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Posts Tagged ‘crabbing’

Thursday, 7 December 2017

I slept long, and so did Skooter.

In the afternoon, Allan went boating again.  He will write up two days together for tomorrow’s post, because yesterday’s trip was not entirely a success, and today he returned to the same place to go further.  (I hear cries of “Thank goodness, we’ll have something to read about other than compost bins!”)

The day was warm, so warm that I had the back window and the front door wide open.  While hauling yesterday’s pile of chopped honeysuckle out to the trailer, I  had to find a summer weight shirt to wear, after having packed them away for winter.

I sorted out the wheelbarrow of purple lysimachia (went into the wheelie bin) and Sedum “Autumn Fire’ (went into a pile to save).

I picked up some windfall branches from the back yard next door, and saw a view that was worth going to the house for the camera.

crab pots being readied for the seaon

Unfortunately, the latest tests show the crabs do not have enough meat and it has been decided that the season will not begin till January.  Many years ago, after visiting and falling in love with this area, I subscribed to the Chinook Observer, the local weekly.  During the winter of 1991, I sat at my table in Seattle and read about a delayed crabbing season and about how the local fishing families were suffering economically at Christmas time.  When I read that a restaurant at the port offered free holiday meals to fishing families, I knew that this was where I wanted to live.  The way the community pulled together in hard times impressed me deeply.  (The restaurant in question might have been the former Reel ‘Em In Café.)

the latest windfall

My own little frustration is that tonight would have been a perfect evening for a campfire, being windless.  I knew Allan would not return till after dark,  and I would have felt rather selfish eating a campfire dinner on my own.  Especially since he was the one who had gone to the store to get sausages.

I feel pressured because it is so hard to get to just stay home on staycation.  We have Important Things to Do for the afternoons or evenings of the next three days.  This strangely warm winter* weather is supposed to go well into next week, though.  I hope so.

*As far as I am concerned, fall is Sept-Oct-Nov and winter is Dec-Jan-Feb.

The only indication of winter is the low angle of the sun and seasonal look of the garden.  Otherwise, it felt like a summer day.

2:20 PM

Cornus ‘Midwinter Fire’ and smokebush

some interesting new growths on the dead “Danger Tree” snag

Frosty walked with me.

After some inexpert pruning of my leaning ‘Cox’s Orange Pippen Tree…

before…it’s leaning to the east

after, some big eastern branches removed

…I measured my compost area (again!) to figure out if a fourth bin would fit.

I don’t use the plastic bin; we have three of them.

I thought about having to empty all the bins at once and then realized that the bins could be moved without having to empty them all at once.  Starting at the near end, one could be moved, and the others shifted as they get emptied.  Eureka!   At the same time, we could move them forward, making room to walk between them and the greenhouse.  I need two more pallets to make another bin.

It has proved annoying when debris falls into this narrow space. And there is no room to maintain the greenhouse exterior.

There is room at the far end, too, if that batch of hops and honeysuckle were pruned regularly.

I simply had to start tearing a bin apart and get it moved.  I just could not wait. I would tie it together and later Allan could do the good job that he likes to do. I managed to tear off one side and move it over.  To my intense frustration, I could not get the back pallet off.  It got wodged into the other one and stuck by one screw.  I worked and worked at it and finally had to give up.

When I dragged the plastic composter to the back of the garden, I looked wistfully through the gate at the pile of gear shed pallets, and then realized that I have one under the wood pile.  I dumped the wood onto the tarp and dragged the pallet up to the compost area.  Now I just need one more.  I considered walking down to the dump pile near the boatyard where sometimes free pallets appear, and rolling one home.  I wasn’t quite that obsessed; it’s a five block “roll”.  (A Flintstones roll of a square object.)

I was left with a great big mess again…but tomorrow Allan will help me.

If we can get bin one set up, I can start shifting compost from bin two into it.  Because the wood pile pallet was a little smaller, I think the fourth bin might even fit in without moving the whole thing over.  (But will it bother me to to have one slightly smaller bin? Yes.) Bins two and three do need to come forward about a foot as they get emptied out.

Other than garden touring, this is the most satisfying event of my year, or will be, when that one danged stuck pallet gets moved.

I could not do my original plan of clipping more debris to compost, so instead I finished the daylight by clipping old hellebore leaves throughout the front garden.  They carry disease and must be discarded. I loosely filled the wheelie bin and didn’t even get to the back garden hellebores.

When Allan returned after dark, he went to the free wood pile and scored two more pallets.  Joy! Tomorrow, he will help me complete bin one.  No sleeping late, because we must get it done in time to go to a rally in Ocean Park.

Tonight, we have a new disc of Stranger Things, season one, so life is extra good.

