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Posts Tagged ‘Cheri’s garden’

Monday, August 26, 2013

Late the previous evening,  Nora’s granddaughter Alicia and some friends arrived next door to spend Monday sorting out the house just south of my friend Judy’s.  It had belonged to Nora’s mother and, with a sale pending, had to have the last of its possessions moved out.  Before we left for work we met Alicia’s friend and four young lads.  They had been admiring the garden through the fence, and we invited them on a tour.

boys

I loved that they went right into the paths through the Bogsy Wood.

Mom follows the boys.

Mom follows the boys.

They were highly amused by the exploding seeds of the wild impatiens (touch me not).

Me encouraging them to dare to pop the seeds!

Me encouraging them to dare to pop the seeds!

seeds

Alicia photographs the action.

Alicia photographs the action.

from my window

from my window

Allan took a few photos as well.

trooping past the river of Rozanne

trooping past the river of Rozanne

Then Alicia and her friend went to work on the house-sorting while the boys were off to explore the river beach by Yellow Bluff at the east end of town and Allan and I went to Long Beach to deadhead and water the planters.

When I removed one of the faucet covers, I found a nest of snails.  (I always check for baby slugs.)  This ties in with Pam Fleming’s suggestion to put upside down black plastic pots in one’s garden as snail traps; they like the warmth and will congregate inside.

snail haven

snail haven

I find snails kind of cute and pretty, so they just went into the garbage can and probably crawled right back out and back into the planter.

h well, there is always something in Long Beach town to lift my spirits, and today it was the lovely signs outside of The Wooden Horse gift shop.

happy

sign

at the Wooden Horse

At Veterans Field I finally decided to cut back the Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’.  To me, the seedheads are cool and structural but to others they probably just look like old dead things.  The garden is still looking red white and blue.

Veterans Field, looking southeast

Veterans Field, looking south

Eryngium seedheads....chopped now

Eryngium seedheads….chopped now

While I worked on the little garden, the wind whipped up considerably…

wind of 20 mph plus

wind of 20 mph plus

My goal had been to get the Long Beach planters watered before the predicted rain came.  Usually rain is not strong enough to penetrate the soil through the dense foliage.  Today, however, the rain, when it came, was definitely strong.

a sudden torrent

a sudden torrent

We were watering and fertilizing at the same time, but after one more block, we gave up and went home!

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Now I have two hanging baskets!   Last night a friend who had to leave town after a summer beach house visit gave me hers.  (You know who you are, and thanks, but I am not going to blog that your house is empty!)

two baskets by the front porch

two baskets by the front porch

I would rather have stayed home and joined Mary on the cat bench….

mary

But instead we went to work.  We do enjoy our work but perhaps not as much as a day in  our own garden.

First, The Depot Restaurant.

The Depot...an overview

The Depot…an overview

Cosmos backed with a wall of hops

Cosmos backed with a wall of hops

Then we went to turn off the soaker hoses that had been lightly dripping for two days (through the rain as well) on the Sid Snyder Drive beach approach planters.   I decided that this particular planter is one that should be completely redone this fall.

across the street from the kite museum

across the street from the kite museum

The monoculture of creeping Jenny, planted by the previous volunteer, is so dull.

Next, Diane’s garden where the Lady’s Mantle was in that horrid stage….

before and after

before and after

waiting for moist fall weather so we can fill in this bed some more!

waiting for moist fall weather so we can fill in this bed some more!

The original impetus for Diane’s roadside garden was when she fell in love with this heather:

blooming now....

blooming now….

Even though I am not much of a heaths and heather fan (except on the moors of Scotland or in the gorgeous heather bank in this garden near Eugene, Oregon), I have to admit this one is a delight.  It came from The Planter Box.  I wanted it interplanted with complementary plants but so far the progress on this garden is slow…Perhaps next year it will leap!

Diane's driveway corner with Stipa gigantea

Diane’s driveway corner with Stipa gigantea

Next door at The Red Barn, Diane’s sister and niece were just riding up….

barn

and their nice dog came to greet me.

a whippet hello

a whippet hello from Disney

Next on the agenda:  Jo’s garden.  Coco was so happy to see us that I can’t decide which photo is cuter.

Coco!

Coco!

Jo pointed out that her rhododendron has very unusual flowers.

rhodo1

rhodo2

Some of the cosmos had fallen over in yesterday’s wind and rain storm and a few stems had broken.  One that we propped up had its flowers all cattywampus but we assumed it would straighten itself out (and it did).

after the storm

after the storm

Most of the cosmos had come through just fine.

a protected corner

a protected corner

One of Jo's friends

One of Jo’s friends

Here’s a new angle on Jo’s house…from the west lawn looking east:

built in 1896 or 8...

built in 1896 or 8…

It is convenient to check the Boreas garden just north of Jo’s.  We park and enter on the west side.

Boreas Inn (and hot tub room)

Boreas Inn (and hot tub room)

I am so happy with the Boreas gardens this year!

I am so happy with the Boreas gardens this year!

The cosmos were lush and floriferous…

cosmos

cosmoscosmos2

cosmos

 

 

The fabulous Lobelia tupa continues to be the only one blooming out of two flats of them that I planted here and there in assorted gardens!

Just the one tupa!

Just the one tupa!

The only thing I do not like in the west side Boreas garden is the old daylily bed:

the original patch of daylilies

the original patch of daylilies

I am determined…and when I suggested it, Susie agreed…to dig these out and replace them with, perhaps, a good medium sized ornamental grass like Miscanthus ‘Morning Light’.    Maybe a couple of narrow upright evergreens like Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’! (which the deer will leave alone).

Boreas:  looking west to the beach path

Boreas: looking west to the beach path

Speaking of Cosmos, we stopped on the way home to deadhead the park by Marsh’s Museum, having been rained out of doing so yesterday.

Marsh's Free Museum, home of Jake the Alligator Man

Marsh’s Free Museum, home of Jake the Alligator Man

And at home, on the last evening of her visit, Alicia was roasting marshmallows over her cute little charcoal pig.

pig

We agreed that her grandma Nora would have loved it.

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

The compost bucket needed switching at Olde Towne…

an old sign from when Olde Towne was an antique store with no café

an old sign from when Olde Towne was an antique store with no café

Luanne tucks into one of her signature breakfasts, waffled with strawberries and whipped cream!

Luanne tucks into one of her signature breakfasts, waffled with strawberries and whipped cream!

We could not linger because work beckoned.

