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Posts Tagged ‘Crank’s Roost’

Friday, 8 November, 2013

They are here!  The UPS truck with big boxes of bulbs arrived just as we were about to go to work, and we were able to have them loaded straight into the garage.

They are HEEERRRRE!

They are HEEERRRRE!

Gracie from across the street came to help.

Gracie from across the street came to help.

Those boxes are HEAVY.  Gracie got a biscuit from the UPS man.

The UPS guy can carry two.

The UPS guy can carry two.

He well remembered our old house and how he had to carry bulbs boxes down wonky stone steps to the front door (after a difficult parking job on a sloping gravel road, and then squeezing past our vehicle to the front gate).

I well remember the difficulty of sorting the bulbs in the tiny living room of the house, with no room to move for several days.  I swear that is one of the main reasons I decided in August of 2010 that we must move to a bigger place.  Although I thought at the time it was because I very much wanted to live on Lake Street, and it was, some of it had to do with not wanting to spend November climbing over bulb boxes.  Bulb time in the old house is one of the reasons this time of the year has been traditonally known as Bulb Hell.  The other might be because of how hard it was to fit boxes of bulbs into Allan’s two door Saturn.  Maybe with our new van, we can finally retire “Bulb Hell” and have “Bulb Time” be the new name for the season.  I suppose it depends on what sort of weather we have to plant them in.

that was then...

that was then (2007)…

and this is now.

and this is now.

While I finished getting ready for work, Allan ingeniously set up a temporary table with three collapsible saw horses and one of the removable sides from the trailer.

sorting table

sorting table

You may note, on right corner of table, that I had picked the squash this morning.  I think they are too hard to be good (except maybe the one on the left, below) and I do not know what to do with them other than use them for Thanksgiving decorations!

three squash

three squash:  Maybe Allan can figure out if they are cook-able

Because we had two prior commitments for work today,  I did not stay home and sort.  (And the weather was too fine to be indoors!)

We switched compost buckets at Olde Towne Café.  I am thinking about whether or not this peacock would be a good outdoor decoration on our fence:

It has potential.

It has potential.

At work,  we had to do the removal of hops from the lattice at the Depot Restaurant and cut down some tall bamboo.  Chef Michael does not want it banging against the building in winter storms.

While Allan unloaded buckets and tools, I noticed gorgeous berries on a cotoneaster by where the employees park.  I’m very fond of cotoneasters.

bright red berries

bright red berries

On the north side, the window box and barrel annuals are still in bloom.

designed by Nancy Aust of The Basket Case Greenhouse

designed by Nancy Aust of The Basket Case Greenhouse

Allan went onto the deck to cut bamboo that was poking through the lattice.  He saw beautiful light on the ornamental grasses on the east side.  I passed the camera through the lattice so he could take photos:

deck

deck

grass

grass

pupWhile dragging bamboo over behind the garage (to be picked up by us later), I saw someone from Oceanside Animal Clinic next door walking three dogs, two older ones and a puppy.  I immediately recognized the three legged puppy from a photo I had seen on Facebook yesterday.  He and his brother had been found abandoned in a box along the road, with rope wrapped so tightly around his little leg that it had to be amputated.  He had a broken pelvis, as well.  Both were treated at the vet.  The brother died, this one lived.  I was afraid to pick him up because of his injuries, so the vet worker (and foster mom) handed him to me.  I have a feeling she will keep him as one of her other dogs is a blue heeler.  I wanted to take him home…but our work hours preclude getting a dog.

After that delightful interlude, I got back to cutting hops twining through the outside of the lattice while Allan did the same on the inside.

before and after

11:50 AM and 2:05 PM

I left one little stand of bamboo to soften things up. (The tall plant on the left is a Leycesteria.)

A plan for the near future:  On the east side of the dining room, the Schizostylis in the front is dull in summer and could be replace by more colourful plants that will draw people’s eyes as they drive by.  I hope to accomplish the removal of some of the schizostylis when it comes time to plant bulbs here.

next on the Depot garden agenda

next on the Depot garden agenda

We then went down the block to Crank’s Roost.  Yes, the same Roost I thought we were done with needed a clean up before a home inspection having to do with its sale.  We had intended to do that job first, but when we got there earlier, Ed Strange and crew had been busy mowing the lawn and removing fallen leaves, so we had left them to it and gone to the Depot instead.

Crank's Roost mown and raked

Crank’s Roost mown and raked

autumn leaves in the boxwoods

autumn leaves in the boxwoods

While Allan weeded the paths in the south garden, I cleaned up the leaves caught in the boxwood and then cut back plants in the bed east of the back porch, and he joined me to finish raking it..

before and after

before and after

Lisa arrived briefly and offered me some of the leftover pile of cow fiber that did not all get used on this garden.

Thank you very much!

Thank you very much!

done

done

crank

There are some things I will miss about this garden.

the cool Rhamnus 'Fine Line' that I planted.

the cool Rhamnus ‘Fine Line’ that I planted.

another little tree I rescued from another garden, where it was langishing...

another little tree I rescued from another garden, where it was languishing…

I won’t miss the salal.  Lisa likes it a lot and actually buys it to plant.  I transplanted some of the new ones (a few years back) into the very center of the woods garden, hoping to keep it in just one area.  It is moving out in all directions.

more salal

more salal

salal on the move

salal on the move

I think the salal will be glad to see me go as it will now be able to take over all the areas we had cleared and defined and planted with other plants.

