Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Cosmos ‘Seashells’’

Wednesday, 17 September 2014

A two day work week?  My goodness, we have gotten lazy.  We have more time off as we have quit jobs that were too hard on my knees (the up and down steep slopes jobs).  When I was very mildly fretting today about whether we should be trying to make more money, Allan pointed out that time off now, when we can enjoy it, might be more valuable than time later when we might be in wheelchairs, perhaps with money made now but with less mobility to get around the garden or the lake.  Our late and missed neighbour Nora often reminded us to do things and SEE things now while we still could walk and had good vision.  Perhaps she herself wished that she had worked less.  The day may come when we have to give up restaurant dining and garden tour trips; we will live on memories, online touring, and Allan’s good cooking.

We made the north end rounds today; next week, we will check on all the rest of the private gardens.

We went all the way to Marilyn's in Surfside today.

We went all the way to Marilyn’s in Surfside today.

The Depot Restaurant in Seaview (between Ilwaco and Long Beach)

the weekly photo from the east end of the flower garden

the weekly photo looking west from the east end of the flower garden

Coreopsis 'Flower Tower'

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’

It looks like the Fort George Brewery Co-HOPerative folks may have come to pick the hop flowers for brewing a beer from several different local hops sources.

Basket Case Nancy, if you are reading this:  The windowboxes still look good for this time of year; I just forgot to take a photo!

Long Beach Welcome Sign

There are a lot of Cosmos ‘Happy Ring’ to deadhead, an enjoyable enough task, and the twelve unenjoyable Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’, which it crossed my mind could be pulled out soonish.

The bidens along the front provides plenty of yellow to "stop the eye".

The bidens along the front provides plenty of yellow to “stop the eye”.

The back of the sign is edged with white bacopa.

The back of the sign is edged with white bacopa.

Golden Sands Assisted Living

The four quadrants of the courtyard garden aren’t looking too bad right now, thanks to Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’, Solidago ‘Fireworks’, some sadly yellow-foliaged Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, and not enough cosmos.

Google Earth of the building surrounding the courtyard.

Google Earth of the building surrounding the courtyard.

Southwest quadrant

SW quadrant

NW quadrant (the front a little bare where a bench used to sit).

NW quadrant (the front a little bare where a bench used to sit).

NE quadrant

NE quadrant

Southeast quadrant

SE quadrant

Every week Allan removes with the pick a couple more of the tatty old carexes that are behind the quadrants.  I think when they are gone, the snail problem will improve as I am sure they hide in those grasses.  That could make it easier to grow more dahlias next year.

I had three ideas later in the day of plants I can get for free to add to the very late summer show at Golden Sands.

Sometime this winter I want to get around to a blog post about how the residents decorate the entryways to their rooms. How would you decorate if this area was your statement to the world?  I thought I’d write it last winter and did not.  Perhaps a sneak peek will motivate me.

One of the residents clearly likes the Rod Run.

One of the residents clearly likes the Rod Run.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

the weekly look in the east gate

the weekly look in the east gate

Mary made a new container.

Mary made a new container planting.

'Streamer' sweet peas

‘Streamer’ sweet peas

and more 'Streamer' sweet peas

and more ‘Streamer’ sweet peas

boxwood and Sedum 'Autumn Joy' backed with Persicaria 'Golden Arrow'.

boxwood and Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ backed with Persicaria ‘Golden Arrow’.  A piece or two of that Persicaria will go to Golden Sands.

Coreopsis 'Flower Tower'; a piece of this could go to Golden Sands (and to Marilyn').

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’; a piece of this could go to Golden Sands (and to Marilyn’).

the garden bench backed with Helianthus 'Lemon Queen' and Tetrapanax papyrifer 'Steroidal Giant'

the garden bench backed with Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ and Tetrapanax papyrifer ‘Steroidal Giant’

The Corokia cotoneaster has happily lived in the big blue pot for years.

The Corokia cotoneaster has happily lived in the big blue pot for years.

Sarah

Sarah (0r Timmy?)

Oman Builders Supply, Ocean Park

Some deadheading of the Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve' was all this low maintenance success needed.

Some deadheading of the Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ was all this low maintenance success needed.

It could use a new plant here later, maybe another Gaura 'Whirling Butterfly'; something got swiped here, probably another Eryngium.

It could use a new plant here later, maybe another Gaura ‘Whirling Butterfly’; something got swiped here, probably another Eryngium.

Marilyn’s Garden, Surfside

We had a talkative audience from the next door roof.

We had a talkative audience from the next door roof.