At Golden Sands Assisted Living, we had intended to check how the newly repaired sprinkler system was doing.  Too much rain had made it impossible to tell the difference between watered and unwatered.  We did get permission to move the bench on of these days, so that the NW quadrant garden shows up better.

soon....

soon….

We at last had time to work hard on two of the quadrants.

thinned and tidied

thinned and tidied

Before we bring in some more mulch, I very much want to get the damnable beach strawberries removed from the backside of the four flower beds.

quite a project

quite a project

Next, the very civilized garden at Klipsan Beach Cottages.  We can always count on owners Mary and Denny Caldwell to water so every week we can concentrate just on the gardening.

inside the deer fence garden

inside the deer fence garden

at KBC: the berries of Billardia longiflora

at KBC: the berries of Billardia longiflora

KBC: the driveway garden

KBC: the driveway garden

Further north in Surfside at Marilyn’s garden we did some light deadheading just to keep it looking fine after its turn in the spotlight on garden tour day.

The Helianthus 'Lemon Queen' is now in bloom.

The Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ is now in bloom.

I am still trying to ID this pink flower that is at Jo’s, and here.  The deer do not eat it.  I think it is a phlox.  It runs politely here, but runs like a thug at Jo’s, where I am trying to get rid of most of it.

phlox?

phlox?

I posted a photo of it on a plant ID group and was advised it is a Dianthus, but I think not!

It is as tall as some of the cosmos...

It is as tall as some of the cosmos…

the lushness of Marilyn's garden, looking northwest

the lushness of Marilyn’s garden, looking northwest

the giant Miscanthus grows this big in one season!

the giant Miscanthus grows this big in one season!

Even though I love its foliage and velvety magenta, pink, or white flowers, I get tired of the prolific reseeding of Lychnis coronaria (rose campion) and yet….each seedling is so very pretty.

in the gravel path

in the gravel path

Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’ is one of the search terms that most often leads people to my blog!

Knautia 'Thunder and Lightning' at Marilyn's

Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’ at Marilyn’s

We closed the work day at the Wiegardt Gallery with a serious thinning out on the west side…

future plan:  add some Ilex 'Sky Pencil'

future plan: add some Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’

Mostly the dreaded Geranium ‘A.T. Johnson’ came out, as it also did in this neglected spot on the SE corner of the building.

pulling...and done

pulling…and done

Why we don’t take this corner more seriously I do not know.  I am thinking lavender…or rosemary, which Eric’s wife, Ann, likes.  It is backed with a rhododendron which I cut down hard a couple of years ago, and another winter blooming one that gallery manager Christl limbed up.  And with sword ferns.

Thursday, August 29, 2013

We woke to rain.  Allan cleverly remembered that we had been meaning to visit the  railroad exhibit at the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum just three blocks east of us.

From the Water to the Woods:  125 Years of Local Rail

train exhibit at the museum

train exhibit at the museum

If I could go back in time and do one thing, it would be to ride on the Clamshell Railroad that used to go up and down the Peninsula.

sign

one of the exhibit’s fascinating signs

an old railroad seat

an old railroad seat…cranberry plush!

Part of the exhibit was about trains in logging camps and the trains that helped build the ocean jetties.

logging

A slideshow played of photos by a photographer named Darius Kinsey, who chronicled life in the logging camps including this stump cottage!

one big stump

one big stump

When my friends and I had stopped at Bailey’s Café in Nahcotta on a garden tour day, I had tried to remember if the old pilings going out into Willapa Bay were from the old railroad line.  I thought so….and this photo proves it.

old Nahcotta

old Nahcotta

Oh I do wish I could have seen this:

fact

This lumberyard was where the Ilwaco boatyard is today:

lumberyard

No one was hurt when the train went off the Ilwaco dock!

oops

So many photos to peruse:

exhibit

In the rest of the museum, I learned something new about salmonberries.

salmonberry facts

salmonberry facts:  I did not know one can eat the shoots!

After the exhibit, we did an afternoon and early evening of work.

The Anchorage gardens looked windblown...

The Anchorage Cottages gardens looked windblown…

as did the Payson Hall planters at Andersen's RV Park.

as did the Payson Hall planters at Andersen’s RV Park.

At this time of year, deadheading the annuals takes hours…

Just one of many Agyranthemum 'Butterfly' at Andersen's!

Just one of many Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ at Andersen’s!

Payson Hall after much deadheading

Payson Hall after much deadheading

We cleaned out and raked the walking path in the now-not-so-poppy field at Andersen’s.

path

As we left, we saw a most interesting vehicle.  Allan said it was like our van but turned into a camper.

Jucy Van

Jucy Van

We saw the Jucy Van couple again when we stopped at the Depot Restaurant to deadhead.  They were just going for a delicious dinner and told us that a slideshow of the van can be seen at jucyrentals.com.

Usually we do the Depot garden before the restaurant opens but I had forgotten it.  Fortunately, the vehicles happened to be parked in a way that gave us easy access.

diners' vehicles

diners’ vehicles

Just as it had been coming into bloom, Solidago ‘Fireworks’ was laid out by the rain.

kind of sideways

kind of sideways

Last, more tedious deadheading at the Long Beach welcome sign where the south side has lots of Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’.  The cosmos on the north side have petered out.  Allan had a great idea: to use Geranium ‘Rozanne’ as the blue accent next year.  I am all for it as the blue Brachychome has gotten almost buried under yellow.

yellow Bidens taking over

yellow Bidens taking over

Friday, August 30, 2013

At Mayor Mike’s garden the time had come to chop the catmint:

before and after

before and after

In the back garden at Mike’s, I recognized the berry of a Lonicera that his previous gardener, Carol of The Elves Did It, probably got from me!

boxleaf honeysuckle

boxleaf honeysuckle

I got many sprouts of this to share from my old garden.

Kitty corner from Mike’s garden, we found some company in the new outdoor cat room at Cheri and Charlie’s!

American shorthaired cats

American shorthaired cats

She's my favourite and she knows it!

She’s my favourite and she knows it!

the black one looks just like my Calvin!

the black one looks just like my Calvin!

I think his name is Elwood!

I think his name is Elwood!

We got some work done, too…including the odd little task of taking the “covers” off the money plant so that it shines all silvery and pretty.

before and after: Lunaria

before and after: Lunaria

translucent

translucent

Helianthus 'Lemon Queen' at Cheri's

Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ at Cheri’s

We stopped at home to divest ourselves of a trailer load of compostable debris from both Mike’s and Cheri’s garden and as we were offloading, Judy came from four doors down to go tomato farming.