Next:  Allan’s boating adventure.  We’ll get back to composting soon, never fear.

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Thursday, 27 November 2014

We decided to not to go the always delicious Ilwaco community Thanksgiving dinner because 1) I am sort of hibernating and 2) we like to eat later than noon to 4 PM (even though early dining is a Thanksgiving tradition for many) and 3) our friend Kathleen had proposed the delightful idea of going to a potluck at the Sou’wester Lodge, where we would mingle with a different crowd.  Therefore, I got to sit and read for the afternoon.

 I asked Allan if he would mind driving down to the Port to get some photos of the Aleutian Ballad, a crabbing boat that was once a part of the Deadliest Catch telly show and was rumoured to be in town dropping off crab pots for the local fleet.  Always interested in a photo assignment, he came back with all these photos.  Our fleet is, we hear, going to drop their pots tomorrow, and when crab season opens on December 1, they will motor out to retrieve all the crabs who’ve wandered into the pots.

Port of Ilwaco

Allan apologizes that the photos are grey.  Twas a grey and rainy and windy day.

IMG_1926

Evening Star ready to go crabbing.

all poised to set their pots

all poised to set their pots

Three boats lined up, loaded up with pots.

Three boats lined up, loaded up with pots.

looks like the whole fleet is loaded and ready

looks like the whole fleet is loaded and ready

on the docks

on the docks

IMG_1933

The Aleutian Ballad;  It now gives Bering Sea tours.

The Aleutian Ballad; It now gives Bering Sea tours.

he Aleutian Ballad;  It now gives Bering Sea tours.

he Aleutian Ballad; It now gives Bering Sea tours.

IMG_1934

IMG_1937

IMG_1938

IMG_1941

IMG_1942

Storm flags (gale warning) flying over the port.

Storm flags (gale warning) flying over the port.

Aleutian Ballad from the lighthouse loop road

Aleutian Ballad from the lighthouse loop road

Allan would like you to see that the rain began in earnest!

Allan would like you to see that the rain began in earnest!

looking east over the harbour

looking east over the harbour

crab pots stacked at Ilwaco Landing

crab pots stacked at Ilwaco Landing

Our local fleet uses round pots, much smaller than the big square or rectangular ones used by the Bering Sea crabbing fleet.

Sou’wester Thanksgiving

At six o clock, we met Kathleen at the Sou’wester Lodge for a potluck Thanksgiving dinner.  Allan had made two pumpkin pies; Kathleen brought a modern sweet potato dish (olive oil instead of a brown sugar glaze).

As we approached the lodge, I took a photo that turned out blurry, so here’s one from our last evening visit.

Sou'wester Lodge by night

Sou’wester Lodge by night

a warm glow from one of the four cabins

a warm glow from one of the four cabins

In the living room, a fire was burning.

In the living room, a fire was burning.

A selection of appetizers were on offer.

A selection of appetizers were on offer.

On the drinks table, I found a bottle of organic cranberry juice from Starvation Alley.  Just a splash is perfect in tonic water.

On the drinks table, I found a bottle of organic cranberry juice from Starvation Alley. Just a splash is perfect in tonic water.

corner of the room that, when I lived at the Sou'wester in '93, was the bedroom of the previous owners.

corner of the room that, when I lived at the Sou’wester in ’93, was the bedroom of the previous owners.

on the sun porch

on the sun porch

an honour system shop on the sunporch

an honour system shop on the sun porch

sun porch shop

sun porch shop

We repaired down below the lodge to the pavilion, where tables were set up for dinner.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo; the potluck table was lavish with food.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo; that’s Sou’wester owner Thandi, right, and her mom, who Thandi said cooked for three days!

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo, Kathleen and I at the end of the line

Allan’s photo, Kathleen and I at the end of the line

Allan's photo of the board groaning with food.

Allan’s photo of the board groaning with food.

Allan's photo; we all raise a glass to the Sou'wester, for a photo

Allan’s photo; we all raise a glass to the Sou’wester, for a photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

dinner1

dinner2

Allan's photo; after dinner, all the leftovers got carried back to the lodge immediately, because of bears.

Allan’s photo; After dinner, all the leftovers got carried back to the lodge immediately, because of bears.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Back in the lodge living room after dinner. I took a few more photos and was glad to be back at the Sou’wester as a guest.

coffee

trailer

Vintage trailers figure large here as decor and as lodging.

 

trailer2

trailer decor on living room shelves

 

In the kitchen, a large crew washed dishes, so many helpers we could not squeeze in.  There were so many dishes, some had to be left to dry before the second round of washing.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo; I took a photo into the living room as we left.