Marilyn’s daughter, Nancy who is co owner of the Depot Restaurant, has been doing a marvelous job of keeping the garden well watered.

Helianthus 'Lemon Queen'

Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’, taller than me (as it gets with enough water)

looking south

looking south

Phygelius can go to the Golden Sands garden!  I can get many pieces of it from here as it wants to go out into the gravel path.

Phygelius can go to the Golden Sands garden! I can get many pieces of it from here as it wants to go out into the gravel path.

Some of the cosmos are seedy and hard to reach.  That's ok because this is a bird garden and birds love cosmos seeds...especially goldfinches.

Some of the cosmos are seedy and hard to reach. That’s ok because this is a bird garden and birds love cosmos seeds…especially goldfinches.

We're keeping the cosmos along the path deadheaded.

We’re keeping the cosmos along the path deadheaded.  The Buddleia to the right is a sterile cultivar, ‘Blueberry Cobbler’.

the deck with pots planted by Basket Case Greenhouse Nancy.

the deck with pots planted by Basket Case Greenhouse Nancy.

The chaise lounge keeps the deer who live in this garden from browsing the annuals on the deck.

Looking northwest; A gust of wind  made the giant Miscanthus rustle enchantingly.

Looking northwest; A gust of wind made the giant Miscanthus rustle enchantingly.

Wiegardt Gallery, Ocean Park

Eric’s gallery was hopping with a painting class which had been brought by their instructor “to get inspiration”.  They had painted at Oysterville Sea Farms the day before, and today at the Oysterville church and school, and tomorrow they will paint at the Ilwaco boatyard.

front garden, cosmos underlaid with the very determined Bad Aster.

front garden, cosmos underlaid with the very determined Bad Aster.

fall crocus

fall crocus

the old kitchen door

the old kitchen door

picotee cosmos

picotee cosmos

a Miscanthus beginning to take its autumn bow.

a Miscanthus beginning to take its autumn bow.

The dratted deer ate the tops off of the Sedumn 'Autumn Joy'...

The dratted deer ate the tops off of the Sedumn ‘Autumn Joy’…

leaving the front garden looking rather empty.

leaving the front garden looking rather empty.

the north side of the gallery

the north side of the gallery

The predicted showers for today had not happened yet.  Rain is so much needed, I would have welcomed working in it.

Sword ferns are looking unusually distressed from hot dry weather.

Sword ferns are looking unusually distressed from hot dry weather.

Port of Ilwaco

When we got back to Ilwaco, we took a drive around the town to check on the Howerton Way gardens.

We saw three dandelions at the east end; Allan hopped out to get them.

We saw three dandelions at the east end; Allan hopped out to get them.

Then we decided to deadhead at the Port office and Time Enough Books.  In the garden north of the office, a Sedumn ‘Autumn Joy’ was pulled almost out of the ground.

Did someone get interrupted mid theft?

Did someone get interrupted mid theft?

South side of the Port Office

South side of the Port Office and Don Nisbett Art Gallery with baskets from The Basket Case

Don’s baskets are bigger from more watering and fertilizing.  He’s been asked to give his special attention to the port office baskets as well next year.

Seashells Cosmos

Cosmos ‘Seashells’

and the marina

and the marina

at home

I did just a bit of weeding and clipping in the front garden.  Tomorrow (September 18th), I’m leaving for the Sylvia Beach Hotel with Carol, a Seattle friend for 36 years.  Rain would be the perfect weather for staying indoors at the bookish hotel.  I was pleased when a drizzle finally began just before I came indoors to blog.  At dusk, the drizzle continued; may it continue for three days so that Allan does not have to do any watering work while I am gone.  (With just a break for the painting class to do their pleine air painting at the boatyard.)

delightfully drizzly window views:

north

north

north

north

photo 2

looking east

I hope that when I return and share whatever I wish to share from the trip that I can then somehow catch up to publishing this blog closer to real time.

 

Read Full Post »

September 19, 2012

Oh, I am so hard to please about the weather.  Today was too darn hot.  Tomorrow a big rain storm is supposed to come, and then a rain and wind storm on Sunday.  I resolved not to complain that I was sweltering today because a cold and windy summer day is far worse.  But…it was hot.  All of  74.8 degrees F.

As we got ready to go to work, I noticed a good example of Cosmos ‘Seashells’ in the garden.  I couldn’t get much of it (my favourite cosmos cultivar) this year so wanted some good photos.  A friend of mine decided he just had to be in the photo shoot.