I won’t miss the orange montbretia that gets into everyone’s business here.

montbretia in a good hak mak grass.

montbretia in a good hakonechloa grass.

Lisa likes the montbretia too, and wanted to take some to her new garden on the bay. (I am sure I have some plants that I love and she does not.)

There are some projects here that I would like to have accomplished….

I would like to have pushed the garden further southeast where the swamp grass grows.

I would like to have pushed the garden further southeast where the swamp grass grows.

I would like to have gotten that last clump of swamp grass out from under that willow...

I would like to have gotten that last clump of swamp grass out from under that willow…

I will remember the cool, crisp green of the formal garden, designed by writer Terence O’ Donnell who named the place Crank’s Roost.  Here is a delightful article about Terrence (partly “about how he used to run naked through the woods near his cabin in Long Beach, Washington, for medicinal purposes, as he said, because he was convinced that salt air and epic ferns were restorative when applied directly to the skin at high speed”).

formal

formal

As a last task, Allan washed the lower half of the green gate.  It tends to get muddy in a heavy rain like we had yesterday.

rinse water

rinse water

I wonder if this really will be the last time we close the gate at Crank’s Roost?

Is it really the final farewell?

Is it really the final farewell?

Returning to Ilwaco at almost dusk, we did one last little outdoor job:  Removing two tired painted sage from one of the Ilwaco planters.

I did not expect to find a lower layer of good looking plants!

I did not expect to find a lower layer of good looking plants!

While Allan hauled today’s clean debris to our big compost pile, I started on BULB TIME.  Tonight I got all of the bulbs prices and set out in groups of like kinds.  Tomorrow, the real sorting will begin.  It would be a great accomplishment if I could get it all done in one day.

ready for a big sorting day

ready for a big sorting day

Allan is making brownies to help get me through it.

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Monday, September 16, 2013

I was so sure that we were going to get a rain day off that I was completely flummoxed when Monday was nice enough for working.  (We do work in rain, but if we don’t have to, we don’t!)   At first I could not even figure out where to go, but then I remembered a pruning project at The Anchorage Cottages.

I forgot to take a before...so here is a during.

I forgot to take a before…so here is a during.

I pruned the Viburnum in the center courtyard with a bit of pruning of the Ceanothus as well.  I actually picked up a handful of old leaves from under the Viburnum to see if the annoying odor that comes from the Viburnum when wet emanates from the old leaves.  NOPE.  Just from the plant in general, apparently!

after

after

Allan’s project was to tackle the sweet woodruff in a shady north wall border.

before and after

before and after

All summer long a broken paver in this area has bugged me.  A sudden tiny brainstorm occurred today:

install the paver as a half circle!  leaving off the broken piece.

install the paver as a half circle! leaving off the broken piece.

Allan put the river rock in there and it helps make it look nicer.

I am not against all groundcovers, just certain ones (sweet woodruff and the horrible aegepodium, to name two.)  On the other side the north wall garden, I quite like the big patches of Geranium macrorrhizum.

a good groundcover, in my opinion

a good groundcover, in my opinion

By the office, Allan removed several clumps of Stella D’Oro daylilies.  I’ve gone off them, too!  Poor plants…

will put in something much better

will put in something much better

Next project here will be to mulch with cow fiber, which must be done on a Monday just to be sure any stink is gone by the weekend.   I don’t think cow fiber has any bad odor but someone might be able to smell faint eau de poo.

We dropped the debris at Peninsula Landscape Supply.  Their U-Pick Dahlia garden has some lovely blooms.

dahlias and oyster shells

dahlias and oyster shells

To fill out the day, I remembered the beach strawberry removal project at the courtyard garden beds at Golden Sands Assisted Living.

Now that the sprinklers are working, we can really begin to address the weeding.  The strawberries can stay outside the landscape timbers.  Inside, they get up in the business of the other plants and have to go away.

progress in SW quadrant

progress in SW quadrant

horrible NW quadrant weeding must wait till next week as we ran out of daylight.

horrible NW quadrant weeding must wait till next week as we ran out of daylight.

Throughout the beds we have to rogue out all the tiny little scabiosa seedlings or they will take over.

haze of self sown seedlings

haze of self sown seedlings

One more session of weeding and maybe we will be ready for more mulch at Golden Sands!

I am pleased to report that outside the quadrants, the roses that were so dry and unhappy are leafing out and blooming thanks to the repaired sprinkler system (fixed by Raymond Millner from The Planter Box).

a much happier rose

a much happier rose

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

We had another slow start due to weather but at least I knew where we were going.   The first job was Mayor Mike’s  weeding.

Schizostylis at Mike's garden

Schizostylis at Mike’s garden

Next, a compost bucket switch at Olde Towne Trading Post Café where an old birdhouse awaits the right buyer.

very nice

very nice

Some gardens down at the Port got weeded next.  I am very pleased with how well these are holding up and how relatively low maintenance they have proved to be.