Allan’s photo; I took a photo into the living room as we left.

looking from the sun porch into the living room

looking from the sun porch into the living room

As we departed, Kathleen (right) stayed to visit some more.

As we departed, Kathleen (right, with white hair) stayed to visit some more.

As we walked back to the van, I looked up at the carriage house.  In ’93, Robert and I lived on the top floor after he had added a bathroom, a kitchen sink and stove and the dormer with the oval window.

carriage house after dark

carriage house after dark

Back then, the wind whistled through the eaves, the roof leaked, and the second dormer had not been built.  The conditions were one of the reasons we left.  I’m happy to show that new owner Thandi takes good care of her staff.  The glowing room in the lower right corner is the old laundry room where I laboured with one washer and dryer.  Now they have several.

Before the carriage house, we lived in the Spartan trailer with the rounded front, second from the end.

Before the carriage house, we lived in the Spartan trailer with the rounded front, second from the far end, for almost five months.

another look at a cozy cabin

another look at a cozy cabin

It did my heart good to visit with the new(ish) owner, Thandi.  I would recommend this place to any friend who likes to stay somewhere with an alternative “vibe”.  It is second in my heart only to the Sylvia Beach Hotel.  I wonder if it has room journals?

love

This was the perfect place to be on Thanksgiving and I am grateful that Kathleen had the idea to go.

Do watch this wonderful music video filmed at the Sou’wester; the music is good, the video is skillful, and I recognize so many of the interiors.  The male protagonist of the story is cleaning the trailers and the lodge…just as I used to do.

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Wednesday, 11 December, 2013

I could tell from the sky that Wednesday’s sunset would be excellent.  The weather had warmed just slightly to hover around freezing. I walked around the corner and down Advent Avenue toward the Port.

A forklift operator was stacking crab pots on the side of Advent.

stacking Dungeness crab pots

stacking Dungeness crab pots

the promising sky to the southwest

the promising sky to the southwest

As I walked past, a big truck drove up and the forklift began to stack the pots onto the flatbed trailer.

onto the truck

onto the truck

The pots were appearing from down the short gravel road leading to the gear shed that is just southeast of our back garden.

much bustling at the gear shed

much bustling at the gear shed

Meanwhile, in the big parking lot between town and port, workers spread out and untangled lines.

getting ready

getting ready

I walked the half block from there to Waterfront Way.

the condor statue

the condor statue

Some of the crabbing boats were already loaded, ready to go early on the first day of commercial crabbing.

Pacific Dream

Pacific Dream

condor and moonrise

condor and moonrise

I wondered if the sunset would live up to my expectations.

looking south

looking south

In the dusk, the lights began to show from the decorated boats.

Nauti-lady always goes all out for the holidays.

Nauti-lady always goes all out for the holidays.

The sunset colour I had hoped for came on…

colour

sunset

Jessie's Fish Company star and processing steam

Jessie’s Fish Company star and processing steam

sunset

brighter

A heron flew in, squawking, and posed.

A heron flew in, squawking, and posed.

no colour enhancement!

no colour enhancement!

sunset colour fades and seasonal lights glow

sunset colour fades and seasonal lights glow

and the moon....

and the moon….

I made a slight detour on the way home to see the lively decorations at the east end of the port by CoHo Charters and Motel.

Imagine Christmas music playing, as well.

Imagine Christmas music playing, as well.

another kind of boat at the Coho Charters

another kind of boat at the Coho Charters

My sunset walk segued into a neighbourhood Christmas lights walk, but that’s another story.

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Sunday, 17 November, 2013

The weather surprised us by being quite workable after some morning rain. While hooking up the trailer, Allan found a large Melianthus major flower thrown on the sidewalk, clearly by a finger blight suspect who just wanted to damage and not take. I had wanted to take a photo of ALL the flowers that have come out on the plant.

now missing one

now missing one

I saw an elephant garlic blossom also thrown upon the sidewalk.

When we arrived at our first job, Larry and Robert’s just five doors down (across Pearl Avenue), we saw that across the street from them, lots of hydrangea flowers were on the ground. We assume the same finger blighter hit that yard, as well, and yanked flowers off the hydrangeas by the fence. Whoever it was would have had to be tall enough to reach my Melianthus flower. I ask you, why?

evidence

evidence

color echo

color echo with the fire station in the garden scross from Larry and Robert’s

We are having an influx of new neighbours on the street, including (soon) at the house across from Larry and Robert’s, and we are happy to welcome them. We’ve already met one on our block, named Judy, three doors down!. I’m calling her “New Judy” for now (in my mind) and when speaking of Judy four doors down, I don’t call my dear friend “Old Judy”, but instead “Our Judy”, a phrasing I learned from Coronation Street and from my previous marriage to a Leedsman. Or I could call them Judy Four Doors Down and Judy Three Doors Down. I used to know so many Kathleens that we just called them all by their last names (till two of them moved away and now I just have two Kathleens in my life, one of whom we still call “Sayce” from olden days). I’ve never before known multiple Judys!