Cosmos 'Seashells'

Cosmos ‘Seashells’

cos

cos cos

Smokey has on his BirdsBeSafe collar.  He usually does not look this sinister.

Cosmos 'Seashells'

Cosmos ‘Seashells’

We did our usual compost buckert switch stop at Olde Towne…where more out of town bicycle tourists were enjoying the great ambience.

Olde Towne Café

Olde Towne Café

And then went to Seaview to have a look at a couple of landscaping needs at the Sou’wester Lodge.  Oh what memories it brought back to be there because for my first year on the Peninsula, that is where I lived.

Sou'wester in snow, Dec. '92

Sou’wester in snow, Dec. ’92

Now under new ownership, The Sou’wester has a plants for sale area by the front door.

plants

To the north of the front door, the garden I planted years ago has turned to an area of large shrubs and trees.

part of my old garden

part of my old garden

In the almost twenty years since I left there, many of the garden beds around the cabins have turned back to plain lawn, as one would expect, but some plants remain including the rose Felicité et Perpetué.   I did not take as many pictures as I should have because of having an interesting time talking with new owner Thandi Rosenbaum.

I had not been back into the big historic lodge since President’s Day weekend of 1994. It was wonderful to be there again and brought back memories good and bad, but all worth having.

I had forgotten much, like what the fireplace looked like, even though I must have cleaned the hearth many times.

I had forgotten much, like what the fireplace looked like, even though I must have cleaned the hearth many times.

We looked at the four nightly rental apartments on the second floor of the lodge.  The “honeymoon suite” has a different lace curtain hanging over the sleeping nook but has the same magical feeling.

On the second floor.

Lacy sleeping area…On the second floor.

The Sou’wester is known for its vintage trailer accommodations and Thandi has  commissioned some trailer art.

trailer paintings in apartment three

trailer paintings in apartment three

I have always loved the way the light falls through the windows of the lodge.

probably in apartment two

probably in apartment two

I think two is the one with the lacy bed…one the one with a red rug…and three and four the two west facing ones.  It has been a long time!

This window of number four faces the second story porch.

This window of number four faces the second story porch.

I took this photo from the same window in 1992.

I took this photo from the same window in December 1992.

I love the postcards over the bed in one of the apartments.

postcard art

postcard art

The view from apartment four made me think about how now I would know better than to plant that beech under the power lines.  I NOW remember that I thought it was going to be a short, weeping tree.  I got it from Hall Gardens, a wonderful home nursery that existed near Nahcotta way back then (and later became the private home called Gypsy Pond).

view with a potentially too large tree

view with a potentially too large tree (planted by me in 1993)

Amy, the housekeeper who has worked there for many more years than I did and who also sells plants there, asked me if I could identify two shrubs out by J Place.  One we thought must be an Osmanthus.  The other…I can almost remember.  I got it from Heronswood mail order, probably.  Thandi stands next to it for size:

She's 5'2".

She’s 5’2″.

Here’s a close up of the leaves…not very good because it was such a hot sunny day.

mystery shrub

mystery shrub

leaves

leaves…what is???

We looked inside the amazing two story trailer called The African Queen, of which I had fond memories just because I liked it.  When Amy spoke of not loving to clean it, I do remember it was a challenge with all its nooks.  I also learned that in later years the previous owners of the lodge, cabins and trailers, for whom I had worked, had the staff (staff? before, it was just me!) just put sheets and bedding in the trailers and not make up the beds.  I had to make every bed, and..with eighteen or so apartments, cabins and trailers, there were…oh I don’t even want to remember.  The trailers were, of course, the hardest, being built in tightly.

While we looked at the interesting vintage RV, Thandi and her friend Alex pulled Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’, after we told them it could be pulled and not just cut back.

next to the African Queen

next to the African Queen

I used to have African Queen Oriental lilies and an African Queen Buddliea planted by The African Queen…I had forgotten the latter even existed till Amy reminded me.  (It is still there, planted long before Buddleias made the invasive list….)

I said the volunteer tree should be cut down so the trailer mural shows!

The mural on the Disoriented Express still shows up well.

The Disoriented Express

The Disoriented Express

I told Thandi, looking at the remains of my old garden and at the shrubs which would look so much better deadwooded, that I could imagine, if I lived in walking distance, coming over just for the fun of bringing some of it back.  She offered to have me chauffeured from Ilwaco.  Hmm.

one of my Sou'wester garden beds in 1993

one of my Sou’wester garden beds in 1993

Through making this garden I met Maxine…and her daughter Jo…and my gardening career started so it was worthwhile.

