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Posts Tagged ‘chrysanthemums’

Sunday, 11 November 2018

Good weather and fall clean up continued.  The days have been like the best of summer, sunny but not too warm.

Long Beach

My goal was to complete a few fall clean up areas and erase them from the work board.

We began with clipping catmint and pulling crocosmia and planting the Basket Case donation of sea thrift in the Sid Snyder Drive planters.

before

after

The ocean was bright blue and calm today.

the westernmost planter

gazania still blooming

The World Kite Museum garden, on the south side of Sid Snyder, got its fall clean up.

The museum dwarfs our pots and pocket garden.

before

after

The garden needs a lavender to match the one on the right side.

I like to leave a lot of seed heads standing, for birds, so did not cut back the oregano or lavender here.

We checked up on the Bolstad beach approach planters.  I did not mention last week that we planted some sea thrift out there.  I did not want to tempt the fate that has for the last several years made plants disappear by the day after I planted them.  It was worth testing it out with free plants from the Basket Case—and the plants are still there.  I am hoping that the thief has moved away.  Or reformed.  I am not hoping the person died, although I suppose that is a possibility.  I am also hoping said person does not read this blog.

Something strange happened.  I stood at the west end of the beach approach after pulling just a few weeds there and suddenly, I fervently wished it was February or March and that we were about to embark upon the ten to thirteen day annual first weeding of the beach approach garden.  I shocked myself with a feeling of joy at the prospect.  Peculiar.

looking east down many blocks of weeding

Apparently I still like this job.  That made me wonder how I am going to make the decision to retire from Long Beach!

We turned our attention to the fall clean up at City Hall (and the big popout nearby, where I clipped back some straying rugosa roses).

City Hall garden, north side

some late Welsh poppies

We next went to Coulter Park, where Allan pulled a vast number of Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ in a bed that became inaccessible after a ramp was built, unless you crawl through or climb over the railing.

before

after (Allan’s photo)

The ramp goes to the old train depot building which will house Shoeboxes of Joy between Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Shoeboxes of Joy in the old train depot, 2013

We don’t have time to make a shoebox (for local seniors) so we just give a monetary donation by popping in with some cash on a day when the volunteers are working, after Thanksgiving day.

Cotoneaster berries in Coulter Park

While Allan yanked Crocosmia, I did the fall clean up on two blocks of planters.  The planters will need a go-round again after the first hard frost.

I found a rock.

The cosmos are coming out of all the planters now.

They have little left to offer.

a planter that still has much to offer

As I took photos, my Lumix—a refurbished one less than a year old—insisted several times that it be turned off and on again, and then came the dreaded message:

Looks like another Lumix bites the dust.  (The several new Lumixes I have bought have all done the same thing after a year or less.)  I am disappointed because I like its capabilities.

I switched to my phone camera.

Escallonia ‘Pink Princess’, before…

and after, again thwarted from being eight feet tall and wide.

Chrysanthemum and Geranium ‘Rozanne’

another chrysanth just now starting to bloom—how I love them!

I have read several blog articles on Garden Rant frothing over with chrysanthemum loathing.  Fie on that!  They are quite wonderful here, bloom for ages, and return reliably in the planters.  And I adore the scent of the foliage.

When I bought my grandmother’s house in 1980, I spent some time trying to find chrysanths that were like the ones she grew when I was a child, the tall ones, almost as tall as me.  Then I realized my memory was measuring them based on my height as a little girl.

The dusky pink one just north of NIVA green is slowly fading.

Across from Dennis Company, has been blooming for weeks.

I am not going to do any fiddly deadheading at this stage.  When the frost comes, or when we go to shop at Dennis hardware for some reason, I will take that whole plant down to the base at once.  Later.

My last individual task was to pull and clip the BadAster which has been moderately welcome to grow under a street tree.

The seeds blew down the block….