Judy in my greenhouse!

Judy in my greenhouse!

Judy's harvest from my edible garden!

Judy’s harvest from my edible garden!

We still had work to do in Long Beach due to having been rained out a couple of times during the week.  The Columbia Pacific Farmers Market was just setting up.

at Veterans Field

at Veterans Field

I just had time to deadhead before all the vendors arrived.

In Fish Alley, the nice variegated sedum I got for the whiskey barrels did not look good at all.  I hope it is just rain spotting and not mildew.

Fish Alley worry

Fish Alley worry

Across the street from city hall, as I deadheaded, I admired the fresh paint job on the “Akari Space” building which will house the Pink Poppy Bakery and Starvation Alley Farms new coffee shop.

love the colour, the pop! of the orange foliage, and the wood trim

love the colour, the pop! of the orange foliage, and the wood trim

This post has gone on almost as long as our work week did so I will repost the photo that appeared at the beginning showing the planter in front of Wind World Kites all full of Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’.

a sudden torrent

a sudden torrent…on Monday!

The kite guy likes the big batch of Phormium but I had been looking forward to cutting it down now that it is done…

after removing the Phormium on Friday...now the Fuchsias show!

after removing the Phormium on Friday…now the Fuchsias show!

Back at Veterans Field, the market had begun and a child was skillfully leaping back and forth across the garden.

kids

As the Naselle Marimba band played….

I like the Naselle Marimba Band very much.

I like the Naselle Marimba Band very much.

We had to check the deadheading at the Boreas Inn one more time because garden blogger Alison was staying there for the weekend!

'Jade Frost'

‘Jade Frost’

I noticed the leaves of the Jade Frost Eryngium is reverting to green…as it does.  There is nothing to be done about it….The flowers will still be as beautiful.

tip of the week: when deadheading Cosmos, cut out the old stem candelabras

tip of the week: when deadheading Cosmos, cut out the old stem candelabras

the wind had battered the cosmos....

the wind had battered the cosmos….

but the garden still looked lovely....here, looking west to the beach path

but the garden still looked lovely….here, looking west to the beach path

We ended the increasingly cool and foggy day by caring for the gardens by the Port of Ilwaco office, both the south and north sides.

On the south side, the hanging baskets had been taken down because of the wind....

On the south side, the hanging baskets had been taken down because of the wind….

on the marina, masts in the fog

on the marina, masts in the fog

a little skiff...

a little skiff…

to and fro in the mist...

to and fro in the mist…

on the docks

on the docks

more fog rolling in

more fog rolling in

on the north side, a view of fog over School Hill

on the north side, a view of fog over School Hill

After finishing the Port Office gardens, we attended to the one down by Queen La De Da’s.  The alliums had blown over, so I tucked them into a planter by her back door.  Wonder if she noticed?

by the queen's doorway

by the queen’s doorway

In a garden behind Queen La De Da’s, an old Arundo donax looms in the fog.

a handsome ornamental grass

a handsome ornamental grass

Even derelict natural spots have their beauty like this dead blackberry cane against a hotel-for-sale next door to Queen La De Da’s building.

very wabi sabi

very wabi sabi

If you have made it this far, thanks for joining us for our whole working week.  It was an easier one than usual because we did not have to do any watering after the rains came.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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So much for buckling down to work as I had promised myself to do after the edible garden tour.   After being rained out early the day before, we now had a day that was interrupted with much socializing.

At home, on my usual route to and from the greenhouse to see if tomatoes needed watering, I saw an unexpected flower:

a hardy ginger in flower

a hardy ginger in flower

with Coleus 'Wasabi'

Roscoea ‘Spice Island’ with Coleus ‘Wasabi’

Going out the front gate, I noticed a Chelone blooming…one I could have sworn I had remembered to move to a damper area in the back garden.

Chelone (Pink Turtlehead)

Chelone (Pink Turtlehead)

the view in...

the view in…

First we did our every other week weeding and grooming of Mayor Mike’s garden….

blue and white theme

blue and white theme

path weeded and raked

path weeded and raked

Next, kitty corner to Cheri’s garden where we found that Charlie had finished creating the outdoor cat room.

room

kitty retreat

kitty retreat

After working in the front and side gardens there, we were only half an hour late for a coffee klatsch at Olde Towne Café, celebrating our friend and former Ilwacoan Patt finding another reason to pass through town.  While she only lived here for a year before having to move away for work reasons (her spouse’s job), she fell hard for this town.

clockwise from left:  Judy, Tom, Patt, Allan, Donna...all talking at once?

clockwise from left: Judy, Tom, Patt, Allan, Donna…all talking at once?

Our friend, art historian Pat Moss, showed up a bit later.  While I failed to get a photo of her, I did get one of her dog outside…my good friend Bella.

Bella

Bella

We stayed longer than we had planned, then hightailed to the garden by Queen La De Da’s Art Castle to get it weeded and fluffed before Art Night began at 6 PM.  We checked on a couple of other gardens along the port buildings and then made a tour from one end of art night to the other…

Randy Powell at Marie Powell Gallery

Randy Powell at Marie Powell Gallery

Nisbett

At the Don Nisbett gallery:  Susan and Sherri from Painted Lady Lavender Farm

At the Don Nisbett gallery: Susan and Sherri from Painted Lady Lavender Farm

Don and some tasty cupcakes from Sweet Celebrations in Long Beach

Don and some tasty cupcakes from Sweet Celebrations in Long Beach

his gallery was hopping

Don’s gallery was hopping

outside the Nisbett Gallery

outside the Nisbett Gallery

Peter on ukelele, baskets by The Basket Case greenhouse

Peter on ukelele, baskets by The Basket Case greenhouse

Allan and Jenna at Queen La De Da's

Allan and Jenna at Queen La De Da’s

Much as we would have liked to linger, work was not done (due to lingering earlier at Olde Towne) so we left to finish weeding the boatyard.  It still was not quite up to my standards for Blues and Seafood weekend.

The marina looked extra beautiful as we departed.

marina

boatyard garden....kind of care and tidy with old annual poppies pulled out

boatyard garden….kind of care and tidy with old annual poppies pulled out

boatyard

As we were weeding, a fisherman came to the other side of the fence and complimented the garden.  He told us that he sometimes tells people not to pick flowers from it.  Recently he saw a young man who had already picked a few flowers (despite the signs asking him not to).  The young man said he hoped it was ok because he was picking them for his girlfriend.  The fisherman told him exactly what I do:  That if everyone picked there would be none left!  He added, “You should give your girlfriend the ones you’ve already picked and tell her they are really special.”   If everyone took such care to watch out for our gardens, I would be most happy.