We passed this year’s possible landscaping job at Sou’wester on to our friend Ed Strange who has a young(er) helper who might feel more inclined that we do to tear out an overgrown garden bed.  Then we can help plant it with something better than Siberian iris and the blah running yellow kind of Hypericum.

After all this goofing off, we went up to Long Beach to deadhead.  With rain predicted, we skipped watering the planters.  The soil was damp, yet the plants looked a little thirsty….but a good rain will be effective because of the already wet soil in the planters.

painted sage still looking grand

painted sage still looking grand

It better HAD rain or we will have to go back and water!

painted sage and cosmos

painted sage and cosmos

Oh, big news….I know the names now of the three cultivars of painted sage (Salvia viridis, sometimes called horminum):  Marble Arch White, Blue, and Pink…looked at the seed packets at The Planters Box for a friend who needed the information.

Every year, when I see the dahlias in a couple of the planters, I think I simply must plant more “patio” dahlias.

fabulous dahlias

fabulous dahlias

Maybe in 2014 I will remember to do so.  They come back every year and bloom like crazy.

Speaking of crazy, check out the nasturtium…this one gets extra liquid fertilizer when the city crew waters the hanging basket overhead.

in front of Home at the Beach

in front of Home at the Beach

trailing into the street!

trailing into the street!

by the door of the Wooden Horse gift shop, very beachy

by the door of the Wooden Horse gift shop, very beachy

We next went to the Anchorage Cottages.  I intended to do nothing but quickly deadhead the containers, as we had done a lot of pruning there on Monday.  Somehow, more pruning ensued today.  Manager Beth asked if we could limb up a tree so she could get to the outside of the office window.

done, and looks great although I forgot before pics!

done, and looks great although I forgot before pics!

The volunteer hebe that was under a low limb is getting sun for the first time!

We also pruned the Ceanothus so that the number one shows really well at last.

Ceanothus, pruned

Ceanothus, pruned

During the course of getting tools in and out, I photographed our rake in the back of the van.

Yesterday, I told Allan this rake makes us look poor.

Yesterday, I told Allan this rake makes us look poor.

We like the style very much and cannot seem to find a new one like it.

After The Anchorage, we deadheaded cosmos and weeded at the Boreas Inn.

Boreas Inn, west garden, with the sun cooling off a bit at last.

Boreas Inn, west garden, with the sun cooling off a bit at last.

The only Lobelia tupa that bloomed for me this year still looks magnificent even as it goes to seed.

The Boreas tupa....

The Boreas tupa….

a garden doodad backed with Phormium

a garden doodad backed with Phormium

If the Lobelia tupa is blooming here because it is happy next to the Phormium, we have a problem…because I like to get rid of Phormiums now whenever I can!

Boreas, looking east

Boreas, looking east

Allan remembered that we had to deadhead the Long Beach welcome sign; I might have forgotten.

back side of welcome sign with Acidanthera

back side of welcome sign with Acidanthera

Six Agyranthemum Butterflies later, we departed to water again at Crank’s Roost.

Crank's, view from the back porch

Crank’s, view from the back porch

Finally, in the last hour of daylight, we filled water buckets at the boatyard and Allan watered the Ilwaco planters while I groomed them.

Ilwaco boatyard

Ilwaco boatyard

I happened to see Thandi and Alex from the Sou’wester again as I deadheaded near the Ilwaco Antique Gallery.  After another pleasant conversation they went off to walk along the port and watch the moonrise.  While I did the last few planters, I suddenly had this vision of living in an old trailer at the Sou’wester again and bringing back my old gardens.  In an alternative universe, that would be fantastic.  In this one, I guess I can’t go back!

Allan and I dropped off the trailer at home as the sun set….

looking west on Lake Street

looking west on Lake Street

We had a choice between making a fire in the back yard fire pit before the rains come and get our alder wood all wet…or going to see the harvest moon rise at the port.  It would be too hard to set up a campfire at the last minute in the twilight, so the port moonrise won.

harvest moon

harvest moon

moon

The sky seemed to get lighter as the big moon rose.

moon

 

moonlight path

moonlight path

Allan’s photos:

moon

Allan did the best job of getting the moon's face.  (We both have dinky cameras.)

