Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Clematis ‘Freckles’’

Friday, 23 January 2016

Another nice day pulled me away from reading.

Before I started gardening, Laila from Salt Hotel dropped by to see if I had any fresh rosemary for a recipe for roasted nuts.  I did.  Allan saw the harvest from the window.

DSC01680.jpg

DSC01681 - Version 2.jpg

Laila with her harvest

DSC03722.jpg

my first snowdrop

DSC03723.JPG

crocuses awaiting some sunshine

DSC03725.jpg

At last, the first Hamamelis to bloom

DSC03726.JPG

Clematis cirrhosa ‘Freckles’

DSC03727.JPG

Clematis cirrhosa ‘Freckles’

DSC03735.JPG

weeding accomplished between the front driveway

I trimmed and weeded here and there and was glad when a rainstorm sent me back into the house before dark, as I did want to read.

DSC03728.JPG

view from north window

DSC03729.JPG

view from north window

DSC03730.JPG

east window view

DSC03732.JPG

A rainbow drew me back out for a moment.

DSC03733.JPG

I had time to read the entire M Train by Patti Smith (whose album Horses changed my life when I checked it out of the library in 1979 because I liked the title).

DSC03737.JPG

In the background, the work board is still blissfully empty.

Patti, how I adore you.

DSC03738.JPG

Two moving things for me in this passage about books that belonged to her mother:

DSC03742.JPG

DSC03743.JPG

One:  I was not close to my mother, yet I miss her more than I ever thought would be possible.  Two:  My grandmother owned few books; one of them was Girl of the Limberlost, and I read that and The Harvester over and over.  I have been meaning to read The Harvester, by Gene Stratton-Porter, again.  I still have my grandma’s copy.

harvester.jpg

harvester2.jpg

Frontispiece.  I gave Montana Mary a second copy that had this in full colour.

FullSizeRender.jpg

I kept the copy with my grandmother’s name.

I see again that the book was a gift from Hugh, her fiancé who did not marry her after she moved to Seattle at age 18 to meet him.  (He lived in California and sent a box of oranges and a ring but never came for her.)  “To be given to Ginger”, in my beloved Grandma’s handwriting, refers to my mother.

But I digress.  Back to Patti:

DSC03744.JPG

I have never heard of wiping furniture down with tea and am fascinated.

I became deeply thrilled when she fell in love with a rundown tiny cottage in Rockaway Beach (New York).

DSC03745.JPG

DSC03746.JPG

Later:

DSC03747.JPG

DSC03748.JPG

In two books in a row, I have found out about someone who does not drive…Patti Smith and Gloria Steinem.

She writes that she has “an old and recurring desire…to live by the sea with a ragged garden of my own.

DSC03751.JPG

I am so moved that her dreams are as simple and small as mine.  “An uninhabitable house on a withered lot, steps away from the train to the right and the sea to the left.”  “Small rooms rusted sink vaulted ceiling century-old smells mingling with musty animal smells.  …Mold and a prevailing dampness ignited my cough but did not dampen my enthusiasm.

How hard will she have to work to raise the money. and what happens to the bungalow in Hurricane Sandy? I will leave you to get M Train to read the rest of story of the bungalow.  I wish she would write a whole illustrated book just about that.

I found the following, about memory, comforting.  Sometimes I cannot remember a book that I recently read and enjoyed:

DSC03757.JPG

DSC03758.JPG

I was shocked to read of her turning 66 years old.  Wait.  Patti Smith is 66?  That makes me old, too.  “Sixty six.  What the hell.” she writes, and later: “How did we get so damn old? I say to my joints, my iron-coloured hair.”  How indeed.  I am equally mystified.

Tomorrow: Still more gardening.

After you read M Train, you might want to read this follow up about the bungalow.

patti.jpg

Read Full Post »

Saturday, 27 December 2014

Allan made a breakfast of fresh egg from Garden Tour Nancy’s flock of hens.

subtle and lovely hues

subtle and lovely hues

Nancy had acquired a new chicken for Christmas!

Nancy had acquired a new chicken for Christmas!  (Nancy’s photo enhanced by Waterlogue)

Scrambled, the eggs were rich in colour.

Scrambled, the eggs were rich in colour.

In the kitchen window, the paperwhites had grown so tall that they were hidden behind the lacy valance.  I moved them down to sink level.

paperwhites

paperwhites

I spent the day blogging about Lisa’s party.  One more event was scheduled for the month: music at the Sou’wester Lodge on Saturday evening.

event

We drove up to the lodge past vintage trailers with holiday lights.

We drove up to the lodge past vintage trailers with holiday lights.

in the living room of the lodge

in the living room of the lodge

Allan's photo.  The room filled till every seat was taken.

