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Posts Tagged ‘Chinook Indian Nation’

Saturday, 19 August 2017

in which Allan goes boating on Young’s Bay and the Lewis and Clark River

“100 Paddles! is an opportunity for people to join in a human-powered water journey. Lewis and Clark National Historical Park invites the public to travel by water into the park, similar to how the Lewis and Clark Expedition members traveled during their winter here in 1805-06.

On the day of Saturday, August 19, experienced kayakers will meet at the Astoria Recreation Center (former Astoria Yacht Club site by the Old Youngs Bay Bridge) for a 10:30 a.m., launch and group paddle across Youngs Bay into the Lewis and Clark River. Less experienced folks are encouraged to meet at Netul Landing at 10:30 a.m., and head downstream on the Lewis and Clark River. The two groups plan to meet on the Lewis and Clark River. After a flintlock gun firing and huzzah, together the groups will paddle to Netul Landing for refreshments. Participants need to bring their own kayak, canoe, paddleboard or any non-motorized watercraft and need to wear a US Coast Guard approved personal floatation device. 

100 Paddles is sponsored by the Lewis & Clark National Park Association which supports park education and interpretative activities at Lewis and Clark National Historical Park.”

Screen Shot 2017-08-26 at 12.06.34 PM.jpg

The yellow line points to the ambitiously named Astoria Yacht Club and the orange indicates how far upstream I went today.

While I was figuring out what I forgot, a happy dog splashed around the boat. “He likes to go in all the boats,” his walker explained. Coincidently, I also got the same tail-wagging greeting when I returned later.

HEY! Get back here.

Waiver signing and a nice kerchief for all, as modeled by one of the Park employees.

Boat, paddle, life vest. A simple combination for a fun day ahead.

Also heading out today were some fisherman.

Getting ready while all those darn kayaks line the boat ramp.

Ten boats in this picture but I did not get a total attendance figure.

“Are you tied up?” I heard as my boat started to drift. I quickly got tied up and waited to leave.

Expedition leader, Mitch, awaiting a gather around.

We had guides in a lead, middle and trailing kayaks. He explained that it was not a race and we were all to stay together.

A water auditorium with Mitch behind the blue kayak.

Off we went

The fishing boat at the dock heading for the Columbia River.

As the flotilla spread out, Mitch sends a boat back to the rear to make sure everyone was having fun.

I unfurled a quarter of my sail at this point and it seemed to make the paddle easier.

Astoria’s Regional Airport is ahead where the Coast Guard helicopters are based.

Two of the park employees passing a water hazard. Behind is the 101 bridge from Astoria to Warrenton. These are often mudflats but the tide is a plus 6.4 feet now.

We went under the Business 101 bridge by the community of Jeffers Garden and then up the Lewis and Clark River.

On the west side, the river bank is mostly ‘wild’ and without buildings.

On the east side was Astoria Marine Construction with a large trawler pulled up for repair.

Several other boats docked.

A fellow paddler with a well done homemade kayak. We discussed kayak seaworthiness and inverted bows.

We grouped up at the entrance to a grass route parallel to the river that would take us under Fort Clatsop.

Note the tree formation to find this route again. We followed the channel upstream about a quarter mile.

Park rangers on the bank to welcome us.

Here we met with the group that had done the shorter trip downstream from Netul Landing.

“Turn down your hearing aids!” we were cautioned.

BAOOM! (but no smoke)

“Hip hip huzzah! Hip hip huzzah!”  Then we crowded up for a group picture. I had the outriggers folded in so I wouldn’t get stuck in the grass or be a road hog.

In August 2015 I visited Fort Clatsap and checked out Netul Landing. My notes are in the last part of this blog post.

We then headed north to the landing for visiting and cake.

The party strung out behind until we re-entered the main channel.

Soon I spotted the most beautiful boat. It’s a small Chinook ocean-going canoe.

The owner had made a wood mold to create the finished boat, gunnels, deck and all entirely of light fiberglass so it would never rot. He now has the molds to create more when the time comes.

It is flat bottomed and reflects a design that has evolved over thousands of years. A sweetwater, or lake canoe has evolved into a different design. A brief explanation by trailtribes.org can be found here.

Pulling out at Netul Landing.

