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Posts Tagged ‘cottages’

Saturday, 10 September 2016

cottage

A benefit for the Cannon Beach History Center

We arrived early at Tolovana Wayside Park at the south end of Cannon Beach and had to wait half an hour to pick up our tour maps.  This was not a problem.

tolovana

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Haystack Rock in view at Tolovana Wayside

Haystack Rock in view to the south at Tolovana Wayside

looking south (Allan's photo)

looking south (Allan’s photo)

some puffin lore

some puffin lore

I wish Washington State powers that be were as smart about beach fireworks.

I wish Washington State powers that be were as smart about beach fireworks.

almost 12:45: The maps are about to be released

almost 12:45: The maps are about to be released

I had heard rumours that the cottage with a tower whose interior I most longed to see (other than June Kroft’s cottage, which I knew was not open this year) was on the tour.  I had hoped for it every year that the tour took place in the Tolovana neighbourhood.

In 2010, I had been so frustrated when I learned that the one year I missed the tour, the tower cottage HAD been one of the featured cottages.  (In 2009, my mother was ill and I completely forgot about the tour till after it had taken place.)

From Cottage Tour 2011: This is the tower I was looking for.

From Cottage Tour 2011: This is the tower I was looking for, photographed over its neighbour.

The house with the tower had been set back behind a tangled woods so that I had not even been able to approach.

The house with the tower had been set back behind a tangled woods so that I had not even been able to approach.

Because I recalled (or thought I did) that my dream cottage was south of the wayside park and close to the beach, we headed that way first.  There were two possibilities on the map that could be it.  We also thought if we started with cottage 6, our touring might be less crowded.  Most map holders had strolled north to the cottages numbers 1-5.

The south end of the tour was within this area.

The south end of the tour was within this area.

on our way (Allan's photo)

on our way (Allan’s photo)

tour goers ahead of us

tour goers ahead of us

Everywhere we walked in Tolovana, we saw bunnies.

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Right next door to that rabbit trio grew a garden that could have planted by Mr. MacGregor.

I wonder if the bunnies are the bane of this gardener.

I wonder if the bunnies are the bane of this gardener.

approaching cottage six, we overheard "You can't even move in there."

approaching cottage six, we overheard “You can’t even move in there.”

When we came to cottage 6, it was full of tour goers, and the entry landscape was so unfamiliar that I said, “That’s not the one I’m desperate to see; let’s come back to it”.  We walked on to try to avoid the thickest crowd.

a handsome pampas grass, given all the room it needs, around the corner from cottage 6

a handsome pampas grass, given all the room it needs, around the corner from cottage 6

The tour rules are posted at each cottage.  The kind museum director has given us press passes for the past two years so that we can take photos.  You will find that many cottage owners tell tour guests that they are welcome to take photos anyway.  At at least two of today’s cottages, the host was announcing to all arriving guests that photography was welcome.  (I see that I broke a rule by not wearing booties over my socks!  Ooops!  I thought clean socks were good enough.)  It astonishes me that anyone would even consider using the restroom or opening drawers in a tour home.

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Cottage Seven: Whim Sea

from the programme:  This quaint beach style bungalow was built in 1940.  Thelma and Harry Brandes purchased the property in 1970 and were the owners for over 30 years until it was sold in 2005 to the current homeowners.  The 600 square foot cottage was no longer habitable and was remodeled by the previous owners’ nephew, David Vonada of Tolovana Architects.  Vonada’s vision was to make the home feel like a traditional beach cottage.

Whim Sea Cottage

Whim Sea Cottage, and the putting on of protective booties, a tour ritual

 

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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east side of cottage

east side of cottage

looking west, two blocks to the beach

looking west, two blocks to the beach

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

view from the living room

view from the living room

river rock fireplace

river rock fireplace

brilliantly beachy art

brilliantly beachy art

modernized for lots of natural light

modernized for lots of natural light

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

in the bathroom window

in the bathroom window

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

quilt reflected in the tiny back garden

quilt reflected in the tiny back garden

a bunny in the garden (Allan's photo)

a bunny in the garden (Allan’s photo)

As we depart, more people bootie-fying

As we depart, more people bootie-fying

Our plan had worked; we were now running a bit ahead of the biggest south end crowd.

