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Posts Tagged ‘Christmas lights’

What have we done this year for the holidays?  Not much.  I did not decorate one little bit, because I did not want to give up reading and gardening time to put up a tree and then take it down again.

Oh, but wait.  I did put out one piece of Christmas decoration, something I have had since 1977:

We have had enough seasonal festivity to make this Season’s Greetings post.  (Soon, I will catch up on the reading and gardening news for December.)

Saturday, 15 December 2018

We had our holiday dinner at the Depot Restaurant early with Our Kathleen, because her schedule would not permit her to join us on Christmas eve.  Our repast was so delicious that I must show you. Even though some people make fun of pictures of dinner, I know for a fact that some of you like that sort of thing.

bubbly, cheesy, flavourful French onion soup

the winter’s best wilted spinach salad

delicately prepared fish for Allan, with a lemony sauce

Kathleen chose the Thai calamari appetizer for her entree.

My favourite winter menu dish, the Cingiale Brasato

flan

sorbet duo

tiramisu

The Depot tree, decorated in a foodie theme, and in the window box, African daisies are still blooming

We decided to forgo our traditional Christmas crackers and exchanged presents without opening them.

Tuesday, 18 December 2018

My own personal mission was to not leave my property.  However, we could not miss our holiday tradition of enjoying the Christmas Village display at the Hungry Harbor Grille in Long Beach.

a Christmas crab pot in our post office garden

On the way, we picked up more books from the library, where we found a Christmas carol gathering.

Allan’s photo

We drove to the end of the Bolstad beach approach to see how far up the massive, storm driven tide had come. Quite, far, with driftwood all the way to the picnic shelters.  Allan acquired a bundle of kelp for compost bins, stuffing it into the back of the van.

a feast day for some gulls

in the planter outside, flowers still blooming in our unusually mild winter

even bigger than usual

I imagine myself in the idyllic scene, where the snow is not slippery and where everyone likes each other.

Each building is so detailed, one could spend hours looking in the windows.  Pilgrim Pat, who first took us to see this village, used to take binoculars so that she could see the details of the far away buildings.

Below, I like the triangular building.  It reminds me of Seattle.  Behind it, by the window, it the apartment building with a roof garden which is my choice of where to live, on the top floor and with the garden as part of my domain.

Why I choose that instead of a house can only be explained by my fond memories of the year when I lived in the Gables apartments in Seattle.

The Gables would fit right into the village.  My apartment was on the second floor off the central courtyard.

Allan went outside the restaurant and, through the window, got two side views of my apartment building.

Looks like we somehow got our heavy cement curved bench up to the roof garden!

I now might rather choose to live in the new little float house:

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo; it is rather exciting that the TARDIS is there.

Allan’s photo

The village harbour has a multitude of lighthouses.

Allan’s photo

the ghost ship

Clang, clang, clang went the trolley,
Ding, ding, ding went the bell…as the trolley zoomed by the fish market…

…and the Long Beach Tavern.

The Clamshell Railroad was running, too.

As darkness fell, the carnival lights came on.

one of several lodgings to stay when you visit

If you would like to watch a video that shows the trains and the trolley, click here.  It is rather noisy from other diners; just imagine that you are sitting in a popular café with a view of the village.

We dined on the pasta special and a Reuben sandwich.

Night had come by the time we left the village.

the lights of Long Beach

Allan photographed the Shelburne Hotel on our way home (with our van whiffing of salty kelp):

And he walked to the next block to get a photo of the Christmas lights at Lucy Dagger’s house:

a piratical Christmas

In the evening, I read a book about another village where (despite an alarming number of murders) life is cozy and friends are friends for life.

After that excursion, I did not have to leave the property for five blissful days. Every day is a holiday of reading, gardening, puttering, and projects.  Skooter sleeps in even later than we do….