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I had planned another all Ilwaco day for Friday because our friend Patt was going to be passing through town. She’s a former resident who had to move away because of her spouse’s job, and she takes every chance to come back and visit.

We began at Larry and Robert’s, where I realized that their Escallonia is the wonderul white Escallonia ‘Iveyi’, old and large. I think of it is rare down here, so I wonder how that happened!

very big and white Escallonia

very big and white Escallonia

I watered while Allan dug the birdbath pedestal into the ground. The base was cracked, and we want to make sure it will not tip over onto one of their little dogs. Allan made it good and solid.

backyard birdbath

backyard birdbath

Then on to Mayor Mike’s; the rambling rose that is climbing into his tree needed a lot of dangling canes clipped with the long handled pruners.

Mike's rose

Mike’s rose

In Mike's garden:  Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

In Mike’s garden: Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

Kitty corner from Mike’s is Cheri’s garden where we weeded and deadheaded and pulled out a lot of spent Rose Campion.

Cheri's front garden

Cheri’s front garden

We timed it pretty well as when we stopped off at home, we were only running about fifteen minutes late for a coffee klatsch at Olde Towne. I tried to pick Luanne a nice bouquet. However, I was feeling exceedingly tired and could not seem to find enough flowers to make a lush arrangement.

This was the best I could do....

This was the best I could do….

I wish my sweet peas had done as well this year as last year. I suppose I can blame the weather. They are lacking in all “my” gardens compared to last year’s amazing bounty…except for Klipsan Beach Cottages where they are doing well.

Patt had arrived and was already enjoying her time at Olde Towne with Judy and Tom and Donna and MR. Luanne got to take a break and join us.

left to right...Donna, MR. Tom, Allan, Judy, Luanne and (just her shoulder), Patt

left to right…Donna, MR. Tom, Allan, Judy, Luanne and (just her shoulder), Patt

The delicious veggie sandwich on a croissant was mine.

Donna herself took some excellent photos. Here she is behind her big camera:

Donna

She edits her photos in Picasa with all sorts of delightful effects.

Patt and me, photo by Donna McKinley

Patt and me, photo by Donna McKinley

MR and Tom, photo by Donna McKinley

MR and Tom, photo by Donna McKinley

Olde Towne's darling Luanne, photo by Donna McKinley

Olde Towne’s darling Luanne, photo by Donna McKinley

Luanne kept visiting with us till about half an hour after closing time (which is 4 PM); then Allan and I went back to work in Ilwaco. He watered the planters while I weeded and watered at the boatyard.

the planter closest to the boatyard

the planter closest to the boatyard

As almost always, there was boat work going on while I watered from behind the fence.

Pacific Breeze

Pacific Breeze

I had an incident while watering. As I stood behind the chainlink fence, hidden by a tall bronze fennel, I saw a couple walk by. The man does not register with me in particular but the woman stands out because she has a large dog and tattoos and piercings. (All three of those things are shared by a number of my friends.) She walks around a lot with her dog. She has made comments to Allan while he waters that imply she knows something about gardening. This time, I saw she was picking a very LARGE bouquet. I stepped out into a view and said (not shouted) “Hey, no picking!” and added the usual: “If everyone did that, there would be no flowers left.” “Sorry”, she said, seeming sincere. I saw what was in her other hand from the one holding the LARGE bouquet: Professional looking red handled garden clippers. I said, “I am SHOCKED. You even brought clippers!” “Sorry,” she said again and she and her friend and dog walked on. I went out after a bit and thought I should take a photo from afar of finger blight in action (the bouquet in her hand as they walked away) but a car got between me and them. Maybe just as well.

As I went down the garden side of the fence pulling weeds, I saw some more finger blight. As always happens, someone had pulled the flowers off the Echinops (Blue Globe Thistle). It seems to be irresistible to finger blighters wherever I plant it. At least I know the attempt to twist off the flower stem was not from the woman with the red clippers.

finger blight

finger blight

I am amazed and pleased that the Alliums have for some reason been immune to picking, maybe because they are low to the ground. They are teetering due to our recent heavy wind but still there.

Allium albopilosum

Allium albopilosum

The big poppies are just going to seed…

red poppy

red poppy

big fluffy white peony poppy

big fluffy white peony poppy

Allan helped me finish weeding….

You can tell the gardening is entering the less flowery midsummer time...

You can tell the gardening is entering the less flowery midsummer time…

…and then we went to check on the Port Office gardens to make sure they looked excellent for the annual Tuna Classic event. Allan went up on the port office balcony to get some photos of the sporty tuna boats that come to town for the event.

marina overview

marina overview

And he snuck a photo of me working on the south side of the port office.

at work

at work

I was not feeling happy because both of my eyelids were stinging and burning, especially the right one. I thought (and still think) it might be because when I was weeding and clipping at the boatyard, I leaned into the Stipa gigantea ornamental grass to cut some broken stems, and the flower of the grass might have brushed against my eyelid when I closed my eyes to protect myself from the dreaded ornamental grass cut. (I should wear goggles when I do that.)

At home, I did the blog for the day while Allan made dinner and then we watched a show as we ate. The whole time, I fretted and fretted because of the burning eyelid syndrome. This had happened before, twice, in the previous two years, with unpleasant results. In a state of extreme anxiety I almost wept because the very next day was the Gearhart garden tour. I had been counting the days and had indeed been looking forward it it ever since last year’s wonderful Gearhart tour. What if I couldn’t see? What if I had to go to the hospital? Oh, the distress.

The horror!  Above, 6 AM.  Below: 9 AM

The horror! Above, 6 AM.
Below: 9 AM

And indeed, when I woke up at 6 AM my right eye was swollen almost shut, just as I feared.

I took photos to email to Judy to garner sympathy. I did not think I would get a wink more sleep after 6 AM, and fretted about how I could enjoy the tour on only four hours of sleep…but I did fall back asleep for two more hours. There was little pain involved, just some eyelid burning, and my eyes themselves were fine, or I might have had the sense to go to the emergency room (or, er, waited till after the tour and then gone immediately). Fortunately, I had a pair of dark glasses so that my still swollen eyelid and under-eye bag would not scare the other tour guests. So off we went across the bridge.

There was the usual bridge work slowdown.

bridge work

bridge work

The usual complete halt, allowing for a photo through the bridge rails (for which I removed the cold washcloth that I had kept pressed to one stinging eyelid).

view

view

And the slowdown allowing a closer look at the bridge itself as we go nice and slowly up the highest spot.

bridge

And then, after all my suspense and fear of missing the tour, we were on to Gearhart for Gardens by the Sea!

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July 11:  We began our day with tidying up Mayor Mike C’s garden, where a rose had impressively climbed a tree.

rambling rose, rambling rose...

rambling rose, rambling rose…

I love that look although it takes careful controlling to not get out of hand.

Mike's garden

Mike’s garden

At Cheri and Charlie’s the cathouse is coming along.  I still don’t know how it is going to be attached so the cats can enter it from the house, but there have been questions about wire fencing.  Cannot wait to see cats in there!

cathouse

cathouse

We admired the new compost bins.

twin bins all set up

twin bins all set up

Cheri thought I would be sad when I saw a place in the garden where their two boxers, Porsche and Beemer, had had a play date with three canine guests.  But I was philosophical.

flattened by romping pooches

flattened by romping pooches

I still have what I think is a great garden design idea, though.  Turn the lawn area, below, into garden with a fence (picket?) on either side, and the dogs could run happily along the outer chain link fence and up and down the sidewalk next to the house.

potential

potential

Meanwhile, I don’t plant much that is delicate in this garden.

Speaking of dogs, we next went to Casa Pacifica, to the east of the peninsula, where we were greeted by my good friend Dusty.

I love this dawg.

I love this dawg.

The whiskey barrels (12 in all) look pretty good.  Spook, the shy Great Dane in the background, was not thrilled to see us.

whiskey barrels

whiskey barrels

under the deck she goes...

under the deck she goes…

Dusty wanted to play, but if I get him started by throwing anything, no work will get done.

my buddy

my buddy

a noble, hopeful pose while I weed by the deck

a noble, hopeful pose while I weed by the deck

As usual, he stole my water bottle.

As usual, he stole my water bottle.  (Here, he brings it back like the good boy he is.)

I set up three artichokes to plant atop the wall garden.  Leeanne had specially requested some.  The area still needs mulching but is so hard to get to; we amended the three artichoke spots with bagged soil amendment.  The only way to get a truck with soil back here is to cross the septic field…potential disaster.

part of the long garden

part of the long garden

my audience

my audience

robin on the warrior

robin on the warrior

While Allan planted the three artichokes, I weeded out a patch of smelly stink-mint.  I don’t know what it is called, but it has square stems and an unpleasant odor.

Because hummingbirds like it, I had left this rough patch till it did its usual thing of going mildewy.

what is it?

what is it?

I am going to ask my friend Kathleen Sayce, expert local botanist, for an ID.

Once I was done the area was clear except for Astilbe and Darmera peltata.  The stinkmint will come right back but all fresh looking.

Normally I might have complained about the heat at this slightly inland job; after the misery of cold wind earlier this week, it felt kind of good.

blue sky at Casa Pacifica

blue sky at Casa Pacifica

Our next task was to return to the Peninsula just north of Long Beach and tidy up the Anchorage Cottages gardens, doing some pruning on the Virburnums again to keep them below the windowboxes, deadheading, light weeding.

revealing the windowboxes

revealing the windowboxes

After garden tour weekend I will have time to give these Viburnums the good pruning that they need.  Something this large should never have been planted here, in my opinion!  I must prune them in time for them to still set their winter flower buds.

Meanwhile:

Alliums by the office

Alliums by the office

Nicotiana langsdorfii by the brick chimney

Nicotiana langsdorfii by the brick chimney of a cottage

Agastache 'Golden Jubilee' by the office

Agastache ‘Golden Jubilee’ by the office (looking toward two cottage doors)

With the Anchorage ready for the weekend, we went back to Long Beach to do that third parking lot berm.

Allan after the birdsfoot trefoil

Allan after the birdsfoot trefoil

From Veterans Field two block north across the parking lot, we could hear marimba music.  I said to Allan that sounded like irresistable blog fodder so I toddled over there.

It was the Naselle Marimba Band!

It was the Naselle Marimba Band!

They were impressively excellent.

They were impressively excellent.

Right next to the field, the sand sculptors had begun their City Sandsations creations.

one

two

three

Ragan, the city tourism director was there and told me she had arranged the band because a big tour bus was going to come in and have a picnic dinner in the field.  How brilliant; can you imagine the joy of coming to a beach town, having a band play for you and having the sand sculpture event right there?

Of course for me, a lot of it has to do with how does it relate to our gardens!

garden

by the garden at Veterans Field

When the big tour bus showed up and parked, I was awfully glad we had cleaned up the berms nearer the field earlier in the week, even though the job was not perfect.

tour bus parked right by middle (weedeated) berm

tour bus parked right by middle (weedeated) berm

The third so-called berm (actually flat) looked better, even though we did not have time to make it perfect.

improved

improved

We had to go water in Ilwaco and so drove off to the boatyard.

Allan fills buckets at the boatyard to bucket water the Ilwaco planters:  Hard, hard work.  (The bucketing, that is.)

Allan fills buckets at the boatyard to bucket water the Ilwaco planters: Hard, hard work. (The bucketing, that is.)

By then it was….

evening

While he dealt with the street tree and planter watering, I watered the boatyard garden.  This involved getting hoses situated around quite an obstacle course.  This time, I found one hose snaking under a truck, around a boat, over a concrete pad and hooked up to another hose.

the usual watering obstacle course

the usual watering obstacle course

the usual boatyard garden pictures

the usual boatyard garden pictures

three

Uh oh, this santolina has fallen open

Uh oh, this santolina has fallen open

After finishing the watering (sprayed from hoses inside the fence) I had a walk at the south end of the boatyard just to look over toward our old house.

(telephotoed a bit)  You can just see the blue dormer window.

(telephotoed a bit) You can just see the blue dormer window.

I don’t miss the up and down nature of my old garden, or its shade, but I do often miss the small natural spring-fed pond.

I contented myself with a brief contemplation of the still water behind the boatyard.

river

Allan returned and we went home at last.   There I found that the neighbour kitten, Onyx, had gotten brave enough to come over to our garden.

a little visitor

a little visitor

Onyx and Frosty

Onyx and Frosty

And although it was too late to do anything more than water pots and greenhouse tomatoes at home, I did enjoy the view of the front garden.

looking east from where we park

looking east from where we park

And the glorious look of the unfurling leaves on the …I think it’s a Rubus…in the front garden…whose leaves are whitish underneath.  I bet Sheila knows what it is!

really stunning foliage

really stunning foliage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I had a new outlook on life after deciding to quit a very big job. Perhaps now we could finally begin to catch up on work and maybe even get around to a couple of valued private garden clients that we have had to completely neglect. (I prefer doing public gardens, but we tend to become friends with our clients over time and then we like doing their private gardens as well.)