Allan’s photo. The room filled till every seat was taken.

Allan's photo:  We were offered (and accepted) tasty little chocolate tarts.

Allan’s photo: We were offered (and accepted) tasty little chocolate tarts.

Sean Ogilvie

Sean Ogilvie

Allan's photo of a CD by Sean and friends

Allan’s photo of a CD by Sean and friends

Sean quietly sang maritime stories of fog, rivers, sails, waves, lighthouses, mariners.  He spoke of how he has been writing songs with his best friend since age 14 and he now has a fifteen year old daughter.  It’s too bad, I thought, that Montana Mary and I did not continue our 14-year-old musical collaboration.

Laura Gibson listens to a song about Sean's childhood.

Laura Gibson (right)  listens to a song about Sean’s childhood.  To the left sat Sean’s daughter and a friend.

Laura Gibson

Laura Gibson

Laura sang more gentle folk songs.  She said, “I don’t have very many upbeat songs so I have to strategically place them”.  She referred several times to The Gambler as being one of her favourite songs, one she might sing later that evening at the karaoke bar just down the block.  I was grateful she did not sing it at the Sou’wester as it is possibly my least favourite song.  She spoke of playing Cards Against Humanity with some young “whippersnappers” and how that had segued into a serious talk about senility (because part of the game was a joke about senility, to go along with jokes about rape, racism, and the Holocaust).  I wondered if she Laura felt the sense of despair about humans that I feel every time I hear that someone likes that game.  My sense of humour, and I do have one, so does not work that way. The usual wave of baffled disheartenment about the game’s popularity distracted me from the next song.  Even though I heard a couple of enthusiastic audience murmurings of “I LOVE that game”, I comforted myself with the realization that most of the gentle readers of this blog (all twenty of you!) would likely share my reaction.

audience

I was glad we had stirred ourselves out of the house to sit in the comfortable old lodge, and we intend to go back for more shows in 2015.

Sunday, 28 December 2014

A Facebook message reminded me that an imaginary friend was visiting the Peninsula, about to make the transition to being a “met in real life” friend.  Thus another social outing presented itself, having dinner at the Depot with Sonya and her friend Paul.  I had met Sonya online in gardening forums and email lists, probably including the old Rainyside Gardeners forum.  We now knew each other through Facebook and would finally meet over dinner at the Depot Restaurant.

First, I decided it was time for Christmas at home to be over.  Allan heartily agreed, saying “I’m ready to move on.”

Ed Strange dropped by for a visit and said he was on his way home to also put away Christmas.

Ed Strange dropped by for a visit and said he was on his way home to also put away Christmas.

It was a relief to have the tree put away and access to my gardening books restored.

It was a relief to have the tree and ornaments and wreaths stored away and access to my gardening books restored.

The only hint of Christmas left indoors was Garden Tour Nancy’s chicken Christmas card (too cute to put away yet) and the beautifully decorated Joy Cup candy that was sent to us by Allan’s Aunt Dorothy and Uncle Hal.

joy

joy2

Allan took some sunset photos from the back garden.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

With the house restored to cozy everyday life, we departed for the Depot.

Sonya and Paul

Sonya and Paul

Over 30 years ago, Sonya and I frequented many of the same places such as the old Monastery all ages dance club in Seattle.  We conversed about the present day, having gone over the old days when we first met online.

Among our selections of delicious dinner fare:

Allan and Paul had the salmon special.

Allan and Paul had the salmon special.

I had a whole delicious bowl of Udon prawns to myself.

I had a whole delicious bowl of Udon prawns to myself.

Allan's espresso chocolate pot de creme.  (The rest of us had eggnog flan.)

Allan’s espresso chocolate pot de creme. (The rest of us had eggnog flan.)

Over appetizers (oysters, crab mac, and carne asada), Sonya showed me the photos she had taken today whilst she and Paul took a long bike ride on the Discovery Trail through the dunes from Long Beach all the way to a walk up to the North Head Lighthouse.  She says I can share them with you.  Here’s a breath of fresh air, much needed since I’ve been mostly staying home reading.

photo by Sonya Reasor

photo by Sonya Reasor

North Head Lighthouse, photo by Sonya Reasor

North Head Lighthouse, photo by Sonya Reasor

photo by Sonya Reasor

photo by Sonya Reasor

photo by Sonya Reasor

photo by Sonya Reasor

photo by Sonya Reasor

photo by Sonya Reasor

"Fantastic sunset - we spent the day riding bikes along the Discovery Trail. Some of the most beautiful ocean views I've ever seen. "  photo by Sonya Reasor

