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Posts Tagged ‘Cerinthe major purpurascens’

Wednesday, 9 May 2018

The day began with so much rain that, when Dark Sky said the rain would go on for a half hour, I took the opportunity to watch an episode of Gardeners’ World before work.

I want this pond:

It reminds me of the dream ponds that my Grandma put in her scrap book, and never realized in real life.  You can see her dreams, here.

I would like to make that dream come true in my own garden.

When the rain stopped, I would rather have stayed home with Skooter.

But off to work we did go. We had had this much rain since late yesterday afternoon:

When Allan went to fetch the wheelbarrow and retrieve tools I had left out, he discovered the mess I had left behind yesterday:

Allan’s photo

And also, what I had accomplished:

newly planted nicotianas (Allan’s photo)

As always, we stopped at the post office for our mail.

Ilwaco post office

We deposited some checks at Bank of the Pacific, where Allan noticed this plant life in the front entry:

Long Beach

We began the planting of agastaches, reddish ones (‘Sangria’ and ‘Mexican Giant’) in the Veterans Field gardens.

I was quite annoyed that during the parade events last weekend, a path had been made through the garden, flattening one area of plants.  This was after Allan fluffed it up:

Two plants (an overwintered agastache and a phygelius) had been smashed to such oblivion that only I knew they were there, flattened.

Allan found an apropos rock as I grumped about quitting public gardening.

Also we planted three Helenium ‘Mardi Gras’ in the corner garden.

It was tremendously, uncomfortably windy.

Allan’s photo

We began planting assorted agastaches as the centerpiece in the planters.

Allium christophii survived Sunday’s parade!

Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’ still going strong

tourists and Lewis and Clark

Amazingly, we got every planter agastached except for the L&C Square planter.

a tattered Tulip ‘Cummins’ (Allan’s photo)

Tulip ‘Formosa’ (Allan’s photo)

Tulip ‘Strong Gold’ still blooming (Allan’s photo)

the pond by Pacific Realty (Allan’s photo)

more Tulip ‘Strong Gold’ (Allan’s photo)

a chat with Heather of our favourite shop, NIVA green

We also got six Nicotianas planted in the NE bed of Fifth Street Park.

Allan’s photo, cerinthe and Dutch iris

a gladiolus and Cerinthe major purpurascens (Allan’s photo)

On the way home, we stopped by

The Shelburne Hotel

just to look over the fence and see what weeds awaited us there tomorrow.

not too bad!

A guest or diner emerging from the front door walked by and said to her companion, “Oh, I just love this, it’s like an English garden.”

Success.

At home, I realized that the flowers of my Davidia involucrata ‘Sonoma’ ARE white this year.  They started out small and greenish, and have elongated and turned very white, but are mostly hidden by the leaves.

So far, since I uncaged it, the deer have not nibbled it at all even though they have browsed plants around it.  (It is outside the deer fence.)

inside the fence, Tulip ‘Night Rider’, the last tulips of all

I only got one more episode of Gardeners’ World at the end of the day.

Some recent notes from watching GW:

The famous Sissinghurst garden had changed over the years to accommodate the many visitors, with roses no longer overhanging the paths.  It is now being revamped to be more like its original, wilder vision.

A guest presenter, in talking of the many gardening projects that can be done in autumn, said “Some think that autumn is time to cut the plants down, get inside by the fire and put the crumpets on.”

Must have plant: Althaea cannabina.

In 2016, Monty Don said “This is the first time I’ve needed glasses to prune my raspberries.”  He was 62 at the time.

I was relieved in the late evening to hear rain; I had been fretting that maybe we had not watered the new agastaches well enough.

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Friday, 22 April 2016

The day began so rainy that I thought it might allow us to only get some essential Long Beach deadheading done.  The weather-induced late start meant that we did not get to Klipsan Beach Cottages and Golden Sands gardens as intended.  I told myself that they would surely be fine for five more days or so.

The Planter Box

We took the time to go to The Planter Box and use the rainy mid morning to clip back our cosmos being grown in the back green house.  It is so wonderful to have few enough jobs that I actually have time, for the first time in several years, to check on the cosmos now and “pinch” it.

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Allan’s photo


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at The Planter Box


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trimming the cosmos to make it bushier and not leggy; will start planting it around Mother’s Day.  This can be done by “pinching” with fingers or with clippers.

