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Posts Tagged ‘Cranberry Research Station’

Wednesday, 19 September 2018

I wanted to begin to work our way through the new projects on the work board.

The Depot Restaurant

Chef Michael had requested that we prune a big rhododendron.  I won’t just hack away at something to make it smaller.  We started with the idea of just keeping it from touching the eaves of the house next to the Depot that has the restaurant office.

before

before

A look inside the branches showed lots of old trash on the ground underneath and much dead wood inside.  While Allan pruned along the back and got the shrub off of the house, I started going in from the lower front and sides.

after

after

before and after (Allan’s photos)

I debated at length about whether to remove the one big old branch that is coming forward, down low.  Because I was so indecisive, it got left for now.  Cutting it would have made a more tree-like shape with perhaps less character.

after; lots of dead wood came out

Allan’s photo; Would you cut that curving branch?

This is not the best time to prune rhododendrons.  It should be done right after flowering before next year’s flowers have formed.  We lost a lot of flower buds doing it now. I can see how after next year’s bloom, we can make the rhododendron smaller and still shapely.

With a trailer load heaped with a debris, we went to the local dump.

Allan’s photo

I had the intention of following the offload by working at the Red Barn and Diane’s, till a considerable rain began.

dump view

The rain increased.  Instead of working in it, we headed north for an errand. On the way, we visited

The Cranberry Museum

on Pioneer Road.  (You’d think the Cranberry Research Station would be on Cranberry Road, further north, but it is not.)

Allan’s photo

I was looking for a birthday present for Mary of KBC.  It was something that the museum no longer had in its gift shop.

tightly clipped Vaccinium ovatum (evergreen huckleberry).

Allan’s photo

When I started gardening for a living here in 1994, one of my first jobs was pruning the huckleberry hedges at the Cranberry Research Station.

the bogs at the Cranberry Research Station

We continued on with our errand.

The Planter Box

Several bags of mulch were acquired, plants were admired, and a good talk was had with Planter Box owner Teresa.

autumnal foliage

autumnal cabbages

and kale

and chrysanthemums

This jungle bench is unusual.

With bags of mulch loaded, we put off Diane’s garden till tomorrow and headed south.

The Shelburne Hotel

I briefly checked the Cosmos ‘Xanthos’ that I had moved from an upstairs pot down into the garden yesterday.

It will provide some pale color (right) for awhile longer.

a new flush of sweet peas

Sanguisorba ‘Pink Elephant’ and one of the giant non blooming cosmos

Port of Ilwaco

The rain stopped and gave us a good evening to weed and mulch the Time Enough Books curbside garden.  (All the rest of the photos are Allan’s.)

This bed originally came with the wild beach strawberry.  I was heartily sick of the way it swamped everything else.  And this bed does not thrive even though I have given it much attention for years.  It was time for a do-over.

before

mulching with Harvest Supreme

after (will be removing more strawberry in the future)

after

the other side, before

after

While Allan went off to dump the debris, I messed around with some rocks.  I have the idea of making a crevice garden here if I can find enough long rocks.

so far that’s all I got…

I also messed around with some river rock.  I have an idea of a diagonal crevice garden and another diagonal river rock garden.  The river rock one started with the planting today of a Leptospermum rupestre that Evan Bean gave me. Xera Plants says “Stems follow contours as they grow, good surrounding rocks and down walls.”  So I had found a big rock to plant it by and then just had to play with others.  This garden bed used to be a tightly packed almost concrete-like river rock xeriscape so there are plenty of river rocks to be had.

The tiny leptospermum is in the middle. (looking south)

Some more rain will clean it up. (Looking north)

It reminded me of playing with tiny round rocks under the gutter when I was a child, and the results look like a child did it.  This did not help my chronic Imposter Syndrome.

But I had fun while I was doing it.  After we cleaned up around the edges, it was almost dark.

At home, I erased two tasks from the work board.

What’s left

When Allan got online, he checked his bank account and found that Medicare had cashed his big catch-up cheque.  This has to be a good sign.  They would not take his money for nothing, so we are sure he is reinstated.  I think the woman from the local office DID make a phone call to help us.  What an enormous relief.  I slept better than I had in the past two weeks.