Mike’s garden

We began with Mike the Ilwaco mayor’s garden. I must remember to acquire a nice plant to fill this hole left by pulling out some tatty rose campions. I am thinking a Brunnera ‘Looking Glass’ if Basket Case Greenhouse still has any.

just the spot for a Brunnera

just the spot for a Brunnera

entry

entry

Allan painstakingly weeded the gravel path while I weeded the beds and thinned out more rose campions, too many feverfew, and spent foxgloves.

front path, nicely weeded

front path, nicely weeded

Eryngium 'Jade Frost' and feverfew

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ and feverfew

I still want to know for sure what this plant is:

I almost know its name but can't remember.

I almost know its name but can’t remember.

Cheri’s garden

Kitty corner from Mike’s is longtime client Cheri’s garden.

Mike's garden from Cheri's

Mike’s garden from Cheri’s

While we were weeding her garden, a cement truck showed up to make two pads, one for a new compost area and one for the new outdoor haven for the cats.

future cat paradise

future cat paradise

They will be able to enter from inside the house (I think, although I can’t quite picture how).

In the front garden, we found another wind and rain flop:

splayed cranesbill geranium

splayed cranesbill geranium

side garden with cement truck backdrop

side garden with cement truck backdrop

We’ll have to wait till next time to do the garden next to the cat room!

Anchorage Cottages

Next we went up through Long Beach to the Anchorage Cottages where we saw many bees on the Ceanothus, just like last week. I managed to prune one more branch to make the number one show even better. The bees buzzed me but not with apparent anger.

Ceanothus (California lilac)

Ceanothus (California lilac)

bee feast

bee feast

Allium albopilosum in office planter

Allium albopilosum in office planter

Allium

On a shady north wall we found one of the largest Pacific tree frogs I’ve ever seen.

sizeable Pacific tree frog

sizeable Pacific tree frog

lily

lily

The windowboxes are looking great…

windowbox at south end

windowbox at south end

The ones on the north end of the parking lot looked better after we pruned down the Viburnum in front of them.

It's a constant task to keep these at the right height and still let them bloom in winter.

It’s a constant task to keep the Viburnum at the right height and still let them bloom in winter.

We also saw a very large spider in the parking lot and Allan thinks it might light up when the brakes are engaged.

!!

Gene’s garden

We did a quick check on Gene’s in south Long Beach. It looks fine although has room for…more plants!

The porch is perfection.

The porch is perfection.

Eryngium and Lavender

Eryngium and Lavender

more plants, please!

more plants, please!

It’s the “first year they sleep, second year they creep, third year they leap” perennial syndrome.

Long Beach

Back to Long Beach, we watered and fertilized all the planters on the main street (and also touched up the street tree gardens).

a miniature rose planted by one of the former volunteers

a miniature rose planted by one of the former volunteers

by the credit union

by the credit union

by Home at the Beach (Agyranthemum 'Butterfly')

by Home at the Beach (Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’)

Fifth Street Park

Fifth Street Park

planter by the Cottage Bakery

planter by the Cottage Bakery

We twist our quick connect device into the, er, water place in each planter.

There are two exceedingly boring planters that I keep thinking of redoing; one has just vinca and Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’, and the other has azaleas that bloom in the spring, two blue star Junipers, and a lot of very invasive mint mixed with a cranesbill geranium.

boring and more boring

boring and more boring

In some of the planters, I remembered to cut back the Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ in June, and it has now recovered into a tidy, compact and smaller flowering shape. The ones I forgot are big, splayed, and floppy.

pruned and not pruned...ooops

pruned and not pruned…ooops

I checked the planters by the Veterans Field Stage and had a gander at the Columbia Pacific Farmers Market which takes place there on Fridays from 4-7 PM. (Gene’s late wife Peggy was one of the prime movers on getting this market going.)

farmers market

farmers market

There, I bought myself five Heirloom tomato plants and was pleased to talk with the seller, Kim, who had had one of my favourite gardens on the 2010 Peninsula garden tour.  [edited later to add:  She and her spouse, Paul, have a flower farm at Deer Island, Oregon called River Rock Farm.]

tomatoes

tomatoes

Her plant selection including fascinating varieties and each plant came with a packet of fertilizer for potting on.

Back to the planter work: I am enjoying the new Calibrachoa ‘Lemon Slice’, very refreshing in name and appearance.

Callie 'Lemon Slice'

Callie ‘Lemon Slice’

One the way to dump our debris at city works, I stopped to photograph this tidy edible garden and left them a note asking if they would be on this year’s Edible tour on August 11th. Have not yet got an email from them, but I know the organizer of that tour is looking for a couple more small edible gardens to include.

charming

charming

Our last task in Long Beach was to cosmetically de-horsetail the welcome sign.

horsetail free (or so it appears)

horsetail free (or so it appears)

Ilwaco boatyard and planters

We closed the day with the rather dreaded bucket watering of the Ilwaco planters, a task for which Allan does the heavy lifting. I pulled a bit horsetail out of the boatyard garden while checking to make sure that it did not need watering yet (not, thank goodness). The evening light at 7:30 PM flatters the garden. The following photos are sort of like the big bunch of fireworks all at once that ends any good fireworks display.

Flanders Field poppies

Flanders Field poppies

Mother of Pearl poppy

Mother of Pearl poppy

daisy

daisy

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue', colour NOT boosted

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, colour NOT boosted

Allium albopilosum

Allium albopilosum

I think a Shirley poppy

I think a Shirley poppy

Allium albopilosum; I am so pleased there has been no finger blight on these!

Allium albopilosum; I am so pleased there has been no finger blight on these!

more poppies

more poppies

Stipa gigantea

Stipa gigantea

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

more poppies and Stipa gigantea

more poppies and Stipa gigantea

I walked through town and checked the condition, deadleafing, and deadheading of each planter and did some weeding under the ten street trees. At the corner of 1st and Eagle, Ethel has turned her holly hedge into a deer fence around her private garden.

It should work!

It should work! Although deer will crawl to get in…seriously, they will.

I long to remove the irritating-to-weed bricks from around the trees, fill in with soil, and just keep the plants clipped in to the square area.

my nemesis

my nemesis

It would save the city money in the long run as these are a bugger to weed, so I am going to suggest it to Mike the mayor.

I think a plant got swiped out of this planter!

I think a plant got swiped out of this planter! We have to keep filling in…

Finally, Allan waters the library planters, and then there is only one more to go back down at the Port at Peninsula Sanitation’s office.

at the Ilwaco library

at the Ilwaco library

Note how he swiveled the planters so that the two thymes match in position.

At last, home at 9 with time to have a quick look at the garden.

past the alstroemeria by the garage

past the alstroemeria by the garage

back yard

back yard

Leycesteria 'Golden Lanterns'

Leycesteria ‘Golden Lanterns’

a new to me Allium

a new to me Allium in the front garden

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Today we got the last of the Cosmos planted. I could think of two unplanted places that might take some, so I suppose I might buy a few more six packs, but maybe not! It is a shame that there are still some very nice Cosmos at the Planter Box that need a home. I suggest local gardeners go buy some. Oh, but not all the Cutesies. I am dissatisfied with having Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ as the only tall plant on the LB welcome sign, south side. The north side, with Cosmos, looks better. So I think we will add four six packs of cutesy cosmos there. (It, like ‘Sonata’, is short.)

Today, we were surprised by a fierce rainstorm while at the bank, so we went to Olde Towne, just a block away. We wound up staying a bit after the rain stopped, just because life is pleasant there.

Olde Towne Café

Olde Towne Café

We put in Luanne’s two flower containers the two different colours of Salvia patens grown by the Planter Box. Not sure what the blue one was called in the seed catalog but the pink is called “Patio Pink”. I adore Salvia patens and before this year have only seen it in cobalt blue and “Cambridge” (light) blue.

The cobalt blue is still my favourite.

The cobalt blue (left) is still my favourite.

We stopped at Larry and Robert’s to put two Petunia ‘Pretty Much Picasso’ in the boat and two Salvia patens in the pots on the front steps. I just needed a home for my last four Salvia patens, and now they are dealt with!

Larry and Robert's east side

Larry and Robert’s east side

I discussed with Larry some exciting plans for the back yard, now that they have had their old deck removed!

Next, on to Mayor Mike’s…but a pause to wait out more of this:

rain

intense squall; not worried because ’twas light around the edges.

In the front corner, closest to the street, I planted a signature patch of three Cosmos and three painted sage, and three more of each elsewhere in the garden. Now the painted sage is all planted (but there are a very few more six packs available at The Planter Box; tell ’em I said it is ok to sell them to you!)

corner signature

corner signature

I pulled a big patch of horrible scilla: a precursor to the end of the day… Should have taken a photo of how bad the area it was in looked before pulling and how nice afterward. More on this later!

scilla by the bucket (with a spent iris)

scilla by the bucket (with a spent iris)

Allan did a beautiful job of weeding the path and path edges:

well done

well done

Oriental poppies

Oriental poppies

I probably would not plant Oriental poppies in such a small garden because they leave such a gap when they are done.

Below is that little daisy…What is it? One sees it in photos of famous British gardens, between stair pavers or on walls…

I have forgotten its name!

I have forgotten its name!

We then spent over an hour at Cheri’s garden, where I planted one of the two Penstemon ‘Burgundy Brew’ that I thought should go to oenophile clients. And six cosmos. I forgot to take any photos at Cheri’s garden even though I meant to show how well filled in is the area where we put transplants that needed to be moved last month from the future outdoor cat run. I was distracted by another rain squall and then an amusing conversation with Charlie (who asked us when we were going to retire…oddly, a thought I had just been pondering myself!).

We then went to our last job of the day, Ann’s garden, which we have sorely neglected all month because it is not a major destination for annuals.

south border, before and after, weeded by Allan

south border, before and after, weeded by Allan

Ann has the oddest weed, one that is unfamiliar to me. It looks just like a forget me not but has small greenish flowers, maybe with a tiny it of blue, so is useless and yet as invasive as forget me nots are! The foliage is kind of yellowy at this time of year. It was all over the edge garden, above left.

Now, here is why I hate, hate, hate, scilla (blue bells). Ann, and my grandmother, and many other gardens have the big coarse one, but I was just reading that the delicate Siberian Squill is also quite pesky. My grandma’s garden was over run with lank dying horrid scilla foliage in springtime, swamping and burying other plants, and so is Ann’s and several other gardens I know. It has appeared in areas of my own garden from where it had been growing in the lawn.

scilla, rampant and hideous

scilla, rampant and hideous

The lank dying foliage is a home for slugs, and smothers other plants, and mingles with the narcissi so that when one pulls the scilla out, out comes a good narcissi bulb by mistake. So annoying! We pulled buckets and buckets and buckets of it and only got four smallish areas done. This is why I cried “NOOOOOOOO!” when I saw that someone had in a kindly meant and sharing way planted some in a new garden we had created for a friend. Fortunately, our friend believed my warning and is removing it….but slowly, so as not to hurt HER friend’s feelings.

The lily of the valley that we have weeded out twice, roots and all (we hoped) has, but of course, sprouted back. This is another plant someone might share with you. Don’t accept it!

here it comes again

here it comes again

I was glad to get back into this interesting garden, despite my dismay with there being scilla everywhere (as I knew there would be from the fact that everywhere one digs, one finds white scilla bulbs). I managed to fit in five six packs of cosmos, in hope that the deer will leave it alone. (They usually do.) I Sluggo-ed heavily because so many slugs were hiding in the scilla leaves.

oriental poppies

frilly Oriental poppies

frilly Oriental poppies

peony and iris...after much removal of scilla and that weird faux-forget me not.

peony and iris…after much removal of scilla and that weird faux-forget me not.

Ann's enclosed veg garden is looking wonderful.

Ann’s enclosed veg garden is looking wonderful.

I hope we can spend a whole day here next week.

Our last small task was to plant one pink Calibrachoa to fill the planter in front of Peninsula Sanitation office. This entailed a drive past the boatyard where we saw two boats named after friends of ours.

for Nancy and Mary

for Nancy and Mary

We were too wet and cold from having been considerably rained on while weeding Ann’s garden to spend the last half hour of daylight weeding the east end garden bed on Howerton at the Port. Tomorrow? At home, before getting dry, I popped in three remaining cosmos and can now declare that annuals hell is over. These are the only unplanted plants in our possession now:

all that is left!

all that is left!