“Fantastic sunset – we spent the day riding bikes along the Discovery Trail. Some of the most beautiful ocean views I’ve ever seen. ” photo by Sonya Reasor

photo by Sonya Reasor

photo by Sonya Reasor

Monday, 29 December 2014

Cold weather and a good book kept me indoors again.

bright cold sun cast strong shadows on the porch across the street

bright cold sun cast strong shadows on the porch across the street

I’ve been turning into such a night person, and have had increasing insomnia, with reading till 4 AM and not being able to sleep till 6 AM, so I am not seeing much daylight.

rustia shadows

rustia shadows

This schedule simply must change in January, as I have garden clean up to do at home before work begins anew in February.  Meanwhile, I have stacks of books to read and the wee morning hours are the most peaceful time.  In the last few days and nights, I’ve read these excellent books:

echo

widow

lydia

small

Despite it being so well written, I don't think I loved this one as much as friends hoped I would.

Despite it being so well written, I don’t think I loved this one as much as friends hoped I would.

Tuesday, 30 December 2014

While I read The Signature of All Things, Allan took down the most Christmasy of the exterior lights (icicles and strings of multi coloured bulbs).  We will leave some plain white and some purple lights up for special occasions all year.  It was so cold out (just below freezing, which is cold by our standards) that he had to take several breaks.  He did notice with interest that I had a clematis in bloom on the west side of the garage.  It is ‘Freckles’, and it is normal for it to bloom in winter.

Freckles

Freckles

photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Wednesday, 31 December 2014

Once again, as the year closes, and as I have done many times this year, I wrote a long thing (dirge? sludge? mortification? revelation?) about emotions, friendship, the changing of the year, and more and then deleted it because, well, I suppose this is a gardening blog, after all.  This time, I saved it all to a draft while I consider publishing it or not.  Instead, here is an excellent post by a friend of mine on her own revelations about having to give up the dream of a perfect white picket fence family.  This paragraph, about friends lost through divorce, especially spoke to me:  “Some people are lifelong friends and some are not AND THAT is OK. … Maybe I should add on my to-do list: lift less weight.  Or drop the bars, turn the page and start writing a new story. Change the characters, develop a better plot, think through the hero’s crux with more purpose, and seek positive resolution. Good writers abandon dead end plots and sequences to invent newer, more bold and brave context to draw in the audience. I am officially discarding the text with no purpose and intentionally interacting with my tale with nothing but LOVE and LIGHT.”  

Meanwhile, the rest of today will consist of this:

I thank Kathleen for recommending it as the first 50 pages are utterly gripping .  500 to go, and it's due on Friday!

I thank Kathleen for recommending it as the first 50 pages are utterly gripping . 500 to go, and it’s due on Friday!

My plan is to next share a garden visit that is planned for New Year’s Day, as our big plans for New Year’s evening involve watching a movie (Baraka: A World Beyond Words), followed by the Seattle fireworks on telly.  As the New Year begins, I hope to share some of my favourite passages from the books I’ve been reading.  Wishing you the best possible 2015.

 

 

Read Full Post »

Tuesday, 7 October 2014

As we got ready to leave for work, two plants in particular caught my eye in our east driveway garden.

Aster lateriflorus 'Prince'

Aster lateriflorus ‘Prince’

Prince: lovely, small, and well behaved

Prince: lovely, small, and well behaved

I hope to divide my one clump of this and put some at the Ilwaco Post Office and Klipsan Beach Cottages and, eventually, all our gardens. It’s not a spreader so it will take awhile to get enough of it. The deer seem to leave it alone even though they nibble other plants in its location.

Nearby, Clematis “Freckles ‘ blooms with similar colours but is so high on the garage wall that it doesn’t seem like much of a colour echo for the aster.

Clematis 'Freckles'

Clematis ‘Freckles’

'Freckles'

‘Freckles’

Port of Ilwaco

We worked our way from the east end of Howerton Avenue at the port toward the west end, weeding and clipping back spent foliage to ready the garden for Creanberrian Fair weekend. It mainly takes place at the museum; this year, some port businesses were getting in on the show.

cranberry hop

east end of Howerton, looking west (before)

east end of Howerton, looking west (before)

and after

and after

As we began the job, the weather was sunny and a bit too warm for my taste.

looking south from the east end garden

looking south from the east end garden (telephoto)

As we worked, a delicious fog began to creep in through the low spot of the west hills.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

How I welcomed that sight!

Here it comes. How I welcomed that sight!

Our mission included the removal of some woody, tatty old lavenders from the old Port Bistro garden (a building which we hope will re-open next year as Burrasca Restaurant).

Allan's photo: before

Allan’s photos: before

and after; we will put in some fresh new lavenders and some spring bulbs.

and after; we will put in some fresh new lavenders and some spring bulbs.