Long Beach

The weather, while windy, cleared up enough to make it possible to finish deadheading the Long Beach planters (started on Wednesday) and Veterans Field.

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Tulip ‘Formosa’ (and an old ‘Bleu Aimable’


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rhododendrons and the Long Beach gazebo


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Cerinthe major purpurascens across from the police station


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planter with golden oregano about to get too rampant


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Dutch iris (Allan’s photo)


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Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’, N. ‘New Baby’, Tulip ‘Strong Gold’


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I’m excited about the new to me me ‘New Baby’ narcissus, late blooming to go with ‘Baby Moon’

 

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Sadly, no time for lunch at the delicious Kabob Cottage


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Allan got two buckets of weeds out of the Vet Field beds.  (Allan’s photo)


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Vet Field garden (Allan’s photo)

Having gotten enough deadheading and weeding done to move on, we addressed the drifts of spent tulips in the Long Beach welcome sign planter.

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before

We made a trip to city works with the debris (lots of horsetail) and got enough soil to fluff up the front of the sign, and planted some geraniums ‘Rozanne’ alternating with ‘Orion’ (which is supposed to be even better than Rozanne).  I consider it too early to plant the annuals which will fill it out.

I had realized partway through that it was high time to dig out the thickly multiplied narcissi along the front.  It had gotten too thick and tall.  I moved some to the back and put some in buckets. Next fall, we will have the tulips in front.  Now, I have three buckets of extra narcissi to plant on the berms (something I don’t in the least feel like doing but I shall).  It was hard work and I know I missed some bulbs so will be removing more in the fall.

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after

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before, with lots of horsetail


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after; have used up my mulch pile and need more.

We weeded the west side of Fifth Street Park and I finished up the east side while Allan went back to the difficult center berm weeding job.

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Fifth Street Park, NE side


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I disturbed this little one’s evening.


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The nice guy from the Title Company and I were discussing how the BadAster keeps coming back.

I joined Allan at the berm where he was struggling with slow progress in hard packed thick weeds.

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before (Allan’s photo)


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Allan’s photo

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I found that even the heavy pick swung full force simply bounced off the weeds and so I got out the string trimmer in a state of high dudgeon.

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strimmed…good enough?


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after (Allan’s photo)

While dumping weeds at city works (again), I pondered further about how I felt that string trimming was just not good enough to allow the erasure of the third berm from the work board, even though I so want to, and then had a flash of hope: Perhaps next week, I can get that weedy “lawn” out with the half moon edger!  I’d even bought some poppy seeds to plant if only we could get the ground clear.  HUMANS WILL WIN!  (I hope.)

We had carried some plants for the planters around all day and had not got them planted, nor had I gotten more than just a few narcissi replanted in the south berm, nor had I remembered to take a photo of the rather good looking south berm, nor had we made it to KBC or Golden Sands at all.  Even so, I declared a three day weekend because life is short.

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at home (Allan’s photo)

Allan captured the intense sunset. 




For those who like the Grandma Scrapbooks blog, I’ve published a new post there.

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1995 (age 71):

April 22: Finished planting 9in pots) the rest of the Foster Farms.  Planted the pansy plants in baskets.  Planted the fuchsia plants in baskets.

1997 (age 73):

April 22:  gray and damp.  Went out to plant strawberries but ended up working on one row moving new daughter plants from middle of row and trimming and/or replanting other plants within the row.  After about 2 hours I was rained in.

1998 (age 74):

April 22 noon-5:00   I worked all this time transplanting tomato seedlings into pots using compost with mushroom compost.  When I thought it was 3:00 and I came in to take a break and was surprised to see it was 5:00 so I closed up shop and came in.  Rec’d the fall Dutch Gardens catalog!

 

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When the Long Beach planters were installed years ago, no plan had been made for their planting and maintenance.  A volunteer “adopt a planter” program began with enthusiastic participants.  Unfortunately, because the enthusiasm tended to not last through the summers, the planters became weedy and unwatered by June.  Finally, a few years ago, we were asked to take over the planting and maintenance of all of them (36 on the main street, and maybe 20 more out on the beach approaches).  Because volunteers chose different plants, some of the planters still have full sized shrubs including non-dwarf barberries, escallonia, variegated euonymous, azaleas, and other too-large choices.  Each year, we re-do a couple of the planters.  In 2016, our mission is to make the planters on the two beach approaches better.  We experience more wind and salt out there, much more vandalism,  and a need, on the Bolstadt approach, to be completely drought tolerant, so wish us luck!