We walked on, with me hoping that one of the next two cottages would be the one with the square tower.

Interlude

As we rounded the corner, I recognized one of my favourite cottages from all past tours.

This little cottage is one of my top ten favourites from 9 years of touring.

This little cottage is one of my top ten favourites from 9 years of touring.

north side

north side

east side

east side

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

You can see the captivating interior in the middle of this post from 2010.  Look for Windshell Cottages, after the photos of the tower that I was seeking today.

Allan walks to the west end of the block to take a photo.

Allan walks to the west end of the block to take a photo.

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dsc05683

 

We knew the next tour cottage couldn’t be the tower one because it was set on the east side of the street.  My quest would continue later.

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 12 September 2015

We departed Ilwaco for the Cannon Beach Cottage tour, a highlight of my year and something I look forward to all summer.

ilwacocannonbeach

7 Dees garden center, Seaside

7Dees

Dennis’ 7 Dees, Seaside

Of course, we had to stop at 7 Dees on the way down to Cannon Beach.  Having just finished planting my ladies in waiting at home, I found myself not in the mood to buy new plants.  This may be the only time I have ever stopped here without buying.

I was sorely tempted by the violas in the foreground and now have non-buyer's remorse.

I was sorely tempted by the violas in the foreground and now have non-buyer’s remorse.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I do love this arbor that is often set up in the covered display area.

I do love this arbor that is often set up in the covered display area.  Seems like it is more beautiful than practical, though.

Look! They have Fatsia 'Spider's Web'

Look! They have Fatsia ‘Spider’s Web’.  I should have bought it as a present for someone.

a harvest display

a harvest display

A tomato tasting was in progress.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

all sorts of tomatoes large and small

all sorts of tomatoes large and small

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

tomatoes

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo, just some of the tomatoes

Allan’s photo, just some of the tomatoes

If I could transport myself back there, I’d taste more tomatoes and buy some plants.  I was in a hurry to get to Cannon Beach so we’d have plenty of time to find parking.

Cannon Beach

In our quest for a parking spot, we passed this cottage and had to pause for photos:

cottage

cottagegarden

cottage

whale arbour

whale arbour

gate detail

gate detail

side

I almost missed this mermaid in the lawn; Allan pointed her out.

I almost missed this mermaid in the lawn; Allan pointed her out.

We went to the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum for our tickets, because museum director Elaine Murdy Trucke had arranged for us to get press passes so that we could take photos in the cottages.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

The other ticket sales and tour map venue was the Coaster Theater downtown.

Yay! This gave us special dispensation to take photos.

Yay! This gave us special dispensation to take photos.  Thank you, Elaine Murdy Trucke!

Even with the press pass, we always ask permission to take photos in private (non vacation rental) cottages and explain that we write a blog and love to share cottage detail vignettes.  We then found parking closer to the tour by this cottage with geraniums in a porch cut-out.  I have admired and photographed it year after year.

geranium cottage

geranium cottage

This planting of geraniums catches my eye every time the tour is on the east side!

2013

geraniums

geraniums in 2012

I could also call it Hydrangea Cottage.

I could also call it Hydrangea Cottage.

I was smitten with a little bridge that crossed over to another cottage.

bridge

Underneath runs a stream with a seasonal waterfall. It would be pleasantly noisy in winter; today it was just a trickle of falling water.

Underneath runs a stream with a seasonal waterfall. It would be pleasantly noisy in winter; today it was just a trickle of falling water.

stream at front of cottage, delightful!

stream at front of cottage, delightful!

We did the tour from front to back because of where we parked.  Our friends Dave and Melissa had come, as well as Debbie Teashon, who would be giving a garden lecture the next day, and longtime garden friend from the Rainyside.com forum, Jeanne from Portland and her mum.  We did not see much of them during the tour as they had begun at the other end of town.

As we walk between cottages, there are so many sublime gardens where I have peeked over the fence and longed to go in and explore.

a cottage across the street from the Hidden Villa

a cottage across the street from the Hidden Villa Cottages, our first stop on the tour.

You know that the kind of cottages that make my heart go pitter pat are the very old ones and especially old ones that are privately owned.  You might want to go back to past tours and look at some of my favourites: A Collector’s Cottage (2013), this sweet one from 2011, and Priddy Cottage, which has been on the tour a couple of times.  My all time favourite was Windshell Cottage from 2010.

Next: The Hidden Villa Cottages

 

 

 

 

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September 14, 2013

By the time we left the Hutchins house, it was 4:15 and we still had three cottages and one historic hotel left to tour.  Obviously, we couldn’t make it to all of them.  By the time we had walked to the next one, it was 4:25.

a driftwood fence on our way

a driftwood fence on our way

The next house seemed large and a peek inside said to me that it was modern (remodeled in 2008), although the program said it had been built on the footprint of the original cottage.  I was particularly interested in seeing the final tour stop that had been built with two cottages on one lot, so we walked on from the modern one.

on the way, a house with a tower

on the way, a house with a tower

and a big natural yard with a hammock

and a big natural yard with a hammock

I would rather tour a tiny home that a large one...

I would rather tour a tiny home that a large one…

I found the shape of this one to be interesting.

I found the shape of this one to be interesting.

We got to the second to last house and had a quick look because it was on the way to our parking spot.

house

house

I took a peek inside while Allan took some photos of the garden.

garden

garden

garden

a peek inside

a peek inside

By now it was 4:40.   There was no way we would make it to that last cottage, the one intriguingly described as “new construction designed to blend with vintage cottages….a duplex designed to resemble two different homes on one lot.  There are many examples in Cannon Beach of two homes built on one lot as families grew in earlier years of Cannon Beach and this fact was used to get the city design review board to approve this concept.  Characteristics of cottages found in previous cottage tours were used and can be found throughout the home.”  The last sentence particularly intrigued me and I wanted to see if I recognized any of those characteristics, but it was not to be because we would have to drive there and find a parking spot, by which time it would be after five.

(Update: As it happens, that duplex (“Inga’s Cottage”) was on the 2017 tour and we did get to see it.)

We decided instead to have a look at the historic Cannon Beach Hotel that featured on the tour and walked the four blocks to see it.

along the way, a mossy arch

along the way, a mossy arch

arch and fence with hydrangeas

arch and fence with hydrangeas

This planting of geraniums catches my eye every time the tour is on the east side!

This planting of geraniums catches my eye every time the tour is on the east side!

Allan was impressed with this banana tree along the way.

Allan was impressed with this banana tree along the way.

Cannon Beach Hotel

Cannon Beach Hotel

The program describes the hotel as having been “constructed in 1914 as the Ecola Rooms, but was commonly referred to as the Becker Building.  It was once a boarding house and restaurant for Van Fleet Logging Company employees.  Van Fleet logged from here all the way to Tillamook County from 1938 to 1964.  The Cannon Beach Hotel was admitted to the historic walking tour (year round tours) in 1997.”    By the time we were across the street from the hotel, we realized we could return to see it any time and that we would rather stop at Back Alley Gardens on the way home than enter the hotel on a busy Saturday evening…so we turned back to our parking spot.  Of course, there was more to see along the way.

plants on the west side of a shop

plants on the west side of a shop

Ivy is a noxious weed indeed...

Ivy is a noxious weed indeed…

but here it was clipped into outdoor windows.

but here it was clipped into outdoor windows.

That ivy reminds me of the shape of the famous clipped hornbeam hedge at Heronswood.

a cute little cottage on the way to the van

a cute little cottage on the way to the van

bamboo cottage

bamboo cottage

cottage

an interesting modern shape

an interesting modern shape

closer

I called Back Alley Gardens, thinking they might be open til five thirty and Pam said they had just closed but we should come by for a visit anyway.   So off we went, with no Cannon Beach lingering, to our favourite north coast collectors’ nursery.

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September 14, 2013

The Cannon Beach Cottage Tour is a fundraiser for the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum.

Hutchins House

from the program:  Built in 1935 by Bernice and Douglas Greer from Portland.  The cottage represents the Laurel Street neighbourhood’s classic beach style.  It has two floors with dormer windows and interior wood paneling.  It is likely that the building contractor was J.H. Dakin, who built and maintained most of the homes in this neighbourhood.  Dakin was a British citizen who settled in Cannon Beach along with many of his fellow countrymen.

I was pleased to recognize the Hutchins house right away as one that I’d seen the first year Allan and I had discovered the Cottage Tour.   Every time we had walked by since then, I had pointed it out and said “I’ve been in THAT one!”

Hutchins House

Hutchins House

north windows

north windows

adorable storage shed on east side of house

adorable storage shed on east side of house by “Bobby the Builder”

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

One of my strongest memories of touring the house years before was the east side deck that is accessed from the upstairs bedroom windows.

looking up at the east side deck

looking up at the east side deck

window boxes

window boxes on the east wall

back door on east side of house

back door on east side of house

The front porch is on the north side of the house and has comfy old chairs.

chairs on the front porch

chairs on the front porch

cottage sign

cottage sign

That sign says 1924 so it might be telling us the cottage is older than the program says it is!

chairs on the west end of the porch

chairs on the west end of the porch

western view from the porch

western view from the porch

peeking in the window at the northwest corner

peeking in the window at the northwest corner

Inside the cottage feels like home even though it is a vacation rental.

the kitchen

the kitchen

kitchen shelves

kitchen shelves

dining room

dining room

I seem to lack photos of the living room but you can see some on the house website.

From upstairs, the beach is this close!

view from upstairs west window

view from upstairs west window

slightly telephoto view

slightly telephoto view

The upstairs has three bedrooms.

bedroom with attic roof

bedroom with attic roof

Access to the deck is through the window past the bed.

window

window

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

another window to the deck

another window to the deck

deck on east side of attic

deck on east side of attic

another attic bedroom

another attic bedroom

detail photo by Allan

detail photo by Allan

and another window to the deck

another bed

west window with beach view

west window with beach view

I could sleep in the salty air in any of these comfy looking beds.

attic sleep spot with south window

attic sleep spot with south window, Allan’s photo

Back downstairs:

a green window view

a green window view

Haystack Rock

Haystack Rock

the back door

the back door

as we leave Hutchins House

as we leave Hutchins House

By now it was 4:15 and we had three more cottages and an old hotel to see, and the tour ended at five.

the beach, just steps from the Hutchins house

the beach, just steps from the Hutchins house

We turned east toward our parking space and two more east side cottages.

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September 14, 2013

The Cannon Beach Cottage Tour is a fundraiser for the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum.

interlude between cottages

Walking to the next tour cottage, I saw an attractive trellis over two windows.

trellis

trellis

As we walked from the wonderful cottage inhabited by collectors toward the next one, we passed an artist’s cottage where the owner was beckoning people to come in.

an artist's cottage

an artist’s cottage

He may have been greeting particular friends, but I wish I had asked if he was showing his cottage.

The docent at the next little cottage told us no interior photos were allowed, so we refrained.

no interior photos allowed

no interior photos allowed

Even though photos on the fence showed the inside!

Even though photos on the fence showed the inside!

Next door to the no-photos cottage, I liked the way windows were used for wind protection.

windows atop fence, at left, for a windbreak

windows atop fence, at left, for a windbreak on this beachfront home

Just steps away was the foredune and then the beach.

beach path

beach path

looking south, the famous Haystack Rock

looking south, the famous Haystack Rock

looking north

looking north

Rugosa roses in a beachfront garden

Rugosa roses in a beachfront garden

a garden right on the beach

a garden right on the beach

a garden on the next east-west street

a garden on the next east-west street

Allan's photo of a sign along the way

Allan’s photo of a sign along the way

Priddy Cottage

The next cottage on the tour was on last year’s tour as well.  Because this year’s was the Tenth Annual tour, some favourites from the past were being reprised.

from the program:  This cottage is the perfect amalgamation of the archetypical Cannon Beach Cottage and custom artistry.  The cottage is a fusion of artistic craftsmanship belonging to the homeowner’s various friends.  The custom details range from unique glasswork to fine metalworking.  These special additions make this home a pleasure to tour.  The Clatsop County Record dates this home to 1924.  It was originally constructed of found material, a common trait of the first Cannon Beach settlers — using driftwood, the almighty Spruce, shells, and more.  The metal has been designed and created by Darryl Nelson, a third generation Timberline blacksmith, who will be present in the home to answer questions about his work.

Priddy Cottage

Priddy Cottage

Allan photographed the top of the metal gate.

Allan photographed the top of the metal gate.

detail of front gate

and the front gate detail

gate

front gate and metal arbour

the inside top of the arbour

the inside top of the arbour

birdbath inside the front gate

birdbath inside the front gate

I walked around the outside first.

window box

south side window box

east side windowboxes

east side windowboxes

bright garage doors

bright garage (guest house) doors

entering the back yard

entering the back yard

lupines

lupines

a sweet friendly dog

a sweet friendly dog

Hydrangea aspera

Hydrangea aspera

I still want one of these hydrangeas.

garden bench

garden bench

back of house, with me coming out of guest house (left)

back of house, with me coming out of guest house (left)

Allan's photo of the outdoor fire

the outdoor fire

I love the guest house to the side of the back garden.

inside the guest house, Allan's photo

inside the guest house, Allan’s photo

inside

guesthouse, Allan's photo

guesthouse, Allan’s photo

guesthouse bouquet

guesthouse bouquet

I went in the back door of the house….

bouquet

bouquet

If you want a good tour of house the house and its decor fit together, check out last year’s post.

another bouquet

another bouquet

Some details:

ceiling lights

ceiling lights

Allan's photo of shelving detail

Allan’s photo of shelving detail

window and sunlight

window and sunlight

It is an extraordinary cottage.

back outside, west window boxes

back outside, west window boxes

Another Interlude

By now it was 3:50 PM and we still had four more cottages and a historic hotel to see and only one hour and ten minutes left of tour time!  (The tour organizer tells me that next year they will return to having more like nine cottages to see:  This was a tenth year anniversary extravaganza.)

Our walk to the next cottage took us to downhill to the very south end of downtown Cannon Beach.  This curvacious walkway caught my eye.

curved walkway and shady courtyard

curved walkway and shady courtyard

I realized that this was the back side of one of my favourite clusters of buildings.

east side

east side

The east side has an entry to an art gallery which I should go into sometime just to see the inside of the building.

north side of the interesting building

north side of the interesting building

Just to the west of it sits my favourite outbuildings ever.

like a fairy tale cottage

like a fairy tale cottage

Allan took this photo of a cedar detail.

Allan took this photo of a cedar detail.

Just uphill from the tiny fairy tale outbuilding is another house that always makes me stop and look.

I love the green and brown...

I love the green and brown…

and the tower

and the tower

Next, we visit a cottage that I fell in love with in 2007, the year I discovered the Cannon Beach Cottage Tour.

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September 14, 2013

The Cannon Beach Cottage Tour is a fundraiser for the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum.  (Be sure to click on that link; the home page has a neat effect with old postcards.)

A Collectors’ Cottage

I decided to call it that for reasons you will soon understand.

from the program:  This home is considered one of the oldest beach houses still standing in the Presidential District.  The county records indicate that it was built in 1913, but an archeological excavation discovered foundations posts dating to the 1890s.  Sylvester White built this home in approximately 1913.  White may have built over a previous foundation left by homesteaders, early campers, or the Tillamook Indians who lived here for centuries.

We now come to my favourite cottage of the tour, one that is hidden behind wind gnarled shore pines.