Allan's photos: before and after

Allan’s photos: before and after

By the time we worked our way down to a few more gardens and dumped a load of debris, the fog had reached the west side of the marina.

fog

We also removed old, sad lavenders from the old Wade Gallery building. (There are a lot of empty buildings now at the port; I like to think of it as a blank slate waiting for a revival.)

old, woody lavender (Allan's photo)

old, woody lavender (Allan’s photo)

same corner as above (Allan's photo)

same corner as above (Allan’s photo)

more sad old lavender (Allan's photo with his hat-wearing shadow)

more sad old lavender (Allan’s photo with his hat-wearing shadow)

later with some transplanted ornamental grass

later with some transplanted ornamental grass

the old Wade Gallery garden, after (Allan's photo)

the old Wade Gallery garden, after (Allan’s photo)

Before and After, Allan's photo; we left a couple of the still-blooming lavenders for now

Before and After, Allan’s photo; we left one big still-blooming lavenders for now on the very right

a little further west, Gaura lindheimeri 'Whirling Butterflies' looking gorgeous by the Ilwaco Pavilion.

a little further west, Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’ looking gorgeous by the Ilwaco Pavilion.

PA070031

one of the smaller Howerton Way garden beds

one of the smaller Howerton Way garden beds

all tidied up

We call this one the Drive-Over garden, as it often has vehicles accidentally driving over one corner or another. Makes it hard to achieve symmetry.

The old lavenders filled our trailer, so we went to dump debris at the east end of the marina, from where we could see a delightful increase in fog.

later

from our dump site, looking west

and the view northwest from Howerton as we weeded by the Port Office and Time Enough Books

and the view northwest from Howerton as we weeded by the Port Office and Time Enough Books

home again

Because rain was not predicted till Friday and we needed the Ilwaco planters to continue to look lush for the Cranberrian Fair, Allan needed to water them for what we fervently hoped would be the last time. Or…I fervently hoped. I don’t think Allan minds watering them as much as I mind FOR him to have to water them; it just seems like a tedious job to me. We had to go home to get the battery for the water trailer pump.

At home, I briefly pondered my sanguisorba conundrum. You can see the little purple flowers, below, behind the Melianthus major (South African honeybush whose leaves smell like peanut butter).

Melianthus major and Sanguisorba

Melianthus major and Sanguisorba

Sanguisorba flowers

Sanguisorba flowers

I had been thinking of moving all the sanguisorba from the front garden (dry) to the back garden (moister) and yet now they look so fabulous that I think I will just move some of them. Sadly, the tall white one got crispy dry and probably will not bloom this year although it did survive (I hope!!).

Coreopsis 'Flower Tower' has been the long blooming champ of the front garden.

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’ has been the long blooming champ of the late summer and fall front garden.

While we were reloading the van with the battery, a new dog came from next door barking and barking; Oh what a delight the dog turned out to be as he wiggled around while I petted him. He was a fast mover, and when they called him back, I only managed to get this photo:

I think his name is Sykes...

I think his name is Sykes…

I hope he’s a permanent fixture as I enjoyed our brief encounter. I don’t think the neighbours (of Starvation Alley Cranberry Farms) realize how much I dote on their dogs.

Ilwaco boatyard and planters

While Allan went to get the water trailer, and then filled the water trailer in the boatyard, and then watered the planters and street trees (all of which takes an hour and forty five minutes), I weeded and clipped part of the boatyard garden.

in the boatyard:  Allan's photo

in the boatyard: Allan’s photo

from the boatyard, looking north: fog rolling in down First Avenue

from the boatyard, looking north: fog rolling in down First Avenue

the northern stretch of boatyard garden

the northern stretch of boatyard garden

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Cosmos and Aster 'Harrington's Pink'

Cosmos and Aster ‘Harrington’s Pink’

marina view of our last debris dump of the day day; the tide is out

marina view of our last debris dump of the day day; the tide is out

marina

marina

We saw two locals on bikes enjoying the almost-sunset light.

looking southeast

looking southeast

bikes

Across the low tidal water, Stringtown Road was aglow.

Across the low tidal water, Stringtown Road was aglow.

The Astoria Megler Bridge was unusually visible from our debris dumping spot.

The Astoria Megler Bridge was unusually visible from our debris dumping spot.

telephoto to a painterly looking bridge catching the sunlight

telephoto to a painterly looking bridge catching the sunlight

home again

At home, I settled in to blog and a cup of tea and a Cox’s Orange Pippin apple. I have found that most of the ones I picked are crisp and fine and the best tasting apple I’ve ever eaten.

Cox's Orange Pippin

Cox’s Orange Pippin

 

 

 

Read Full Post »