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Posts Tagged ‘Cove Restaurant at Peninsula Golf Course’

Friday, 15 July 2017

I had done something unpleasant to my right heel toward the end of yesterday’s work day; it even kept me awake for awhile during the night.  Why??? Just before a weekend of touring gardens!  However, on Friday I wanted to do some more weeding because some informal touring of our garden was sure to take place.

Before I began, we hosted the first garden tour of our three day weekend; Dan from the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum came by.

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Like most people, he had assumed the front garden was all there was, and had no idea the lot goes over 200 feet back to the meander line.

After walking all round the garden and talking about the history of how it used to be waterfront before the port expanded by filling and building two blocks south, I embarked upon my plan of thorough weeding.

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weeded the new-ish bogsy wood hillock garden, in the area that was once riverfront beach.

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then managed to snake enough hose to get a sprinkler set up out there

I forgot after awhile to try to take it easy and instead succumbed to the sudden impulse of a rather intense project: Digging huge flopsy clumps of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ out of what used to be a debris pile, to make room for more variety.

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after: lots fewer sedums, lots more room for what is there to grow and breathe.

All afternoon I worked on this, forgetting to wear my knee brace because all I had intended to do was the easy task of pulling dwarf fireweed.  This was not the wisest lead up to a garden tour weekend.

I planted four ladies in waiting, including Chelone obliqua ‘Tiny Tortuga’ and Tricyrtis formosana ‘Samurai’, all acquired at the Basket Case Greenhouse.

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Tricyrtis formosana ‘Samurai’

In the late afternoon, Devery came from next door to pick some strawberries.  I had finished my projects and was able to sit with her on the patio for a spell.

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Devery on the good ship Ann Lovejoy, sailing into Strawberry Land.

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a good harvest

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on the patio: succulents in an old hibachi (Allan’s photo)

At 7, Allan and I joined seven friends for a gardener’s dinner at the Cove Restaurant: Dave and Melissa (Sea Star Gardening), Todd Wiegardt (Willapa Gardening), Debbie Teashon (rainyside.com and author of Gardening for the Homebrewer), Jeanne (Portland gardener), Ann Amato-Zorich (Spiffy Seeds and the Amateur Bot-ann-ist), and Evan Bean (former co worker with Todd at Plant Delights, now with plantlust.com).  Much plant talk ensued.

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in the foyer (Allan’s photo)

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Ann appreciating (Allan’s photo)

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Ann, looking droll, and Evan (Allan’s photo)

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Ann’s fish and no chips

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Todd, me, Debbie (photographing Allan), Melissa (hidden), Dave, Jeanne, Ann, Evan

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plant thoughts with Evan and Todd

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The kitchen produced a special dessert of 9 small portions of strawberry rhubarb cake.

Saturday, 15 July 2017

We were up oh so early for us, although not as early as we would have if Patti J had come with us as we had all sort of planned.  (She was having company and could not take such a long day away after all.)  By 9:15, Allan and I were on the road to Menlo, Washington, to attend the Master Gardeners of Grays Harbor and Pacific County garden tour.  It moves around each year.  Last year’s tour in Aberdeen was one of the best I’d seen, and I had been counting the weeks and days till this one.  Knee brace, cane, and the fluffiest of fluffy socks for my sore heel would get me through the day of walking.  A bandaid on my right trigger finger would (mostly) keep me from going ouch each time I took a photo (because a thin rugosa rose thorn was sitting in my finger just in the spot where I click on the camera).

Because we left 15 minutes later than I had hoped, we took the dreaded (just by me) Willapa Curves rather than the less harrowing (to me) longer route through Naselle.

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Low tide, scenic view, and ultra squiggly narrow road

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Possibly to most people, it does not seem extra narrow.

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At least going north, we are on the inside!

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So many curves

After ten minutes of that, I was relieved to be on the straight, long road through woods to South Bend and Raymond and on to the much anticipated garden tour.

Join us for the next batch of posts for the Menlo tour, followed by a bonus tour of a South Bend secret garden, and then a Sunday of touring six gardens with friends on the Long Beach Peninsula.

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Friday, 28 April 2017

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a postcard promising a new exhibit at our local Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

Today our main mission was to get Long Beach gardens as fluffed up as possible in the areas where the annual Razor Clam Festival would take place.  But first:

The Depot Restaurant’s 

….garden needed deadheading.

This is not a good beetle.  It was inside a curled up leaf.  I haven’t identified it, though.

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north garden, with tulips, looked better in person


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lily foliage and tulips

Long Beach

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The wind and some deer damage (at the right end) have diminished the tulip display on the front of the sign.


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The backside is still awesome.

We checked the planters on the west end of the Bolstad approach…

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no Autumn Joy left in the most western one 😦

I felt a sense of mild and unsurprised disgruntlement and disappointment in human nature. But the Autumn Joy was not stolen from the next three planters to the east, so that was good news.