Monday, 24 December 2018

We had the pleasure of a visit from Mary and Denny, formerly of Klipsan Beach Cottage and now easing into their retirement in their new home in nearby Naselle.  After so many years of being constantly on call at the cottage resort, Mary says she is going to have to figure out what she likes to do in all her free time.  Mary and Denny were on their way to a late afternoon Christmas Eve dinner at the Depot, and our own Dickens Christmas Eve dinner came later at 7:30 PM.

The Depot Restaurant

Dickens dinner

The glory of Yorkshire pudding

Allan tried a new menu item of spice meat balls and hummus.

Window boxes still flowering

Egg nog flan

View from our table

On the tree




We opened our presents late in the evening and now, for us, the celebration is done and we will return to gardening, puttering, reading, and projects—one of which is to catch up with a few blog posts before going on another short blogging hiatus.

 

 

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Friday, 15 December 2017

When we’d learned there was to be a rally against ICE deportations in the afternoon, interfering with my at-home goals, I had decided that we should try to polish off some of the leftover work beforehand.

We began at the Ilwaco boatyard garden, planting about six good sized starts of Solidago ‘Fireworks’ in empty spaces along the two block long garden.

boatyard garden looking south

planting

The last of the old cosmos got pulled, and I am calling this garden done for 2017.

crab pot tree at the end of the garden (Allan’s photo)

In Long Beach’s Fifth Street Park, I planted two clumps of the solidago (a short and well behaved clumping goldenrod) while Allan snipped a few stray brown stems from nearby planters.

Fifth Street Park

Narcissi already blooming in Fifth Street Park

We cruised up to the Anchorage Cottages, thinking we could finally clip back the chrysanthemums and agyranthemums.  Our summery weather had them still blooming, so we did not even get out of the van, just turned around and left.

At The Red Barn Arena, we planted a couple of pieces of the goldenrod and pulled out one dead erysimum.

a wee bit of weeding

Midge in her fine coat.

Next door at Diane’s garden, the remaining annuals still looked too lush to pull.  I left a note suggesting she just cut back anything in those pots that looks tatty later.  I can’t keep going back to check on them every week; that is not cost effective for either of us.

the annuals that will not die

I look forward to many bulbs in this raised septic garden.

We now had an hour and a half left before the rally, with no more work to do.  This called for a stop at NIVA green.

In NIVA green, with Heather’s assistant, Wes, and Heather Ramsay herself

a peek through the doorway into the magic workshop (Allan’s photo)

Heather had put out some new lamps:

I fell hard for this double decker nightlight and got it for myself, even though buying presents for myself was not on the agenda.

This red truck is going to go beautifully with a “Card Lady’ card of a red truck with a Christmas tree in the back.

After NIVA, we spent 40 minutes relaxing at Abbracci Coffee Bar.  I am quite annoyed that the bright summer-like sun blurred out my focus on the Christmas tree in their window.  Trust me, it was such a pretty sight.  Let’s say it is like a water colour.

an elegant pattern on my latte

Maddy of Pink Poppy Bakery is retiring her business to become a personal chef for an artists’ retreat.   Abbracci will be the only local place to get her baked goods, like this delicately flavoured Swedish Traveling Cake.  Elixir Coffee up in South Bend will also have her treats.

Abbracci art (Allan’s photo)

In Abbracci, I had such a helpful conversation with owners Tony and Bernardo and one of their patrons. I was asked (not in these exact words) about the severe clean up of the narrow garden to the south of their building: Would the plants come back? I had dug up lots of volunteer blue scabiosa and other perennials in an attempt to start over. I told them that I try to rein in my “messy gardening style” and was thinking of a much tidier planting there. Turns out all three of them love the wild and tangly style. It made the happy to hear that I could so easily make that garden bed messy again.

Finally, it was time for the rally.  This time, the organizer had decided to split the event between Long Beach and Ocean Park.  I had kvetched about it making the groups too small, and indeed, the rally began with only three of us.  For new readers, here is the background again:

“[Long Beach Peninsula Resident] Rosas was arrested when going to Okie’s early in the morning of November 27. When he asked why he was being arrested, ICE officers said “My supervisor asked me to come find you because of what appeared in the newspaper.” We want to speak out against this arrest and on the attack on his rights to free speech.