Allan's photo, from the street

Allan’s photo, from the street

hidden behind the pines

hidden behind the pines

The caution tape was just to direct people to use a side entrance to the yard rather than squeeze into the path through the trees.

Two old cannons flank the front entry.

to the right

to the right

and to the left

and to the left

We heard the owner tell someone that the cannons, found on the beach, from which the town gets its name, were smaller than these.

We came around to the side of the front porch.

porch

looking west.  The path to the beach is half a block away.

looking west. The path to the beach is half a block away.

at east end of front porch

at east end of front porch

table

old porch bench

old porch bench

front garden

front garden

from the porch

from the porch

looking south from inside the front door

looking south from inside the front door

I knew right away that we were in a home of people who like to collect interesting and historic things and we were so pleased that the owners allowed photographs.

in the front room

in the front room

two tables in the front room

two tables in the front room

a rustic fireplace

a rustic fireplace

old fashioned fireplace surround

old fashioned fireplace surround

imagining a cozy winter day here...

imagining a cozy winter day here…

a face in the fire

a face in the fire

wainscoting

wainscoting

a comfy couch

a comfy couch

an old cabinet

an old cabinet

Antique appreciators were having wonderful conversations with the owners…about shops, auctions, and collecting old pieces.  The owners recommended a place called Cannon Beach Treasure Co.

beach

How I would love to spend a grey winter day (or a lifetime) here on beach time.

How I would love to spend a grey winter day (or a lifetime) here on beach time.

in the front room

Here is a cottage where I will have no trouble getting a feeling for what the owners like!

lamp

In the lower right of the photo above, you can see a copy of Terence O’Donnell’s  A Place by The Sea.  I must read the book (which I own) again.  It is excellent.  Terrence owned Crank’s Roost, the Seaview cottage whose garden we maintained for its subsequent owner until it was recently sold.

another good sit spot

another good sit spot

more cool stuff

more cool stuff

a work space

a work space

collections

collections

beachy bathers

beachy bathers

Thank goodness I was able to take photos here, because I would have been able to remember so few of these treasures.

beach art

beach art

an old door

an old door

The downstairs had one of those floor plans where one walks from room to room in a circle around the enclosed staircase to the upstairs.

the kitchen

the kitchen

an old stove sat next to a modern one.

an old stove sat next to a modern one.

in the kitchen

in the kitchen

art

stuff

In the kitchen, I met the woman of the house.  She told me something grand:  She and her partner both like to collect things, AND they like the same things so there are no disagreements about what they acquire.  I admired the calico dishes in the kitchen and she said she particularly liked the shape of the shallow bowls.

Blue Calico

Blue Calico

kitchen detail, photo by Allan

kitchen detail, photo by Allan

vintage kitchen door

vintage kitchen door
in the mud room (by back door)

in the mud room (by back door)

a bottle of little shells

a bottle of little shells

mudroom

mudroom (or pantry)

clothes rack on the mud room ceiling

clothes rack on the mud room ceiling

Dutch door to the back yard

Dutch door to the back yard

view into back yard

view into back yard

boardwalk to outbuilding

boardwalk from back door to outbuilding

Back in the kitchen,  I admired the windowpane photo display behind a door to the stairway.

stairs

Because I make it back down stairs very slowly, I only go upstairs in houses where I know I’ll see idiosyncratic and interesting rooms.  This house definitely qualified, especially after Allan came down the stairs saying there was a wardrobe right out of Narnia.

one of the upstairs bedrooms

one of the upstairs bedrooms

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

The mirrored dresser is extraordinary.

a gorgeous mirrored dresser

little closet doors

little closet door

upstairs bedroom

upstairs bedroom

The other bedroom had a very high and fluffy looking bed.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

another bedroom with a tall bed

another bedroom with a tall bed

bed

wardrobe

wardrobe

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I told Allan that wardrobe could not go to Narnia because this is clearly a USA wardrobe so not as magical.

headboard detail, Allan's photo

headboard detail, Allan’s photo

upstairs

upstairs

stairs going down

stairs going down

On the right side as we look down, we were told that old art projects from hippie days were on display, showing how long the family has inhabited this wonderful old house.