Allan did the best job of getting the moon’s face. (We both have dinky cameras.)

higher

higher

and higher still

over the tidal flat

over the tidal flat

moonlight on the water

moonlight on the water between the port and Stringtown Road

And then, home….to pick some eggplants, as the edible harvest continues.

another little harvest

another little harvest

These are the first eggplants I have ever grown.  I hope they were picked at the right stage.  Allan has prepared them according to Joy of Cooking while I wrote this, and now it is time to eat them.!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

In the morning I was happy to depart for work in a light fog.

at home

at home

I had walked out into the back garden to photograph this tableaux which glowed from my window.

I had walked out into the back garden to photograph this tableau which glowed from my window.

cukes waiting for Judy to walk down and harvest

cukes waiting for Judy to walk down and harvest

beans on the south shed wall

beans on the south shed wall

Spice Island hardy ginger

Spice Island hardy ginger

The danger tree is beloved by the birds.

The danger tree is beloved by the birds.

a tree frog photographed by Allan

a tree frog photographed by Allan

detail

detail

sanguisorba by the van as we leave...

sanguisorba by the van as we leave…

We were stopped at the post office by an Ilwaco resident who wanted to discuss whether or not Buddleias are truly invasive.  She had had a weed inspector question her about the ones in her garden!  The delay in driving north resulted in us seeing a line of old vintage cars pull into the museum parking lot across the street.

cars

cars

There have been so many cars in this blog lately that I direct you to this slideshow of the Horseless Carriage Club at the museum.

An hour later, we finally left down for our north end jobs.  First, Golden Sands Assisted Living and a good chance to check out how the sprinkler system is working.  We skipped it last week because of Rod Run prep, and the week before it had rained.

Today, we could see that the plants looked much happier.

The four quadrants are perking up even though it has not rained for a week!

The four quadrants are perking up even though it has not rained for a week!

In the center swale, the Geranium 'Rozanne' is putting out new growth in the center.

In the center swale, the Geranium ‘Rozanne’ is putting out new growth.

Allan working on getting beach strawberry out of the back of one of the quadrants.

Allan working on getting beach strawberry out of the back of one of the quadrants.

Removing the strawberries will be such a job that I decided it should wait till we have more time to devote to it…and bigger tools, like a grub hoe.

All the roses looked perked up, especially one my my mother’s old Joseph’s Coat climbers that had so many blooms it had fallen over!

Joseph's Coat...which Allan propped up

Joseph’s Coat…which Allan propped up

Then, Klipsan Beach Cottages.

The view into the fenced garden is becoming less floriferous by the week.

The view into the fenced garden is becoming less floriferous by the week.

a beautiful rose

a beautiful rose

Fuchsia 'Debron's Black Cherry'

Fuchsia ‘Debron’s Black Cherry’

Following KBC we did a quick check on the Oman Builder’s Supply garden and did not even have to stop, then on to Wiegardt Gallery.

Now the blue Bad Aster that escaped my pulling is putting on a pleasant show.

Now the blue Bad Aster that escaped my pulling is putting on a pleasant show.

Cosmos 'Seashells' at Wiegardt Gallery

Cosmos ‘Seashells’ at Wiegardt Gallery

Schizostylis and a little bun of a Dianthus at Wiegardts

Schizostylis and a little bun of a Dianthus at Wiegardt’s

After Wiegardt Gallery weeding and deadheading we went on to Marilyn’s garden.  As we approached to park, I saw a deer on the lawn so I got out of the van to photograph her.

from the street....

from the street….

closer

closer

closer

She's not afraid.

She’s not afraid.

doe

Now I'm too close.

Now I’m too close.

Her fawn trots from the neighbour's yard to join her.

Her fawn trots from the neighbour’s yard to join her.

They disappear through a tiny gap in the flowers.

They disappear through a tiny gap in the flowers.

I knew that a conifer that had been by the driveway had been cut, and that the alders were to be limbed up, but I was startled when I turned from my absorption in the deer and saw how the view to the neighbour’s house had been completely opened up.

I think the trimmers trimmed a few alder branches too many.

I think the trimmers trimmed a few alder branches too many.

Here's a partial idea of what it was like...I don't regret the loss of the conifer...just the canopy...

Here’s a partial idea of what it was like…I don’t regret the loss of the conifer as it was going to get way too big…just the middle limbs of the alders…

Well….I fretted about it as we went on to our next job and then came up with a solution:  I’ll plant a Buddleia in there, one of the new sterile kinds.  The ‘Blueberry Cobbler’ one in the west side of Marilyn’s garden has gotten quite tall and should fill in quickly for next summer.  At least, that’s my thought right now.

