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Posts Tagged ‘clamshell railroad’

Wednesday, 16 July 2014

We had the sort of day where we work our way from south to north…

starting with the compost bucket switch at Olde Towne Café

starting with the compost bucket switch at Olde Towne Café

The Depot Restaurant garden

We had to drag the hose to water the very front of the bed, behind the log, where the sprinklers don’t reach, and deadheading, much deadheading of the cosmos that were finally putting on a good show.

In the Depot garden bed north of the deck, the cosmos had finally popped!

In the Depot garden bed north of the deck, the cosmos had finally popped!

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Cosmos 'Happy Ring', Allan's photo

Cosmos ‘Happy Ring’, Allan’s photo

and the drip system for the window boxes (planted by Nancy Aust) were getting turned on, thank goodness.

and the drip system for the window boxes (planted by Nancy Aust) were getting turned on, thank goodness.

lush annuals from The Basket Case Greenhouse

lush annuals from The Basket Case Greenhouse

The rosemaries on the south side have responded very well to Dr Earth fertilizer.

The rosemaries on the south side have responded very well to Dr Earth fertilizer.

Golden Sands Assisted Living, Klipsan Beach

I want this garden to look as luscious as Floramagoria.  To achieve that, I am going to have to buy more cool plants and not use just “passalong plants” (free ones).

southeast quadrant...I want more pizzazz.

southeast quadrant…I want more pizzazz.

Now that the vast number of Sweet Williams have gone to seed, the garden needs something more.

southwest quadrant

southwest quadrant

northwest quadrant

northwest quadrant

southeast quadrant; I think it needs some tall rudbeckias.

southeast quadrant; I think it needs some tall rudbeckias.

We want to find time to pull more of the crapulous low not-very-ornamental grasses and horrible salal from behind the garden bed above.

The white hydrangeas are quite pleasing.

The white hydrangeas are quite pleasing along the west and east sides.

Wiegardt Gallery, Ocean Park/Nahcotta

Then we went all the way north to the Wiegardt Gallery and began to work our way south again.

Wiegardt Gallery:  The west wall still looks annoyingly partly.  I wish those Ilex would GROW.  Not enough water, I think.

Wiegardt Gallery: The west wall still looks annoyingly partly. I wish those Ilex would GROW. Not enough water, I think.  The hardy geranium, a good one (macrorrhizum) needs to go, as it does not like the dryness.  Lavenders instead?

I have tried other solutions for that narrow side bed.  Back when the building was pink, I had three Lavatera ‘Barnsley’, one in front and two on that side.

Barnsley in the front of the building, looking good with pink.  Eventually, the three lavateras died of old age as they are wont to do.

years ago: Barnsley in the front of the building, looking good with pink. Eventually, the three lavateras died of old age as they are wont to do.

Also years ago, I had Salvia uliginosa growing along the side.  That lasted one year...too dry.

Also years ago, I had Salvia uliginosa growing along the side. That lasted one year…too dry.  You can see Lavatera in the background.

I don’t think the Lavatera would look good with the new colour of the gallery.

I also tried Escallonia, two, along the west side and they gave a nice solid big green anchor to the height of the building, but Eric did not want them as they were up against the wood.  So now I am trying for something green and tallish but very vertical, thus the Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’ (which I believe is finding it too dry).

Fortunately, the front entrance looks inviting.

Fortunately, the front entrance looks inviting.

and grasses in the field to the south look most satifactory

and grasses in the field to the south look most satisfactory….

and so does the north garden bed...

and so does the north garden bed…

While weeding in the front, I saw someone skulk furtively across the east end of the lawn:

just a baby...

just a baby…

Baby and mother crossed to the south side of the street…

deer2

They watched us watching them…

deer3

And then decided we were no bother, so they came back.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

That’s why the garden has to be deer proof.

Fortunately, deer don't like Cosmos, one of Eric's favourites.

Fortunately, deer don’t like Cosmos, one of Eric’s favourites…

and a favourite of bees.

and a favourite of bees.