Allan and I reunited by pulling some cosmos at the front of Coulter Park.  A hebe had suddenly decided to hide the memorial.

fixed

After we dumped debris, we bought four bales of Gardner and Bloome Soil Building Compost at Dennis Company.  The first three went to…

The Depot Restaurant

…where I had felt that mulch was needed after yesterday’s fall clean up.

before

after

The fourth bag went to…

The Shelburne Hotel

….to fluff up the area where we had dug out loads of Crocosmia corms to make a new fuchsia bed.  I am sure the soil had been thoroughly worn out by the vigor of crocosmia.

No wonder Allan is tired by end of the day.

That bale would be un-liftable had it been outside for awhile.  Dennis sells it from inside of a building, so it is dry.

very nice for the Hawkshead fuchsia I planted there yesterday…

While I did more tidying of the path and put river rock at the back of the fuchsia bed, Allan cleaned up a neglected area on the north side of the building.

before

after (Allan’s photos)

I noticed the canna is blooming in the full shade mini bog garden by the fine dining entrance:

The big dining room is open with its own menu on Friday and Saturday nights.

We did some more garden trimming until dusk….

Shelburne at sunset

the garden by lamplight )Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

…and then we were lured into the pub by the warm lights through the stained glass windows.

guests by the living room fireplace

I tried a Cranberry Shrub, delicious!

I told Brooke, the young bartender, that we were celebrating the end of Mulch Week.  She replied in her delightful manner, “I don’t know what that is, but yay!”…a reminder that not everyone knows our gardening terminology.

Caesar salad, delectable black garlic fried rice, fish and chips

my favourite dessert, the cream cheese blackberry tart

But oh, the dessert Allan had is new and so delicious, a rocky road semifreddo, like a frozen mousse.  It could almost divert me from the tart…This will be a difficult choice next time.

Allan’s photo

I reflected during dinner on how I feel that the Shelburne itself wants me to be its gardener, and how it missed me during the ten years when I left the garden (because of reasons).  I feel a connection with the place that I cannot explain.

At home, I was able to erase Coulter crocosmias, beach approaches, city hall, and kite museum from the work board.

I won’t say where, but today I saw the hidden stash of a homeless person hidden in a barberry patch…

I can only imagine the misery of making a camp in a grove of barberries because of the terrible thorns:

Tiny mean thorns all over the barberry grove.

 

 

 

 

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Sunday, 16 November 2014

We continued to take advantage of every day of workable weather.

On the way to continue the bulbing of the Long Beach planters, I cried “Pull over!” next to Ilwaco city hall as I could see the Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ was done at last and ready to be pulled.

It takes some strength to pull these out.

It takes some strength to pull these out.

That made me think that we should check the Butterflies at the Depot Restaurant, and indeed, they, too, were done.

They are now yanked.

They are now yanked.

The annuals in the windowboxes are still refusing to die.

The annuals in the windowboxes are still refusing to die.

Long Beach

The rest of the day was spent planting bulbs in the last three and a half blocks of planters in Long Beach. We made better time than yesterday because we did not stop to completely re-do any of the planters.

an attractive display outside of The Wooden Horse gift shop.

an attractive display outside of The Wooden Horse gift shop.

Further comeback to the chrysanthemum-haters: The ones in the planters have been blooming beautifully for about a month now.

a dark pink spoon-petaled one

a dark pink spoon-petaled one

a yellow one by Campiche Gallery

a yellow one by Campiche Gallery (with all the other plants gone down with frost)

and a yellow one north of NIVA green.

and a yellow one north of NIVA green.

I set up bulbs around the rim of each planter and moved on to clean up the next while Allan planted, and when I would get far enough ahead, I would plant, as well.

bulbs at the ready: tall tulips on either side of the lamp post, species tulips and narcissi, and assorted other small bulbs

bulbs at the ready before cleaning out a planter: tall tulips on either side of the lamp post, species tulips and narcissi, and assorted other small bulbs

There were some tense moments as crows eyed the small bulbs I had placed.

A crow watches from the roof of Stormin' Norman's kite shop.

A crow watches from the roof of Stormin’ Norman’s kite shop.

Momentously, while working I got a text from Garden Tour Nancy with a photo of the first egg from her flock of young hens. It was produced by a hen names Spot who seemed to find the whole process quite a shock, as one can imagine.

IMG_1136

Nancy’s photo

 

Although I had been suffering from aches and pains at the last part of every bulb planting day, I was still thinking of this year as “bulb time” instead of “bulb hell”. In order to get through the last two blocks, we bought maple bars from the Cottage Bakery. I’ve been trying to avoid pastries because of a hyphondriac imaginary gall bladder attack. Today, I had a severe need to have a huge sugar rush to do two more blocks of planting. And then, when I got into the van so we could drive up to the last two blocks…the rattly empty sound of a dead battery.

I almost wept. Called Garden Tour Nancy for a jump but Phil was across the river. Called Ed Strange but he was mowing somewhere and did not answer. Had heard horror stories about how long triple A takes around here. Feeling like I was about to do the impossible, I took the wheelbarrow and the rest of the bulbs and headed on up the street, leaving Allan to figure something out.

We were paying for procrastination. Our van battery had been weak for awhile and we were planning to do something about it once staycation began. Allan had often been putting it on the charger overnight to give it a boost. He hadn’t last night, and all the stopping and starting in Long Beach had exacted a price.

While I slogged away with the wheelbarrow, Allan made some calls and cleverly took our local cab service to NAPA auto parts, got a new battery, and was back at work within an hour.

Allan's photo: spiffing new battery

Allan’s photo: spiffing new battery

Only within the last few years has there been a reliable cab service on the Peninsula and back and forth to Astoria. This is the first time we have used them, and they came quickly and charged a reasonable fee.

Bless you, Royal Cab!

Bless you, Royal Cab!

I was so glad to see Allan pull the van up next to me as I finished planter number four of eight, with the sun threatening to set.

Below, planter six of the eight we’d had left to do: I loathe this planting by Dennis Company: almost pure vinca. This planter (below) is now top of my list to re-do. It has a low evergreen candytuft on either side of the post that looks grand in the spring and then dull all summer. So I will give it one more springtime and hope to dig it all out before mid-May annuals planting in 2015.

the loathed vinca planter

the loathed vinca planter (has a little bit of Phygelius ‘Yellow Trumpet’)

Allan's photo: sunset, with two planters left to do

Allan’s photo: sunset, with two planters left to do

Allan went the half block to Bolstadt to see the sky to the west.

Allan went the half block to Bolstadt to see the sky to the west.

Allan's photo: planter 7 of 8, one of the planters with would-be huge escallonia

Allan’s photo: planter 7 of 8, one of the planters with would-be huge escallonia

Finally, we had the last planter planted. I crossed back to the planter by NIVA green to add one last handful of narcissi. Five o clock is our little traffic rush hour and I had to wait for a nice big gap in traffic to hobble back to the van.

left and right

look right, left, right, and GO!

Allan wants you to know that he went out in the street with his safety vest on to make sure I could hobble across unscathed.

Ilwaco

After work as we drove home with our energetic new battery, Allan noticed a house at the west end of Lake Street already lit up for Christmas. We drove around the block to get some photos. This house has new occupants who clearly are going to be an asset to the town.

a handsome half-timber style home

a handsome half-timber style home

I suggested we also go to the port and get a photo of the lights at Time Enough Books, as the previous evening I had been able to see them from my south window. On the way, we observed that the crab pot Christmas tree is already under construction. This year’s tree lighting will be on December 6th.

tree

crab pot tree partway done

Allan's photo:  Time Enough Books

Allan’s photo: Time Enough Books

Allan's photo:  Time Enough Books garden boat

Allan’s photo: Time Enough Books garden boat

 

At home, it gave me great satisfaction to take the LB planters off the work board under “bulbs” AND the “frost clean up” list.

work

In fact, I have only two clumps of camassia to plant in Fifth Street Park and all the bulbs from our first batch will be in. A second batch of 400 end of season sale bulbs will arrive Tuesday, I hope. If all goes well, with no major glitches, bulb time should be done by Thursday.

 

 

 

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Saturday, 1 November 2014

Although boxes and boxes of bulbs await sorting, beautiful weather meant we had to go out to work instead.  Rain is predicted for the next three or four days and that should give me plenty of time not just to sort, but to process photos and to blog about Halloween.

Ilwaco

Soon we are going to remove all the catmint from the Ilwaco city planters; next year annuals or perennials that don’t need shearing halfway through the season will take its place.  We’ll give some of the catmint to Debbie for the spring seminar plant sale.    I’ll have some to spare, even after planting some at the Ilwaco boatyard and under the Ilwaco street trees, so perhaps Picture Attic Jean would like some, as well?  It’s Nepeta ‘Walkers Low’ to be exact.  The planters were already planted up with it when we took them over some years ago.  Today, we just did a little clipping of the ‘Butterfly’ agyranthemum at city hall.

Ilwaco City Hall

Ilwaco City Hall

On the way out of town, Allan noticed Black Lake being reflectively photogenic, worthy of a pause.

black

black lake

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Depot Restaurant

Fortunately, Allan remembered that Chef Michael had texted me yesterday with a request that we cut back a shrub on the east wall, so that some building repairs could be done.  I intended to chop the shrubby honeysuckle right to the ground as it would come back just fine.  Fortunately, Chef Michael was there and told me he liked it as is and just wished it would be pruned to allow access to a wooden hatch.

Lonicera 'Baggeson's Gold' before

Lonicera ‘Baggeson’s Gold’ before

during

during

after

full access to the hatch thingie

full access to the hatch thingie

Long Beach

We paused to assess the new Sid Snyder memorial garden at Veterans Field to see how much room remained for new plants.

NE corner of Vet Field

NE corner of Vet Field

On the way to the Planter Box to scope out plant availability, we stopped at The Picture Attic to give Jean Nitzel some of the Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ we’d dug out at Jo’s.

The Picture Attic

The Picture Attic

inside: cards, stickers, stamps, and fine picture framing

inside: cards, stickers, stamps, and fine picture framing

Jean acquiring some Sedum

Jean acquiring some Sedum

She needs some help in her garden.  Allan has helped before but I know he would rather have free time than an extra job.  I recommended the new gardening business, Flowering Hedges (our friends Shelly and Terran); if they can’t help with her project, Allan will.

Jean's beautiful lace cap hydrangea

Jean’s beautiful lace cap hydrangea

The Anchorage Cottages

On the way back from The Planter Box, we did a bit of post storm clean up at The Anchorage.

The north garden bed; the Ceanothus needed some dead branches cut out.

The north garden bed; the Ceanothus needed some dead branches cut out.

I'm still deadheading the two Agyranthemum 'Butterfly' at the office.

I’m still deadheading the two Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ by the office.

just south of the office

just south of the office

Deer are now coming regularly into the garden and nipping the Viburnums.

Deer are now coming regularly into the garden and nipping the Viburnums.

Melianthus major is the autumn star of the center courtyard garden (in which we found deer tracks).

Melianthus major is the autumn star of the center courtyard garden (in which we found deer tracks).

The deer probably come only at night, as The Anchorage is a dog friendly resort and there are usually dogs around during the day.

Long Beach

Back to Long Beach with a treat from Pink Poppy Bakery…

pink

Pink Poppy seating

Last night on Halloween, Maddy was next door at the Starvation Alley house.  If a person knew to say “I love Pink Poppy Bakery”, a special treat would be proffered.  Kathleen and I split the last pumpkin spice cookie, so I was glad to find them for sale at the bakery today.

delicious cookies

delicious cookies

Pink Poppy will only be open as a retail shop till Thanksgiving, and will then have a booth at the Ilwaco Saturday Christmas market.