In Julie Moir-Messervy’s excellent book, The Inward Garden, she writes about how we each have a certain type of garden we prefer based on experiences of our childhood.  From a review:  “Evocative, poetic, and beautifully written, The Inward Garden gives the reader a process for designing a dream garden. Based on garden archetypes the sea, the cave, the harbor, the promontory, the island, the mountain, and the sky — the book provides a structure for imagining the garden of one’s desires and a practical process for designing this personal garden.”  Mine is definitely The Cave and I have a really hard time when a garden that I work on gets opened up to a view of the next door house.  This has happened to two gardens this year…One I have no control over so I just try to focus on planting up certain good sections and not thinking about how the hedges have been removed.  This one I can probably get away with planting for privacy again as long as there are no branches interfering with the driveway.

We finished the day at Andersen’s RV Park where more of the Bad Aster that eluded me is now looking like large and pretty blue bouquets.

At Andersen's RV Park

At Andersen’s RV Park

Allan weeded raked out the sandy path.

Allan weeded raked out the sandy path.

love this calendula in a pot....

love this calendula in a pot….

The sweet peas waited all summer to finally get good!

The sweet peas waited all summer to finally get good!

peas

the happy face of staffer Joy's dog

the happy face of staffer Joy’s dog

the rope wrapped pots holding up well

the rope wrapped pots holding up well

The park is for sale….  So I have a sense of temporary-ness (what is the word?) with this job more and more.  I don’t think any future owner would want to put as much money and effort into having a beautiful garden as Lorna does.

I do hope that if it does sell, she will let me take the mirror in the women’s bathroom (and replace it with a new one).  My former partner Robert painted it with a Desert Rose pattern and he did such a beautiful job…I would like to have it for sentimental reasons.

Robert's Desert Rose mirror

Robert’s Desert Rose mirror

It will be poignant in many ways when Andersen’s sells but it might solve my dilemma about being overbooked.

Read Full Post »

We worked in some of our favourite gardens on Monday.

Patti’s Seaview Paradise

First, two hours and a couple of specific projects in Patti’s Seaview garden:

the Akebia arbour before

the Akebia arbour before

and after (my project)

and after (my project)

the pond before

the pond before

and after (Allan's project)

and after (Allan’s project)

My friend Boscoe was visiting.

My friend Boscoe was visiting.

Stella provided entertainment and puppy kisses.

Stella provided entertainment and puppy kisses.

always busy

always busy Stella

garden tours 5 cents

garden tour payments

garden tour payments

NIVA green

Next, on to Jo’s, via Heather Ramsay’s NIVA green shop.  I got a new Tangly Cottage sign which I will show once I get it hung up somewhere.  Patti had given us a bronze rooster that she no longer wanted, to join my hens and chicks, so we have two new pieces of garden art.

While at NIVA, I photographed the article about our friend Sarah Sloane, a woman of many talents who has also written a delightful children’s book called The Marble Game.

Sarah's topiary

Sarah’s topiary

the article

the article

page one

page two

Sarah’s topiaries and books are for sale at Niva green.

Jo’s garden

At Jo’s, we weeded and deadheaded for an hour and a half to keep it in perfection for the upcoming garden tour.  The more deadheading now, the more blooms on the big day (June 20th).

pots

pots

looking west

looking west

two birds

two birds

one bird

one bird

view from deck

view from deck

Boreas Inn

Next door (across the road to the north) we then went to the Boreas garden where we spent about an hour.  I am so pleased at the way the west side gardens are looking this year after a lot of hard work.

replanted this year

replanted this year

Cosmos 'Seashells'

Cosmos ‘Seashells’

Cosmos...picotee edge whose name slips my mind

Cosmos…picotee edge whose name slips my mind

Nicotiana langsdorfii makes a great unifier.

Nicotiana langsdorfii makes a great unifier when repeated in all the beds.

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

looking east

looking east
looking west...That Phormium is so somber, but Susie likes it.

looking west…That Phormium is so somber, but Susie likes it.

Crank’s Roost and The Depot Restaurant

Finally, we watered at Crank’s Roost and admired the garden while also doing some weeding and clipping.

Have never seen this Clematis look this good.

Have never seen this Clematis look this good.

a magical place

a magical place

lounging areas

lounging areas

the fairy door

the fairy door

another Clematis

another Clematis

another view

another view

I love this pig!

I love this pig!

and I must know where this frog was acquired!

and I must know where this frog was acquired!

At the early hour of seven pm we stopped work and joined an old friend of Allan’s and her camping companion for a delicious dinner at The Depot Restaurant.

our Depot garden

our Depot garden

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »