear to be small.

containers in Lucy's garden

containers in Lucy’s garden

Lucy had begun to make mosaic pieces.

Lucy had begun to make mosaic pieces.

mosaic table

mosaic table

I was very taken with the shrub (below) but even though I have bought a couple since then, I have never managed to grow it successfully.  When I returned to tour Lucy’s garden some years later, the shrub was gone so it may be rather tender.

Cestrum

Cestrum

bronze fennel....now called by some a noxious weed

bronze fennel….now called by some a noxious weed because it reseeds so freely

The tiny paths in the back of her garden made me feel better about the little tiny path running up the north side of mine.

tiny secret path

tiny secret path

pots

pots on Lucy’s deck

We lingered by the beautiful sidewalk garden atop a stone wall.   Ludy often tells in lectures how she and Fred saved for years to have the wall done.

atop the wall

atop the wall

atop the wall: Origanum rotundifolium (ornamental oregano)

atop the wall: Origanum rotundifolium (ornamental oregano)

In one of her garden show slide presentations, I had first seen, growing on this wall, Salvia viridis (painted sage) and Cerinthe purpurascens, still two of my three favourite annuals.  (Number three?  Cosmos, of course!)

The centerpiece of the wall is the famous heart that reaches out to passersby.  It is overgrown with a plant in this photo:

Lucy's wall

Lucy’s wall

Another favourite Lucy story of mine is how she would sit above the wall in a hidden area behind some shrubs and listen to people’s comments about the garden.

Heirloom Roses in St. Paul

On the second day of our road trip we went to Heirloom Roses, in St Paul, Oregon, where the front arbour was more thickly covered than on my previous visits.

shop entrance

shop entrance, with cat

Below:  I think the pillar rose is Eden, which Mary of KBC fell for hard but which never grew well for us at the beach.  The flowers are so full that in our damp air, they browned off before opening fully.

Eden

Eden? and a clematis

at Heirloom Roses

at Heirloom Roses

somebody's roses!

roses

roses trained and free

roses trained and free

Ferguson’s Fragrant Nursery

We also went to the wonderful Ferguson’s Fragrant Nursery nearby.

at Ferguson's

at Ferguson’s

2001 was the year that Cathy Peterson, who wrote a weekly gardening column for the Daily Astorian, asked me if I would organize a garden tour for her and some friends, and I did.  Such fun it was!   My garden was on it, and Sheila helped me get it weeded and cleaned up in time.  I also featured Seagarden,  Patti’s garden, The Shelburne, Jo’s Long Beach garden, and Klipsan Beach Cottages.  I have no photos to show that it ever happened, but I do recall that we all had dinner on the deck at the Depot restaurant afterwards, and Cathy bought my dinner as a thank you.   I believe she wrote something about it, and it would be so wonderful if I could find it.  Why is my file cabinet of gardening articles no longer in alphabetical order?  Next winter’s project!

A few years later, Cathy retired from writing for the Astorian.  Someone else took over “In the Garden” and wrote two excellent columns, and then the Astorian dropped the column altogether.  I still miss it.  A lot.

 

A digression:  The Depot restaurant had been bought the year before by two young locals and had turned into a very good restaurant.  Before, during the year 1993 when we lived at the Sou’wester, it had been a noisy tavern with much drunken whooping every night at closing time.  Then it had sat vacant for several years.   We were so happy to see it revived.   It became the restaurant we know today (our favourite!) after Michael Lalewicz and Nancy Gorshe bought it a few years later.   Below, the Depot in 2000:

The Depot, the previous year (2000)

The Depot well before it had its north side gardens.

The Depot well before it had its north side gardens.

Below, in 2000:  The new garden being created by the new owners, Nat and Domique, and by Dirk Sweringen of the nearby English nursery. I ended up pruning these ornamental grasses every spring. They make a great rustling privacy screen for the outdoor deck.

Depot ornamental grasses, 2000

Depot ornamental grasses, 2000

 

 

 

 

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The Astoria Garden Tour is put on by  a society whose focus is preservation historic homes rather than hortheads.  So forgive me if I say that in 2008 I ended up saving only these few photos from the tour…2008 was not the tour’s most impressive year.

two gardens

(left) the garden with dog and interesting container display is a gardening business down a hard to find road.  For years I kept their beautiful business card…..something Moon??  They had a fascinating collection of container plants and I remember a good water feature down by the street….

I liked the middle garden’s waterfall cascading through a couple of ponds down a shady ferny slope.  I remember talking with the homeowner, a woman older than me, about chronic dizziness (brought up by my choosing to go around the edge path rather than back down the steep steps).  She had suffered from it for years.  Happily mine passed by 2011, mostly.  The righthand photo is from the same garden on the very top of the slope.  When I saw the greenhouse I remembered I had been in the garden before the waterfall had been built.  It must have been on a previous tour and a far different garden without the lovely water feature.

The best garden for me was one I had lucked into seeing several years earlier, back when the Daily Astorian had an excellent weekly column called “In the Garden” (and why they dropped it is beyond me; I loved it and read it first thing every week in the Coast Weekend section).  The author’s name was…can I remember? Cathy Peterson maybe? and I had corresponded with her a bit in e-mail.  Oh!  She interviewed Robert and me for the paper once!  And my webmistress saved it on our website…Yes, Cathy Peterson….What a great weekly column she wrote.  When she retired from the column, the Astoria brought in a new writer who wrote at least two very good columns (one was about installing an old garden shed into her new Ilwaco garden lot)…and then the column was dropped.  I remain flummoxed and think of it every time we drive by the Ilwaco house with the old shed.

Cathy and an Astorian gardener named Jessica (whose business had a charming name like Wyndlesham gardens or something like that and whose clever slogan was “hand tool gardening”) spirited us away from the tour that year to see a non-tour garden up and over the hill in an area of more modern homes.  I have now slowly worked to my point:  In 2008 that garden was again on the tour and had it not been such a bright, hard to photograph day, I would have more photos of it.

by the sidewalk

Golden foliage brightens the gardens in front of the house and the Alliums are the sure sign of someone who appreciates good plants.

by the deck

The back yard has sunny beds around the inviting deck.

on the deck

The deck has a prow shape, good for standing as on a ship and overlooking the garden.

The garden falls away in the back to shady woods which are not particularly planted up but do have the occasional decorative touch.

in the woods

On the left is a good idea for camouflaging a black plastic pot and on the left, a statue makes a focal point in an old outdoor fireplace.

After visiting so many gardens in June and July I felt a little bereft at the end of the Astoria tour.  I had one more open day to look forward it in our own garden and in less than a month we would luck into a surprisingly excellent tour of gardens not far from Astoria.

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