We hadn’t been able to acquire any small ‘Crimson Pygmy’ barberries or much else on the red white and blue theme for the Sid Snyder garden bed.  Allan planted one Barberry ‘Helmond Pillar’ and three little reddish pansies.  I cleaned up the semi circle garden by the flag poles and found some little blue and white viola seedlings and two seedling of Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ to move to the new garden.

The barberry will make for some height behind the little monument.

The barberry will make for some height behind the little monument.

I hope no one mistakes the tiny Eryngium for a weed.

I hope no one mistakes the tiny Eryngium for a weed.

(Note:  About three days later, we were back planting bulbs and Allan said “Is that a weed?”)

Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies' still blooms profusely in the flag garden.

Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’ still blooms profusely in the flag garden.

While Allan planted some Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ starts under one of the street trees and then worked on cutting back lady’s mantle in Fifth Street Park, I walked five blocks of the trees and planters.

This tree was infested with chickweed.

This tree was infested with chickweed.

not anymore

not anymore

I was glad to pull this cosmos as I'd been seeing it every time we drove through town!

I was glad to pull this cosmos as I’d been seeing it every time we drove through town!

Calibrachoa 'Lemon Slice' still blooming

Calibrachoa ‘Lemon Slice’ still blooming

some painted sage, faded but still passable

some painted sage, faded but still passable

This may not get done in the fall, but I do so want to rip out all the vinca from this particular planter.

This may not get done in the fall, but I do so want to rip out all the vinca from this particular planter.

I would save only this one charming hardy fuchsia.

I would save only this one charming hardy fuchsia.

good iris foliage by Dennis Company

good iris foliage by Dennis Company

On the subject of chrysanthemums, and in rebuttal to various articles that say they last only a few days, here is a continuation of photos showing that ours have been blooming for weeks now.  (I weary of articles with a superior tone, like the anti-chrysanth rant or the one I read recently that was OH so very ABOVE the container idea of “thrillers, spillers and thrillers”..and idea that someone came up with, so why make fun of it?)

By Campiche Gallery

By Campiche Gallery

with hardy fuchsia

with hardy fuchsia

simply beautiful

simply beautiful

by the Dennis Company outdoor yard

by the Dennis Company outdoor yard

pink chrysanths with barberry

pink chrysanths with barberry

By the Elks Lodge with Calibrachoa 'Lemon Slice'

By the Elks Lodge with Calibrachoa ‘Lemon Slice’

same planter with clipped Sedumn 'Autumn Joy', daphne, and heuchera

same planter with clipped Sedumn ‘Autumn Joy’, daphne, and heuchera and a little hydrangea that was planted years ago by a volunteer

by NIVA green

pink chrysanths by NIVA green

Speaking of NIVA green, I popped in to buy a few of the most delicious smelling cucumber mint soap.

NIVA green

NIVA green

Artist Heather Ramsay emerges from her workshop to greet me.

Artist Heather Ramsay emerges from her workshop to greet me.

what her shop is....

what her shop is….

Further down the street, I found one spoon petaled chrysanth that has come through several years.

Further down the street, I found one spoon petaled chrysanth that has come through several years, not as vigorously as the plain ones.

When I joined Allan at Fifth Street Park, I realized that the Darmera peltata needed chopping down so that the city crew can clean the fountain pond.  Allan did so while I checked one more block of planters, and then I helped him clean up the mess.

before

before

after

after

Allan’s befores and afters of the rest of the day’s park project:

lady's mantle before

lady’s mantle before

after, sheared back hard

after, sheared back hard

under the trees, the annoyingly rampant lady's mantle

under the trees, the annoyingly rampant lady’s mantle

sheared back hard.  While I don't love lady's mantle, not much will grow here so it's welcome.

sheared back hard. While I don’t love lady’s mantle, not much will grow in this rooty bed so it’s welcome.

I guess I have to admit that, like those who hate chrysanthemums, there are certain plants that do not earn my favour.

the clouds over the sewer plant as we dumped debris at city works

the clouds over the sewer plant as we dumped debris at city works

Jo’s garden

I wanted to complete the clean up of Jo’s garden and yet, even though she likes all the annuals removed as she prefers a cleaned up look for winter, I could not bear to take the ones that still look so good in the windowboxes.  I’ll await a frost.

We did pull the geraniums at ground level and from the pots.

We did pull the geraniums at ground level and from the pots.

windowboxes, still pretty

windowboxes, still pretty

box

box

I remember when a former client, Glennie Woodcock (who moved away) would have me and Robert over for dinner just before Halloween and give us $100 to caretake her home for the winter.  The weather would always be sharply frosty by then, in the mid to late 90s.  Now it seems we rarely get a frost till the end of November, if then, and so the fall clean up stretches on and on with the annuals refusing to die.

after work

I had every intention of going to the haunted house at the Sou’wester Lodge.  Having a crab roll at Captain Bob’s Chowder would nicely fill in the time till the haunted house opened for the evening.

Captain Bob's

Captain Bob’s

In conversation there, I had a revelation: neither Allan nor I like haunted houses.  I especially don’t like sudden noises or being grabbed it!  So despite wanting to support a favourite local business, we decided to just have a look from outside the pavilion.

Sou'wester Lodge by night

Sou’wester Lodge by night

A reader asked me recently how I had happened to move to the peninsula.  The story begins here with my visits to the Sou’wester Lodge in 1991.  Every visit there, now that it has new owners, fills me with nostalgia.

the vintage trailers, mostly Spartans in this row, for rent by the night.

the vintage trailers, mostly Spartans in this row, for rent by the night.

When I lived there, vehicles would park next to each rental trailer.  Now they park to the west of the lodge and the center area is open for picnic gatherings.

I lived for six months in the Spartan with rounded windows, second from the end of this row.

I lived for six months in the Spartan with rounded windows, second from the end of this row.

The “haunted house” in the pavilion resounded with screaming.  We went on home, with the very good excuse that we had hundreds of Halloween photos to process and upload to the Our Ilwaco Facebook page, followed by a late night viewing of two of our telly shows, Grimm and Elementary.  Tomorrow’s predicted rain had better arrive so that I can begin the sorting of bulbs.

 

 

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Friday, 24 October 2014

The storm I had been expecting had been postponed till the weekend. I wasn’t quite sure what we were going to do, although I had a vague idea of doing the picket fence garden clean up at Andersen’s RV Park. First thing, I decided, would be to check for fallen cosmos at the Depot Restaurant garden in Seaview. On the way, we picked up some books at the library. (Three Junes by Julia Glass is still not here, and I am so eagerly waiting to reread it.)

in the library garden, fall crocus and heather

in the library garden, fall crocus and heather

fall colour in the library garden (Hamamelis, witch hazel)

fall colour in the library garden (Hamamelis, witch hazel)

I did get a book that I’d ordered through interlibrary loan: The Sisters of Hardscrabble Bay. All I know about it is its irresistible title.

Depot Restaurant

Once there, so many cosmos were tipped over by wind that I began to pull most of them, and then decided we should clip the hop vines on the lattice, as well.

before

before

after

after

before2

before

after

after

I remain impressed with the Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’ this year. I liked it before because of the amusement of having smallish coreopsis flowers way up high. This year, maybe because all the ones I’ve planted are well established three year old plants, they’ve all bloomed well and profusely and for a long time.