Two landings techniques were notable. One was to accelerate into the ramp, grind off a little hull, and then step out dry. Another was to park parallel and then roll out and accept the wet. The Chinook canoe was treated more carefully.

I was privileged to help carry the canoe to the trailer.

A closer look at the home built boat I paddled with back at the river’s mouth. It has a built in wheel. When on land he just drags it around like airport luggage.

A little bit of cake was still left by the time I got there.

This is a lightweight under 40lb. canoe by ‘Advantage’

The Rangers went around asking if anyone needed a ride back to the Astoria landing to fetch their cars so they could come back and load up their boats. I didn’t know that this was an option but it worked out well for most as the wind was picking up. I can’t guarantee they’ll do a shuttle next year but it could tempting after a 5.1 mile paddle.

The literature downplayed the short trip down from Netul Landing as suitable for less experienced kayakers but it is a good place to launch to paddle the entire river. The Lewis and Clark river runs about six miles.  I headed upstream alone as it was was still only one o-clock.

The first adventure was a black creature rustling ahead behind the shrubs. After just leaving the Lewis and Clark expedition I first thought BEAR and cautiously steered for the other bank.

The river banks were otherwise quiet, grassy, non-threatening and played their part of a pleasant day out on the water.

I reached the first upstream bridge in about twenty minutes.

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Here is the bridge from google’s street view. It has a pull out if you wish to drag a boat down to the water.

Screen Shot 2017-08-25 at 12.50.03 PM.png

Here’s a ‘googlemap’ view of the upper Lewis and Clark river as it crosses under a couple of bridges.

Heading back downstream I dodged the pilings. I only hit one because it was hiding underwater. The flipper’s shaft bent about thirty degrees but still worked almost fine.

Back near the Netul Landing the pilings are more frequent and often made of steel.

By now the wind was gusting up to 24.2 mph mostly from varying angles ahead.  That meant much fun tacking through the pilings.

I passed and greeted an inflatable that with the aid of the wind, was easily paddling back upstream.

One of many small mini gardens growing atop the pilings.

I beached under the riverside trail at the fort and got out warmer stuff to wear. Dave and Melissa had given me a waterproof bag as a gift and it proved handy to keep my sweatshirt dry before getting it soaked later in the bay.

The Astoria column with the boatyard in the foreground.

One of the boatyard buildings as seen through a wet sail.

It was a windy and splashy trip back along the edge of Young’s Bay. With the sail mostly rolled up (reefed) the boat still felt flat and secure as it reached almost 14 mph.

Screen Shot 2017-08-26 at 2.35.39 AM.png

This boat has what is referred to s a ‘wet ride’.

I had invited two guests. One observed that 100 paddles sounded like about 96 too many. Group rides are how I got started but it can be a solo sport. This trip follows a historical route that led to the building of the winter encampment of Lewis and Clark in 1805-1806. I appreciated the Park staff giving us a sense of the importance of the place that I would not have noticed alone.

The other invited guest had a tight timeline. I couldn’t see not being out in the water all day if I had cleared off enough of my obligations and there was fun was to be had.

Fort Clatsop also offers three hour guided paddle tours throughout the summer where they will provide the two-person boats and equipment. The registration is done online.

Lewis and Clark River Paddle Tours

Hop in a two person watercraft and paddle along the lush riverbanks of the Lewis and Clark River. See bald eagles soar while you calmly float through history and hear a unique perspective of Lewis and Clark National Historical Park.The themes of these three hour ranger-led paddles will vary and include natural and cultural topics geared for all interests.
Tours will run Thursday through Sunday during the summer. Tours will start on June 24, 2017 and run through September 3, 2017.

  • The park will provide water craft, paddles, and life jackets however, if you are a special size you may want to bring your own life jacket.

…There is more to read, you register online, and the Tour is free with park admission.

I saw one bald eagle today as I ‘calmly floated through history.’

Go to: https://www.nps.gov/lewi/planyourvisit/paddle-tours.htm for more information.

Due to a battery failure, I like the results of my phone’s MapMyTracks ap better as it shows 3.6 miles more distance.  I think the phone covered the faster return trip when the Garmin had ‘died’. Even better, the phone picked up a top speed of 13.8 mph (!!) versus the 7.9 on the Garmin. Paddling usually averages around 3 mph.