 

 

 

 

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Friday, 9 October 2015

I looked forward to four days off, although I knew that various activities would require my leaving our property.  Friday was not a day that I had to leave home for any reason; company came to us.

We had an intensely stormy day with much welcome rain.

from 642.weather.com

from 642.weather.com

Only Allan took photos today.

Prissy came from Seaside to get some Macleaya cordata (plume poppy).

Prissy came from Seaside to get some Macleaya cordata (plume poppy).

Prissy’s friends Debbie and Steve came to meet her for a lunch date.  I did not get to them in time to warn them not to go back under the trees in the 30 plus mph wind!

They survived!

They survived!  Steve said he had been scared!

much rain

much rain

Steve's adorable dog: half pit bull, half dachshund!

Steve’s adorable dog: half pit bull, half dachshund!

a low slung pitty mix

a low slung pitty mix

Allan went on some errands and checked out the weather at the port.

storm flags

storm flags

warning flags flown at the port office

warning flags flown at the port office

choppy weather

choppy weather

gulls hunkered down in the field behind our house

gulls hunkered down in the field behind our house

Allan got a little too close.

Allan got a little too close for their comfort.

I had a lovely afternoon reading a Susan Conant Dog Lover’s Mystery.

th_0425194590

Saturday, 10 October 2015

The rain was pelting and the wind at gale force in the late morning when I arose, expecting our friend J9 to arrive to collect some hops vines to decorate at a catering job.  I was not surprised when she changed her mind about the need for hops decor.

from 642weather.com, today's impressive storm

from 642weather.com, today’s impressive storm

Allan and I had to go out and about, first to buy two cozy mysteries by local author Jan Bono, who was doing a book signing of her “Sylvia Avery mystery series” at Long Beach Coffee Roasters.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

photographing Jan's books (Allan's photo)

photographing Jan’s books (Allan’s photo)

Jan's booksigning

Jan’s book signing

Next, we headed up to the Long Beach Depot building for the Peninsula Arts Association art show, on a mission to deliver two big daylily hunks to our friend Debbie for the upcoming master gardener’s plant sale.

In Long Beach, I thought the planters were holding up well in the storm.

In Long Beach, I thought the planters were holding up well in the storm.

in the back way to Coulter Park (Allan's photo)

in the back way to Coulter Park (Allan’s photo)

the Depot building (Allan's photo)

the Depot building (Allan’s photo)

This building, like the Depot Restaurant, was a station for the long ago Clamshell Railroad.

Debbie's steampunk-inspired jewelry

Debbie’s steampunk-inspired jewelry at the art show

the art show

the art show

With the daylilies delivered, we returned to Ilwaco.  I had been planning to skip the Cranberrian Fair this year in favour of reading quietly at home on a stormy day.  However, Our Kathleen dearly wanted one of the buttons with its lovely heron logo, so we decided to go after all.  (To gain admission, the $5 button becomes your ticket to the event that encompasses two museums.)

ranfair

button art by Debbi Littlefield of Naselle

button art by Debbi Littlefield of Naselle

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Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum in Ilwaco

The Long Beach trolley was called into service as the "Bog Bus" (Allan's photo)

The Long Beach trolley was called into service as the “Bog Bus” (Allan’s photo)

Susie of the Boreas Inn at the kitchen window, with cranberry peach pies (Allan's photo)

Susie of the Boreas Inn at the kitchen window, with cranberry peach pies (Allan’s photo)

potter Karen Brownlee (Allan's photo)

potter Karen Brownlee (Allan’s photo)

We bought an assortment of delightful handmade cards from this vendor. (Allan's photo)

We bought an assortment of delightful handmade cards from this vendor. (Allan’s photo)

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Allan perusing the bake sale. Our dessert later on was two Pink Poppy cupcakes.

Allan perusing the bake sale. Our dessert later on was two Pink Poppy cupcakes and pumpkin bread with craisins.

I liked this fellow's couture.

I liked this fellow’s couture.

blacksmithing demonstration

blacksmithing demonstration

outside, people boarding the bog bus (Allan's photo)

outside, people boarding the bog bus (Allan’s photo)

I had a sudden urge to get on the bog bus, which would take me to the Cranberry Museum on Pioneer Road.

museums PM

As we walked back to our parking spot, I thought this planter was looking rather fine despite the weather:

DSC00543

We watched the trolley go by, heading north.

trolley on First Avenue

trolley on First Avenue

All of a sudden I had the most intense urge to go to the Cranberry Museum, as well, instead of going home to read.  So, most un-ecologically, we drove our van north again.  Part of the lure was that Sondra of the Cove Restaurant was catering the lunch at the Cranberry Museum, located at the Cranberry Research Station on Pioneer Road.