Port office, south side

Port office, south side

Such a beautiful view we see when we turn from the garden and look at the water.

beautiful clouds over the marina

beautiful clouds over the marina

We deadheaded at The Depot Restaurant and then nipped round the corner and did a little work at Crank’s Roost.   I know, I said we had made our last visit there, and made a big dramatic goodbye post, and then another goodbye post, but it still needs the occasional deadheading!   When the new owners totally take over, we will be done.  (Nothing against them, but we are sentimental about liking the previous/current owner and we can’t imagine the job without her!)  It is very possible the new owners will do their own gardening.

Crank's Roost daisies, before..

Crank’s Roost daisies, before..

and after deadheading

and after deadheading

For some reason, this cute Crank’s Roost chair looks like a little fairy chair, but I am sure it is full sized!  Or is it?

a sit spot

a sit spot

After Crank’s we went to the Ilwaco boatyard to work till sunset.  The one long section, south of the gate, that we had not finished the other day looked good until one got close up and saw all the pesky creeping sorrel.

creeping sorrel

creeping sorrel at ground level…  the leaves taste like lemon!

While we were working, I saw a man walking up the block toward us stopping to photograph many plants.  He introduced himself as a visitor from a town near Purdy, here to go fishing, a gardener and former chef.  We had an enjoyable conversation about plants and I hope he will find this blog and send us a Facebook friend request.

boatyard garden, end of day

boatyard garden, end of day

Working late has its benefits as we got to see a moonrise and some glowing pre-sunset clouds.

moonrise over Jessie's Fish Co

moonrise over Jessie’s Fish Co

clouds over Baker Bay

clouds over Baker Bay

and more glowing clouds over the boatyard

and more glowing clouds over the boatyard

It promised to be quite a sunset, but we were tired so went home, went indoors, and I have to admit I forgot to even look out the window later to see the pinkest time of the sky!

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August 20, 2013

Our day began….with a frog on a daisy.  I was watering a few containers in the the back garden when I saw it, and it stayed put till I went into the house and returned with my camera.

daisy

Pacific tree frog

Pacific tree frog

froggie

My first stop was the Depot Restaurant.  Here is a different view from the usual:

the outdoor dining deck

the outdoor dining deck

and the usual garden view

and the usual garden view

and an update on the herb garden (rosemary, oregano, chives and some thyme in the foreground)

and an update on the herb garden (rosemary, oregano, chives and some thyme in the foreground)

Then I walked to meet Allan who was watering at Crank’s Roost.

I love this house sign between the Depot and Crank's.

I love this house sign between the Depot and Crank’s.

I had said goodbye to Crank’s a few posts ago, so I asked Allan if he would take a photo essay of what was most evocative to him of the essence of Crank’s Roost, and here it is:

Allan’s Crank’s Roost photos:

crank

crank

door

door

crank

lighthouse bird

blue

crank

shed

crank

fern

crank

crank

 

You can see that Crank’s Roost is a wonderful place to think a green thought in a green shade.

Jo’s garden and the Boreas Inn

We then worked on the gardens on 6th North in Long Beach:  Jo’s on the south side of the road and the Boreas on the north side.

At Jo's: a large patch of daisies to deadhead

At Jo’s: a large patch of daisies to deadhead

Jo and Bob's bird sanctuary

Jo and Bob’s bird sanctuary

agapanthus

agapanthus

snapdragons

snapdragons

Uh oh, Coco chewed through another sprinkler head!  Fortunately, Allan carried parts to replace it because occasionally we snip one when it is entwined with plant stems.

Oh, Coco!

Oh, Coco!

Poor Coco looked sad after being shown the sprinkler head by Jo and told not to do it again.  It has been rather chronic…

Coco

Coco:  Who, me?

coco

I confess.

Then: The Boreas Inn garden.

looking east toward the Boreas Inn

looking east toward the Boreas Inn

The newly redone beds have been gorgeous this year.

beds

I acquired a few flats of Lobelia tupa this year and planted it in pretty much every garden I could get my hands on….and the one at the Boreas is the only one that has bloomed!

Lobelia tupa, why so temperamental?

Lobelia tupa, why so temperamental?

stunning Lobelia tupa

stunning Lobelia tupa

Only Susie of the Boreas is going to believe me about what a gorgeous plant this is!

cosmos at the Boreas

cosmos at the Boreas…at least I can count on them everywhere

We stopped work a bit early to go the the retirement party for Jim Neva, Port of Ilwaco manager.  He has been such a great friend of landscaping at the port…and has been instrumental in supporting our work in the boatyard garden and Howerton street gardens.

to the right: Jim Neva

to the right: Jim Neva

The party was the the museum and the theme was Hawaiian because Jim is retiring partly to spend more time with his wife Jet’s family in Hawaii.  The food was delicious!

a feast

a feast

food

The new port manager, Guy Glenn Jr, says he is going to be just as much a friend of the gardens as Jim was.  We are very happy about that.

left: Mark, who oversees the boatyard; Guy, our new friend of gardens, and Allan

left: Mark, who oversees the boatyard; Guy, our new friend of gardens, and Allan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Monday, August 5th, we needed to do a check up on Gene’s and Jo’s gardens because on the 7th, I would be coming around with a ladies’ gardening club.