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Saturday, 9 November, 2013

I had set a goal of sorting bulbs from noon till six, then going to a community dinner, then some more sorting.  I even took a photo of the bulb room on my phone in case I had no time to blog other than from the phone app.  And then…  I went outside to take some photos of the garden so I would have an easy little something about which to blog at the end of the day.

Hebe in Allan's garden

Hebe in Allan’s garden

another of Allan's hebes, the one that looks just like a juniper.

another of Allan’s hebes, the one that looks just like a juniper.

side garden fuchsia

side garden fuchsia

another Fuchsia

another Fuchsia

a pretty Lysimachia blooming in a pot....Sorry so uninformative about the names!

a pretty Lysimachia blooming in a pot….Sorry so uninformative about the names!

Just a few tiny flowers still on the Dicentra scandens; most of it has died back.

Just a few tiny flowers still on the Dicentra scandens; most of it has died back.

heathers waiting to be planted

heathers waiting to be planted

Yes, heathers!  I was lured by these at Back Alley Gardens and they are the first heathers I have ever bought for myself.  I like the upright shapes, just cannot figure out where to put them.

Hydrangea 'Pistachio' waiting to planted because I have not found the perfect spot.

Hydrangea ‘Pistachio’ waiting to planted because I have not found the perfect spot.

my topiary bird, a gift from Sarah Sloane

my topiary bird, a gift from Sarah Sloane

The trouble started when I looked in the greenhouse and was reminded of the various plants I recently acquired at Back Alley Gardens and have not yet planted.

greenhouse

plants to winter over, and ones that should get planted

I lost the tag for the one below; it has been blooming blue for several weeks and I have no clue what it is, or how big it gets:

impressive blue thing

impressive blue thing

I continued my tour down the east side of the garden.

Penstemon backed with Euphorbia

Penstemon backed with Euphorbia

some kale I can't seem to get around to harvesting

some kale I can’t seem to get around to harvesting

Leycesteria 'Golden Lanterns'

Leycesteria ‘Golden Lanterns’

a color echo with Sedum 'Autumn Joy'

a color echo with Sedum ‘Autumn Fire’ (yes, Fire instead of Joy)

cotoneaster berries and rose hips

cotoneaster berries and rose hips

a Euphorbia in waiting to put on a late winter flower show

a Euphorbia in waiting to put on a late winter flower show

There is work going on next door on the crab pots and some have emerged all bright and ready from under the silver tarp.

with old debris pile in foreground

with old debris pile in foreground

Almost to the bogsy woods, I was reminded why I don’t go back there on windy days.

two of several branches down from last Saturday's windstorm...not even from the Danger Tree

two of several branches down from last Saturday’s windstorm…not even from the Danger Tree

Across the south end of the mixed beds:

a few Nicotiana langsdorfii flowers

a few Nicotiana langsdorfii flowers

"black" scabiosa

“black” scabiosa

tall and dramatic Eupatorium heads (Joe Pye Weed)

tall and dramatic Eupatorium heads (Joe Pye Weed)

a golden hydrangea reminds me I should (but did not) put out some Sluggo.

a golden hydrangea reminds me I should (but did not) put out some Sluggo.

Turning to walk up the west side path…

Schizostylis and Hebe

Schizostylis and Hebe

Escallonia 'Pink Princess' blooming ridiculously late

Escallonia ‘Pink Princess’ blooming ridiculously late

more hardy fuchsias

more hardy fuchsias

We just last night watched a Ciscoe Morris show in which he said Fuchsia ‘Lady Boothby’ gets 14 feet tall.  I must have it!

Physocarpus leaves backed with Leycesteria 'Jealousy'

Physocarpus leaves backed with Leycesteria ‘Jealousy’

Almost at the north end of the west path, major procrastination slammed headlong into my bulb sorting plans.  I took a photo of another hardy Fuchsia and pondered how there is nothing to stop the eye from seeing the white white white garage next door.

view through to garage

view through to garage

When Nora was alive, I liked to leave the views open for her to see the garden.  Now I realized this would be an excellent spot for three of the evergreens I got from Back Alley…the ones languishing in the greenhouse.

