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Posts Tagged ‘Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’’

Tuesday, 19 June 2018

Ilwaco post office with Asiatic lilies and Stipa gigantea

Mike’s garden

My plan for today had been just to water the port curbside gardens.  However, I had seen on the Plant Idents Facebook group that the little geranium which had recently started running rampant in Mike’s garden is on the noxious weed list, common name Shiny Geranium.  So I pulled a bag of it while Allan worked some more on Mike’s back garden.

The red is Geranium lucidum.

suddenly all over the narrow north side of the garden

later

The geranium went into a tied shut garbage bag.

The north side of the house is a dry and drab area that is mostly used as a path.    I have not tried to do much of anything to make it better.

Today, however, I realized that the buried path (because of some construction) was not going to reappear by itself.

We moved an entry area sideways to get away from a big Escallonia iveyi…

Allan’s before…

and after

And Allan brought the rest of the path back after I moved an H block and found the pavers (and moved some of them sideways for an easier route).

during

after

We both worked on making dirt paths reappear in the woodsy back yard.

Allan’s before…

and after

A path circles the tree again.

Port of Ilwaco

We watered from one end to the other, randomly because the Pavilion was being pressure washed, which threw us off our proper order.

I must remember to be on the lookout for some good semi shade plants to re-do these pots at OleBob’s Café.  The pampas grass, mostly dead, was not a wise choice.

We did not do it!

Another vandalized Eryngium at the Riverszen garden:

Allan’s photos

trashed for no reason other than the will to damage beauty

an undamaged Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ (Allan’s photo)

At the west end, the oxeye daisies in the driest spot are starting to die off, so time was spent clipping them back.  (Often I just pull them.)

I applied fish fertilizer to the Time Enough Books garden, which does worst of all even though we have done it longest and with much love.  It was terrible soil under river rock.  We removed a lot of rock, added mulch, and yet…it struggles.  It probably gets the most water, too, because sometimes bookstore owner Karla waters it.

We weeded the curbside garden at the former Shorebank, which is going to be a hotel called At the Helm (with a pub!).

Allan went on to water the east end, while I went home to try to get ready for our trip.

east end garden (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

at home

I was home soon enough to garden for a short while.

back garden looking south

Sunday I got seven or eight barrows of compost from compost bin one.  Today, this was all I got by getting to the bottom of bin two.

It was almost all dried up ornamental grass stalks.  I had not been able to properly mix green and brown, due to a shortage of green in early spring.

I noticed that the leaves of the golden hypericum that I pruned radically not long ago have turned splotchy and ugly.

I had to cut it down again, and in the process snapped off a new lily.

Call the WAHmbulance over the poor lily.

Now I wish ever so much I had just left that golden shrub alone in the first place.

Once you cut it, you can’t put it back.

There were consolations.

Mermaid rose on the arbour

Paul’s Himalayan Musk rose

pink and yellow rose whose name I have forgotten

The rose that was here when we bought the place.

close up; it is fragrant and once blooming

with Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’

I do not want to leave my garden even for a trip to see other splendid gardens.

 

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Sunday, 14 June 2015

More intense wind than yesterday meant I could not weed back by the bogsy wood, so I focused on the front garden.  But first, I had woken up with a brainstorm that I shared with Allan, hoping he would implement it, and he did.  We have an old plastic pond form passed on to us (thanks, Betsy!), that I had not figured out where to put till this morning.  It could be a tadpole haven, I thought, and would fit perfectly in an empty spot in the raspberry patch.  The pond did fit, and the only sad thing was learning that the last tadpole puddle has dried up along the meander line ditch.  At least I was able to shift a few tadpoles from a crowded water box into this new home.

Allan's photo: the dry ditch, not a puddle left

Allan’s photo: the dry ditch, not a puddle left

the good news: lots of tiny tree frogs had managed to grow legs in time.

the good news: lots of tiny tree frogs had managed to grow legs in time.

IMG_2205IMG_2221

Allan took a sequence of photos of filling the plastic pond.  Such things are deeply fascinating to us.

before

before

during

during

siphoning water from a rain barrel

siphoning water from a rain barrel

all the way around the corner

all the way around the corner

One of 8 barrels that collect water from gutters on shed and house

One of 8 barrels that collect water from gutters on shed and house

A couple of them even have proper faucets (inset by Allan)

A couple of them even have proper faucets (inset by Allan)

after

after

The pond form is actually made to sink into the ground.  I like it raised up high where I can see it better.  We used up all the barrel water on the not quite full new pond and some watering of planters and the burbling yesterday of all the ladies in waiting.

During my first rest break, I was about to share a local cross-post to Discover Ilwaco to help promote an Ilwaco business, and I saw a little motion on the corner of my iPhone.

checking out a selection of the pages I administrate or help administrate

checking out a selection of the pages I administrate or help administrate

I do think snails are cute.

I do think snails are cute.

I think snails are so cute that I can’t kill them.  My latest solution is I put them in a pot, and gently insert another pot to hold them in, and at the end of the day I take them to the other side of the meander line and dump them in the long grass and hope they find something to eat there and that they do not breed and march all the way back into my garden again.  I do put out Sluggo, which counts as killing, except that snails don’t seem to consume it.  Slugs do, although not voraciously enough.  I do not thinks slugs are cute at all because they don’t have little houses by which I can pick them up.

my little friend

my little friend

Back outdoors, I realized that a hardy fuchsia had gotten so big it was swamping other choice plants.  It’s the pale pink magellanica and it is now back (planted at risk of the wind, but it had to be done) under one of the alder trees.  I cut it back hard and hoped for the best.  It is not the only pale pink magellanica I have so it was worth the risk.

before

before

after: Now I really need a deer fence here!  (We stuck in a temporary fence section for now.)

after: Now I really need a deer fence here! (We stuck in a temporary fence section for now.)

Allan's garden looked lovely; he had just weeded and watered.

Allan’s garden looked lovely; he had just weeded and watered.

arch to the back garden: Clematis 'Etoile Violette' is not as prolific as last year.

arch to the back garden: Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’ is not as prolific as last year.

She is magnifique from every angle.

In 2013: She was magnifique from every angle.

Paul's Himalayan Musk rose on the west arbor

Paul’s Himalayan Musk rose on the west arbor

Allan went to work for a bit watering the Ilwaco Community Building Garden.

He brought back this proof that a few of the California poppy seeds I sowed have come up.

He brought back this proof that a few of the California poppy seeds I sowed have come up.

We rewarded ourselves for a productive weekend with dinner at the Depot for their once yearly Paella special.

We sat at the counter at 8 PM.

We sat at the counter at 8 PM.

some wine: Pinot Noir for me...

some wine: Pinot Noir for me…

Chef Michael's delicious paella

Chef Michael’s delicious paella

When we got back home, I noticed in the long evening light that the volunteer poppy in a garage planter looked especially fine.

a self sown volunteer

a self sown volunteer

Allan had clipped it to make it stand up.

Allan had clipped it to make it stand up.

Monday, 15 June 2015

The cold 20 plus mile an hour north wind was horrid for me gardening at home; Allan took off on a boating trip to South Bend where the wind was an advantage and the temperature not as cold.  (Next post!)

looking south to the bogsy woods

looking south to the bogsy woods

Imagine the roar of wintry-feeling wind in the trees!  I forced myself to stay outside and do a few projects closer to the house.

before, between the greenhouse and the shed, untouched so far this year

before, between the greenhouse and the shed, untouched so far this year

after....

after….

I had big plans for putting some driftwood in front of the pond form…and did not get far.

found one little thing to help camouflage the front of the plastic pond

found one little thing to help camouflage the front of the plastic pond

After weeding by the garden boat and cutting some willow limbs that were leaning over the west edge of the garden, I had had enough of the horrid weather.  I’m surprised I lasted the several hours that I did.  I forced myself to pick some strawberries; I’ve been letting our friend Devery have them all so far.

40 strawberries with many more ripening

40 strawberries with many more ripening

During the weeding sessions, I have been noticing more deer damage inside the deer fence.  Is it from when they got in last week, or is it new damage, implying they are jumping the fence???!  Although the wind prevented me from making a circuit of the whole fence, and our workweek begins tomorrow, next weekend might find me tying tall bamboo poles all along the fence to turn it into a taller stockade.  Seven feet is supposedly not tall enough.

just a lovely sanguisorba

just a lovely sanguisorba

and no more ladies in waiting except for four plants that are for Steve and John

and no more ladies in waiting except for four plants that are for Steve and John

Well before dark, I took refuge in the house and finished my book, which is what I had been longing to do all along.

DSC03823

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 10 June 2014

It’s a heavy responsibility and one that will weigh on us until mid September to keep plants watered. Fortunately some of our clients (especially Andersen’s RV Park and Klipsan Beach Cottages) can be counted on to keep the gardens watered for us, really for themselves.

I won’t even take on a new job now that requires regular watering.

Casa Pacifica

First job of the day, watering and fertilizing the whiskey barrels at Casa Pacifica, east of the Peninsula near Wallicut Farms.

Leanne has been doing a good job of keeping them watered.

Leanne has been doing a good job of keeping them watered.

two out of the seven by the guest house/shop.

three out of the seven by the guest house/shop.

My good friend Dusty greeted me when I walked up the long driveway to the house.  Tail going in happy circles.

My good friend Dusty greeted me when I walked up the long driveway to the house. Tail going in happy circles.

Darcy and Spook were standoffish as usual, although I may be making progress.

Darcy and Spook were standoffish as usual, although I may be making progress.

five more barrels atop a steep slope..tilting! and an interested Darcy.

five more barrels atop a steep slope..tilting! and an interested Darcy.

The barrels on the upper level are hard to reach with the hose and were a little too dry.

The garden atop the rocks was very dry.

The garden atop the rocks was very dry.

One of the artichokes that Leanne had asked for last year was falling over with thirst.

One of the artichokes that Leanne had asked for last year was falling over with thirst.

This garden has problems in that sprinklers cannot be set up because sometimes the well has run dry!

I emailed a photo of the artichoke to Dan and in the evening heard back that Leanne had watered it with her tears.  I know she cares so much for the plants; the amount of water needed is just not available.  I add very few new plants to that upper garden now even though I had originally envisioned it being lush.

Long Beach

Then we were off to water the main street planters in Long Beach:  36 of them, plus one big planter, four whiskey barrels, and two veterans field pots.  That does not include the planters on the two beach approach roads.

Long Beach fifth street restrooms, Sanguisorba, one of my favourite perennials.  Find the snail!  Allan sees it in the photo.

Long Beach Fifth Street restrooms, with Sanguisorba, one of my favourite perennials. Find the snail! Allan sees it in the photo.

As we were getting ready for the watering, one of the city crew chaps walked by and said to me “Don’t retire!  We don’t have time to do what you do.”  I said what WE don’t have time for this year is the relatively low skill job of weeding the Bolstadt beach approach six or so blocks long garden bed, a job that takes about seven days.  It is going to turn into a jungle and Allan and I have not had time to touch it this year (partly because I am determined to not work seven days a week or ten hours a day at our advanced age).

an immediate emergency...recently planted wilted Agyranthemum to the left!  Got an extra good soaking.

an immediate emergency…recently planted wilted Agyranthemum to the right! Got an extra good soaking.

As I began my walk around town with hose, quick-connect faucet device, and bucket (with Allan doing the same in the opposite direction), I saw a sign that reminded me that the Farmers Market opens this Friday afternoon.

We had better get the roses cut back from the sidewalk.

We had better get the roses cut back from the sidewalk.

And then I found another heart rock, to add to the mystery of the one I found yesterday.

rock

back

This time I looked on the back, and later looked at the heart rock I found yesterday and it did indeed have the same lettering.

Was it an assignation to someone, or could a friend have left it for ...me?

Yesterday’s rock

It is intensely poignant to find these “love rocks” memorializing two talented young girls.  I wonder who is distributing them here?  The ones I found will make their way to somewhere in Ilwaco.

Further up the block, I bucket watered the four whiskey barrel planters in Fish Alley.

It is a long, heart-pounding walk to those back two planters...

It is a long, heart-pounding walk with a 25 lb half bucket of water to those back two planters…one half bucket each, two walks….  

There are white strawberries to find in the planter in front of Wind World Kites.  I have seen people spit in the planters (sad but not uncommon) so would not eat them.

little white strawberries

little white strawberries

And in the planter just north of Dennis Company, I found something not so nice.

stinky dead crabs...with lemon...carried by me by their pincers, at arms length to a garbage can half a block away.

four stinky dead crabs…with lemon…carried by me by their pincers, at arms length to a garbage can half a block away.

Fifth Street Park planter, Allan's photo

Fifth Street Park planter, Allan’s photo

Fifth Street Park planter, Allan's photo, Lollipop Asiatic lilies from back when the planter was done by volunteers.

Fifth Street Park planter, Allan’s photo, Lollipop Asiatic lilies from back when the planter was done by volunteers.

(I love lilies but don’t add them to the planters because the foliage looks so bad when dying back.)

When we had finished watering the planters, we had time to reward ourselves with a quick meal at Captain Bob’s Chowder, right behind our starting point at Fifth Street Park.

bob

bouquet

The crab rolls were my favourite.

The crab rolls are my favourite….delicious.

Before we moved on, I was happy to see the wilted Agyranthemum had perked up.

I am going to have to keep an eye on this one.

I am going to have to keep an eye on this one.

I weeded and deadheaded at Veterans Field to prep for the Farmers Market...

I weeded and deadheaded at Veterans Field to prep for the Farmers Market…

and Allan cut back the white rugosa roses for the same reason.

and Allan cut back the white rugosa roses for the same reason.

Ilwaco planters and the boatyard (not)

Our plan for the evening was for Allan to water the Ilwaco planters and me to water the boatyard garden…until we found that in the boatyard faucets all the water was OFF.  Allan had to quest for water, eventually hooking up with a long hose to the port office faucet.  Thus his job took an extra half an hour.  I gave up and went home.

I had a rather lovely time puttering around my own garden for awhile.

Iris ensata about to open in the bogsy wood

Iris ensata about to open in the bogsy wood

Clematis 'Etoile Violette' on the rebar arbour

Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’ on the rebar arbour

looking south west from the patio

looking south west from the arbour

Pink rose that came with the house

Pink rose that came with the house

I picked ripe strawberries from next to the boat.

I picked ripe strawberries from next to the boat.

If there was no rain, we would have to fill the water trailer at the port office soon to water the boatyard…although we did hope the water would be back on by the next day.

On the way home, Allan checked the controlled burn site, now level and clean.

It might not be too late to throw some seeds in there now...except I have none at hand.

It might not be too late to throw some seeds in there now…except I have none at hand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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(While I try to catch up on the blog, writing this on August 3, I am also trying to catch up on sorely neglected billing.  Blogging is highly entertaining but has gotten in the way of some of the more practical details of running a business…)

July 24

I seem to have had a little walk through of the garden in the morning.  The lettuce bowl is evidence of trying to be adequate for the edible garden tour.

lettuce bowl

lettuce bowl

I have been picking leaves from it almost every night in order to keep it going till the tour on August 11.  Doing so is mildly enjoyable unless I see a slug or, as last time I brought in a bowl of assorted leaves, found a pretty yellow spider on one.  (Leaf and spider went back outside.)   I hope the flowers in the garden will distract tour guests from the paucity of edibles compared to other gardens.

Clematis 'Etoile Violette'

Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’

Then…work.  We began at the Red Barn tending to five container plantings and a small strip of garden.

looking northeast at the Red Barn

looking northeast at the Red Barn

My photos there rarely show the barn itself, so I got behind the garden and took this:

The Red Barn

The Red Barn

Next time I will try to get a horse emerging, although I can’t hang around and wait.  This time we’ll just see the pretty horse that lives next door to Diane’s place just north of the barn, our next little job.

Diane's sister's horse

Diane’s sister’s horse

The roadside garden at Diane’s is slowly filling in.  Here it is looking north…really shaking things up as I usually show it looking south.

Diane's roadside garden

Diane’s roadside garden

We stopped next at The Basket Case which has now closed for the season to get some of the very last sale plants to fill in a few places.

in an almost empty greenhouse

in an almost empty greenhouse

a wee tree frog in a water bucket

a wee tree frog in a water bucket

another on a greenhouse shelf

another on a greenhouse shelf

part of the crew watches us drive away

part of the crew watches us drive away

We were on our way to Andersen’s RV Park.  When we arrived, I realized I had forgotten the flat of trailing plants which I so wanted to fill in some of Lorna’s empty pots (left over from tulip time), so back we went to Basket Case.  This time, on the way back to Andersen’s, we made a quick stop to drop off a gift of a few extra annuals to our friend Vernice in her new spot in the RV park residence on Cranberry Road.  She was not home but we had no trouble recognizing her trailer with its lavish little garden.

Vernice's rig and garden

Vernice’s rig and garden

She should be on the edible tour; her vegetable patch is better than mine.

Vernice's veg

Vernice’s veg

I think the whole park could be on the edible tour because it sure looks like a lot of gardeners live there.

a good neighbourhood

a good neighbourhood

No wonder Vernice tells us she is happy living there.

Back at Andersen’s, we stuffed more plants along the edge of the Payson Hall planters to fill in a few gaps that had been bothering me.

The mural is by Susan Wallace of Painted Lady Lavender Farm

The mural is by Susan Wallace of Painted Lady Lavender Farm

One cosmos got freakishly large (above).  Fortunately that one happens to be right in the middle of the center planter so it does not throw off the balance.

The Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ in the containers in the west garden look bright even on a grey day.  Colour, colour, colour is what is sought at this job.

looking southwest

looking southwest

garden at Andersen's back office door

garden at Andersen’s back office door

More 'Butterfly' near the front of the office

More ‘Butterfly’ near the front of the office

Rudbeckia 'Tangerine Dream' by the picket fence

Rudbeckia ‘Tangerine Dream’ by the picket fence

After all the Andersen’s beds had had a going-over, we returned south to add some plants to the Long Beach planter by NIVA green.  I had not been happy with how it looked; it had some dull plants left over from its days as a volunteer garden.  I have been trying to make it better for my favourite shopkeeper, NIVA’s Heather Ramsay.

I like the lambs-ear but...maybe not colourfil enough...and a tatty old chrysanthemum will be pulled this fall.

I like the lambs-ear but…maybe not colourful enough…and a tatty old chrysanthemum will be pulled this fall.  

Maybe I should rip all of the old perennials out of that planter and start over!

While I stuffed six more annuals and two Geranium ‘Rozanne’ into the planter by NIVA, Allan got started on the planter watering and did the northern two blocks and we then went on to water the rest of the planters.  I found yummy white strawberries, left over from the days of volunteer planters,  in the one in front of Wind World Kites and made sure to show the nice man who owns that shop.

white strawberries

white strawberries

The Fish Alley whiskey barrels, replanted earlier this year to require less bucket watering, are not as showy as last year’s thirsty annuals,  but they will have a tapestry effect (I hope) as the sedums and herbs start to grow closer together.

one of four Fish Alley barrels

one of four Fish Alley barrels

Veterans Field garden is still red-white-and-bluing.

Veterans Field garden strip

Veterans Field garden strip

We ended the Long Beach session by a light weeding of the Fifth Street Parks.  Looks like I planted the lily below to match the Benson’s Restaurant sign but it is a happy coincidence.

colour echo

colour echo

That lily is so fragrant I could smell it twenty feet away.

On the other side of the street, in front of Captain Bob's Chowder

On the other side of the street, in front of Captain Bob’s Chowder

We still have not had time to eat at Captain Bob’s this summer because it always seems we have urgent watering to get to in Ilwaco at the end of a Long Beach day….

Detail with Eryngium 'Jade Frost/

Detail with Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’, cosmos, and catmint

the north end of that border with Marsh's Free Museum

the north end of that border with Marsh’s Free Museum

Then, off to Ilwaco.  Allan had bucket watered the Ilwaco planters two days before so (after we weeded at the yellow cottage; that part of the workday gets neglected in the blog if I go home to water the tomatoes and veg!)  That’s a job for every third day except in very warm weather.

Larry and Robert’s garden (a half block from our home) definitely needed watering and I had some more end-of-season annuals from The Basket Case to stuff into the garden boat.  It has rather suffered in our unseasonably strong cold winds lately and the cosmos is not putting on as good a show as I wanted.

boat stuffed with more annuals

boat stuffed with more annuals (pink agyranthemum, Salvia ‘Victoria Blue’

We have to be sure to give plenty of water regularly to the new tree we planted in the corner garden so that it thrives.

in the corner:  Robinia Pseudoacacia 'Frisia'

in the corner: Robinia Pseudoacacia ‘Frisia’

There’s something to be said for the Hornbuckle style of gardening with space between the plants!  It bothered me while I was there, but looking at the photo the effect is rather nice.  And it is what Judy can see from her window, so it is appropriate the way that each plant stands out in its own glory.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 9

Tuesday was a bit of a roller coaster of a day in Long Beach.