Gene’s garden, the Peggy Miles Memorial Garden

Looking west from the street:  Gene's garden would catch any gardener's eye.

Looking west from the street: Gene’s garden would catch any gardener’s eye.

the street-side garden

the street-side garden

the obligatory painted sage photo!

the obligatory painted sage photo!. Courtyard gate and veg box in background.

I knew the courtyard would be a big hit with the garden club.

the cozy, shady courtyard (looking north from the gate)

the cozy, shady courtyard (looking north from the gate)

a blue Scabiosa from 7 Dees

a blue Scabiosa from 7 Dees

I love this flower that Gene acquired and planted.

I love this flower that Gene acquired and planted.

One of Gene's containers

One of Gene’s containers

featuring a fabulous annual verbena that he found somewhere!

featuring a fabulous annual verbena that he found somewhere!

His little drainage garden is going strong and I knew the club would love it.

drainage area by the street

drainage area by the street

We did some very light weeding and deadheading just to make it perfect.

Jo’s garden

Jo and Bob were still out of town so we put in a good session of deadheading and weeding while I worried about whether they would be back in time for the garden club.  Without them, the water feature in the patio would not be functioning and it adds so much to the garden.  (I won’t leave you in suspense:  They did get back.)

the newest perennial planting, still luscious

the newest perennial planting, still luscious

lily

lily still blooming, waiting for Jo’s return

and another

and another

and another

and another

and more

and more

and more

and more

the tall dark red one

the tall dark red one

another, with daisies

another, with daisies

and one in bud

and one in bud

I was so very pleased that the lilies would still be blooming for Jo; had been afraid she would miss their biggest show.

looking west

looking west

view from the deck, looking northeast

view from the deck, looking northeast

on the deck

on the deck

Crank’s Roost

We ended the day with a weeding and pruning visit to Crank’s Roost.  This might be our last visit to this garden that we took on a couple of years ago.  No, four years ago!  It is about to be sold, but its owners are very likely moving to another garden which we quite admire.

It was rather poignant taking the last photos of the garden after we were done.

front porch

front porch

front window

front window

patio

patio

hammock

hammock

back porch

back porch

north side

north side

The north side of the cottage is the area we have worked most on, developing paths and plantings in what was a boggy wilderness.

shady sit spot

shady sit spot

I had planned to plant lots more lilies...

I had planned to plant lots more lilies…

From outside the gate…closed for maybe our last visit here.

maybe the last photo...as we leave

maybe the last photo…as we leave

I did not get all verklempt about it.  At some time in the next 12 years, I am going to have to let go of a lot of gardens as I doubt I can keep working this hard into my late 60s.

At home, I had another edible success:  a really quite impressive salad from the garden!

less than a week till the August 11th edible tour!

less than a week till the August 11th edible tour!

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We worked in some of our favourite gardens on Monday.

Patti’s Seaview Paradise

First, two hours and a couple of specific projects in Patti’s Seaview garden:

the Akebia arbour before

the Akebia arbour before

and after (my project)

and after (my project)

the pond before

the pond before

and after (Allan's project)

and after (Allan’s project)

My friend Boscoe was visiting.

My friend Boscoe was visiting.

Stella provided entertainment and puppy kisses.

Stella provided entertainment and puppy kisses.

always busy

always busy Stella

garden tours 5 cents

garden tour payments

garden tour payments

NIVA green

Next, on to Jo’s, via Heather Ramsay’s NIVA green shop.  I got a new Tangly Cottage sign which I will show once I get it hung up somewhere.  Patti had given us a bronze rooster that she no longer wanted, to join my hens and chicks, so we have two new pieces of garden art.

While at NIVA, I photographed the article about our friend Sarah Sloane, a woman of many talents who has also written a delightful children’s book called The Marble Game.

Sarah's topiary

Sarah’s topiary

the article

the article

page one

page two

Sarah’s topiaries and books are for sale at Niva green.

Jo’s garden

At Jo’s, we weeded and deadheaded for an hour and a half to keep it in perfection for the upcoming garden tour.  The more deadheading now, the more blooms on the big day (June 20th).

pots

pots

looking west

looking west

two birds

two birds

one bird

one bird

view from deck

view from deck

Boreas Inn

Next door (across the road to the north) we then went to the Boreas garden where we spent about an hour.  I am so pleased at the way the west side gardens are looking this year after a lot of hard work.

replanted this year

replanted this year

Cosmos 'Seashells'

Cosmos ‘Seashells’

Cosmos...picotee edge whose name slips my mind

Cosmos…picotee edge whose name slips my mind

Nicotiana langsdorfii makes a great unifier.

Nicotiana langsdorfii makes a great unifier when repeated in all the beds.

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

looking east

looking east
looking west...That Phormium is so somber, but Susie likes it.

looking west…That Phormium is so somber, but Susie likes it.

Crank’s Roost and The Depot Restaurant

Finally, we watered at Crank’s Roost and admired the garden while also doing some weeding and clipping.

Have never seen this Clematis look this good.