Washington State University Cranberry Research Station

Washington State University Cranberry Research Station

DSC00589

The Museum and Gift Shop

in the gift shop

in the gift shop

cranberry wine

cranberry wine. We bought an orange cranberry blend to save for the holidays.

gifts displayed in cranberry boxes

gifts displayed in cranberry boxes

DSC00550

in the Cranberry Museum

in the Cranberry Museum

DSC00552

We’ve shared more details about the museum in this post from a previous Cranberrian Fair.

Cranberry Museum labels

Cranberry Museum labels

and dress patterns

and dress patterns

We bought lunch from Sondra.

We bought lunch from Sondra.

some seasonal decor

some seasonal decor

Despite Tom Trudell’s piano music, the dining room at the museum lacks ambience.

IMG_0450

I talked with Sondra of the Cove about helping to decorate it with some autumnal foliage and hops next year.

Outside, in the bogs, a harvest demonstration was taking place, and the rain stopped just in time for us to walk out and observe.

folks boarding the trolley for a return trip to Ilwaco (Allan's photo)

folks boarding the trolley for a return trip to Ilwaco (Allan’s photo)

This walking tour is available year round.

This walking tour is available year round.

(Allan's photo)

Allan’s photo

Flooded bog with floating cranberries (Allan's photo)

Flooded bog with floating cranberries (Allan’s photo)

corralling the cranberries (Allan's photo)

corralling the cranberries (Allan’s photo)

Birds help out the growers. (Allan's photo)

Birds help out the growers. (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

The berries are corralled into a smaller and smaller area. (Allan's photo)

The berries are corralled into a smaller and smaller area. (Allan’s photo)

DSC00585

cranberry conveyer (Allan's photo)

cranberry conveyer (Allan’s photo)

A highlight for me was meeting this darling wire hair dachshund puppy, Britta, who had come all the way from Germany.

A highlight for me was meeting this darling wire hair dachshund puppy, Britta, who had come all the way from Germany. (Although she looks a little bedraggled here, she was having a wonderful time.)

One of the ponds from which water was being pumped to flood the bogs.

One of the ponds from which water was being pumped to flood the bogs.

Because of the unusually dry summer, cranberry farmers have been worried about whether there would be enough water to flood the bogs.  A crisis had been looming. They must have been rejoicing to have some rain.

In 1994, one of my first regular gardening jobs was weeding this garden by the Cranberry Museum.

Cranberry Research Station garden...looks like it needs a weeder's touch.

Cranberry Research Station garden…looks like it needs a weeder’s touch.

Heather is grown to attract pollinators.

Heather is grown to attract pollinators.

the trolley heading north again as we drove home

the trolley heading north again as we drove home

The rest of the day was all reading for me.

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Next: two more days off, and after that, some boating.

 

 

 

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Wednesday, 5 February 2014

Cranberry Museum

  • After our visit to Oysterville, the trolley took us south to the Cranberry Museum at the Cranberry Research Center.  Confusingly, it is on Pioneer Road instead of Cranberry Road.  Allan still feels bad about the time he accidentally sent a tourist to Cranberry Road to find it.  The museum was closed for the day.  Somehow my friend who had done the trolley tour three weeks before had managed to score some cranberry ice cream at this stop, but we were not so lucky.  If you visit during summer hours, perhaps you can taste some.  We just pulled up by the museum for a moment to get a feel of the place.  We might have taken a self guided tour of the bogs had it not been an unusually freezing cold day.
photo courtesy Cranberry Museum

photo courtesy Cranberry Museum

In the bog (below), photographed from the trolley (which, although unheated, did protect us from the wind chill factor that made the day feel like 8 degrees), the research scientists are testing out an assortment of different cranberry cultivars.

a winter bog

a test bog

The self guided tour goes along the green paths.  Heather is planted next to the bogs to attract the very earliest bees, so necessary for pollenating the cranberry plants.

bog paths

bog paths

I’ve been in the Cranberry Museum before and blogged some years ago about the cranberry harvest, here.