It started well with a walk of admiration around our own garden. I wanted to make sure to get a photo of Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’ at its peak.

Etoile Violette

Etoile Violette

She is magnifique from every angle.

She is magnifique from every angle.

Would that all my clematis did this well!

Would that all my clematis did this well!

In the front garden: Melianthus major and lily

In the front garden: Melianthus major and lily

Everyone who visits has to be shown how the leaves of Melianthus smell like peanut butter. Rarely, someone thinks the leaves stink of old socks.

Lily and Joe Pye  looking well together.

Lily and Joe Pye looking well together.

and a handsome pink veronica

and a handsome pink veronica

We checked on Gene’s garden first, one of the upcoming tour gardens, and very satisfying it was to see how well it had filled in. He has been working hard on it in memory of his dear wife, Peggy.

the view as we drove up...excellent!

the view as we drove up…excellent!

Gene's edible raised bed

Gene’s edible raised bed

the beautiful courtyard

the beautiful courtyard

I had felt the weather would be a bit on the chilly side so had taken several layers of clothing to add if need be. Watering can be a cold job. Little did I imagine that the wind would soon kick up to a bone chilling 20 miles an hours. Worse yet, I did not expect it to be Sandsations weekend. Two years ago, Sandsations was at the end of July. I realize now that it changes around depending on which Saturday has the proper time of low tide for building sculptures on the beach. CITY Sandsations takes place downtown the week before, and there, next to Veterans Field, were big mounds of sand.

sand!

sand!

sign!

sign!

one of three horribly unweeded parking lot berms!

one of three horribly unweeded parking lot berms!

Ironically, just last week I had made some noises about how a summer intern could weed the berms because we could not make enough extra hours appear in the week…and here we were, faced with lots of people in the parking lots areas and the berms looking just awful. The day’s plan changed. (We had been hoping to get to a private garden that we’ve been neglecting due to tour prep.) Because there are few special plants in the center berm, Allan went back home to get the weedeater while I started watering the planters. And the cold wind blew.

Because of working in unpleasant conditions, I had considerable swings of mood over the next two hours.

cold wind: bad!

cold wind: bad! (looking up at one of the hanging baskets)

Seeing Tiny in the front door of Niva green:  good!

Seeing Tiny in the front door of Niva green: good!

Then I got to talk to Heather of Niva green when she arrived home at that opportune moment…and got to pet little Tiny. Very good.

But then I left my clippers on the other side of Bolstadt, whose streetlight is the one I call the Light of Mystery because it takes so long.

My clippers are way back on that planter by the Pharmacy.  Bad!!

My clippers are way back on that planter by the Pharmacy. Bad!!

But then I saw a motorcyclist with a cute pomeranium in his jacket. Good!

a happy sight!

a happy sight!

But then…a razor blade left on the side of a planter, leading to dire thoughts of what if it had been hidden in plants.

very bad

potentially very bad

But then I looked across the street and saw how wonderful the circle garden at the front of Coulter Park is looking…

I like it.

I like it.

Diascia and Sunbini are also cheering.

Diascia and Sunbini are also cheering.

Then I saw that the curry plant and lavender had grown so far over the bench on the northernmost west side planter that I started to fear for the sidewalk passage.

worrisome

worrisome

But the plants are covered with bees.

very good!

very good!

And my eyes feasted on the way Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ POPS against the dark green building behind Coulter Park.

stunning

stunning

Best of all, Allan had finished the weedeating and clean up of the middle berm and caught up to me watering, so that was done.

Badness: I had forgotten that we needed to check on the Depot Restaurant garden for deadheading, so we had to drive back down to Seaview before the restaurant opened for dinner.

Depot

Depot

The Dierama in full bloom there was an uplifting sight.

Back to Long Beach, I admired Allan’s accomplishment on the middle berm.

after

after

Weedeating the grass and dandelions (he pulled some, too) was a rough job, but since the trees were limbed up last year, all of a sudden this whole new weed territory has appeared and turning it into a rough lawn is all we had time for.

The crows liked it.

The crows liked it.

We then addressed the problem of the northernmost berm, the one right next to the City Sandsations area. We began to weed it at 5:30, not having time to do a superior detailed job. By this time the wind was so cold and strong that I put on a winter scarf that was still in the back of the car and very glad I was that I had it with me.

before

before

after (7 PM)

after (7 PM)

We cheated in spots and just ran the weedeater; what else could we do? At least it is tidy…and we had a trailer load of debris to dump.