Have never seen this Clematis look this good.

a magical place

a magical place

lounging areas

lounging areas

the fairy door

the fairy door

another Clematis

another Clematis

another view

another view

I love this pig!

I love this pig!

and I must know where this frog was acquired!

and I must know where this frog was acquired!

At the early hour of seven pm we stopped work and joined an old friend of Allan’s and her camping companion for a delicious dinner at The Depot Restaurant.

our Depot garden

our Depot garden

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Other than Long Beach, we did a few other garden jobs on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Tuesday, April 30

Andersen’s RV Park on Tuesday:  We finally got the beds outside the back office door pretty much weeded and mulched.

cow fiber!

cow fiber!

better

better

And yet this whole area needs weeding again….(below)…but will have to wait till next week.

next time...

next time…

The narcissi are done and it needs another weeding!

The narcissi are done and it needs another weeding!

We have got to get a grip on the quack-grass mess behind the piece of driftwood.

lordy!

lordy!

We hope the guests look instead at Lorna’s gorgeous pots of tulips.  The deer have not bothered them!

behind the office

behind the office

aglow in the sun

aglow in the sun

almost done

almost done

windblown but glorious

windblown but glorious

east side of house

east side of house

in front of the office

in front of the office

The staff picked pots of tulips that tones well with the bench.

pink and yellow

pink and yellow

bench

Wednesday, May 1

Cranks’ Roost:  Just a quick fertilizing of the rhodos and hydrangeas with the appropriate Dr. Earth fertilizer.  Oh, and the Hapsden Blood Astrantia I was so pleased to find on Monday afternoon at Back Alley Gardens?  Guess what I saw blooming in my own garden on Tuesday morning!  So the new one found a good home at shady Crank’s Roost.

the new fairy door at Crank's Roost

the new fairy door at Crank’s Roost

Crank's

Pieris catching the light

Pieris catching the light

beauty in a rhodo

beauty in a rhodo

Then a deadheading at the Depot Restaurant garden:

Depot

Depot

Depot tulips

Depot tulips

Virichic

Virichic

tulips

So glad the deer have not wandered in from the dunes and eaten these!

So glad the deer have not wandered in from the dunes and eaten these!

The Anchorage Cottages came next, just an hour long deadheading and weeding before moving on to Long Beach.

Anchorage courtyard

Anchorage courtyard

I may have to give up on one of my favourite tulips, Cummins.  It did not open well this year.

unsightly, had to be yanked.

unsightly, had to be yanked.

Gavota still looking good with bricks.

Gavota still looking good with bricks.

A tiny pale tree frog hopped out from the Gavota tulips.

A tiny pale tree frog hopped out from the Gavota tulips.

tulips by office door

tulips by office door

tulip 'Green Star'

tulip ‘Green Star’: my star of the year

by the office

by the office

a pot of driftwood

a pot of driftwood

Friday we will have spent the day getting Ilwaco planters and Port gardens ready for the Saturday children’s parade, and checking one more time on that Flag Plaze garden in Long Beach.  It will be such a busy day (especially with two social events also planned) that I have prepared this blog entry in advance and set it to publish Friday evening.  Thankyou, WordPress!

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Sunday 4-28

Sunday….we took the day off. Shocking behavior for me after just having had three days off to go to the Sylvia Beach Hotel, but my weedy garden cried out to me, as did blogging about the SBH room journals. Because of the latter obsession, I only got (most of) the front garden weeded.

At least ten buckets of weeds came out of this and the rest of the front garden.

At least ten buckets of weeds came out of this and the rest of the front garden.

My Australian mint bush had completely popped into bloom while I was gone, and does smell deliciously like mint.

Prostranthera

prostranthera

prostranthera

A few earlier spring flowers hung on while I wait for a bigger show later this month.

golden bleeding heart

golden bleeding heart

The back garden is another story….as other than one previous major weeding session pulling shotweed, I have accomplished little back here since starting the 2013 work season.

east bed needs horsetail pulled

east bed needs horsetail pulled

middle bed:  shotweed, horsetail, creeping sorrel!

middle bed: shotweed, horsetail, creeping sorrel!

west bed....more horsetail

west bed….more horsetail

plume poppy....uh oh.

plume poppy….uh oh.

In my old garden, I could hardly get Macleaya cordata (plume poppy) to struggle along. In this garden, it is going to be a problem and live up to its vigorous reputation. Drat!

The back garden looks pretty good if I squint. I am not at all sure when I will get a gardening day at home, as this coming weekend is full of local festivities that I need to preapre the town gardens for and then attend. Allan is going to be the judge for the Ilwaco children’s parade on Saturday. We were asked, and I volunteered him because I do like a free mind for taking photos for our Ilwaco blog and so on.

Once upon a time, I would have gardened at home till dusk. Now I come home and must do…The Daily Blog. How does one garden AND blog? Especially when the days are long?

I did have one very clever idea. Allan had a larger shade garden at our old house, and I suggested he might very much like to take over a couple of areas I had planted up. They are planted with things he likes so I don’t think he would want to change them but…if they are part of his garden, he will weed them!

Allan's new nicely weeded acquisiton

Allan’s new nicely weeded acquisiton

He will probably make a grid and map of it eventually.

Monday 4-29

Monday we had to buckle down to work, most particularly getting some more plants in the ground. On our first stop, Crank’s Roost, a robin sat over the gate.

Robin in the honeysuckle

Robin in the honeysuckle

We had one plant for this garden, an Azara microphylla, a very special small tree that I had been pleased to get from The Basket Case.

Here it is in difficult light to photograph.

Here it is in difficult light to photograph.

I wish I could get Azara lanceolata. I had it in my old garden and it was spectacular until it mysteriously died….And my Azara microphylla blew down in a big wind just when it was about to have its winter blooms for the very first time.

I am thinking, at Crank’s Roost, of trying do battle with this last huge swamp sedge. That means my garden champion, Allan, would attack it with a pick. The whole back garden was thick with this when we added paths some years ago. Now this one looks sort of out of place. Because its roots go under the willow tree, it would always be trying to come back, but we could reduce it and keep it reduced.

should it go away?

should it go away?

In Long Beach, we planted some more not-too-tender (we hope!) annuals in the new Veterans Field garden. I prefer to wait til around Mother’s Day to plant annuals, but the dedication is this coming Sunday. Parks manager Mike Kitzman wants it to be very stuffed full of plants and showy and, of course, red white and blue. The trickiest thing to manage at this time of the year is to get red flowers that are not geraniums.

coming along but needs more, and needs it now...

coming along but needs more, and needs it by Sunday…

I got to pet this cute 7 month old dog who belonged to one of the carpenters working on the stage construction!

I got to pet this cute 7 month old dog who belonged to one of the carpenters working on the stage construction!

We also need to get all the parks and planters in both Long Beach and Ilwaco perfect for the Loyalty Day Saturday and Sunday parades. I wish the parades were to celebrate the beginning of May and International Workers Day instead of nationalistic patriotism. (From Wikipedia: The holiday was first observed in 1921, during the first Red Scare. It was originally called “Americanization Day,” and it was intended to replace the May 1 celebration of theInternational Worker’s Day which commemorates the 1886 Haymarket Massacre in Chicago.) Our two small town parades have evolved beyond the jingoism of the holiday’s origins into just being a good time with lots of floats, music, and happy crowds, and Allan and I like the gardens to be perfect. It’s a week too early to plant tender annuals and most of the tulips have gone over (even though, in Long Beach, I concentrate on a lot of May flowering tulips) so being well weeded is key to having them look good.

There is not much point in making them perfect on the Monday before the weekend event so we decided to get some shopping done overseas (in North Oregon, across the Astoria Megler Bridge) while we could take a bit of free time.

On the way (feeling rather like a slacker) we got espresso to go at Chinook Coffee Company and took some Chinook photos for a friend’s real estate page. Like Ilwaco, Chinook is a fishing town, and feels like it is only three blocks wide between the Columbia River and the hills.

Port

at the Port of Chinook

at the Port of Chinook

on the waterfront road

on the waterfront road

Other than at the Port, our Chinook photos today were garden-centric.

This used to be a nursery; now it's Family and Friends Adult Family Home

This used to be a nursery; now it’s Family and Friends Adult Family Home

Family and Friends front garden

Family and Friends front garden

house on the main road

house on the main road

and just for the Tootlepedals, a bird in a puddle:

bathing bird

bathing bird

Our shopping mission consisted of groceries at Costco. Of course, we drove on past to Gearhart to check in on one my favourite collectors’ nurseries, Back Alley Gardens.

Back Alley Gardens and The Natural Nook

Back Alley Gardens and The Natural Nook (used to be Fitzgeralds and they left that sign out of happy memories of the place)

There we saw:

a vertical salad garden

a vertical salad garden

planted rocks

planted rocks

a mossy basket

a mossy basket

a driftwood "chandelier"

a driftwood “chandelier”

bird artbird art

bird art

bird art

a water feature

a water feature

a garden sign

a garden sign

There was another sign that amuses me more in retrospect than when I saw it. At least it sticks in my memory. It read: The best way to get real enjoyment out of the garden is to put on a wide straw hat, dress in thin, loose-fitting clothes, hold a little trowel in one hand and a cool drink in the other, and tell the man where to dig.” (Charles Barr) I couldn’t disagree more.

The nursery is expecting more plant deliveries this week. I did find one plant irresistable: Astrantia ‘Hapsden Blood’, surely on my list of plants to acquire.

When we got to Costco, I saw that the ugly red garden bark that had hurt my eyes on a previous visit has now faded to pink.

"You Americans and your barkscapes..." -Rosemary Verey

“You Americans and your barkscapes…” -Rosemary Verey. It really is garish, pinker than it looks here.

We got home in time for a walk round the garden…

flowers on my young Cox's Orange Pippin apple tree!

flowers on my young Cox’s Orange Pippin apple tree!

barberry

barberry

A special barberry that I bought on a trip to Dancing Oaks Nursery is flowering and I can look forward to its spectacular berries this year.

tulips

tulips

that crazy ornamental rhubarb

that crazy ornamental rhubarb

and already some Fuchsia magellanica flowers

and already some Fuchsia magellanica flowers

I still was not feeling very much in the work mode. It is dangerous to take a vacation break in April (unless to weed my own garden). I have to get back into full force work enthusiasm or we will be regret it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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While I swanned off to the Sylvia Beach Hotel with my friend Carol, Allan worked hard on a huge garden project at Andersen’s RV Park: weeding a nasty stretch of rugosa rose ‘Blanc Double de Coubert’ outside the park fence. We have a of garden space to care for INSIDE the park and usually weed this once a year. Last year, we did not even get the roses pruned and did not do any weeding of this stretch except for right where people drive in the entry road. Oh, dear.

before

before

What a mess! The roses had gotten way too messy so one of the park caretakers had cut them down for us in the fall.

tools of the trade

tools of the trade

partway done

partway done

That red leafed rose in the foreground is the old root stock coming up.  A boring rose.  Most of these rugosas are on their own roots, but one, just one, seems to have been grafted.  Or perhaps the boring rose was there from before.

Rugosa roses got their name because their leaves are “rugose”:  wrinkled, corrugated.   They can take the salt air (thus their nickname, the salt spray rose) and are fragrant and resistant to black spot.

very nice!

very nice!

all weeded

all weeded

The neighbour across the street had just moved in full time and was most appreciative of an improved view!

The weed pile got put in the woods off to the side of the park with rose roots and clippings removed because the caretakers want to use this pile to fill rough areas around the edges.the weed pile!

the weed pile!

Thanks, Allan!!

For a much more creative project, he installed a fairy door at Crank’s Roost. He bought the door at Home and Garden Art in Seattle (same place we got the fairy doors in our bogsy woods), but he built the steps and added the paint to match the Roost’s trim.

crank's

Crank's Roost

new fairy door at Crank's Roost

new fairy door at Crank’s Roost

Sorry for the short post; I have been preoccupied tonight with setting up blog entries for my Ilwaco blog. I procrastinated till this last week in getting last year’s Saturday Market photos posted….and the market starts up again this Saturday. Fortunately, WordPress allows me to schedule publishing in the future, so I set up four posts to publish throughout this week….except for the yearly Parade Of Dogs which I do hope to get organized by Saturday. Not an actual parade of dogs: a photo retrospective of dogs that I photographed at the market last year.

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My rainy day off did not materialize in the morning. While the lazy side of me regrets that, the part that wants to be caught up on work was happy to get out there and get stuff done. So off we went to work despite a very cold and blustery wind.

I did take a brief moment to admire the front garden before leaving. That pointed bud of the peachy tulip just amazed me with its swirled petals. I wonder if it will ever actually open!

This might be 'Blushing Lady' single late tulip.

This might be ‘Blushing Lady’ single late tulip.

with bleeding heart

with bleeding heart

In Long Beach, I continued to admire tulips after we parked at the halfway mark of downtown and I went south while Allan went north to deadhead the planters and the street tree gardens. I also put some Mission Bells California poppy seeds in some empty tree garden spots.

This batch of parrot tulips looked especially good.

parrot buds

parrot buds

I have always disliked that sign on one of the shops that says “This shop is every husband’s nightmare” and find it interesting that the little red gift shop has the sign “My husband’s nightmare” with the word husband x’ed out so it reads “My nightmare.” Very odd indeed.

These will be spectacular if not damaged by wind and rain.

‘Apricot Parrot’ and “Rococo’: These will be spectacular if not damaged by wind and rain.

I stopped into the Home at the Beach shop to get some photos to use to promote the next Peninsula Cash Mob event and thought a reader might enjoy their perfectly beachy displays:

Home at the Beach

Home at the Beach

Home at the Beach

Home at the Beach

Home at the Beach

Home at the Beach

Home at the Beach

Home at the Beach

Then…back out into the chilly wind to deadhead the planters in the next block.

This tulip would be wide open on a sunny day.

This tulip would be wide open on a sunny day.

yellow backed with yellow

yellow backed with yellow

Back at the Fifth Street quadrant of parks, the Darmera peltata bloomed next to the waterfall pond. Later it will have large leaves, but not as large as the gunnera.

Darmera peltata

Darmera peltata

One of the planters already has a good display of reseeded Cerinthe purpurascens, one of my three favourite annuals.

The colour comes from bracts as well as flowers.

The colour comes from bracts as well as flowers.

The Asphodeline that reliably returns each year in the planter right across from the one shown above always amuses me. I think it would be kicky to have more. They are not readily available; I got this one on a wonderful visit to Mesogeo nursery in 2007 and here it still is.

asphodel

asphodel on Fifth Street

A half block further north the ‘Cool Crystal’ and ‘Sensual Touch’ peony/fringed tulips testified to the restaurant behind that planter, The Hungry Harbor, being run by two very nice people. I wanted to give them an extra special planting which is why two of my most spectacular tulips live there.

Hungry Harbour:  The Gavota tulips are from last year.

Hungry Harbour: The Gavota tulips are from last year.