Flower Tower

Flower Tower

I’d given up on the maddening cosmos that had not even flowered yet. I’m sure it was not ‘Sensation’ and pretty sure it wasn’t ‘Psyche’ that was so late coming on. The foliage was pretty, but no flowers yet. I left just one, to see if it ever blooms before frost (or before it falls right over from wind).

depot

the tardy non blooming cosmos

the tardy non blooming cosmos

Long Beach

We pulled the cosmos and some of the Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ out of the welcome sign garden (and forgot to take a photo) and pulled more cosmos and cut down a rugosa rose in Fifth Street Park.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

The rose is chopped down.  The Melianthus major has fallen sideways since we cut down the Helianthus that was holding it up.

The rose is chopped down. Part of the Melianthus major has fallen sideways since we cut down the Helianthus that was holding it up.

Allan's photo: after

Allan’s photo: after

after

after

We left this section mostly untouched because it's still so pretty.

We left this section mostly untouched because it’s still so pretty.

Lots of debris in our little cart and lots more to come after the next storm.

Lots of debris in our little cart and lots more to come after the next storm.

a digression: In Defense of Chrysanthemums

Not long ago I read an article on Garden Rant excoriating chrysanthemums. It’s not the first anti-chrysanthemum article; here’s another. One of the criticisms is that chrysanthemums brown off in just about a week.

I disagree.

The chrysanthemums in the Long Beach planters have been there for years, from when the Basket Case Greenhouse used to sell them in the fall. They have perennialized beautifully, have lovely natural shapes and bloom for weeks.

Here are a couple of photos from October 3rd:

pink ones

pink ones

pale pink ones by NIVA green

pale pink ones by NIVA green

And here are some photos from two days ago:

October 3rd

yellow ones by Campiche Gallery

yellow ones by Campiche Gallery (have been blooming for weeks)

pink ones still blooming

pink ones still blooming

and more

and more

photo 4

just north of NIVA green

just north of NIVA green

mum3

 

And here are the dark pink chrysanthemums still going strong on October 27 after heavy wind and rain:

Monday, 27 October

Monday, 27 October

AND the scent of the foliage reminds me of my grandmother’s garden. She loved chrysanthemums, and that’s good enough for me. (My page about her garden is newly updated and expanded, by the way.)

I'm pretty sure those are chrysanthemums in a vase in my grandma's living room.

I’m pretty sure those are chrysanthemums in a vase in my grandma’s living room.

Now…back to work.

Jo’s Garden

After our work in Fifth Street Park and the dumping of debris, it seemed too late to go all the way to Andersen’s. Instead, we decided to start on the fall cleanup of Jo’s garden. In previous years, we have left it till after bulb planting and it’s been the last hard, cold job of the season. With fewer jobs this year, we might be able to get it done earlier, Wouldn’t that be nice?

jobefore

We did not make much of a dent in the job before we got rained out just after four PM.

after

after

beforejo

after

after

Jo likes the garden flattened for winter, so we have a long, long way to go.

Allan pulled the crocosmia at the west end.

Allan pulled the crocosmia at the west end.

She wants to get rid of all her Sedum 'Autumn Joy'.  Who wants some?

She wants to get rid of all her Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’. Who wants some?

Allan's before and after of pulling the crocosmia

Allan’s before and after of pulling the crocosmia; still many more plants to take down

hydrangea blooming in the driveway

hydrangea blooming in the driveway

Captain Bob’s Chowder

Earlier, while working in Fifth Street Park, we’d decided to have crab rolls at the end of our work day, and so we did.

chowder

crab rolls and chowder

crab rolls and chowder

It was a good meal and a good talk with restaurateur Cathy.

the end of our workday

the end of our workday

After blogging (which takes a couple of hours), we have a later dinner (thanks to Allan) and watch some telly. In the last month we’ve been watching the most recently released seasons of some series: The Americans, Bletchley Park, Homeland, Doctor Who, and tonight we saw a charming film called The Perks of Being a Wallflower. My only complaint: From my own experience, I don’t think high school misfits would be so pretty.
 

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