Oman Builders Supply Garden, Ocean Park

just a bit of deadheading at our most low maintenance garden

just a bit of deadheading at our most low maintenance garden

Klipsan Beach Cottages, Klipsan

At KBC, a tall fence protects a large area from deer.

At KBC, a tall fence protects a large area from deer.

inside the fenced garden

inside the fenced garden; Tetrapanax papyrifer ‘Steroidal Giant’ next to the bench

There are eight cottages on the ridge.

There are eight cottages on the ridge.

The drumstick alliums have gone all purple now; earlier, they are green, then half purple and half green.

The drumstick alliums have gone all purple now; earlier, they are green, then half purple and half green.

Andersen’s RV Park, 138th Street, North of Long Beach

the middle of the garden shed garden

the middle of the garden shed garden (painted sage along the front, and a fig tree with a few figs)

just a very few figs!

The garden/storage shed is on the northeast corner of the park.

the west side garden

the west side garden

Eryngiums by the restrooms (Allan's photo)

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ by the laundry room (Allan’s photo)

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ (Allan’s photo)

poppies, Eryngium, Verbascum (Allan's photo)

poppies, Eryngium, Verbascum (Allan’s photo)

the poppy field, Allan's photo

the poppy field, Allan’s photo

Banana Cream daisies (Allan's photo)

Banana Cream daisies (Allan’s photo)

poppy field, Allan's photo

poppy field, Allan’s photo

By the back door of the office, one of the birdhouses had occupants.

P7150042

waiting and peeping

waiting and peeping

P7150052

P7150061

P7150062

baby just realized I was there!  or perhaps was not as focused on its upcoming meal.

Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue' in the garden below the birdhouses.

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ and godetia (and the ubiquitous Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’) in the garden below the birdhouses.

Thursday, 18 July 2014

Allan starts the day by thoroughly soaking the Larry and Robert garden!

Allan starts the day by thoroughly soaking the Larry and Robert garden!  So dry now!

The cats were not making me feel like going to work.

The cats were not making me feel like going to work.  (Smokey, Frosty, and their mother Mary)

Columbia Pacific Heritage Musuem

We had been procrastinating for weeks about seeing the “Rolling Stock of the Clamshell Railroad” exhibit at the museum just three blocks east of our house.  I love stories of the railway that used to run up the Peninsula and wanted to make sure not to miss it; it would end on the weekend so we started work late in order to go to Free Thursday at the museum.

train

Oregon Washington Railroad and Navigation

train car seat

train car seat

train car door

train car door

painting

a watercolour called “Last Run”; how I wish we still had this train.

maybe not entirely idyllic

maybe not entirely idyllic

photos of train cars turned into dwellings

Jackson and Sharp car as vacation cottage, Seaview  (It is still there.  I so wanted it last time it was for sale, but the yard is small.)

And then, work.

Anchorage Cottages, Long Beach

Look how perfectly the lily matches the Anchorage sign!

Look how perfectly the lily matches the Anchorage sign!

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

anch

Was this planned?  Not at all; this old sign had not been put on display when the lilies were planted.

painted sage in the center courtyard planters

painted sage in the center courtyard planters

Another motel sign; I like that these older signs have been put up between the windows.

Another motel sign; I like that these older signs have been put up between the windows.

Long Beach town

The deadheading of the welcome sign is a painstaking job now.  Wish the Geranium 'Rozanne' would get busy with providing more blue.

The deadheading of the welcome sign is a painstaking job now. Wish the Geranium ‘Rozanne’ would get busy with providing more blue.  Back:  Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’; front: Bidens

tigridia in a street planter, Allan's photo: a vibrant Mexican shell flower, seems perfectly hardy here, bulbs planted in fall or spring.

tigridia in a street planter, Allan’s photo: a vibrant Mexican shell flower, seems perfectly hardy here, bulbs planted in fall or spring.  (Allan’s photo)

Allan found a sneaky dandelion in the planter by Wind World Kites (where the shop owner likes the Crocosmia 'Lucifer' which we have removed as a thug from most of the planters).

Allan found a sneaky dandelion in the planter by Wind World Kites (where the shop owner likes the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ which we have removed as a thug from most of the planters).

The sand had been brought in for City Sandsations.  While the main event of the annual sand castle contest takes place on the beach, expert sand sculptors also create some displays right downtown in the street south of Veterans Field.  I was watering the south blocks of planters, and my knee was bothering me so much I did not feel like walking up to see the sand sculpting action, so I asked Allan to take photos for me.  I thought you might like to see them, too.

Sandsations

Sandsations sign by the police station

sculpting begins

looking east from the main street (Pacific Highway)

sculpting begins (Allan's photo)

sculpting begins

Allan's photo

Allan's photo

Allan's photo

one of the team tee shirts

Allan's photo

Allan's photo

Allan's photo

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I think they use a little bit of glue in the water to hold the  creations together for the four days of the show.

I think they use a little bit of glue in the water to hold the creations together for the four days of the show.

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dinner at The Cove

We had a cheerful plan for the evening:  dinner with our friend Michelle Z at the Cove Restaurant.

Parking Lot Cat was the greeter at the door.

Parking Lot Cat was the greeter at the door.

at the Cove

at the Cove

yum

Menu by Chef Jason Lancaster..yum… (We had the Thursday fish tacos, $2 each, and strawberry salads)

Of course, when I got home I worked some more on the Garden Bloggers Fling blog entries, as I had been doing every night .  I was enjoying touring the gardens through our photos without having to deal with any mobility problems.

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Wednesday, 2 April 2014

I had a plan for today that involved a pleasant assortment of work: an interesting little project, then some garden visits and planting (but not too much planting), then a nursery trip and some more (light) planting. It worked out even better than I had hoped it would.

Just down the street from the Ilwaco Post Office, Helen posed in front of our accountant’s office. Petting a nice dog is a great way to start the day.

Helen at Jennifer Hopkins' office

Helen at Jennifer Hopkins’ office

helen

We stopped by Olde Towne to switch compost buckets. The additional perfection of having time for more coffee was not to be, as we had to hustle on to work.

Olde Towne Coffee Café

Olde Towne Coffee Café

Our first job: to prune the fuchsias in Coulter Park, which like hardy fuchsias in all our gardens have died back to the base. Usually we can count on mild enough winters so that they leaf out all along the stems, but not this year. While Allan got started on that, I checked on deadheading in the trees and planters on the Dennis Company block just south of Coulter Park. The first thing I saw made me glad I’d checked:

dandelions in a street tree garden...how embarassing!

dandelions in a street tree garden…how embarassing!

street tree narcissi across the street from Dennis Company

street tree narcissi across the street from Dennis Company

narcissi

and narcissi under the street tree in front of Dennis Co

and narcissi under the street tree in front of Dennis Co

another view of that little garden

another view of that little garden

I did a brief shopping excursion into Dennis Co’s gardening section to buy some different kinds of sunflower seeds to try at the Ilwaco Post Office garden and maybe Fifth Street Park.

When I joined Allan in Coulter Park, I was pleased to see a brand new sign on the old train depot building there.

Long Beach Depot

Long Beach Depot

The new sign is just under the oval sign in above photo from last year.

driving tour of the Clamshell Railway

driving tour of the Clamshell Railway

detail

detail

Another Clamshell Railroad train depot would figure into the end of our day.

In the area of the park behind the depot building, Ribes sanguineum ‘King Edward VII’ was in full bloom. I had two back here; one died and I could/should add a new a pink flowered variety to make an even better show.

flowering currant, with Pieris japonica

flowering currant, with Pieris japonica

from both sides now

from both sides now

I was thrilled to see that the city crew had mulched the row of roses on the other side of the park. I had expressed to the parks manager my despair about the bindweed and salmonberry that keep coming under the fence from the neighboring yard. Our motto is “Just say no to barkscapes”, but this is a desperate situation.

roses, mulched

roses, mulched

A closer look revealed bindweed popping up everywhere.

A closer look revealed bindweed popping up everywhere.

and a rose with its base infested with birds foot trefoil!

and a rose with its base infested with birds foot trefoil!

These weeds were not on our agenda. All we were there for was pruning and weeding around the fuchsias. I did add one thing: It had gotten very difficult to get in and out of the back entrance of the park due to two trees planted too closely together. We pruned up the underskirt and widened the pathway, a fun project that I think left the trees looking natural. The next time the crew brings the lawn mower in that way, I hope they notice that it is much better. Didn’t take a before photo:

after

after

after, looking into the park from the back entrance

after, looking into the park from the back entrance

a pocket garden, on our way to dump debris

a pocket garden, on our way to dump debris; next year must plant lots of white narcissi here!

Our city dump site is on 6th N and so is the Boreas Inn, so Boreas became our next convenient stop for planting a couple of penstemons and some more California poppy seeds.

Boreas Inn garden, with Allan way in the background weeding

Boreas Inn garden, with Allan way in the background weeding

Boreas narcissi

Boreas narcissi

Boreas narcissi and the hot tub gazebo

Boreas narcissi and the hot tub gazebo

Next, we made a quick stop at Erin’s garden to add three plants: Penstemon ‘Raven’, Penstemon ‘Blue Midnight’, and Agastache ‘Sangria’. Look who got right up in my face to say hi.

Felix, standing atop a stone wall

Felix, standing atop a stone wall

Although there were deer tracks in the new garden bed, none of the plants we recently added had been pulled out. The boat still sang with massed narcissi.

a chorus of narcissi

a chorus of narcissi

narcissi

AND an exciting plant I’ve never grown before this year; I did not expect such lush foliage:

Iris bucharica 'Juno', a wowzer!

Iris bucharica ‘Juno’, a wowzer!

Leaving Erin’s, we drove across Pioneer Road to get to the Basket Case Greenhouse. Contrary to logic, the Cranberry Museum and Cranberry Research Station is on Pioneer rather than Cranberry Road. (Cranberry is the next west to east road north of Pioneer.)

Cranberry Research Station

Cranberry Research Station

passing cranberry bogs on Pioneer Road

passing cranberry bogs on Pioneer Road, heading east

At the Basket Case, I took some photos for their Facebook page (of which these are but a few):

colourful tomato cages

colourful tomato cages

How had I not noticed this Phygelius 'Lemon Spritzer' last time or the time before?

How had I not noticed this Phygelius ‘Lemon Spritzer’ last time or the time before?

I love the foliage...Allan said "like a painter dripped paint on it".

I love the foliage…Allan said “like a painter dripped paint on it”.

I bought some violas (blues and pastels) for Diane’s garden and some yellow ones for the Red Barn. Usually I avoid the big flowered pansies because they get so beaten by weather. Diane likes them so I did get three.

a selection of violas with three pansies

a selection of violas with two of the pansies

Just as we were leaving, Jayne Bailey of Bailey’s Café arrived to select some herbs for her kitchen garden.

Jayne shops for herbs.

Jayne shops for herbs.

Basket Case owners Fred and Nancy suggested we join them for dinner out later in the early evening and we readily agreed. Meanwhile, we drove south to the Red Barn Arena.

Red Barn Arena

Red Barn Arena

Allan planted up a container while I did some narcissi deadheading.

Erysimum 'Winter Orchid' and yellow violas

Erysimum ‘Winter Orchid’ and yellow violas

in the Red Barn garden

in the Red Barn garden

Past the ditch where I dumped the deadheads, skunk cabbage bloomed.

Past the ditch where I dumped the deadheads, skunk cabbage bloomed.

swamp lanterns?  I read somewhere that that's the name for skunk cabbage in the UK.

swamp lanterns? I read somewhere that that’s the name for skunk cabbage in the UK.

Behind the barn, heading west, is a trail for horse riding. As you can see (sort of), it enables horse riders to get all the way to the beach.

Red Barn

The trail leads through the woods, then onto roads through Long Beach and thence to the ocean.