Debris from one berm

Debris from one berm

By the way, they are not really berms, just long beds, not raised at all. I don’t know why we call them berms. We just do!

And there, in the distance, as we prepared to go to the city dump site, we could see “berm” number three. We would have to find time for it later in the week.

berm three lurks in the distance

berm three lurks in the distance

On the way to the City Works yard, I stopped for one last task of the day. I had created a Facebook page for the Edible Garden Tour (August 11, including our not very edible garden!) and wanted to update one of last year’s gardens. The Long Beach community garden had not looked very good on the 2012 tour as it was brand new. Now it looks just marvelous!

at 11th and Washington North

at 11th and Washington North

community garden

community garden

beds

clever raised beds

clever raised beds

The day was productive but I was awfully glad to come to the end of it.

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First, a flashback to a few photos from earlier in the week, before and after work:

black Centaurea (perennial cornflower)

black Centaurea (perennial cornflower)

That tall...um..Rubus something?? that I wanted for a long time and now have might be a bit vigourous.

That tall…um..Rubus something?? that I wanted for a long time and now have might be a bit vigourous.

front gate view Saturday as we leave for Doggie Olympic Games

front gate view Saturday as we leave for Doggie Olympic Games

an annual poppy

an annual poppy

a lily in the front garden, admired as we left again to work for an hour in the early evening.

a lily in the front garden, admired as we left again to work for an hour in the early evening.

As always on Saturday morning, we took photos at Ilwaco Saturday Market and uploaded them to Discover Ilwaco. Saturday afternoon, the fun and lively annual Doggie Olympic Games kept us busy taking photos and uploading them well into the evening. Sunday I could not make myself go out into the garden because I was absorbed in uploading the rest of the photos…and it was so hot the cats were sleeping on the cool bathroom counter.

a cool spot when wearing a fur coat

a cool spot when wearing a fur coat

You can see our Doggie photos here; later this summer I may make a post of our favourites from D.O.G. and the upcoming Sand Flea Pet Parade as I did a few years back.

Sunday evening, I finally got out into the garden while Allan bucket watered the Ilwaco planters.  I had felt only mildly guilty all day even though I suspected a cool breeze from the Port might have mitigated the heat. We have worked through all sorts of weather lately without much of a rest, and it felt good to just sit.

I had big plans for my evening session….but remembered that I needed to put some fish fertilizer on the beans and water the greenhouse tomatoes and peppers and plant a few more containers of veg seed.

In looking for another container to use, I disturbed someone.

In looking for another container to use, I disturbed someone.

In the interest of not showing only the pretty things, I did NOT get to weeding this area as I had planned this weekend:

bogsy wood east edge still unweeded

bogsy wood east edge still unweeded

bogsy wood front edge still unweeded!

bogsy wood front edge still unweeded!

I realized one of my favourite garden signs had been sucked in to the salmonberry grove and retrieved it.

sign

Just before going in, I went around and took the kind of pretty picture that shows mostly just the good things. I had some company on the excursion:

Frosty

Frosty

Smokey

Smokey

Mary

Mary

I think this daylily is a keeper.

I think this daylily is a keeper.

and this one?

and this one?

Iris

Iris

and another

and another

Penstemon fallen open in rain and wind

Penstemon fallen open in rain and wind

had to telephoto an annual poppy way in the middle of the garden

had to telephoto an annual poppy way in the middle of the garden

I am loving all my Astilbes.

I am loving all my Astilbes.

another

another

just opening

just opening

another

another

and another

and another

more Astilbe and a Phygelius

more Astilbe and a Phygelius

Clematis 'Etoile Violette'

Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’

Etiole Violette has surpassed my dreams for a beautiful clematis on the arbour leading into the back garden.  Too bad she is never in bloom on a garden tour day.

Pink Campanula

Pink Campanula

Pink Campanula, although a more “cup and saucer” sort which I find very hard to come by, figured large in a bouquet from my past that changed the way I looked at flowers.

On the lawn on Sunday, I found a perfect cap that had blown off the top of an elephant garlic.  I modelled it on a metal crow:

a rakish hat

a rakish hat

But Maddy absolutely refused to wear it for me.

Maddy

 

 

 

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