All of the hanging baskets are by Nancy Aust of the Basket Case Greenhouse.

Here are some photos of the planters through 2015.  If you click on a photo to embiggen it, you will get back and forth navigation arrows.

 

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Friday, 1 May 2015

We were down to the wire for getting Long Beach ready for parade day on Sunday.   Usually, we have Saturday afternoon after the Ilwaco parade to make one more go-round of Long Beach.  This year, I knew the Rhodie Tour would consume all of Saturday.

Before Long Beach, I wanted to get one more old trailing rosemary out of the Ilwaco planters.  To my horror, I realized they were already so dry that either we needed to water them today or on Sunday.  So as not to be worried about them all during Saturday, I decided on watering today.  We did not have time to get the water trailer organized so it had to be bucket watering; that takes at least 45 minutes less than using the water pump trailer but is much harder on aging backs.

dry

dry

Allan using up the water from a jug we carry with us in the van.

Allan using up the water from a jug we carry with us in the van.

We no longer have enough water buckets for this big project; this time, we would skip the street trees.

Filling buckets at the boatyard: We no longer have enough water buckets for this big project; this time, we would skip the street trees.

meanwhile....

meanwhile….

more bucket filling

more bucket filling

the Southern Cross looming overhead

the Southern Cross looming overhead

Having to bucket water was stressful, so we were squabbling from the get go today.  Some days are like that, as any couple who lives and works together would probably tell you.

After we got at least 2 gallons of water onto each of the 26 planters, we were able to head north.  The only thing standing between us and Long Beach was a quick check up on the garden at The Depot Restaurant.  There, we found the painters about to start.  To our surprise, one of them was the neighbour of our client Marilyn up in Surfside.  This makes sense when I think about it, because Marilyn is the mother of Nancy who co-owns the Depot.  (Nancy’s spouse, Michael, is the chef.)

The other painter, here about to pressure wash, was being very careful about the garden.

The other painter, here about to pressure wash, was being very careful about the garden.

We did not linger after deadheading a few narcissi.  Next up was a substantial clean up of the Long Beach welcome sign bed.  It was a mess.  Most of the May flowering tulips that I can usually count on to be in full bloom for parade weekend had already gone over due to our early spring (climate change or a one-off fluke?) and it was too early to plant annuals.

before

before

after.  We treat the tulips as annuals and yank them right out.

after. We treat the tulips as annuals and yank them right out.

The back of the sign still has some tulips in bloom.

The back of the sign still has some tulips in bloom.

In downtown Long Beach, I got my new wheelie cart, provided by blog reader MaryBeth, ready for its first use.  She told me that in the UK, such a cart is called a garden trolley.  As an anglophile I am adopting this usage so garden trolley it is from now on.

My trolley.

My trolley.

I was able to carry a jug of water, a heavy container of Sluggo, a weed bucket, my hand tools, a few plants, and eventually a full bucket of weeds.  The trolley was so perfectly balanced that even when weighed down with weeds, I could move it with two fingers and my thumb.  It made the job almost heavenly.  I want to find a pockety-thing to tie onto the top to hold small tools and maybe seed packets.

I would have been in a world of pain if I had had to carry a heavy bucket of weeds all around town.  Allan and I had split off into separate tasks; he was weeding all the parks, including the gardens at Veterans Field, while I did all the planters and street trees.

Herb N Legend Smoke Shop and a new tattoo parlor

Herb N Legend Smoke Shop and a new tattoo parlor

In front of the smoke shop:  Cerinthe major purpurascens

In front of the smoke shop: Cerinthe major purpurascens

The workers at the Herb N Legend smoke shop are among the  friendliest and nicest of any of the shopkeepers on our planter route. Other especially nice folks are at Captain Bob’s Chowder, the Hungry Harbor Grille, Wind World Kites, and of course NIVA green.

California poppy by the smoke shop

California poppy by the smoke shop.  Yes, the damnable COLD north wind was blowing something fierce.