Hungry Harbour:  Tulip 'Cool Crystal'

 Tulip ‘Cool Crystal’

'Cool Crystal' (pink) and 'Sensual Touch' (orange)

‘Cool Crystal’ (pink) and ‘Sensual Touch’ (orange)

The planter straight across the street is the one I think often of redoing. The azaleas look good now but will be blah all summer.

looking over the Hungry Harbour planter

looking over the Hungry Harbour planter

In the planter south of Hungry Harbour in front of the former Sand Dollar Deli (now Sweet McPhees….frozen yogurt perhaps?), I put some more ‘Cool Crystal’ and in this shadier planter it tones well with a purple Heuchera.

Heuchera and 'Cool Crystal'

Heuchera and ‘Cool Crystal’

That particular planter is one of my favourites for good perennial combinations: golden marjoram, the Heuchera, and a dusky cranesbill geranium that I acquired at Joy Creek Nursery.

a good planter

a good planter

Before we drove off, we went into a new shop called The Wooden Horse. It had been recommended to me by the owners of Home at the Beach and is a treasure trove of clever displays.

The Wooden Horse

The Wooden Horse, just south of Frantic Fred’s!

The Wooden Horse

The Wooden Horse

display cases made of pallets

display cases made of pallets

fencing

display shelves with old fencing

wooden horse

The Wooden Horse

wooden horse

The Wooden Horse

The Wooden Horse

At the city works dump spot, while ridding ourselves of plant debris, we briefly sifted the top of the pile to see if we could find the perennial sunflower start we had lost two days ago. No, but we did find a lost hand tool, and I swear it was the one Allan was using. That makes up for my having left another pair of clippers behind at Golden Sands yesterday. (I know I will find them next time we go there.)

We had one more work stop to make for sure. We had brought a hydrangea for Crank’s Roost and although the weather was changing for the worse, I did not want to take it back home again. The dog Maddie greeted us.

Maddie..or Mattie.

Maddie..or Mattie.

A couple of years ago, one of a matched set of hydrangeas on either side of an arbour had mysteriously died. Ominously, so had a small replacement. Today we put in a replacement in hope of regaining balance.

asymmetry

asymmetry

satisfying symmetry

satisfying symmetry (if one grows to match the other)

I need to bring some Dr Earth rhododendron food to help out the old hydrangeas.

a sit spot

a sit spot

And as we left, a serious rain began. We did stop one block away to deadhead the narcissi at The Depot Restaurant.

The Depot

The Depot

I think this tulip is Yellow Mountain

I think this tulip is Yellow Mountain

the pink and green one is Virichic.

The pink and green one is Virichic.

The timing of the rain conveniently coincided with Judy wanting to meet me at 3 PM at Olde Towne. And I had gotten a message from owner Luanne suggesting that because of the rain, she hoped to see me there today.

To be warm, and meet friends, and have a delicious chai latte, and watch the rain blowing sideways outside was such a relief after battling the stiff wind in Long Beach.

Judy, Tom, Jenna

Judy, Tom, Jenna

Not only were the Hornbuckles there but also our dear friend Jenna of Queen La De Da’s so we had an excellent visit. And remember yesterday when I tempted Judy with a photo of a beautiful Japanese maple I’d seen at The Planter Box? This morning she bought not one, but three different maples (making a total in their small garden of 29?) AND she and Tom had already planted the little trees by the time we met for coffee.

Finally, after an hour at home where I got a head start on this blog entry, we went back out with our friend Kelly of Blue Crab Graphics to have dinner at The Depot. We arrived in late daylight, so I was glad I did not have to worry about deadheading tulips before dinner, and we almost closed down the restaurant like My Dinner with Andre.

late evening at The Depot

late evening at The Depot

So tomorrow, will I have a rainy day to relax and read the Tootlepedal blog? I don’t know what to hope for because it would be awfully nice to get the north end resort gardens done….

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Oh, how I did not want to go to work in the drizzle.  Allan was the one who was more determined.  I said ok, I will JUST go to prune TWO hydrangeas at Crank’s Roost.

Hydrangea number one

Hydrangea number one

There used to be a matching hydrangea on the left side of the boxwood hedge and arbour, but it mysteriously died.  And when I replaced with with a start of the righthand one, it also mysteriously died.  This is an issue that I must try to solve as it would look more balanced with two!   I am pretty sure the hydrangea is Nikko Blue.

I had sort of forgotten that the two hydrangeas that had gotten much too floppy last year and needed some serious trimming.  The second one is to the left of the birdhouse, below.

Hydrangea number two

Hydrangea number two

While checking out the garden, I immediately saw that we had not gotten it as ship shape in the late fall as I thought we had!

oops

oops!

So Allan started tidying up the perennial bed, and before long, I became completely absorbed in the job, weeding and pruning in the woodsy area, and we spent several happy hours there, not even noticing the light drizzle.

after

after

after

after

the woodsy garden

the woodsy garden

The deer have been coming in and eating the tops of the daylily in the foreground.  Fortunately, there are plans afoot for the garden to be fenced.

all tidy now

all tidy now

When we left the sheltered garden, the rain and wind were much stronger than we had realized so we bailed out on the rest of the day and had a pleasant late afternoon at home.

The moral of the story is that even if I don’t want to go to work, I will enjoy it when I get there, simply because I love to garden.

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