I tried to ignore the project, taking another photo.

golden pineapple sage and dahlia

golden pineapple sage and dahlia

One look  back did me in.  I could move the blueberry to the cleared area of the debris pile and oh, I should do it now on this mild, pleasant day, much too nice a day to be sorting bulbs in the garage.

I could just move that blueberry....

I could just move that blueberry….

An hour later, three new plants were in and the blueberry and a Kerria japonica variegata had been moved to the debris pile and the bogsy wood.  I madly pulled potatoes out of hole in the debris pile that the blueberry went into.

after....I just walked away from the mess when done planting.

after….I just walked away from the mess when done planting.

I planted a Eucryphia ‘Nymansay’ and a Olearia traversii…and a third little tree whose tag I HAD but I fear it may have gotten buried and I now have no clue what it is.  Maybe Pam Fleming of Back Alley Gardens will know:

It is silver and lovely

It is silver and lovely

with delicate brown stems and tiny leaves.

with delicate brown stems and tiny leaves.

[Next day: I found the tag: Leptospermum lanigerum ‘Silver Form’]

Oh, by the way, Stephen and John of the wonderful bayside garden that I visited with Nancy not long ago have now discovered Back Alley as well and bought some very cool plants there to enhance their garden….including a Mahonia ‘Dan Hinkley’ that escaped me!  Good find!

I had already changed my socks twice and shoes once.  Twice because I put feet in nice dry socks back into the first pair of wet shoes.  In watering the new plants in I managed to pour water into my shoe.

dagnab it

dagnab it

At 1:45 I finally entered bulb land, wet shoe and all, and buckled down to work, fueled by two of Allan’s brownies.

bulb central

bulb central

I applied myself pretty well except for a couple of walks down to Judy’s house (four doors down) to share some potatoes and the one rather small acorn squash.  She had had plants to dig up two old mugo pines and replace them with fresh dwarf ones, but football had intervened.

It is not as easy as it used to be to stand and sort for many hours, so I truly did need a couple of little walks.

Meanwhile, I thought Allan had been out goofing off or perhaps collecting the pile of bamboo left at the Depot Restaurant after yesterday’s job.  Instead he had been doing a hard slog at Ann’s garden clearing a rough area along the east side of the back yard.

Allan's before...

Allan’s before…

and after.

and after.

before

before

and an impressive after

and an impressive after

The next interference to my bulb sorting focus came at 5:45 when we went three blocks down Lake Street to the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum for the annual Chinook Indian Nation fundraiser and dinner.  This local tribe continues to struggle for federal recognition and their cause is one we believe in supporting.

Chinook Indian Nation dinner

Chinook Indian Nation dinner

dinner

salmon, oysters, coleslaw, fry bread...

salmon, oysters, coleslaw, fry bread…

and desserts

and desserts

I don’t like oysters, and a man at our table had gotten to the dinner just after they had run out, so I was able to give him my three oysters.  In exchange, I was offered  extra fry bread so it worked out well.

t shirts for sale

t shirts for sale

silent auction

silent auction

After dinner a group entertained us with drumming and a chant.

chant

I got choked up because it was so beautiful, especially when I looked around the room and saw audience members joining in.

joining in

joining in with hand gestures

Then…home to bulb land.  I lasted one more hour before my back hurt so much I had to give it up for the night.

bulbs

bulb central

bulb central

Unfortunately, the weather is supposed to be beautiful for two days, meaning we will have to plant bulbs during the day.  How much I would rather have three rainy days to get them all sorted at once.  That never seems to happen!

On the other hand, it may be a boon to break up the sorting with some planting because the sorting does make my back freeze up something fierce.  I have utmost respect for anyone who sorts bulbs in the bulb warehouse for eight hours a day.

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August 23, 2013, in Menlo, Washington

We approached the fair from the back, having taken a detour in order to look at a pretty garden.   I had expected a quiet and sedate little fair so  the large selection of gaudy carnival rides quite took me by surprise.

approaching the fair

approaching the fair

rides

rides

kind of warlike, but science-fictiony.

kind of warlike, but science-fictiony.

bright whirly thing

bright whirly thing

rides

Starship...was it named before the year 2000?

Starship…was it named before the year 2000?

It whirled around quickly and perhaps was anti-gravity inside.

It whirled around quickly and perhaps was anti-gravity inside.

cups

memories

memories

As you can guess with my various phobias, a Merry-Go-Round is about my speed and my only childhood memory of a roller coaster is not a happy one!  I was scared out of my wits and after one circuit breathed a sigh of relief…but it passed by the loading spot and went around two more times!

Allan's roller coaster photo.  He admits he usually had his eyes closed when going on a roller coaster.

Allan’s roller coaster photo.

Below:  Allan’s photo of one of the ride attendants filling a bubble with air for a waiting child:

air

We heard that the air bubble ride was very popular.

We heard that the air bubble ride was very popular.  photo by Allan

It was impossible to stand up in the spinning bubbles.

Allan’s photo: It was impossible to stand up in the spinning bubbles.

Allan's photo of stairs going up to a long slide.

Allan’s photo of stairs going up to a long slide.

Leaving the screams and laughter of the carnival, we entered the horse barn.

painted horse

painted horse

We later saw the above horse in a competition and its name was “Love”.

This little pony was getting some affection:

pony

But apparently it did not want affection from just anyone.  After it was led out (amid cried by its people of “Horse coming through! Horse coming through!”)…

pony

….we saw this sign on its stall.

pony

I looked up 4-H (about which as a city girl I grew up knowing little) and learned that it stands for  Head (Managing, Thinking),  Heart (Relating, Caring), Hands (Giving, Working) and Health (Being, Living.)a 4-H-ers handsome horseMost of the horses were out at a competition of some sort.  We left the barn and walked past food vendors to a series of sheds and barns, each with a theme.

sheds

Thinking we might find our client, Ann, who had inspired us to go the fair, we started with the sewing barn.

sewing

Throughout the fair we found tributes to Margaret who had clearly been a supporter and contributor to many aspects of the event.

margaret

the fair's slogan

the fair’s slogan

Quilts and Roses, Tails and Noses…..For some reason, wherever I saw the fair’s catchy slogan, I felt choked up and a little teary eyed.  I wished my friend Montana Mary was with us because she would have loved the whole thing.

Some excellent quilts were on display.

quilts, photo by Allan

quilts, photo by Allan

ABCs

ABCs

quilt

Allan’s photo of a prize winner

circles

Now I’m going to do that terribly annoying thing that newcomers and incomers do:  Make brilliant suggestions for improving the fair.  A lot of the quilts were hung sideways like this:

hard to see and appreciate

hard to see and appreciate

sideways

hard to get the full effect

hard to get the full effect

Allan held a couple of them open so I could see them better, but I know there were many quilts that I missed just through not wanting to struggle with the sideways poles they hung on.

roses

roses

It was nothing like looking at them full on.  I am sure the problem was lack of room.

However, in the next barn a large selection of hobbies was on display.   I did not go deep into that barn; Allan told me later some of them were in small old cases that were worn out and opaque, cloudy, hard to see into.  Some of the hobbies were more like collections:

barbie collection

barbie collection, photo by Allan

I don’t want to insult anyone’s collection, but that’s not the kind of thing I think of as a hobby.  (Allan tells me the Puyallup Fair has similar collection displays but with more room.)

a book collection

Allan’s photo of a book collection

Here comes my incomer suggestion:  I say consolidate the collections into a smaller area in the center of the room, (sorry, Barbie!) and give way more wall space for the skilled and beautiful quilt creations.  Perhaps even the “foods” barn could have more room for quilts, and the quilts could be a running theme through the whole show.    End suggestion number one!

Allan's photo of a clock in the hobby barn:  Now that's beautiful!

Allan’s photo of a clock in the hobby barn: Now that’s beautiful!

This human-sized sculpture of St Francis reminded me intensely (in a positive way) of a Vorlon from Babylon 5.

Vorlon

In the “foods” barn we found the classic displays of gleaming home canned produce and treats.

food

peaches

peaches

mix

mix

In another small barn, we found some gardening displays.

Master Gardeners

Master Gardeners

(I was a Master Gardener, so called, never felt the training really qualified one as a “master”, dropped out after one year. )

map of Master Gardener project at our museum

map of Master Gardener project at our museum

a creative display

a creative display

Our local grange is the sponsor of the Long Beach Peninsula Edible Garden Tour.

Long Beach Grange

Long Beach Grange

bees

bees

The hornet next below reminds me of the scariest experiences I have ever had gardening, when I came thisclose to backing into one while weeding at Discovery Heights.

chilling

chilling

This man was charmingly enthusiastic about his pitcher plant and the flies inside of it.  I used to have one of these at the edge of my pond…it came through one winter…wish I still had it!

plant

Grange news

Grange news

[I find it interesting that Nirvana member Krist Novoselic moved to a small town upriver from us and became an active member (the “Worthy Master”, in fact) of his local grange.]

rhodos

Next door to the gardening themed barn, we found animal cuteness, preceded by chickens.

chicks

more poultry

more poultry

and then …. bunnies.

Allan's rabbit photo

I find them unsurpassingly adorable although I know my friend Sheila, who has been plagued with garden-raiding rabbits, feels quite, quite differently.

rabbit

ears

such ears!

such ears!

wiggly

This “rabbit parts” drawing makes me worry about the eventual fate of the bunnies…But I suppose 4-H-ers might make a similar drawing of a horse…

bunnies

After perusing every rabbit and bird, we entered the barn of the flower exhibit.

garden

Within, assorted categories of plants were displayed.

flowers

First came roses:

As you can see, some quilts were also on display in this room.

As you can see, there was room to display more quitls….

All along the walls in this room, it would have been possible to hang more of the quilts that were so crowdedly displayed in the sewing barn.

Rose 'Julio Iglesias'

Rose ‘Julio Iglesias’

The roses were well labeled with the name of each.

Rose 'Distant Drums'

Rose ‘Distant Drums’

Distant Drums was labeled as “Distance Drums” but because this rose was given to me as a present once by a particularly valued old friend (Bryan Runnings), I knew its real name.  Wish I still had it!  At the time, my old garden was too shady to support many roses.  That silvery colour is true to reality.

Next came dahlias, and here comes my next Incomer Suggestion for Improvement.  The gorgeous dahlias were not labeled at all by name.  So when I saw several black ones I particularly craved, I could not write down names for later plant acquisition.

dahlias

I want this one...

I want this one…

and this one...

and this one…

dahlia

trio

dahliaThis was the only information given:

sign

Allan said I could write to the person at the bottom of the tag but that is a lot of effort!

another example of the need for more informative labeling

another example of the need for more informative labeling

and another:  name of Hosta, please?

and another: name of Hosta, please?

Another suggestion, and this one was brought up by someone else with whom I was talking at the fair:  The flower room could be cooled off with fans, and perhaps the water in the vases changed to keep the flowers fresh.  By Friday evening, some were wilting and some had lost their petals.  The room had been, I was told, quite warm earlier in the day.

Allan's photo of cosmos

Allan’s photo of cosmos

and another bouquet photo by Allan

and another bouquet photo by Allan

I would like a name for the interesting cultivar in the above photo!

just a little cool air would be good here to keep them closer to tip top shape

just a little cool air would be good here to keep them closer to tip top shape

These were labeled ("blue globe thistle" and "Russian sage") and thus educational as well as attractive

These were labeled (“blue globe thistle” and “Russian sage”) and thus educational as well as attractive

another informative sign

another informative sign

a 1st prize

and another 1st

1st prizes

Allan said this was the only Dianthus entry.

Allan said this was the only Dianthus entry.

bouquet

Down the center of the room, a row of bouquets had competed for prizes.

flowers

a foliage display

a foliage display

one display unaffected by warm temperatures

one display unaffected by warm temperatures

I found the several memorials for Margaret to be very moving.

another Memorial for Margaret

another Memorial for Margaret

I did a little research and learned she managed the fair for 8 years and died in early 2013.

margaret

margaret

that darling slogan again

that darling slogan again

As this journal  entry goes on and on…and on….I wonder if I should have divided it into “Quilts and Roses” and “Tails and Noses”!  But then where would the rides and (later) Elvis have fit in?