This horse did not look in the mood for a ride.

This horse did not look in the mood for a ride.

Allan planted violas in containers in Diane’s garden north of the barn. I planted some pink and white and buttercream California poppies in the roadside garden and we both did a little weeding along the edges.

some violas and pansies

some violas and pansies by Diane’s garage and back porch

in a shade container

in a shade container

red barberry in a whiskey barrel

red barberry in a whiskey barrel…

with Fritillaria meleagris

with Fritillaria meleagris

The roadside garden, in its second year, is starting to fill in and be the eyecatcher I hoped it would be. It got two Penstemon’s and a Verbascum ‘Eleanor’s Blush’.

looking south

looking south

looking north

looking north

I had acquired three more Geum ‘Sangria’ for Long Beach; they and one more Gaura and three blue Catananche (Cupid’s Dart) got planted at Veterans Field, by Allan, when I did some deadheading along the main street. Do you notice how, since I don’t like planting, I make it more of a perfect day for me by getting Allan to do that part? He looked for our narrow shovel to plant the gallon sized plants and it was not to be found. I remembered the last photo taken in Nellie’s garden yesterday:

4:50 PM

Yesterday: shovel with round yellow handle!

Veterans Field half circle garden

Veterans Field half circle garden; Allan managed to plant without the narrow shovel.

Fifth Street Park then got three more plants, two penstemons and an agastache, and I got a photo of an artifact one block east of there.

car

And then…dinner at 5:30 with Fred and Nancy at The Depot Restaurant’s burger night.

depot

showing about one fourth of the garden's narcissi

showing about one fourth of the garden’s narcissi (and tulips)

In good company, we feasted on burgers (stacked so high with ingredients that they can barely be held) and apple cobbler a la mode and a beer each (Total Domination IPA for me and a Guinness for Allan). It seemed to make us so sleepy that when we got home I only had strength to look out the back window instead of going out there…

view from south window

view from south window

looking southeast

looking southeast

…and Allan snoozed while I wrote this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday, 5 February 2014

Cranberry Museum

  • After our visit to Oysterville, the trolley took us south to the Cranberry Museum at the Cranberry Research Center.  Confusingly, it is on Pioneer Road instead of Cranberry Road.  Allan still feels bad about the time he accidentally sent a tourist to Cranberry Road to find it.  The museum was closed for the day.  Somehow my friend who had done the trolley tour three weeks before had managed to score some cranberry ice cream at this stop, but we were not so lucky.  If you visit during summer hours, perhaps you can taste some.  We just pulled up by the museum for a moment to get a feel of the place.  We might have taken a self guided tour of the bogs had it not been an unusually freezing cold day.
photo courtesy Cranberry Museum

photo courtesy Cranberry Museum

In the bog (below), photographed from the trolley (which, although unheated, did protect us from the wind chill factor that made the day feel like 8 degrees), the research scientists are testing out an assortment of different cranberry cultivars.

a winter bog

a test bog

The self guided tour goes along the green paths.  Heather is planted next to the bogs to attract the very earliest bees, so necessary for pollenating the cranberry plants.

bog paths

bog paths

I’ve been in the Cranberry Museum before and blogged some years ago about the cranberry harvest, here.

World Kite Museum

Our next stop was The World Kite Museum on Sid Snyder Drive beach approach in Long Beach.  Even though Allan and I take care of a pocket garden by the front door, we rarely take time to go in to the museum.  This stop allowed enough time to explore two floors of displays of kites from around the world and even to make a little kite for ourselves!

photo courtesy World Kite Musem

photo courtesy World Kite Museum

I was relieved that our pocket garden, which we had not checked on since the beginning of staycation, looked okay.

kite garden with some bulbs coming up

kite garden with some bulbs coming up

inside the museum

inside the museum
World War II kite collection

World War II kite collection

The big windows set kite colours aglow.

The big windows set kite colours aglow.