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ducks on a pond or are they gulls? (Allan’s photo)


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just off the beach approach, path from restroom parking lot is a pond now (Allan’s photo)

Allan then worked on the Veterans Field gardens and the north parking lot berm while I walked around and checked on all of the Pacific Way planters AND made notes on what plants each one might need.

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Vet Field (Allan’s photo)


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berm, before


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after (Allan’s photo)


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across the street from the berm (Allan’s photo)

my walk around:

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the first flower on a Geranium ‘Rozanne’ recently added to a planter (and first Rozanne of the year)


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red tulips to match red building


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parrot tulip ‘Rococo’


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note to Allan: must weed this horsetail before the parade on Sunday, May 7


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No time to visit NIVA green today

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must put nice edge on this little garden in Coulter Park before the parade…and weed the whole park…next week.


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Sometimes vehicles make it hard to weed the tree gardens.


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possibly Tulip ‘Madonna’


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bud of T. ‘Flaming Spring Green’ and some cute yellow hoop petticoat narcissus


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would love to find the energy to totally dig out and redo this planter of boring, once blooming blue geranium (left from volunteer days).  It is a mad runner and fills back in every time I thin it.


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thrilling asphodel, last year’s birthday present from Dave and Melissa, from Plant Delights Nursery


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Fifth Street Park still looking nice with mulch.


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Tulip bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’ STILL blooming

I called Allan to meet me at the last four planters because I was exhausted.  He weeded the very weediest street tree garden while I finished the planters.

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before


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after


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southernmost east side planter; Allan in view weeding that difficult tree garden (right middle of photo)

We weeded at city hall and the big pop out because lots of folks will be walking by this weekend.

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city hall detail with Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ (Allan’s photo)


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Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ foliage (Allan’s photo)

After checking on the Sid Snyder Drive planters…

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sweet little species tulip in a Sid Snyder Drive planter (Allan’s photos)


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Tulip batalinii ‘Bright Gem’ with a poppy seedling

and the kite museum garden…..

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just a touch of string trimming at the kite museum….and those tatty hebes are still there!

…we filled up the rest of the day with more weeding of the north parking lot berm.

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berm, weeded (Allan’s photo)

but did not QUITE get it done before time to meet Dave and Melissa at

The Cove Restaurant

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two tired gardeners (Allan’s photo)


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delectable clam chowder; I made Mel take her spoon out so I could get this photo.


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dinner salad


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Thai street prawns (spicy)


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vegetable stir fry


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fish and chips (Allan’s photo)


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curry fish dinner (Allan’s photo)

Melissa and I always agree that our North Beach Garden Gang dinner is the highlight of our week.

All of us had been working hard to the point of pushing ourselves to the limit and it felt mighty good to sit and eat and talk about gardening.

Tomorrow: I hope to work in my own garden!  We won’t be attending the clam festival; you can read about it from a past year here.

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Friday, 21 April 2017

I had some small work tasks to complete, after which I figured we would make it out to the beach approach to get at least half a garden section weeded and clipped.

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My own garden looked enticing…

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…as did Smokey,

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Frosty,

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Skooter,

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and neighbour cat Onyx.

But work we must.

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work board this morning

Port of Ilwaco

A bit late, I transplanted some chives and elephant garlic to the Freedom Market garden.

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transplanted these Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ starts to a less walkedupon spot!

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Making the store’s garden as pretty as this, the curbside garden, is my goal…except for the walking upon is a problem.  So, making parts of it pretty is my goal.

Long Beach

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deadheaded the welcome sign, front…

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and back

We decided we had better dig out the ivy in the big Lewis and Clark Square planter next, in case we punctured the sprinkler system.  Best to not do that, but if it happened, best to do it when the city crew is available rather than after hours.

While Allan did the digging, I planted some Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ in nearby planters.

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the shrubbiest planter’s one week of glory

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so called “blue” tulips for the police station

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street tree (Allan’s photo)

Folks were gathering in Veterans Field, half a block away, for a “Walk for Veterans”.

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The walk begins (Allan’s photo)

The planter in question (Allan’s photos), before:

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variegated ivy

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That was not easy.

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a lot of ivy to dump at city works

When we arrived at city works, we learned that the planter at the south end of town was ready to plant.  I’d noticed the same planter as before, still roughly mortared, but now full of soil again.  The crew had met with the frustration of the one replacement planter breaking when they tried to move it…so now they will be doing their best to re-mortar the old one and make it look good.  Therefore, it was time for us to plant it.  This changed our day by giving us a more pleasant project than weeding the beach approach.

We rescued the little roses that I had heeled into the mulch pile and that had gotten covered with a new load of mulch!

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found it!

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battered but alive; good thing I knew sort of where to dig.

I also gathered some little shrubs, left over from volunteer planter days, that I would put elsewhere rather than back into the planter.

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ready to plant a few things

Last fall, a vehicle drove into this planter and cracked it, and moved it enough to crush the plumbing system (now fixed).

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roses and Rozannes in

It makes me nervous to plant all fresh plants for fear someone will steal them.

Next…something that we had to do today…

The Red Barn’s…

…little garden needed deadheading and weeding.

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The Red Barn has crabbing as well as horses.

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crab pots

While I was weeding, one of the dogs came by…

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and snubbed me!

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all pretty well weeded

Diane’s garden

Next door, we deadheaded and weeded at Diane and Larry’s place.

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narcissi deadheads (Allan’s photo)

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new planters to drill holes in (next time)

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planter assortment

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I love fringed tulips!

In the past, fringed tulips’ edges have browned off in the rain.  This year, we got massive record breaking amounts of rain and yet the fringes look great!

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Tulip ‘Green Star’

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Diane likes pastels, and purples and whites, not yellows and reds and oranges.

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Tulip ‘White Parrot’

Basket Case Greenhouse

We drove a mile or so up Sandridge Road to get some plants for the almost empty Long Beach planter.

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pelican for sale

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Darrell, Roxanne, and me talking plants

Long Beach

Now we were able to make more of a planter impact, leaving room for annuals when the weather is a bit warmer.

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Allan’s photos

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At City Hall, we planted a couple of shrubs from the planter’s former array.

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This variegated boxwood from a planter a few years back…

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is now somewhat balanced by a variegated euonymous.

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driving home, 6 PM

It had gotten HOT today, and for once I had been grateful for a cool wind.

We just barely had time to go home, unhook the trailer, unload some plants, load a couple agastaches, drive back to Long Beach, plant the agastaches in the planter, and be ten minutes late for dinner with Dave and Melissa (Sea Star Gardening) at

The Cove Restaurant

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petting Lacy on the way in

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Cove entry garden

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arriving late

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refreshing dinner salad

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Sondra’s lasagne for me and Dave

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lemony prawns scampi for Melissa

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Reuben with waffle fries for Allan

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a dessert for four of us to share

The four of us solved some of the world’s problems (we wish); tomorrow Allan and I will try to solve more at an Earth and Science Day demonstration.

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ivy job erased!

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Saturday, 8 April 2017

With some workable weather, I was determined to get some at home gardening done, and doing the five assorted sizes of driveway beds seemed the best choice to finish in a day. (And the weather felt too windy and variable and rather cold to endure weeding on the beach approach in Long Beach.)

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before, little bed by the front fence

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I was sad that the wind had broken my Fritillaria imperialis.

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after

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square bed right next to driveway, before

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after

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snails congregate on the bamboo poles for some reason! (Allan’s photo)

I was able to collect many snails in a jar for re-homing.

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Pieris at east end of front garden (Allan’s photo)

Allan walked to the post office and back:

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fern unfurling across the street at the J’s

He took with him an doll house that he built from a kit when his child was young.  Now it has gone to Thandi, Mike, and baby Celestine’s home two blocks west of us.

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If it were yellow with twin dormers, it would look like their house.

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a baby gift for Celestine

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post office planter

When some serious rain came, I retreated inside, thinking the rest of the afternoon would be reading time.

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I knew I could read this in an afternoon.

A foray into Facebook resulted in seeing a photo that satisfied some curiosity I’d been having about our old garden at a local assisted living place.  This photo shows a friend, whose identity I have masked, filling a bird feeder outside her mum’s room, in what used to be one of our four garden beds.

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Two of the beds show in the photos, and as you can see, they have gone to weeds, with just a couple of tulips struggling through.

Here was the same area last April under our care.

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just poised to bloom with lilies, irises, and more

We never did get to see the lilies and iris bloom there last spring as we had been ousted by then.  I can tell by this week’s photo that tall horsetail has been allowed to take over that garden bed.  REALLY INFURIATING to see the state it is in. We did it for the lowest price possible, too.  We were laid off from the job so that the new manager could hire a “young man” because “it is hard for young men to find jobs here at the beach.”  You can see what a fine job has resulted.

The rain had stopped and in order to keep my head from exploding, I put down my book and returned to my weeding.  As always, it was therapeutic enough so that I stopped fuming.

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long middle driveway bed, before

That long bed was a tiring one because of mats of grass that don’t show in the before photo.

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after photo from the different angle

Not shown: some weeding around the edges of the former debris pile and some tidying of the tiny triangle shaped bed at the very south end of the driveway (which belongs to Nora/Alycia’s house next door where a friend now resides).

As I weeded, we had two sets of visitors.

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The J’s!

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One of the J’s, Junior

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Carol and her daughter Julia.

Carol, Julia, and I walked all through the garden.

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tulips in the garden boat

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grape hyacinth

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plant table

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center bed

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branch from the storm

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more branches

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a speared branch (Allan’s photo)

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tarp blown off the crab pot stack next door

Our walk through the garden inspired Allan to trim a sword fern that was obscuring one of the fairy doors.

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Although it was difficult to tear myself away from the garden at 6:40, we had a social engagement for which we were about ten minutes later.  Since three days after my birthday party, four out of five members of our North Beach Garden Gang have been sick with colds.  Dave had it worst of all of us.  We’ve been missing out on our weekly meetings till now.

The Cove Restaurant

The Cove is open for dinners again on Fridays and Saturdays.  Chef Indus, formerly the sous chef, produced scrumptious food.

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Cove entry garden (Allan’s photo)

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Allan’s photo

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North Beach Garden Gang

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refreshing Caesar salad

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Allan had Sondra’s lasagne.

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ahi tuna steak

My only error with dinner was accidentally eating almost the whole ball of wasabi at once.  Oops.  Lynn, our truly great server, said “I thought you were more experienced than that!”

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Melissa’s delicious pasta.

Back at home, I was able to erase “driveway” from the at home gardening list.

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Thursday, 10 November 2016

I woke early, after maybe four hours of sleep, to the kick in the gut feeling of the election, and immediately turned to the news on my iPhone because I knew more sleep was impossible.  My heart broke over reports of hate crimes across the country.  I also learned that the biracial child of a local friend had been targeted by violent bullying; we do not think it is coincidental that it happened the day after.  I was somewhat heartened by peaceful protests across the nation (some marred by the usual small contingent of vandals).  In Portland, the peaceful protestors made a gofundme to donate to repair the vandalism and raised $51 thousand  dollars (by the time I am writing this five days later).  (Now 55K, as this publishes a week later.)

This blog is mostly in my voice, unless Allan writes about a boating trip.  Don’t doubt that he also feels great dismay at current events.  At first, I thought he did not feel it as deeply as I, simply because tears were not his first reaction, but the day after I learned that he also was losing sleep and experiencing distress and feeling sick while reading the news.

We decided to start the work day with a project:

Ilwaco Freedom Market

Ilwaco now has a marijuana shop at the port.  The owner had asked us if we could make their entry garden look good.  I was thrilled to take it on.  He even wanted us to deal with the weeds along the sidewalk between Howerton and Waterfront Way, property that doesn’t even belong to the Freedom Market.  That shows a good civic spirit.

the sidewalk, before

the sidewalk, before

We decided to string trim the left side and weed the right side of the sidewalk.

Allan's photos: before

Allan’s photos: before

during

during

 

after

after

along the building, before

along the building, before

and after

and after

The garden itself had landscape fabric under shallow bark so that the “underwear” showed badly.

the Freedom Market garden, before

the Freedom Market garden, before

I decided the fabric had to go away.  In the process, I ended up leaving it under the south side of the garden bed which is a walking area.

The pulling commences.

The pulling commences.

Weeds with their roots stuck into landscape fabric show how ineffective it is in a garden bed.

Weeds with their roots stuck into landscape fabric show how ineffective it is in a garden bed.  In the long run, this area would have filled up with firmly entrenched weeds.

Half of the fabric was the ridiculously thin kind that tears like paper.

Half of the fabric was the ridiculously thin kind that tears like paper.

after: I provided some free Sedum 'Autumn Joy', lambs ears, and a libertia, which it now occurs to me is a perfectly named plant for a Freedom Market garden.

1.75 hours later: I provided some free Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, lambs ears, and a libertia, which it now occurs to me is a perfectly named plant for a Freedom Market garden.

The whole time we were working, the Freedom Market did a bustling business.  This should be good for the city’s tax coffers.

While Allan weeded at the Salt Hotel curbside garden, I visited Karla at Time Enough Books for some much needed commiseration.

Ceanothus having an unusual lavish autumnal bloom.

Ceanothus having an unusual lavish autumnal bloom.

some timely reading matter

some timely reading matter

Mike’s garden

After the Freedom Market, we went to Mayor Mike’s garden for its final fall clean up…a short one because we had done considerable clean up last time.

Mike's garden

Mike’s garden

garden spider (Allan's photo)

garden spider (Allan’s photo)

Mike's kitty cat (Allan's photo)

Mike’s kitty cat (Allan’s photo)

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Mike’s garden now goes onto the “post frost clean up” list, probably just for leaf raking.

Long Beach

Some tidying in Long Beach finished the day.  Allan worked on the Veterans Field gardens while I groomed a couple of blocks worth of planters.

Vet Field corner garden (Allan's photo)

Vet Field corner garden (Allan’s photo)

a ridiculously early anemone (Allan's photo)

a ridiculously early anemone (Allan’s photo)

The carousel is now down for the winter.

The carousel (across the street from this planter) is now down for the winter.

I am finding it helpful to stop and visit friends who I know who are also having a dark week.  At the end of the day, one fellow we visited was wearing this year’s Jake the Alligator Man event’s 2016 t shirt.

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Apparently I am still feeling intensely blurry, as today’s work board photo indeed testifies.  It does show that the “fall clean up” list is almost complete and that the “post frost clean up” work list now awaits either a frost (which we might not get) or a final clean up at some jobs before the Christmas holidays, whichever comes first.

haven't added Mike's leaf raking yet

haven’t added Mike’s leaf raking yet

The Van Engelen end of season sale began but did not include the sort of bulbs I want.  Unless they add more, some of the second round bulb planting list might simply disappear from the board.

The Cove Restaurant

Our close friends are all as devastated as we are.  It took some doing for us to find our energy to have our weekly North Beach Garden Gang meeting.  I pushed for it because it is important to me to support local businesses with simpatico owners (such at The Cove).  I was so glad we went, because at the next table were two dear friends who sorely needed hugs and conversation.  With the hate crimes in the news, people are devastated emotionally and, if potentially a target, are afraid.

Also, the food was delicious as always.

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Lomo soltado

Lomo soltado

ambient music by Tom Trudell

ambient music by Tom Trudell


ginger

1995 (age 71):

Nov 10:  I bought “berry” wire at Yelm Hardware and 3 more metal posts for the new raspberry row. I hope Robert’s back gets better—they won’t be up there till the day before Thanksgiving.  [That must be the autumn when Robert threw his back out planting bulbs and was down for several days.] I stopped at Gordon’s=32 pansies and 18 mums.

1997 (age 73):

Nov 10:  Happy Birthday Marine Corps.  I worked again in the Tam area, the same work I’ve done the last two days.  On the evening news they said it will be below freezing tonight.

1998 (age 74):

Nov 10: Beautiful warm day and I spent the entire day in the kitchen canning the applesauce I cooked last night, and peeling and cooking more which I’ll can tomorrow after I buy some more lids.   I also dried 5 large onions, potatoes, and 2 cabbages.  Cabbage doesn’t dry well.  It ends up little tiny shreds.  Too much waste.  HAPPY MARINE CORPS BIRTHDAY.

[My mother was a Marine in WWII.]

 

 

 

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Thursday, 2 June 2016

I accompanied Allan on a grocery shopping trip to Warrenton, Oregon, solely to detour into Seaside and see Pam Fleming’s public gardens.  (Checking out the plant selection at Fred Meyer would be a bonus.)

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Pam Fleming has been the public gardener for downtown Seaside for as long as I can remember, and every year her gardens get better.  The gardens run along both sides of Broadway from the main highway to the beach view turnaround.

Broadway in Seaside

Broadway in Seaside

We drove and looked at the first couple of blocks as I took photos from the passenger window.

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Love that dusky Phygelius; I wonder if it is 'Salmon Leap'.

Love that dusky Phygelius; I wonder if it is ‘Salmon Leap’.

Then a parking place opened up on the busy street and we decided to walk to the turnaround and back to get a close look at the gardens.  What a good decision!

One of Seaside's well designed sit spots.

One of Seaside’s well designed sit spots.

on the bridge

on the bridge

bridge

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I love gold and variegated foliage.

I love gold and variegated foliage.

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Nigella (love in a mist) (Allan's photo)

Nigella (love in a mist) (Allan’s photo)

Pam plants flowering tobacco and head-whirling type flowers in front of the Bridgetender Tavern.

Pam plants flowering tobacco and head-whirling type flowers in front of the Bridge Tender Tavern.

Nicotiana langsdorfii (a flowering tobacco)

Nicotiana langsdorfii (a flowering tobacco)

a whirly spoon leaved osteospermum; she likes the kind with more of a color pattern but it has become hard to find.

a whirly spoon leafed osteospermum; she likes the kind with more of a color pattern but it has become hard to find.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I hope no tavern patron gets thrown into this pocket garden this year.

The Bridge Tender

The Bridge Tender

As we strolled by a café with outdoor seating, a walker approaching said to two folks seated there, “Looks like the perfect life.”   “It’s our think tank,” said the sitters; “We’re solving the world’s problems.”  “How far have you gotten?”  “Not very far.”

Pam often plants culinary plants in front of restaurants, like this seafood place.

Pam often plants culinary plants in front of restaurants, like this seafood place.

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I spy parsley in the Dooger's garden.

I spy parsley in the Dooger’s garden.  Maybe sage, rosemary, and thyme, too.

by Dooger's

by Dooger’s

This is the "swinging tree" of a little local girl who has swung from the branches for years.

This is the “swinging tree” of a local girl who has swung from the branches for years.

I'd say put leatherleaf viburnum here except I don't much like it!

I’d say put leatherleaf viburnum here except I don’t much like it!

When the business storefronts change hands, sometimes Pam’s planting scheme is thrown off; she might have plants from Mexico in front of a Mexican restaurant and then have it turn into a souvenir shop instead.

another culinary garden by the Pig 'n' Pancake, with golden lemon balm.

another culinary garden by the Pig ‘n’ Pancake, with golden lemon balm.  (I think.)

Lovage, I think, on the right.

Lovage, I think, on the right.

The vigorous houttuynia was already in the gardens when she took them on.

The vigorous houttuynia was already in the gardens when she took them on.

Why don't I ever remember to mass plant like she does? Looks so much better.

Why don’t I ever remember to mass plant like she does? Looks so much better.

I just realized my own Primrose vialii may be petered out at home.

I just realized my own Primrose vialii may be petered out at home.

Unlike some people, when I see a plant that I want in a public garden (like the primrose above), I do NOT help myself.

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As always, I envy the variety of street trees...not just boring old columnar pears like we have. Here: paperbark maple.

As always, I envy the variety of street trees…not just boring old columnar pears like we have. Here: paperbark maple.

another sit spot

another sit spot

Forever is a long, long time.

Forever is a long, long time.

a wintry windowbox

a wintry window box

shop window (Allan's photo)

shop window (Allan’s photo)

There is alchemilla (lady's mantle) looking frothy and glorious.

There is alchemilla (lady’s mantle) looking frothy and glorious.

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looks like Helenium 'Sahin's Early Flowerer' being way early!

looks like Helenium ‘Sahin’s Early Flowerer’ blooming way early!

Sambucus 'Black Lace'

Sambucus ‘Black Lace’

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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I also envy the reliable sprinkler system in every pocket garden.

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Last year, Pam told us her mulch of choice was bales of Gardner and Bloome soil building compost.

Last year, Pam told us her mulch of choice was bales of Gardner and Bloome soil building compost.

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I was deeply smitten with this bed with its candelabra primroses.

I was deeply smitten with this bed with its candelabra primroses.

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I spy little statice. I've had helpful people pull them out as dandelions before they bloom.

I spy little statice. I’ve had helpful people pull them out as dandelions before they bloom.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

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almost to the turnaround

almost to the turnaround

At first, I thought this kid might be one of Pam's workers, till I realized he was playing hide and seek.

At first, I thought this kid might be one of Pam’s workers, till I realized he was playing hide and seek.

Now I had reached the turnaround.  Allan had walked back to get the van and come pick me up.

turnaround

looking east

looking east

looking west

looking west

I found these two plaques deeply touching:

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looking south

in full wind and weather...and irrigated

in full wind and weather…and irrigated

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On the way back to the highway, one block over:

a big fluffy peony under a beach pine

a big fluffy peony under a beach pine

some flying birds by a Seaside storefront

some flying birds by a Seaside café

On the way north, we had a look at the garden of an ironworks shop in Gearhart.

Gearhart Ironworks

Gearhart Ironworks

the ironworks garden

the ironworks garden

We accomplished our grocery shopping at Costco.  I miss the old, smaller store behind the Fred Meyer.  The big new one has lighting that makes me feel dizzy and disoriented.  I find myself thinking that I must visit an optometrist immediately:

too much glare

too much glare, I feel like I am seeing double.

I prefer mood lighting while shopping.

Further toward home, I succumbed to the siren call of the Fred Meyer plant department.

petunias of interesting hues

petunias of interesting hues; I bought a yellowy-pinky one.

another unusual petunia

another unusual petunia

a haul of plants for my garden (Allan's photo)

a haul of plants for my garden (Allan’s photo)

eastern view from the highest part of the 4 mile long Astoria Megler bridge over the Columbia river.

eastern view from the highest part of the 4 mile long Astoria Megler bridge over the Columbia river.

The only flaw in this excellent day (other than the lighting at Costco) was that I had not organized a visit with Pam herself.  I felt we would not have time to do that, shop, and get to our weekly dinner in time.  Oh, how wrong I was because we got home with two hours to spare.  I did spend it puttering with my new plants; however, visiting with Pam would have been better, and rare.

The Cove Restaurant

We were slightly late to our North Beach Garden Gang meeting because I found it hard to tear myself away from my new plants.

a tad bit late to the party

a tad bit late to the party

artful dinner salad

artful dinner salad

strawberry feta salad (Allan's photo)

strawberry feta salad (Allan’s photo)

prawn scampi

prawn scampi

ahi tuna

ahi tuna

Dave, Melissa and me

Dave, Melissa and me

Todd and Dave (Allan's photo)

Todd and Dave (Allan’s photo)

We usually stay until the serving staff start sweeping up and vacuuming.  Carmen made an amusing show of sweeping right by our table.

a hug from our Carmen

a hug from our Carmen

After dinner, the usual lingering in the parking lot:

The plant that got away?

The plant that got away?

Tomorrow: back to the watering rounds.


Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1998 (age 74):

June 2: HOT in afternoon!!  Noon to six  I finally got those tulip bulbs (from the tubs and pots) planted in the garden area next to the onion and asparagus bed.  Boy I’m glad to have it done.  Then I planted seedlings into pots—the next move will be to plant them into the various bowls.  The next main job is to start planting the perennials that are on the picnic table.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, 19 May 2016

I woke after five hours of sleep with the feeling of a broken heart.  Of course, my first thought was about the lost (to me) garden at Golden Sands, and the astilbes and lilies that were about to bloom.

I had not yet written the post about it, the one you may have read yesterday.  I would not have time for that catharsis for at least three days (as this blog tends to run four days or more behind).

When I did publish yesterday’s story, I appreciated your many comments, both here and on Facebook. I especially liked this, written by Carol Sheaffer, who perfectly and poetically expressed my vision for that garden:

Your plantings and dedication were given to/for the seniors to experience a peace filled vision of beauty to help with their own memories and day dreams.”

Exactly.  The words of comfort, inspiration about letting go, and appreciation that poured in both here and on Facebook were a great help to me…but that was in the future on this particular Thursday.

I had recently read an article about how helpful gardens are to people with dementia.  “Doctors should prescribe gardening for patients more often”, in The Guardian.  A friend with severe chronic pain pointed out correctly that gardening is not a tonic for that, nor, in the experience of friends of mine, is it a reliable cure for deep depression.  What spoke to me in this article was this:

“Outdoor spaces including gardens can reduce social isolation among older people as well as help patients recover and manage conditions such as dementia, according to the influential King’s Fund health thinktank.  ….

Dementia patients can benefit from being near a garden and one study cited in the report found a 19% reduction in violence in patients staying in garden sites and a sevenfold increase in violence in the non-garden sites during a year. Many studies suggest that a garden changes how residents, staff and visitors interact in the long term and can help people reconnect with their past interests.”  This could have been an argument (among many!) successfully presented to the powers that be that pulled the plug on the Golden Sands garden.  It is one of the many reasons that it would be a shame to have that garden decline.  I still hope some knowledgeable volunteers step up to care for it, and that they (these imaginary volunteers) are allowed to keep it as a flower garden that evokes memories of gardens past.

However, it is done.  Once I got up and went out to check on my mother’s three transplanted shrubs (two roses and a rhodie), I felt fine again except for sleep deprivation.  

Mom's "Red Velvet" rose in the window this morning (her name for it, don't know the actual name).

Mom’s “red velvet” rose flowers in the window this morning (her name for it, don’t know the actual name).


Mom's rhodie looks fine, with no wilt at all.

Mom’s rhodie looks fine, with no wilt at all.


the "red velvet" rose this morning

the “red velvet” rose this morning in the garden


Her melianthus major also looks fine even though a big piece of the root broke off in transplanting.

Her Melianthus major also looks fine even though a big piece of the root broke off in transplanting.


the middle garden with Allium albopilosum

the middle garden with Allium albopilosum

Last night, I finished Lust and Wonder by Augusten Burroughs.  I liked it, although I felt sorry for his former significant other who got written about rather harshly.  And I don’t like the way he judges people by their appearance.  What I liked best were his passages about being a catastrophizer. My own tendency to catastrophize is why I had hoped that my fears that the garden would be lost to me were just another case of me imagining the worst.

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I also enjoyed the following passage because of the many times that Allan and I are almost hit by bicycles tearing down the sidewalks (illegally) in Long Beach.  We much prefer skateboards because we can hear them coming.

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Last night, I had forgotten to update the work board.  Here is what remained this morning:

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We took with us lots of painted sage, the special cosmos ‘Seashells’ and ‘Double Click’, and the tray of Cosmos ‘Sensation’ mix that had been intended for Golden Sands, with the intent of finding other homes for them.

Ilwaco

We planted one of the extra cosmos six packs down at Mike’s garden.

The post office garden has no room for more.

The post office garden has no room for more.


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


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adding some more painted sage at the post office


Allan planting two Helenium at the boatyard garden.

Allan planting two Helenium at the boatyard garden.


at the boatyard (Allan's photo)

at the boatyard (Allan’s photo)

I had considered adding just a few painted sage at the boatyard.  However, next week we will be doing a thorough pre-Memorial Day weekend weeding of horsetail.  IF we have any sage left, that would be the time to add some.  Meanwhile, we went to Time Enough Books and added a few to the garden boat.

moving on in a light mist

moving on in a light mist

The Depot Restaurant

The Depot got its painted sage and Cosmos ‘Seashells’ and ‘Double Click’.  I also found a home there for one of the mown-down Geranium ‘Rozanne’ that I had rescued yesterday.

Allan's photo: It replaced part of an area of Schizostylis.

Allan’s photos: It replaced part of an area of Schizostylis.


a new home for one chopped back Rozanne.

a new home for one chopped back Rozanne.


pulling bindweed

pulling bindweed in the rain


north side of dining deck; one of the big logs has been pushed in by a nosy vehicle.

north side of dining deck; one of the big logs has been pushed in by a nosy vehicle.  No plants were harmed (yet, but I do catastrophize about what would happen if the log gets pushed further in).