Sparaxis by the smoke shop

Sparaxis by the smoke shop

and Narcissus 'Baby Moon'

and Narcissus ‘Baby Moon’

Last night, driving through town to go to dinner at the Cove, I sang a little song to Baby Moon thanking it for still being in bloom for parade weekend.  It started so early this year that I was sure it would all be done by now.  About one third of the Baby Moons are still blooming.

The little dog who is the mascot of the smoke shop likes to delicately pick snails and bugs out of the planter.  He treats the plants carefully and is an excellent helper.

dog

my little camera shy friend

The planters all took much longer than I thought to remove every little weed.  By the time I got to the southernmost one, I was grateful to be able to nip in to use the loo at Northwest Financial, the business owned by our friend Shelly Pollock (who spearheads the Grass Roots Garbage Gang beach clean ups).  If you live locally, and need any help sorting out your ACA medical insurance, her assistance is invaluable and free.

Northwest Financial and Insurance

Northwest Financial and Insurance, and a rhododendron

tiny cupped narcissi...my favourite...still in bloom in front of Kompton's Mini Mart.

tiny cupped narcissi…my favourite…still in bloom in front of Kompton’s Mini Mart.

Tulip 'Florette' still blooming.

Tulip ‘Florette’ still blooming.

Florette is a star this year.

Florette is a star this year.

Asphodel going strong in Fifth Street Park

Asphodel going strong in Fifth Street Park

Allan was still toiling at Fifth Street Park.  I helped a bit, and he moved on to the parks on Third Street.  I planted some fill in sweet pea seeds at the back of the northwest quadrant.

Fifth Street Park

Fifth Street Park

Captain Bob's Chowder

Captain Bob’s Chowder

across from the carousel: windblown Tulip 'Akebono' barely holding on

across from the carousel: windblown Tulip ‘Akebono’ barely holding on.  You can see the flag blowing straight out in 20 mph the north wind.  Brrrr.

The only thing I do not like about living at the beach is the accursed cold wind.  My friends who are sailors are able to appreciate it.

Because I’m working on a “Rhodie Driving Tour” album for the Music in the Gardens Tour Facebook page, I got some photos of the rhododendrons in the parks at 3rd Street.

SW corner of park

SW corner of park

This big bright red one has bloomed and dropped its petals.

This big bright red one has bloomed and dropped its petals.

The parks department wants me to prune that rhodo, above, down to the height of the fence and I do. not. want. to do it.

 

Northwest corner behind the gazebo

Northwest corner behind the gazebo

with the new river rock landscaping

with the new river rock landscaping

from across the street, looking west at those two rhododendron lined parks

from across the street, looking west at those two rhododendron lined parks

behind me as I took the previous photo: Lewis and Clark square

behind me as I took the previous photo: Lewis and Clark square

The wall encircling the back of Lewis and Clark Square has a plaque for the places the explorers visited.

The wall encircling the back of Lewis and Clark Square has  plaques for the places the explorers visited.

Allan was far enough ahead of me to now to have already weeded the little park behind the wall.

Allan was far enough ahead of me to now to have already weeded the little park behind the wall.

He had found a bird nest in one of the shrubs (Allan's photo)

He had found a bird nest in one of the shrubs (Allan’s photo)

behind the wall, viewed from across the street by Veterans Field

behind the wall, viewed from across the street by Veterans Field

flower detail (Allan's photo)

flower detail (Allan’s photo)

street planter by Lewis and Clark Square, lots of little violas have reseeded

street planter by Lewis and Clark Square, lots of little violas have reseeded

In about a week, we will begin the annuals planting of all these street planters.  I thought of planting some diascias this week and then thought why? when plants along the edge would likely be sat upon during the parade.

As I worked my way north, I saw something mighty cute in the window of the Cottage Bakery.

cats

kittycar

I checked out the new location of Home at the Beach, now inside the Sandpiper Mall just south of the pharmacy.

Home at the Beach's new shop

Home at the Beach’s new shop

inside the tiny mall, a bench with a touching memorial plaque

inside the tiny mall, a bench with a touching memorial plaque

bench

Across the street, I noticed and ignored, for now, a big weedy sedge that has snuck in under the street trees.

I did not have a tool strong enough to remove the weedy sedge.  Next week, its time will come.

I did not have a tool strong enough to remove the weedy sedge. Next week, its time will come.  It has comouflaged itself among narciss and schizostylis.