Whoever moves in across from Larry and Robert’s, if they are gardeners, will find some nice boxwood and hydrangeas. Most of the yard is incomplete and will be an interesting blank palate for someone to play with. The blueberry and other shrubs that tones so well with the police station dates back to when architect Anthony and writer Victoria Stoppiello had a wonderful, mysterious, half wild garden there. The very first thing I would do is cut down that badly pruned rhododendron that is so gangly….but it is no secret that I am not a fan of plain old rhodos, ill pruned and in the wrong place. Now, some nice species rhodos with fabulous indumentum like at a certain bay side garden are another thing altogether.

New Judy loves to garden and has a completely blank slate of lawn. I wonder if she knows about the newspaper method of garden bed creation. Perhaps she would like some Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’.

There is even a possibility that some people who bought a nearby house to “flip” it have fallen in love with Ilwaco and might keep it as a second home. Ilwaco can have that effect!

Meanwhile, at Larry and Robert’s, I had laid out the bulbs and we planted and weeded small weeds along the front of the garden beds.

looking from Larry and Robert's east, with Judy and Tom's in the background

looking from Larry and Robert’s east, with Judy and Tom’s in the background

a lovely photo but I left my bulb bucket by the boat!

a lovely photo but I left my bulb bucket by the boat!

Here we mostly plant Narcissi with some Alliums and minor bulbs. I dared some Tulip ‘Princess Irene’ in the boat as it is short and strong for the wind and perhaps the deer will ignore it.

Larry and Robert's old hydrangea

Larry and Robert’s old hydrangea

pineapple sage

pineapple sage

and an even bigger pineapple sage.  (blooms late, leaves smell like pineapple)

and an even bigger pineapple sage. (blooms late, leaves smell like pineapple)

Both the pineapple sages came back from last year and are thriving on the east wall with protection from southwest wind.

Then…down to the Port to finish the project we left yesterday to go to the Wizard of Oz play.

Allan weeded a green lawn of short grass out from this bed...what a job!

Allan weeded a green lawn of short grass out from this bed…what a job!

Two boys were skateboarding on the picnic table by the restrooms and then they started to sing an offkey version of Over the Rainbow, so they must have seen the play, as well.

finished what I started yesterday

finished what I started yesterday

I put two plant starts from my friend Sheila into the bed above: a hebe and Miscanthus ‘Gold Bar’. We planted short narcissi in both beds, especially ‘Baby Moon’. We went on to add Baby Moon, Itzim, Peeping Tom, Baby Boomer, and Sun Disc narcissi at the Shoalwater Cove and Pelicano curbside garden, and Time Enough Books, and Queen La De Da’s. The Baby Moons should still be blooming prolifically for the annual children’s parade at the beginning of May.

Last year, we planted scads of crocuses and Iris reticulata as well. Crows and seagulls were watching and dug up and pecked at almost all of them.

colour echo with grasses and crab pots by Queen La De Da's Art Castle

faint colour echo with grasses and crab pots by Queen La De Da’s Art Castle

Signs of crabbing are everywhere now, as crabbers get poised for when the season begins.

a truckload of floats

a truckload of floats

The frames are a shout out to my favourite blogger, Mr. Tootlepedal.

I had a big idea of getting my own bulbs planted in the last hour of daylight. A drizzle arriving just as we parked at home put an end to that. Our Judy walked down with some Dave’s Killer Bread loaves (essential to the digestion) that she and Tom had picked up for us across the river, and we had a visit in the misty rain. At least I got my bulbs out on a shelf to stay nice and airy, and if it rains on Monday, I will organize them by garden area so they go in quickly when the time comes. A storm is due; I would love time in the morning to plant the Veterans Field bulbs in Long Beach before it arrives, as we certainly did not get there today.

Meanwhile, as with Saturday evening, I spend hours making bulb spreadsheets for each friend who went in on my big order. I do enjoy a nice alphabetical spreadsheet and it is a huge relief when the money comes out right, as I juggle a lot when sorting to make sure this person gets $30 of bulbs and that one exactly $100, and that one $50, and a more impoverished friend maybe just $10 worth. People with a deer problem get no tulips; those with fenced areas or protected containers can grow tulips. I charge no mark up; the profit (other than in the labor of the ones I plant) is in seeing the beauty in the spring.

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