Long Beach

The planting session in Long Beach, during which I hoped to get all the painted sage into the planters, started in a cold and gusty rain.

Cornus 'Hedgerows Gold' added to Fifth Street Park.  It will have to grow taller to show up well.

Cornus ‘Hedgerows Gold’ added to Fifth Street Park. It will have to grow taller to show up well. (Allan’s photo)

The rain lightened to a fine mist, easy to work in, and perfect planting weather.  Nothing needed to be watered in; the soil was damp way down, we did not have to hook up the hose to each planter, and it could not have been more wonderful to plant. We accomplished our mission of finishing every planter.  I even had ONE bidens with me to replace one that I found stolen.  If any more get stolen, I am out of luck as I have used every bidens available at local nurseries.

I noticed that the foliage on the occasional annual had turned purple, indicating it is still too cold for their comfort at night.  It was not endemic so I won’t worry.  If all were like this, I’d be in a right old state.

a purpled, pinched back cosmos

a purpled, pinched back cosmos


and an annual salvia gone purple leaved

and an annual salvia gone purple leaved


Reminder to self: shear these rugosa roses back from the sidewalk edge.  These were cut to ground level in March.

Reminder to self: shear these rugosa roses back from the sidewalk edge. These were cut to ground level in March.


Basket Case basket by the police station

Basket Case basket by the police station

Because the planting had gone so well, we had time to weed the planters on the Sid Snyder beach approach.

a planter we dug out and replanted last fall

Allan photographing a planter we dug out and replanted last fall


variegated thyme (Allan's photo)

variegated thyme (Allan’s photo)


I love santolinas in a beach planter.  But why is there only one catmint?

I love santolinas in a beach planter. But why is there only one catmint?


Mature thymes are so gorgeous if they make it past the tiny, cute, and easily stolen stage.

Mature thymes are so gorgeous if they make it past the tiny, cute, and easily stolen stage.


thyme (Allan's photo)

thyme (Allan’s photo)

We had timed the day to finish it with cleaning up the entry garden and planting some cosmos and painted sage at the World Kite Museum.  Allan’s photos:

before

before


before

before


The soil in this small bed is intensely rooty, perhaps from the escallonia roots invading from the side.

The soil in this small bed is intensely rooty, perhaps from the escallonia roots invading from the side.  Despite all the rain, it was dry underneath, and not from lack of hose watering.


Snails love to hitch a ride on the bottom of the six packs of plants.

Snails love to hitch a ride on the bottom of the six packs of plants.


after

after


after.  I decided it badly needs mulch...tomorrow.

after. I decided it badly needs mulch…tomorrow.


Shrubs on either side are poking up with their roots.

Shrubs on either side are poking up with their roots.  They will enjoy the mulch, too.


after work: still misting

after work: still misting

We left the the Kite Museum with time to dump our load of debris at Long Beach city works yard.  On the way there, in the pocket garden at Culbertson Field, I saw some dead bulb foliage that necessitated an emergency weeding stop.  We ran out of time for our debris dump.

The Cove Restaurant

We arrived at our weekly dinner with Dave and Melissa (Sea Star Gardening) only a few minutes late.  Outside, Lacey the golf course mascot loved getting a belly rub.

Lacey

Lacey

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


Sondra's garden at the restaurant entrance

Sondra’s garden at the restaurant entrance, nicely mulched


I had very much been looking forward to this cider.

I had very much been looking forward to this cider.


Annika was singing.

Annika was singing.


artichoke fries

artichoke fries


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


Sondra making us laugh (Allan's photo)

Sondra making us laugh (Allan’s photo)


Melissa's elegantly presented dinner

Melissa’s elegantly presented dinner


after dinner (Allan's photo)

after dinner (Allan’s photo)

Because it was still just light when we left the restaurant at 9:00 o’ clock, we went to the works yard after all and had the satisfaction of getting rid of our debris.  (We have our own key, since our hours differ from that of the city crew.)

almost full moon over the works yard

almost full moon over the works yard

At home, the work board shows that Annuals Planting Time is almost over:

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Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago

1997 (age 73):

May 19: Robert’s birthday—Omaha Steaks.  Drs appt and errands—dentist office, vets for Tabby’s Advantage, Tim’s for Rx and Gordon’s [Nursery].  [Robert was my spouse and co-gardener during those years.]

1998 (age 74):

May 19:  I decided to plant some of the petunia seeds concentrating on the basket petunias at about two and I got tired of sitting so I went out and started repotting tomatoes and pepper seedlings.  Alan [a neighbor] came over and was real interested and he planted some tomatoes and sieved the seed in the wheelbarrow.  He said he would hang my baskets next week.

 

 

 

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