A nearby barn contained the traditional displays of veg large and small that I expected and looked forward to finding at the fair.

herb display

herb display

veg

veg

fun veg

fun veg

strange veg

strange veg

big veg

big veg

green

You know I love gardening quotations:

quote

quote

Wall space had been found to hang a few more quilts:

quilt2

quilt

and another memorial for Margaret Habersetzer.

m

Even though I wanted more education on cultivar names of flowers in the flower display, I did find informative displays here and there at the fair.

about fish....

about fish….

and pigs

and pigs

Pigs are said to be smarter and more trainable than dogs.  I could see the intelligence in their eyes in the pig barn….

pig

that is, when their eyes were open.

pigs

pig

pigs

pig

pig

pig

This girl felt safe and comfortable between two large pigs cleaning a pig’s ears.

pig

In the cattle barn, the animals were tethered to the wall but clearly were so placid that they would not kick out behind themselves.

cows

I hope this was less annoying to wear than it looked...

I hope this was less annoying to wear than it looked…

dinnertime

dinnertime

classical cow names

classical cow names

These two folks were having a well informed discussion about the finer points of cows.

These two folks were having a well informed discussion about the finer points of cows.

mom

sleek like a sea lion

sleek like a sea lion

a calf being petted

a calf being petted

Both Allan and I took photos of the pattern on these two backs:

my photo

my photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

more pets

more pets

Having looked at every animal and every veg and flower in every barn (we thought), we went in search of dinner.  On the way, we passed Elvis.

Allan got the best photo of Mr. Presley.

Allan got the best photo of Mr. Presley.

We found one more barn to go through whose booths seemed to consist mostly of churches and politics but there I did find Andi Day promoting the Long Beach Peninsula.

Andi Day

Andi Day

While she and I were talking, a couple from the area joined the conversation and it turned out that their family had been somehow connected with the Kola House in Ilwaco, a large former B&B that is to the south of our friends and garden clients Larry and Robert’s home.  Their names were Pete and Penny Kramer and I would like to talk to them some more.  They said they have some interesting historical photos of Ilwaco.

Allan had not noticed the Funbeach booth so he wandered off and got lost.  By the time I emerged, Elvis had been replaced by the excellent Naselle Marimba Band.

Naselle Marimba Band

Naselle Marimba Band

This tall cowgirl was photographed by both me and Allan as she wandered the fair.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

my photo

my photo

fairground hilarity

fairground hilarity

I found the Indian Fry bread I had been seeking…

chinook

chinooks

The Chinook have had a heartbreakingly difficult time being recognized as a tribe.  You can sign a petition on this subject here.

Eventually, Allan reappeared (perhaps I was the lost one) after I had finished my bread.  He had eaten a gyros but said it was too mayonaissey.  I saw a sign for a baked potato booth and thought that sounded intriguing.  Couldn’t locate it.  Did see a friendly deep fried booth but had no desire for a fried twinkie.

Deep Fried Heaven

Deep Fried Heaven

Then I noticed something that had peripherally registed before: salmon being cooked near the rollercoaster ride.

fish

Chinook tattoo on the salmon chef

Chinook tattoo on the salmon chef

salmon fire

salmon fire

Allan's photo:  It smelled delicious

Allan’s photo: It smelled delicious

The salmon came from the same kitchen as the fry bread for a good price, so I had some.

very tasty

very tasty

Nearby, a man played traditional flute.

Nearby, a man played traditional flute.

On Allan’s walkabout, he had seen that an equestrian event was about to take place so we strolled over past the horse barn to the corral.   I was busy eating the last of the salmon, so Allan took some photos.

The younger riders were led through the course…

pony

The older riders and their mounts were swift and accomplished.

horse

Some were just too young to compete.

baby

Allan’s photo

I did want to get home before dark and had already stayed longer than planned.  As we looked for the exit gate, a rain began.  Fortunately for the fairgoers, it was not a cold rain.

At the gate, we saw this sign and realized…we had not found any goats!

where had they been?

where had they been?

We did not go back to seek them out.

Returning to our van, we passed another nice garden.

right on Highway 6

right on Highway 6

garden

The houses along this stretch of road back right up to the fair.

Now, having seen the Pacific County Fair, I am interested in going next year to the Clatsop County Fair near Astoria, Oregon and see how it compares.

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