World Kite Museum

Our next stop was The World Kite Museum on Sid Snyder Drive beach approach in Long Beach.  Even though Allan and I take care of a pocket garden by the front door, we rarely take time to go in to the museum.  This stop allowed enough time to explore two floors of displays of kites from around the world and even to make a little kite for ourselves!

photo courtesy World Kite Musem

photo courtesy World Kite Museum

I was relieved that our pocket garden, which we had not checked on since the beginning of staycation, looked okay.

kite garden with some bulbs coming up

kite garden with some bulbs coming up

inside the museum

inside the museum
World War II kite collection

World War II kite collection

The big windows set kite colours aglow.

The big windows set kite colours aglow.

From the west windows, we could see Back Country Horse Rides.  Three representatives of that company were on the tourism tour with us, along with the manager of Driftwood RV Park, the mayor and first lady of Long Beach, one of the workers from The Cottage Bakery (which the mayor and his wife own), a worker from Jessie’s Ilwaco Fish Company, Jayne Bailey of Bailey’s Café, a few people from Astoria, and more…  This led to exuberant cheering each time the trolley passed one of the businesses whose people were on the tour that day.

Back Country Horse Rides and, further west,  the Adrift Hotel

Back Country Horse Rides and, further west, the Adrift Hotel

more kites

more kites

horse

kites

I'm fond of the face kites.

I’m fond of the face kites.

Patty Rolfe, manager of the Kite Museum gift shop, led a brief workshop in making a small kite.

patty

making kites

making kites

Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

The trolley took us south to our town, Ilwaco, and to the museum on our street, Lake Street.  I made sure that Olde Towne Café, my favourite business, got a cheer from the riders as we passed by it.  We arrived at the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum and trooped in for a guided tour from the museum docents.

Rosemary, Ellen, and museum director Betsy Millard ready to take us on tour

Rosemary, Ellen, and museum director Betsy Millard ready to take us on tour

our tour group

part of our tour group

We split into two groups; the one Allan and I joined first toured the Clamshell Railroad annex of the museum, passing the historic train car on the way.  You can read up on the railroad here.  If I could go back in time and do one thing, it would be to ride on that train.

historic train car

historic train car

In the annex building, the Peninsula Model Railroad Club has built a model of the Peninsula towns; for a quarter, you can make a little train run from Ilwaco to Oysterville (not to scale).  Some tour goers could not resist making train noises to go along with the experiences…sort of like Sheldon on Big Bang Theory.  Chugchugchugchug WOOOO WOOOO!

model of Ilwaco

model of Ilwaco

Black Lake, just north of Ilwaco

Black Lake, just north of Ilwaco

model train car inside the annex

train

oceanpark

The train made it all the way to Nahcotta without derailing.  Once Allan and I gave it a run and it derailed halfway up the track.  We quietly snuck into the other part of the museum (but did confess to someone there that the derailment had happened).

railway artifacts

railway artifacts

rrphotos

one of the beautiful seats from a railway car

one of the beautiful seats from a railway car

op

ilwacorr

Ilwaco train dock

Ilwaco train dock

We followed our tour guide into a back door of the museum; I did not even know that door existed.

into the easternmost room of the museum building

into the easternmost room of the museum building

lifeboat

lifejackets hang over an old lifeboat

lifejackets hang over an old lifeboat

crab pot

crab pot

a life ring for Allan

a life ring for Allan

Betsy Millard, museum director

Betsy Millard, museum director

a cool old boat

a cool old boat

The next room has a model of horses seine fishing on the Columbia River.  Here’s a fascinating video on the history of horse seining, a practice which ended in 1948.

horses

This part of the museum also has my favourite exhibit, a street of shops, each housing a different display of artifacts.

model street

model street

The next room has a Lewis and Clark display.  As the docents themselves said, it is nothing on the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center, our next destination.

trolley tour folks in the Lewis and Clark room

trolley tour folks in the Lewis and Clark room

Lewis and Clark

Lewis and Clark

The final room, which is usually the first one I enter but we were going back to front, has nature displays and a basket collection and some history of the Chinook Indians.

baskets

nature

We exited by the charming little gift shop.

gift shop

gift shop

back aboard the trolley!

back aboard the trolley!