Geranium 'A.T. Johnson' redeeming itself under a street tree.  It's one of the plants I have gone off over the years due to its weedy habits.

Geranium ‘A.T. Johnson’ redeeming itself under a street tree. It’s one of the plants I have gone off over the years due to its weedy habits.

in the window of the Long Beach Pharmacy

in the window of the Long Beach Pharmacy  (Chemist, in the UK)

Helianthemum 'Wisley Pink' about to bloom with a red leaved Armeria

a pink Helianthemum  about to bloom with a red leaved Armeria in a street planter by the stoplight

Across from Dennis Company in the northernmost block

Across from Dennis Company in the northernmost block with Tulip ‘Formosa’

By the time I got to the final block, Allan had finished the City Hall gardens and Coulter Park’s street side gardens and was helping to finish the planters.  The tulip ‘Formosa’ is in some places just starting to bloom.  I planted lots of it this year, but clearly not enough.

As we prepare to drive off, I notice a bright deciduous azalea behind the Coulter Park historic train depot.

As we prepare to drive off, I notice a bright deciduous azalea behind the Coulter Park historic train depot.

Our very last task, as the sun was about to set, was to check on the planters on the Bolstadt beach approach.

one of the beach planters

one of the beach planters with two heights of armeria (sea thrift)

On the way home we had a look at the sunset from the Seaview beach approach road near the Depot Restaurant.

sunset over a monkey tree

sunset over a monkey tree

One last rhododendron photo in Seaview, just south of the Sou'wester Lodge.

One last rhododendron photo in Seaview, just south of the Sou’wester Lodge.

Back when the house above belonged to an elderly artist named Marge Horner, I used to mow her lawn and clean for her occasionally.  I miss her.

All our parade and tour preparations were as done as they could be, and we could collapse and look forward to the rhodie tour tomorrow.  We would miss the Saturday Ilwaco parade because of the rhodie tour.  Because of needing time at home, we would skip the Sunday parade.  You can enjoy last year’s parade here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, 23 April 2015

Last weekend, while gardening at home, I realized that I have suddenly shifted into gardening mode and no longer even think with longing of a reading day off (because I’d rather get my garden weeded).  Today, suddenly it seemed a reading day had arrived.

wind graph on WindAlert, with driving sideways rain

wind graph on WindAlert, with driving sideways rain

The local airport forecast showed the wind dropping in the afternoon, and the several other weather apps that we check said that the sun would appear at 4 PM.

Ilwaco airport wind forecast

Ilwaco airport wind forecast

So I settled down to read, but restlessly, with an eye on the weather.

Tony Hillerman's daughter is doing a good job at carrying on his mystery series.

Tony Hillerman’s daughter is doing a good job at carrying on his mystery series.

The rain did stop, as predicted, at just before 4 PM, and we were off.  Allan took the opportunity to get another photo of the dogwood outside our kitchen window, with the flower of the wild cucumber vine.

Marah

Allan’s photo: Marah, wild cucumber vine, in dogwood.

I suppose we should get the cucumber vine out of there, as it has a massive root, leading to its also being known as “manroot” and “man underground”.

Ilwaco

Our very first project was to re-do the Ilwaco street planter that finally got moved back to the fire station.  It had been tucked up against a café where it did not show.  The fire station planter had been moved instead of the café one, after I’d promised the fire chief it would NOT be moved, so some musical planters was played by the city crew.

Allan's photo: before.

Allan’s photo: before: too many bulbs, and has catmint, which we are removing from the planters because it looks bad for awhile after its first flowering.

planter after

Allan’s photo: after, with Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ and diascia and violas and one little piece of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’

 

I broke up the rest of the Autumn Joy and ran it down the west side of the fire station in a narrow bed that had lots of empty (weedy) spaces.

after.  (We did not forget that extra bag of potting soil.)

after. (We did not forget that extra bag of potting soil.)

Since we were working just across the street from Nellie’s house, I wondered if I would catch her attention.  Sure enough, her husband came over and I went in to speak with her and she does indeed want us to do a spring clean up on her garden.  We will be happy to, although I had to tell her it might not be for over a week as we have a lot of prep to do before the May 2 and 3 city parades AND the Rhodie tour.  (Klipsan Beach Cottages is one of the tour gardens.)

Nelie's historic house

Nelie’s historic house

In case you’ve forgotten that the Rhodie tour tour is coming up soon:

rhodietour

Long Beach

Next, we had to deadhead all the planters and street tree gardens along the main highway in Long Beach.  I was mighty glad for the good evening weather, as I had noticed lots of dead narcissi flowers when driving home the previous evening.  I took some photos while we worked.  I did not need the green wheelie cart this time as we parked several times and worked fairly close to the van instead of walking the whole route.

lavender already in full bloom

lavender already in full bloom  (This is one of the few planters where we’ve allowed Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ to stay)

The first Geranium 'Rozanne' flower this year...very early

The first Geranium ‘Rozanne’ flower this year…very early

Cerinthe major purpurascens

Cerinthe major purpurascens

Tulip 'Florette' is a real do-er this year.

Tulip ‘Florette’ is a real do-er this year.

Asphodeline by Fifth Street Park

Asphodeline by Fifth Street Park

Gunnera in Fifth Street Park, already with a huge seedpod

Gunnera in Fifth Street Park, already with huge flowers

Darmera peltata and Gunnera.  Note to self: remember that Gunnera likes fertilizer.  Dan Hinkley said

Darmera peltata and Gunnera. Note to self: remember that Gunnera likes fertilizer. Dan Hinkley said “Feed the brute!”

Dutch iris in Fifth Street Park (north side)

Dutch iris in Fifth Street Park (north side)

another note to self:  Get this Carex OUT of the planter by the carousel!!!

another note to self: Get this Carex OUT of the planter by the carousel!!!

across from NIVA green: Tulip 'Green Wave'

across from NIVA green: Tulip ‘Green Wave’

on the NIVA green side: more Tulip 'Green Wave'

on the NIVA green side: more Tulip ‘Green Wave’

by the Elks lodge: a columbine left over from volunteer days

by the Elks lodge: a columbine left over from volunteer days

It was on this block, across the street, that a man walking his dog said, “Now that’s a good looking planter” about the boring one with two escallonias and creeping sedums (also leftover from volunteer days).  Then he said, “The planters on the beach approach are FULL of grass.”  I said, “That’s impossible; we weeded them last Friday.”  He said “Nope, they are FULL of grass and it looks terrible” and walked on.  He’d gotten about ten feet when my last nerve snapped and I said, “REALLY?”  He turned and I repeated that they were weeded last week, then said, “Do you mean the raised planters or do you mean the garden at ground level?”  “The ground,” said he. “The roses looked so good last year but now it is all grassy and the roses look beat up and need to be trimmed.”  I looked at him all goggle-eyed and said (in a calm enough tone that Allan, just up the block, though we were having a jolly chat), “I have no idea what to do about that.  We do the whole town of Long beach, and Ilwaco, and about ten resorts [that’s easier to say quickly than enumerating private gardens, resorts, and businesses] and we do not have TIME to weed the beach approach till later in the year so I really have no idea what can be done about it unless the city finds more weeders.”  “I wasn’t complaining,” said the man, walking on a faster clip.  I refrained from another “REALLY????”  As he departed, I remembered that I had seen his dog tied up for awhile in front of the Long Beach Tavern and wondered if beer had anything to do with his desire to inform me that the beach approach is not up to his standards.  (I could also have pointed out that those roses do not bloom till at least May AND that last year we did not get the darn garden, which takes about SIX DAYS to weed, done until sometime in July!!!

Fortunately, by this time we were almost done and I was able to go soothe my shattered nerves at…

The Cove Restaurant

in the foyer of The Cove

in the foyer of The Cove

We sat at the bar at about 7:30 PM and I was so lucky to get one of the last two servings of ahi tuna.  With no hard cider on tap, I had a Vortex beer from Astoria’s Fort George Brewery and Allan had a Guinness.

Strawberry salad...and Carmen at work

Strawberry salad…and Carmen at work

delicious food at the pass

delicious food at the pass

ahi tuna

ahi tuna

The tiny peppers to the left, above, were sweet and smoky and Chef Jason Lancaster told us they are Peruvian peppers.

Allan tried a new sandwich.  I had a bite (two!) of the pineapple slaw.  Delicious.

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Finally, at home, I had to take a dusk photo of the cutest little tiny cup narcissi on the garage wall.

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