From the west windows, we could see Back Country Horse Rides.  Three representatives of that company were on the tourism tour with us, along with the manager of Driftwood RV Park, the mayor and first lady of Long Beach, one of the workers from The Cottage Bakery (which the mayor and his wife own), a worker from Jessie’s Ilwaco Fish Company, Jayne Bailey of Bailey’s Café, a few people from Astoria, and more…  This led to exuberant cheering each time the trolley passed one of the businesses whose people were on the tour that day.

Back Country Horse Rides and, further west,  the Adrift Hotel

Back Country Horse Rides and, further west, the Adrift Hotel

more kites

more kites

horse

kites

I'm fond of the face kites.

I’m fond of the face kites.

Patty Rolfe, manager of the Kite Museum gift shop, led a brief workshop in making a small kite.

patty

making kites

making kites

Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

The trolley took us south to our town, Ilwaco, and to the museum on our street, Lake Street.  I made sure that Olde Towne Café, my favourite business, got a cheer from the riders as we passed by it.  We arrived at the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum and trooped in for a guided tour from the museum docents.

Rosemary, Ellen, and museum director Betsy Millard ready to take us on tour

Rosemary, Ellen, and museum director Betsy Millard ready to take us on tour

our tour group

part of our tour group

We split into two groups; the one Allan and I joined first toured the Clamshell Railroad annex of the museum, passing the historic train car on the way.  You can read up on the railroad here.  If I could go back in time and do one thing, it would be to ride on that train.

historic train car

historic train car

In the annex building, the Peninsula Model Railroad Club has built a model of the Peninsula towns; for a quarter, you can make a little train run from Ilwaco to Oysterville (not to scale).  Some tour goers could not resist making train noises to go along with the experiences…sort of like Sheldon on Big Bang Theory.  Chugchugchugchug WOOOO WOOOO!

model of Ilwaco

model of Ilwaco

Black Lake, just north of Ilwaco

Black Lake, just north of Ilwaco

model train car inside the annex

train

oceanpark

The train made it all the way to Nahcotta without derailing.  Once Allan and I gave it a run and it derailed halfway up the track.  We quietly snuck into the other part of the museum (but did confess to someone there that the derailment had happened).

railway artifacts

railway artifacts

rrphotos

one of the beautiful seats from a railway car

one of the beautiful seats from a railway car

op

ilwacorr

Ilwaco train dock

Ilwaco train dock

We followed our tour guide into a back door of the museum; I did not even know that door existed.

into the easternmost room of the museum building

into the easternmost room of the museum building

lifeboat

lifejackets hang over an old lifeboat

lifejackets hang over an old lifeboat

crab pot

crab pot

a life ring for Allan

a life ring for Allan

Betsy Millard, museum director

Betsy Millard, museum director

a cool old boat

a cool old boat

The next room has a model of horses seine fishing on the Columbia River.  Here’s a fascinating video on the history of horse seining, a practice which ended in 1948.

horses

This part of the museum also has my favourite exhibit, a street of shops, each housing a different display of artifacts.

model street

model street

The next room has a Lewis and Clark display.  As the docents themselves said, it is nothing on the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center, our next destination.

trolley tour folks in the Lewis and Clark room

trolley tour folks in the Lewis and Clark room

Lewis and Clark

Lewis and Clark

The final room, which is usually the first one I enter but we were going back to front, has nature displays and a basket collection and some history of the Chinook Indians.

baskets

nature

We exited by the charming little gift shop.

gift shop

gift shop

back aboard the trolley!

back aboard the trolley!

For those who might wonder, the trim on the outside of the trolley and the interior woodwork is all oak.

Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center

The trolley took us up the loop road to the hills of Cape Disappointment, where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean.  This glorious park is just a mile or so from where we live.

view from the trolley, looking south over the river marshes

view from the trolley, looking south over the river marshes at low tide

on a bluff overlooking the ocean, the museum

on a bluff overlooking the ocean, the museum

Despite the chill east wind (straight out of the Columbia Gorge) whipping fiercely up here, some of us went to the railing to enjoy the view.

the north jetty

the north jetty

interpretive sign about cormorants

interpretive sign about cormorants

cormorants

cormorants

west side of the interpretive center

west side of the interpretive center

Cape Disappointment Lighthouse

Cape Disappointment Lighthouse

Just for fun, here’s a view from the Cape D lighthouse looking back, taken last spring.

view from the base of the lighthouse

view from the base of the lighthouse

Inside the interpretive center, one goes down a long ramp lined with Lewis and Clark information, with switchbacks and small plateaus with larger displays.

inside

down we go...

down we go…

A history buff could spend hours here.  I have a small confession:  I am not one for reading all the history a museum has to offer (unless its about the Clamshell Railroad, of which I never tire).  Allan, however, is someone who would read every word.

ramps

museum

Jane of Bailey's Café

Jane of Bailey’s Café

This is a captivating display.

This is a captivating display.

as is this

as is this

and this

and this

There is one spot on the downward ramp where a turn takes you to a flight of stairs that leads up into the light of the view room that is the breathtaking heart of the museum.

entering a room of light

entering a room of light

windows

from the center to the lighthouse

from the center to the lighthouse (south)

why we have two lighthouses

why we have two lighthouses

view to the jetty (north)

view to the jetty (north)

A park ranger was there to answer any questions.  I learned something new:  The entire North Jetty was originally free standing and over decades has filled in on the north side with sand, grass and trees so that only the westernmost end of it juts out into the ocean.

park ranger

park ranger

part of a lighthouse beacon in display

part of a lighthouse beacon in display

boat signs

a display about shipwrecks

I almost did not look up to see the collection of glass floats

I almost did not look up to see the collection of glass floats

Amazingly it was not quite three o clock when the trolley took us back north to the Long Beach train depot building where our vehicles were parked.  I never would have thought one could make it from Long Beach to Oysterville and back to Long Beach and Ilwaco and see so much in less than six hours.  Come be a tourist here, where the locals care enough to train in the art of hospitality.  There are two more of these trolley tours being offered, on March 6th and March 25th.  If any of you locals are interested, call Sue at Our Place at the Beach Hotel to save your spot.

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Our favourite local restaurant and one that gets all the top star ratings is The Depot Restaurant in Seaview, Washington, and we are honoured to work on their small garden.

The Depot Restaurant

The Depot building was indeed a depot for the Clamshell Railroad. The Depot gardens consist of the front door container plantings, a garden bed on east side (left) of entrance, a garden bed behind the log that defines the parking area (backed with a wall of hops). You enter the dining deck from behind the clump of bamboo in the crook of the “L”.  A raised bed with ornamental grasses segues into a bed of herbs as it wraps around the east and south sides of the dining deck.

Depot, two garden beds, 30 June

Above: On a sunny day in June, the east wall garden bed with Cistus and Cosmos (left), and the north side of deck garden bed with Astilbe and Allium schubertii (right).

5 August, Dierama (Angel’s Fishing Rod)

Above, Dierama, Cosmos, Hardy Fuchsia, Cistus in the east wall bed.

5 August, Persicaria ‘Firetail, Brodiaea ‘Queen Fabiola’, Astilbe

5 August, Hardy Fuchsia, Astilbe

Above six photos on August 5th: The mostly shady garden bed on the north side of the outdoor dining deck.

Alongside the outdoor dining deck, a raised bed of railroad sleepers (ties) was built back when the restaurant opened and planted up with ornamental grasses and Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ from The English Nursery, a small collector’s nursery just three blocks away.  These make a privacy screen and rustling backdrop for outdoor dining in the summer.

Ornamental grass border along dining deck

In tribute to the delicious beers on tap at the Depot, we planted hops on the north side of the deck.

5 August, hops, views from inside and outside the dining deck

The containers and windowboxes around the entryway were planted up by The Basket Case Greenhouse.

Depot front door plantings

window box with plants from The Basket Case

late summer, Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ by the dining deck.

5 August, fresh herbs right outside the kitchen door

Let me know if you want company for dinner; we are always eager to dine at the Depot!

at entrance to outdoor dining deck

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