Two rosemary for the Depot, a Burgundy Brew for Gene, a four o clock donated by Planter Box for Golden Sands, three artichokes for Leanne (Casa Pacifica), a ‘Green Jewel’ echinacea for the Wiegardt Gallery, a golden thyme for a beach approach planter and a Verbascum ‘Jackie in Yellow’ for Erin’s garden to which we STILL have not been this year. (Someone else has been weeding there, thank goodness!)

We need more yellow flowering plants for Erin. Why NOT use Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ even though it is an annual? Some short cosmos to punch up the effect at the welcome sign. Eight more beachy perennials for the Bolstadt beach approach planters. Some plants for Larry and Robert’s front stairs pots. (Kind of shady there. I think they want colour, though, flowers, not a tasteful perennial planting.) Those will be fun to gather and do not represent a descent back into planting hell.

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We made our second visit to a brand new job today, a garden that is just a few blocks further down Lake Street.

Mike's garden

Mike’s garden

It is, in fact, our mayor’s garden.  I believe it was at least partly designed by Carol Jones, with whose “The Elves Did It” gardening business I shared some work in 2003.

Today was our second visit and I enjoyed working at Carol’s former job because all those years ago she had worked on some of my jobs and this made for an interesting switch.    One thing I feel the garden cried out for is some clumps of small narcissi.  There was not a one!

rhododendron

Carol liked gardens with clipped and tidy shrubs.  I must find out if Mike likes things a little looser, because I think the small square boxwoods should be allowed to size up a bit.

boxwood path

boxwood path

I found a circle garden around a tree in the less formal back yard area.

tree circle

tree circle

I spoke with a cute little dog through the lattice of the back porch.

shiny dog nose

shiny dog nose

Then we went to our longtime client Cheri’s garden.  Mike’s garden is conveniently located kitty corner across the street.  (We are so busy we would not have taken on a new garden had it not been so very handy.)

I wonder if two photos will tell the tale of  tulips with and without shotweed.

Cheri's front garden tulips before

Cheri’s front garden tulips before

and after weeding

and after weeding

I find it hard to tell the difference from the photos.

Cheri's narcissi

Cheri’s narcissi

I love those small cups.

I love those frilly small cups.

Cheri's front garden

Cheri’s front garden

Allan alerted me that as we packed up, Frank was watching us from the side window:

blue eyed Frank

blue eyed Frank

Frank among the clouds

Frank among the clouds

Frank among the clouds

Frank

Til next time, Frank..

And then at last it was time for my coffee klatsch with Patt and Judy…We had been bereft for a couple of weeks while Olde Towne was in the process of moving.

coffee/lunch hour with Patt, Judy, and Luanne!

coffee/lunch hour with Patt, Judy, and Luanne!

We were so pleased that after three bustling days, Luanne had time to sit with us for awhile.

During the two hours that I schmoozed with friends, Allan nobly weeded horsetail at the boatyard garden and took these photos to share the horror.

hideous large horsetail

hideous large horsetail

The large horsetail looks difficult but is actually easier to control than the finer, thin type (the latter being, unfortunately, the kind in my garden).

boatyard weeding progress...still two blocks to go.

boatyard weeding progress…still two blocks to go.

We both went on to work in Long Beach in the quiet evening.   Allan spent the time in the quadrant of parks on Fifth Street.   One of them has lots of the wild garlic, the same that we battled yesterday in Ann’s garden, and he removed enough so that it does not look like a grassy haze to the untutored eye.

Allan's project before

Allan’s project before…and a horsetail to boot!

There is no after photo to show you how much better it looked.

Meanwhile I had the more pleasant job of walking the ten blocks of street trees and planters, deadheading narcissi and tulips and pulling small weeds.   I’ll share some of the flower show with you, especially for Mr and Mrs. Tootlepedal, whose flowers in south Scotland are not as far along as ours.

Lewis and Clark Square planter

Lewis and Clark Square planter

Narcissi with apricot cup

Narcissi with apricot cup

foreground:  Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve'; background: Lewis and Clark

foreground: Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’; background: Lewis and Clark

the new bed at Veterans Field

the new bed at Veterans Field

Veteran's Field with white narcissi and blue and white violas

Veteran’s Field with white narcissi and blue and white violas

So far, the only red is from the foliage of a Barberry ‘Crimson Pygmy’, but the mission I have chosen to accept is to make the garden red white and blue for Loyalty Day (May 5th), when the field will be dedicated.  It will be my first ever red white and blue garden and if I do it closer to the day, I will have a better selection of plants.  One thing it will not be is red and white pelargoniums (annual geraniums) and blue lithodora.

The narrow border wraps partway around the circle.

The narrow border wraps partway around the circle.

After that half-block digression, I returned to the main street.

tulips

tulips and astible

street tree flowers

street tree flowers

I encountered my friend Heather from my favourite shop, Niva green, walking with her dog Tiny, and drew her attention to one of my favourite tulips.  Like the great botanist that I am I said “I really love the holdy thingie”….the way the flower looks cupped in a green hand.

Tulips

Tulips

Niva green

Niva green

I’ve planted green (viridflora) tulips in the planter by NIVA green…but of course an orange one has crept in from when the planter had tulips to tone with the building’s former colour: bright yellow.

leftover orange tulip

leftover orange tulip

I think these tulips that are just coming on might the the exciting new ‘Green Star’.

Green Star?

Green Star?

In a planter originally done back in the volunteer days by my friend Susie who owns the Boreas Inn, her red tulips are still coming back but with some of the flowers a bit smaller every year.

now

now

then

then

I walked a half a block west on Bolstadt to deadhead the narcissi at Long Beach city hall.

Tulip 'Leo' at city hall

Tulip ‘Leo’ at city hall

Pulmonaria at city hall

Pulmonaria at city hall

Tulips and Hebe, city hall

Tulips and Hebe, city hall

A lambs ear has reseeded itself next to a lamp post at Bolstadt and Ocean Beach Boulevard.

escapee

escapee

Back to the main drag…I see the Erysimum are doing well in the four whiskey barrels in Fish Alley.

Bowles Mauve

Bowles Mauve

in a planter: Tulip 'Sensual Touch'

in a planter: Tulip ‘Sensual Touch’

Tulip 'Cut Crystal'

Tulip ‘Cut Crystal’

And finally, on the way to dump Allan’s park debris at city works, we just had to stop and deadhead the narcissi in Margaret’s garden on the way…

Margaret's narcissi

Margaret’s narcissi

Tomorrow: we must attend to several resort and business gardens and if we get lucky with time, we might get to check on the garden at Golden Sands Assisted Living which is rather worrying me as we have only been there once this year.

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