I certainly did not want to leave this one.  iPhoto tells me we were there from 3:00 til 3:16; the tour was due to end at 5:00 and we still had seven more places to see (and we had already skipped one, the Sea Sprite Motel in Tolovana Park).

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September 14, 2013

The Cannon Beach Cottage Tour is a fundraiser for The Cannon Beach History Center and Museum.

On the walk from the Surf Shack to our next cottage, we crossed the main road into the Presidential blocks on the west side, just northwest of downtown.   On the way, as always happens in Cannon Beach, we saw lovely places to photograph.

a little grey cottage

a little grey cottage

"Bonnie Nook"

“Bonnie Nook”

You can read the history of Bonnie Nook here.  It is one of the oldest houses still standing in Cannon Beach.   I find it interesting that some of the older cottages are on the east side instead of in the blocks closest to the beach.  I wonder if beachfront property was much more expensive even then?

cottage with hydrangea

cottage with hydrangea

Any one of these tiny places would be fascinating to tour!

Hopper’s House Historic Cottage

from the program:  This home was built in 1916 by Sylvester White.  Mr. White also constructed several other homes on Van Buren (one located directly across the street).  This house was originally built for the Morton and Elsie Alger family, cousins of White’s wife.  Mr. White also built the house next door, but that was torn down many years ago.

Hopper’s House is a vacation rental and yet had the feeling of a home, which is assuredly why it has such good reviews.  I wonder if there are bunnies around?  They seem to abound in the Tolovana Park neighbourhood to the south of Cannon Beach.

Hopper's House

Hopper’s House

You can see the ocean right at the end of the block.

Hopper's House from across the street

Hopper’s House from across the street

an expansive front porch

an expansive front porch

house number tiles

house number tiles

The porch had a dreamy seat at the west end.

What a lovely place to sit at the west end of the porch.

What a lovely place to sit at the west end of the porch.

The river rock fireplace is typical and iconic Cannon Beach cottage style.

the fireplace

the fireplace with wooden mantel

The kitchen retains an old fashioned feeling.

The kitchen retains an old fashioned feeling.

I remember that at the lecture that preceded the tour, Jill Grady said that one of the Cannon Beach builders was short and all his kitchens were built for someone short.  My Craftman bungalow kitchen in Seattle was that way and when I had a short friend visit, she said it was the most comfortable kitchen she had ever cooked in.

old fashioned bathroom sink

old fashioned bathroom sink

shower and towel cabinet

shower and towel cabinet

I so much like that the old features of the cottage have been retained.  I would not want to stay at an overly modernized beach cottage.

looking from the kitchen to a dining nook at the SW corner of the cottage.

looking from the kitchen to a dining nook at the SW corner of the cottage.

Note the gleaming white board ceiling.

living room window

living room window with a glimpse of the fireplace exterior

Stepping out onto a back porch, one can get a good look at the impressive stone chimney on the west wall of the cottage.

the stone chimney

the stone chimney

the back porch

the back porch

Back inside, I saw a guest book on a side table.  Oh, how I love guest books at lodgings.  I would like to have sat down and read the whole thing.

guest book

guest book

the downstairs bedroom

the downstairs bedroom

The hosts understand the importance of a reading lamp.

The hosts understand the importance of a reading lamp.

I like to read reviews of local hotels, and I have noticed that one thing that is very much noticed by guests is the absence of bedside reading lamps.  Here, this detail has not been overlooked.

bedroom window

bedroom window

I did not go upstairs in this cottage, so the upstairs photos are all from Allan.

the stairs

the stairs

a sign

a sign

upstairs window

upstairs bathroom windows

another old fashioned sink

another old fashioned sink

bedroom

bedroom

One would sleep so well in the salt air.

One would sleep so well in the salt air.

The next cottage was right across the street and would prove to be my favourite of the tour.

Next door to Hopper's, another comfy porch.

Next door to Hopper’s, another comfy big beachy porch.

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