For those who might wonder, the trim on the outside of the trolley and the interior woodwork is all oak.

Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center

The trolley took us up the loop road to the hills of Cape Disappointment, where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean.  This glorious park is just a mile or so from where we live.

view from the trolley, looking south over the river marshes

view from the trolley, looking south over the river marshes at low tide

on a bluff overlooking the ocean, the museum

on a bluff overlooking the ocean, the museum

Despite the chill east wind (straight out of the Columbia Gorge) whipping fiercely up here, some of us went to the railing to enjoy the view.

the north jetty

the north jetty

interpretive sign about cormorants

interpretive sign about cormorants

cormorants

cormorants

west side of the interpretive center

west side of the interpretive center

Cape Disappointment Lighthouse

Cape Disappointment Lighthouse

Just for fun, here’s a view from the Cape D lighthouse looking back, taken last spring.

view from the base of the lighthouse

view from the base of the lighthouse

Inside the interpretive center, one goes down a long ramp lined with Lewis and Clark information, with switchbacks and small plateaus with larger displays.

inside

down we go...

down we go…

A history buff could spend hours here.  I have a small confession:  I am not one for reading all the history a museum has to offer (unless its about the Clamshell Railroad, of which I never tire).  Allan, however, is someone who would read every word.

ramps

museum

Jane of Bailey's Café

Jane of Bailey’s Café

This is a captivating display.

This is a captivating display.

as is this

as is this

and this

and this

There is one spot on the downward ramp where a turn takes you to a flight of stairs that leads up into the light of the view room that is the breathtaking heart of the museum.

entering a room of light

entering a room of light

windows

from the center to the lighthouse

from the center to the lighthouse (south)

why we have two lighthouses

why we have two lighthouses

view to the jetty (north)

view to the jetty (north)

A park ranger was there to answer any questions.  I learned something new:  The entire North Jetty was originally free standing and over decades has filled in on the north side with sand, grass and trees so that only the westernmost end of it juts out into the ocean.

park ranger

park ranger

part of a lighthouse beacon in display

part of a lighthouse beacon in display

boat signs

a display about shipwrecks

I almost did not look up to see the collection of glass floats

I almost did not look up to see the collection of glass floats

Amazingly it was not quite three o clock when the trolley took us back north to the Long Beach train depot building where our vehicles were parked.  I never would have thought one could make it from Long Beach to Oysterville and back to Long Beach and Ilwaco and see so much in less than six hours.  Come be a tourist here, where the locals care enough to train in the art of hospitality.  There are two more of these trolley tours being offered, on March 6th and March 25th.  If any of you locals are interested, call Sue at Our Place at the Beach Hotel to save your spot.

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Cranberry farming creates many beautiful sights on the Long Beach Peninsula, from the haze of red on the field to the sparkling sprays of irrigation jets in the mist.  Every year Ilwaco’s Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum (formerly the Ilwaco Heritate Museum) hosts the Cranberrian fair with a “bog bus” (actually the handsome old Long Beach trolley) that will take you to see the autumn harvest in progress.  In October of 2010 the tour happened on a particularly beautiful autumn day.

the bog bus posed to take us touring

Cranberry Research Station

The trolley took us out of Ilwaco to the Cranberry Research Station with its bogs and its Cranberry Museum.

Cranberry Museum

cranberry harvesting tools

The method of harvesting does not seem to have changed much over the years…

corralling the berries

wading in

herding berries

cranberries

a modern procedure

cranberry truck

across the bog

the old-fashioned harvest

bog bus and harvesters on Pioneer Road

Heathers are planted alongside the bogs to encourage bees early in the season.  Bees are also brought in by beekeepers to pollenate the crop.

an edge of heather

view from the porch of the Cranberry Museum

Red is the perfect colour to wear to the Cranberrian fair.

Get your picture taken in a harvester cutout!

Inside the museum, we had a delicious lunch catered by Beach House Catering and perused Cranberrian Fair t- shirts, a wine tasting, a walk through display of old harvesting implements and history, and a gift shop full on cranberry related items (soap, food, even lampshades painted with cranberries).

in the museum

a collection of old Cranberry Festival buttons

In 2012, the fair will be on October 13th and 14th.

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