The original story in the Seattle Times (my home town paper) is here, and well worth reading.

The follow up, after the arrest of Rosas, is here.

He appears to have been sought out because he spoke (under his nickname) to the Seattle Times.  ICE did not detain him earlier, even though he asked them why they took his family and not him.

This story has drawn the attention of the Mexican consulate and has been picked up by national and international news, including the Washington Post and The Independent, UK.

Here is a link to the gofundme where you can contribute, to help him and his family, who were deported to Mexico.  (His children are American citizens, who went with their mother.)

Today, when we first arrived, we thought there was no one else, and we waited in our van for a bit.  Then we saw one lone figure arrive; it was Ann, who had also been waiting in her vehicle.

Allan’s photo

We settled into our rallying as the wind picked up and the rain arrived.  Allan took all the rally photos but one.  My hands were so cold that I didn’t even think of getting out the camera.

Only once were we heckled with a “WOOO Trump!” from a young fellow driving a foreign made car; the rest of the interaction from passing vehicles was all waves and honks and thumbs up.

Everyne at the Ocean Park rally point bailed out when the rain came.  I was not about to stop for rain; I know darn well that Rosas himself worked on the bay in all sorts of weather.

MaryBeth saw my one real-time photo on Facebook and came to join us.  Four felt much more effective to me than three.

The rain finally stopped and out came a rainbow behind us.

Our good friend Susie was just at that moment returning from an out of town trip, too late to join us..

our Susie

We endured till 4:15 PM.

Allan and I could see a glorious pink sky and so we drove to the west end of Sid Snyder drive for a better look.

looking west

Allan’s photo, to the south

We nabbed a few Christmas lights photos on the way home.

Ilwaco City Hall

Ocean Beach Hospital, Ilwaco (Allan’s photo)

Ocean Beach Hospital (Allan’s photo)

Crab pots on First Avenue

We had a mere 45 minutes turn around time at home.  I was able to erase Diane’s garden and the Red Barn from the work board.  The other jobs are simply going to have to wait until we have a hard frost for their final check up…if we have such a thing this winter.

We soon left again for our weekly North Beach Garden Gang dinner at OleBob’s Café at the Port.

on the way: The Crab Pot Tree

The four us us (Tangly Cottage Gardening and Sea Star Gardening) were joined this week by our good friend Ed of Strange Landscaping.

In the entry hallway: Pins show where visitors have come from.

a local sea captain

This week’s specials:

a beef empanada

the view

south window reflection shows the inside, the outdoor dining deck, and the Jessie’s Ilwaco Fish Co Christmas star

Dave, Ed, Allan, Melissa, with Lynn and Chef Laura in the background

Paella was another special of the night.

Allan’s fresh caught rockfish with Laura’s chimichurri sauce and a “perfectly done” baked potato

flan for dessert

We stayed till after closing, when I was so happy to sit with Laura’s dog, Pancho.

I so much want a nice little dog.  Pancho is such a good boy.

I suddenly felt ever so exhausted.  Yet tomorrow is another busy, not at-home day.

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Sunday, 10 December 2017

I wrenched myself away from gardening projects today, and Allan from writing his boating blog post (the one that published a couple of days ago) to attend a housewarming party for our friend Sarah, author of The Marble Game.   We arrived in the last hour of the party.  The conversation among her friends turned to how some of us just like to stay home, but we all wanted to see Sarah more than we wanted to stay home that day.

Sarah has a brand new little house.  It would have been a tiny house had there not been rules in Ocean Park that a house cannot be smaller than…600 square feet?  It is a LITTLE, darling house, so new that it does not yet have its final coat of exterior paint or all of its indoor trim.

cozy

 

an ocean view from the kitchen, and a fire circle

stairs to the loft

looking down (Allan’s photo)

the lofty view (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

We enjoyed Sarah’s potato leek soup and some bread, with cookies for dessert.  I loved seeing Sarah’s good dogs again and her brand new kitty, Wally.

Wally is a snuggler.

a very relaxed kitten

Mabe

and Piper

We had the perfect housewarming card for Sarah, from The Card Lady.

naptime

The yard is on two levels, open in the middle around the house, and surrounded with evergreen huckleberry shrubs.  Sarah was a garden designer on the east coast.  I’m excited to see what she does with it.

north east corner, overlooking evergreen huckleberries

After we departed, we took ourselves on a driving tour of the neighbourhood.

I do love a tower.

an enticing path

sign says “CAMP…something…”

outflow from Loomis Lake

Those yellow outbuildings by the slough, above, are by a manufactured home for sale right on the slough…with a double lot as big as mine.  OH how I want it!  I miss having a natural water feature in my garden.  If it had been for sale when we were looking in 2010…I wonder if I would have picked it.  Maybe one of you will buy it so I can visit.  Maybe one of those outbuildings could be a tiny house…

Further west:

fancy porch

We drove to the Ocean Park approach (Bay Avenue) to see the sunset.  Allan’s sunset photos:

Part of our mission was to go to Oysterville after dark to see the lights at THE Oysterville garden and another house nearby.

While waiting for dusk to end, we passed the time at Oysterville Sea Farms…

Allan’s photo

on the deck overlooking Willapa Bay….

looking east

looking south (Allan’s photo)

…and we bought a jar of cranberry butter to “pay” for enjoying the deck.

in the shop

Oysters are the main feature.

We then found the lights we were seeking.

At THE Oysterville garden, only two of the boxwood balls were lit up; we’ve heard that on some evenings, more of them are:

Back in Ilwaco, while dropping a couple of books in the library drop box:

Ilwaco Timberland Library

Now, back to the garden for me for at least three more days of this almost summerlike weather.

 

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Tuesday, 2 December 2014

I had every intention of finishing Perks of Being a Wallflower and moving on to another book.  (Perks seems much more simplistic than the movie treatment; the protagonist is supposed to be 15 but it seems to me he writes more like a 10 year old.)

At least I have no trouble sleeping in on staycation days…with a little help from Valerian or ZZZquil.  However, waking up to sunny weather made me feel restless.

view from south window

view from south window

"Twas tempting to clean up the river of Geranium 'Rozanne'.  Frozen ground would have made it a chilly task.

“Twas tempting to clean up the river of Geranium ‘Rozanne’. Frozen ground would have made it a chilly task.

view to the southwest

view to the southwest

mermaids in ice

mermaids in ice

I could not help feel the urge to do the project at our volunteer Post Office garden.  This meant I robbed Allan of his staycation day, as the project involved fetching gravel.

(When I went back to our greenhouse to get our tamping tool, I saw the special  buddliea that Todd gave us is thriving despite the cold.)

(When I went back to our greenhouse to get our tamping tool, I saw the special buddliea that Todd gave us is thriving despite the cold.  With some reseeded mustard and arugula.)

so cold the ice was not melting by our parking spot

so cold the ice was not melting by our parking spot

Ilwaco Post Office garden

before

before

The grassy corner has been bugging me since we created this garden a few years back from a rectangle of lawn.  The previous postmistress worried that gravel would get tracked into the post office.  (Not if it’s tamped! But I used her concern as an excuse to do nothing.)  The current postmistress thought it would be fine to bring the garden all the way to the bench, but I worried that the plants would get walked on.  Humans MUST cut corners, you know.  For the past year, all that has been stopping me from fixing the corner was my own stinginess about buying gravel.  When I found out that the Port would let us use some from a pile of theirs, I became obsessed with the idea of getting this little project done.  I had thought of waiting till a Sunday, when we would have fewer passersby.  (Locals do not get home delivery, so the post office is a place where you might see everyone in a day.)  I couldn’t wait!

buckets, hand tools, half moon edger

buckets, ho-mi, double tool, half moon edger, and warm enough in the sun to not need a jacket.

We also used the big pick as the sidewalk edge of the lawn was frozen solid.

sod dug out, garden slightly expanded, brown sandy dirt used to build of garden edge.

sod dug out, garden slightly expanded, brown sandy dirt used to build of garden edge.

sod ready to be hauled away

sod ready to be hauled away

At the port, sod is tossed into our dump spot.

At the port, sod is tossed into our dump spot.  (Looks like it’s going into the marsh but it is really going into a debris pile.)

view to the southeast without distractions

view to the southeast without distractions

view to the northwest, low tide

view to the northwest, low tide

and a gull

and a gull

back to the post office with gravel and all our leftover scraps of landscape fabric

back to the post office with gravel and all our leftover scraps of landscape fabric

We had dug out more of the brown sandy soil to make the gravel nice and thick.  Thus we had to make another trip to the port for more gravel.

tamping

tamping (For a bigger project, we would use our big roller filled with water.)

Testing out how it feels to sit with a nice gravel spot for feet.

Testing out how it feels to sit with a nice gravel spot for one’s feet.

finishing touches, so so Allan thinks.

finishing touches, or so we thought.

I tossed the brown sand toward the back, too, so the soil colour would more or less match.

I am not quite satisfied as I take what I thought would be the "after" photo.

I am not quite satisfied as I take what I thought would be the “after” photo.

Dang blang it!  In the dark, someone could trip on that corner piece of driftwood.

Dang blang it! In the dark, someone could trip on that corner piece of driftwood.

NOW it is done, with white rocks moved to the edge for better visibility, driftwood moved back, and edge much lower.

NOW it is done, with white rocks moved to the edge for better visibility, driftwood moved back, and edge much lower.

officially after

a two and a half hour project:  officially after

more…

We took a little side trip to the Ilwaco Timberland Library, where I hoped I’d get the book I’d been waiting for.

entrance to library...and my book was there!

entrance to library…and my book was there!

I had one more project in mind, one I figured I could accomplish alone.  Having used up the yearly budget for a garden five doors down, I had decided to pull out the dead cosmos as a Christmas present.  I walked down the block and started pulling, sure I could do it all…

before

before

However, I ended up with such a big pile of cosmos that I had to call Allan for help.  There was too much cosmos for the garbage can; it had grown lavishly.

He came with the trailer, to haul the cosmos away to our debris pile.

He came with the trailer, to haul the cosmos away to our debris pile.

Neither one of the tasks we did today was even on my to do list, so there was no crossing-off satisfaction.  The satisfaction was pretty big even without that ritual.

There are still two tiny jobs on the work board:  cleaning up the window boxes at the Depot and cutting back two chrysanthemums in Long Beach.  SURELY this latest cold spell has finished off those plants.

And one bigger project remains: adding some mulch to the post office garden.  I hope to get my own garden cleaned up enough to have some mulch delivered in a nice big pile, some of which could be bucketed down to the post office.

Now, though, I hope I can take a rest, because look what I’ve got: the rest of the Seaside Knitters series, in order.  I’ll be doing a blog post exploring the fictional town of Sea Harbor when I’m done with these.

books

Two days of rain would be helpful for reading.

lights

at dusk, our seasonal lights…

and the moon with our old lighted apple tree

and the moon with our old lighted apple tree

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday, 26 November 2014

While I’ve had my nose in one book after another, Allan saved the blogging day by a boating excursion on….

Loomis Lake

loomis

Loomis Lake

Loomis Lake

The state park access was closed for the season.  Fortunately, having our friend J9 residing in Tides West just a block from a little lakeside park made it possible to launch from there as a guest.

loomispark

Tides West community park, lower right

Allan:  I felt it was a better day for the birds and the bird-watching residents before I intruded. There were over a dozen swans when I first arrived. I quietly walked to the waters edge with my camera but they had moved to the other side of the lake and were gone before I dragged the boat through the shoreside weeds.

IMG_1863

elusive swans

He came prepared with his ‘wellies’ to drag the boat out through the weeds.

He came prepared with his ‘wellies’ to drag the boat out through the weeds.

a weedy shoreline

a weedy shoreline

The Tides West community plans to continue clean up of this lake, as evidenced by meetings listed on their website.

a flock of geese leaving as I drifted downwind toward them.

a flock of geese leaving as I drifted downwind toward them.

IMG_1878

In typical staycation fashion, Allan did not get out of the house till mid afternoon, so it was a short boating excursion.   Afterward, he stopped by J9’s house to help her put up her storm windows and got to see her rambuctius new kittens, Jake and Louie, in action.

Kitten Intermission

IMG_1886

IMG_1888

IMG_1884

On the way home in the dark, he got us all some photos of the Christmas lights in…

Long Beach

IMG_1891

Long Beach City Hall

IMG_1890

lights along Pacific, north of Bolstadt

IMG_1893

Bolstadt beach approach

IMG_1898

window of our favourite shop, NIVA green

IMG_1899

window of our favourite shop, NIVA green

IMG_1900

window of our favourite shop, NIVA green

IMG_1902

Have a look: the yellow chrysanthemum is STILL blooming.

IMG_1903

another lovely shop

IMG_1906

Fifth Street Park

IMG_1908

Fifth Street Park

IMG_1909

Fifth Street Park

IMG_1911

Pacific Avenue (Highway 103)

Holiday lights on Pacific in Long Beach

Fifth Street Park

and Ilwaco…

Ilwaco community building and Ilwaco Timberland library

Ilwaco community building and Ilwaco Timberland library

Ilwaco City Hall

Ilwaco City Hall

crab pot decorations on street lights

crab pot decorations on street lights

Thanks, Allan, for keeping the blog going for one more day!

On Thanksgiving we will be attending an interesting potluck at the Sou’wester Lodge (thanks to the suggestion of Kathleen)…and on Friday an art studio tour all over the Peninsula.  Saturday is the first day of the Saturday Christmas Market at the Port, which I need to photograph for the Discover Ilwaco FB page..  Even though I am mentally in hibernation mode, all of these may provide enough blog fodder to keep the blog going daily through the end November even though staycation arrived early this year.

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Wednesday, 11 December 2013

After a sunset walk along Waterfront Way at the Port of Ilwaco, I took a chilly evening stroll on Spruce Street to gather some holiday lights photos.

The biggest house on School Hill shows up all the way to the port.  The blue stars are a new addition this year.  This house is fairly new and has taken some of the view from houses behind it, an age old problem with residential neighbourhoods on hills and one that I remember well from my years in Seattle.

Cutting house as seen from the flatlands.

blue star house as seen from the flatlands.

On the main road through town, Spruce Street, a bright Santa had appeared.

spruce

north side of Spruce Street

moonrise over Christmas lights on Spruce and Eliza

moonrise over Christmas lights on Spruce and Eliza

This house on Spruce always has good holiday lights.

This house on Spruce always has good holiday lights.

There is nothing quite as nice as a wrapped pillar.  I wish we could get it together to wrap the pillars on the arbour in front of our own house.

Pretty pink Shell Cottage is my perennial favourite Spruce Street house.

Pretty pink Shell Cottage is my perennial favourite Spruce Street house.

Ilwaco Volunteer Fire Department on Spruce

Ilwaco Volunteer Fire Department on Spruce

Friday, 13 December 2013

During the day, walking back from (of course), Olde Towne, I admired some more holiday decor.

our accountant's office on Lake Street

our accountant’s office on Lake Street

adorable twin dormer house at Lake and Myrtle

adorable twin dormer house at Lake and Myrtle

our new neighbour's window (three doors down)

our new neighbour’s window (three doors down)

And at dusk, out I went for another lights walk.

Every year, across the street a white tree shines with reflection every time it rains.

Every year, across the street a white tree shines with reflection every time it rains.

on Spruce and Williams, lights, headlights, and the highway sign (Hopperesque somehow!)

on Spruce and Williams, lights, headlights, and the highway sign (Hopperesque somehow!)

the front of the same house at Spruce and Williams

the front of the same house at Spruce and Williams

Inn at Harbour Village, on a little hill at the north end of Williams

Inn at Harbour Village, on a little hill at the north end of Williams

rain reflections at Heidi's Inn on Spruce

rain reflections at Heidi’s Inn on Spruce

Why, it’s not just a lights walk, it’s a Puddle Walk!

I wanted to get the lights on Blue Crab Graphics right across the street from Heidi’s Inn but they weren’t turned on, so I walked back east along Spruce.

the glow of a tree and an old fashioned porch

the glow of a tree and an old fashioned porch

a block north of Spruce (still on the flatlands) on Willow Street

a block north of Spruce (still on the flatlands) on Willow Street

Advent Ave, up on School Hill

Advent Ave, up on School Hill

Advent Avenue runs up School Hill on the east side of the high school, and Brumback is on the west side.  As I walked east to west along the front of the high school, a herd of deer raised their heads to watch me.

deer

on the high school lawn

Was I a threat?

Was I a threat?

deer2

deer3

deerThis is why even in the center of town, one needs a deer fence if one wants to grow plants that they like.

The Glenn house on Brumbach

The Glenn house on Brumbach

The house above, just west of the school and almost to the top of the hill, figured large in a box of vintage photos that I scanned in the summer of 2010.

Almost at the very top, the Jensen house, whose white lights I can see from my living room window.

Almost at the very top, the Jensen house, whose white lights I can see from my living room window.

Back down on Spruce Street, a house that is always well decorated for Christmas and for Halloween has a ticker in the window that counts down to Christmas.  It said eleven days.  Could that be right?  Surely not.  I calculated, and it was correct!

Spruce Street

Spruce Street

Monday 16 December 2013

Because I had not walked the east end of School Hill, I took another walk on a much less chilly night, in a light misty rain and fog.  Allan had taken a photo of a fog circle around the moon.

moon

Our house.  O, if only the pillars were wrapped in lights (but we might blow a fuse!)

Our house. O, if only the pillars were wrapped in lights (but we might blow a fuse!)

Hint to someone handy who reads this blog:  If the pillars WERE wrapped in lights, they should be multi-coloured to match the string that goes around the garage.

On Spruce Street, Santa had been accented by more lights.

On Spruce Street, Santa had been accented by more lights.

I walked down to the east end of Spruce because I knew that at the very end, between Maryann and Adelia, sat a house that would be beautifully lit.

My walk was rewarded.

My walk was rewarded.

I then walked up Elizabeth Ave.  Except for on the main street, Spruce, evening walks are often easier walking in the street rather than on sidewalks that appear and disappear.  Passing cars on the side streets are few.

at Spruce and Elizabeth

at Spruce and Elizabeth

Just one block east of Spruce is my favourite Christmas light of all, one that can be relied upon to appear every December:

the peace sign on the Anderson house

the peace sign on the Anderson house

At the very top of the hill I made a right turn onto a dead end street where I could see the glow of a long run of lights.

east end of Cedar Ave

east end of Cedar Ave

I felt rather like a prowler when a couple of cars passed me, but walked a little further east to get another angle. including the long row of lights that had first caught my eye.

driveway lights with house in background

driveway lights with house in background

As I walked back to the Elizabeth street,  I turned for another look at the rising moon, feeling furtive because someone was watching, just a silhouette in the lower windows of the house across a long slope of lawn.

Not only the moon was rising!

Not only the moon was rising!

Moonrise

Moonrise

Not only the moon was rising, but two Christmas inflatables!

inflatables

inflatables

So, still feeling like a prowler in my purple Blue Crab Graphics hoodie, I went back to get the angle from the driveway corner again.

Wow!

Wow!

I especially like big bright lights on stakes.

I especially like big bright lights on stakes.

I took a detour across Quaker Avenue to see the historic Williams house, in my opinion the most beautiful house in town.

a grand old house

a grand old house on Quaker

at Advent and Willow

at Advent and Willow

a picket fence near Advent and Willow

a picket fence on Advent near Willow

By the time I got back down to the flatland, one of my favourite lighted houses was all aglow.  I love the arched doorway with lights and greenery.

Spruce Street

Spruce Street

I collect these photos to put in a Facebook album on my “Our Ilwaco” page, where they now reside along with more photos of holiday decorations in the town.

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At last I have come to the last entry for 2012.  Through the mild end of the year we had no snow and only minimal frost.

south window view, 1 November

south window view, 1 November

On the day after Thanksgiving, the Christmas star was lit at Jessie’s Ilwaco Fish Company, here photographed from my neighbour’s back yard.

Jessie's star

Jessie’s star

26 November, full moon

26 November, full moon

full moon over Allan's shed and the greenhouse

full moon over Allan’s shed and the greenhouse

We barely….well, Allan barely managed to get our lights up in time for Ilwaco’s traditional night of lighted crab pot tree and lighted boat parade.  In fact, the hazardous stormy weather prevented the boat parade on December 1st.

2 December, our holiday lights

2 December, our holiday lights

one string of lights on the back of the house to show from the Port

one string of lights on the back of the house to show from the Port

lighted tree in east side garden.

lighted tree in east side garden.

Due to mild weather, our Melianthis major was going strong on December 6th.

Due to mild weather, our Melianthis major was going strong on December 4th.

I rejoiced in plenty of rain.

I rejoiced in plenty of rain.

Although the part of the storms I did not like was trying to get the last of the bulbs planted and the lighted boat parade being cancelled.

On December 4th, grape hyacinths were confusedly blooming very early in the front garden.

Muscari, much too soon

Muscari, much too soon

9 December

9 December

10 December

10 December

By Dec 12th we had our tree...very early.

By Dec 12th we had our tree…very early.

12 December

12 December

On December 13th, a wonderful present arrived from my friend Mary F., a great gardener (and a jobbing gardener to whom I had passed on several jobs).  She had had to leave the Peninsula for health reasons, and I miss her.

Miss Mary's gift

Miss Mary’s gift

The gift theme for my Christmas seemed to be vehicles, because meanwhile Allan had been painting a little VW bus model to exactly replicate my beloved old “Beaky”, the vehicle that Robert and I had moved to the Peninsula with on December 24th, 1992.  It had indeed been twenty years since I had moved from Seattle to the Long Beach Peninsula.

Allan even included a gardening figure who looked somewhat like a younger me.

Beaky

Beaky

Beaky and me

Smokey took an interest in the Beaky tableau as I took the photos in the back garden.

Smokey, upper right

Smokey, upper right

For reference, here are some photos of Beaky from Seattle, a camping trip, and from 1992 when we first lived and worked at the Sou’wester Lodge in Seaview.

Beaky history

Beaky history

Beaky’s name came from the beak-shaped chrome around the VW logo. It had been a orange van. The stripe came from masking tape that divided the colours. We painted it with XO Rust paint with little rollers.

Every van camping trip we went on, Robert had to fix something on the van: clutch cable, starter, something!  So he may have loved it less than I did.

Just one thing is missing from the model of the van:  our bumper stickers.

1991

1991

Back to 2012:  On December 25th, another present from Allan:

gardening Scrabble

gardening Scrabble

Now who can I possible get to play REAL Scrabble (garden themed, with a few different rules) with me? It won’t tell us if our words are right or not like Words with Friends does.

On December 27th, we still had flowers in bloom in the front garden.

Geranium 'Rozanne'

Geranium ‘Rozanne’

Calendula

Calendula

Agyranthemum and Christmas lights

Agyranthemum and Christmas lights

And with that, I have at last officially caught up with the present year in this journal.

My goal for 2013:  to blog regularly and sometimes more briefly year-round as I did in 2007, and during the rainy days of late winter and spring to take you on some more garden tours that took place BEFORE 2007.

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