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Posts Tagged ‘Crinodendron hookerianum’

Wednesday, 29 August 2018

Depot Restaurant

weeding, deadheading, watering…

Fuchsia magellanica ‘Hawkshead’

Solidago ‘Fireworks’ and Persicaria ‘Firetail’

Last week, I was finally able to cut down all the twiggy stems on the escallonia.

It has more or less died out in the middle.

Long Beach

We did a quick weeding of horsetail in Fifth Street Park.  With the days getting shorter, we no longer have time to fit a project into the middle of a Long Beach-Shelburne-Ilwaco watering day.

Skookum Surf was returning from the beach….

to their new shop in First Place Mall.

The Red Barn

We did not have to water.  Amy said, “If those plants are telling you they are thirsty, they are lying.”  (The plants had told us that they were quite satisfied.)  So only some light deadheading and weeding was necessary.

our tiny Red Barn garden

crab pots and thistles by the Red Barn

Cosmo the barn cat (Allan’s photo)

I want to take Cosmo home. Maybe he wants to come home with us.

Allan’s photo

Diane’s garden

Diane herself doing some deadheading by the road.

By the way, Diane is a champion barrel racer. I found this photo (not by us) from four years ago.

Diane and Bunny

I told Diane today how impressed I am with her skills.

We had a good talk about the various plants in the raised box garden.

I had my new version of lunch: a deconstructed cheese, pickle, and onion sandwich, because I don’t especially like bready sandwiches.

deconstructed sandwich

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We did the usual hour long tidy. Deer had got into the garden again.

leaves stripped off the roses

birdbath view

Strobilanthus atropurpurea

Hydrangea ‘Izu No Hana’

looking in the east gate

Perovskia (Russian sage)

in the fenced garden

Helenium

Timmie (Timothea)

Mary and I are starting to talk about labeling a lot of plants by the end of the year for the new owners, and about which plants Mary will want to take starts of to their new home.

We were finishing work early today so that we could tour a friend’s garden near KBC.

Gail’s garden

Going down a road we had never been down before, and jogging over to another road, we found a woodland garden tucked away at the end of a long gravel driveway.  Gail has lived here for a couple of year.  Local gardeners Mark and Joe have helped her to create a garden in a woodland frequented by deer, raccoons, and bears.

The property abounds in old rhododendrons because the previous owners used to work at Clarke Nursery, the local specialists in rhododendrons, which was located where Steve and John’s Bayside garden is now.  Steve Clarke’s family nursery had a big influence here on the peninsula and you will find their plants in many gardens (including mine).

We were greeted by Gail and Bob the Dog.

Bob the Dog

lots of big old rhododendrons

Allan’s photo

a late lily and a rhodie with huge leaves

a “fairy garden” around an old stump

Bob the Dog on the back porch

The east edge of the property is marshland, with Spirea douglasii on an island in the middle.

The spirea is a haze of pink spires earlier in the year.

The raccoons and bears go in under the tree to the right, above, and cross over to the solid ground island.

farther along the edge of the marsh

I felt a little presence at my feet, and looked down to see Collar.  That was my clue that Mark and Joe had arrived to join our tour.

Joe and Collar. Let me see your ears!

Let me see your ears, Collar!

There we go!

a sit spot

Jack the Cat appeared.

a plush and friendly cat

Green Man on a tree

More sun along the entry drive allowed room for a flower garden on either side.

Gail took us back into the shade to see the last few blooms on the Crinodendron hookerianum (Chilean lantern tree).  Clarke Nursery used to sell this little tree; I do not see it often.

Gail sent me some photos later of the garden in springtime.

three rhodies by the woodshed (Gail’s photo)

a support built for the start of a new “Princess Rose”; it has covered the poles now. (Gail’s photo)

Crinodendron hookerianum (Gail’s photo) Best one I have ever seen.

Chilean Lantern Tree (Gail’s photo)

She also sent a photo of the bashful resident we did not get to meet:

“My assistants” (Gail’s photo) Freya the Beautiful and Jack the Cat

Gail says, “Bob the Dog, who is 14 ½, and Jack the Cat, 10?, both rescued me several years apart and were very happy with their original “guys at the pub” names so we kept them. Freya (formerly Rumbly!) was renamed by me to give her confidence and ranking.”

We departed after a good hour in this hidden woodsy paradise.  I love discovering a special garden like this down a secret road.

On the longish drive home, we decided to have a dinner work reward at the

 42nd Street Café.

We had a gift certificate from Allan’s January birthday from our friends Susie and Bill of the Boreas Inn.

42nd Street Café

Dinner there always begins with their good bread with corn relish or marionberry preserves.

brussels sprouts appetizers

delicious carne asada style steak

Butternut squash ravioli

My favourite dessert on the peninsula is their tiny chocolate mint sorbet served with a tiny spoon.

Allan had the tiramisu, which came as a cake, not layered in a glass.

better this way, I decided.

a new mural painted by Susan Spence

Why, I thought, don’t we eat here more often?  I tend to frequent restaurants associated with gardening jobs. The ambience here is friendly and cozy and the food is so tasty that I felt especially happy throughout the meal.

sunset over the trees in Seaview on our way home

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Saturday, 25 August 2018

We continued garden touring with Pam, Prissy, Beth, and Ketzel, visiting a oceanfront house with a garden designed by Sean Hogan of Cistus Nursery.

Usually, I notice the garden first.  This time, the first thing I noticed was the gutters, and I was obsessed with them.

Can I retrofit my double wide to have gutters like this?

rain chains going into a little pool

center outfall with clear channel for watching rain water

Allan’s photo; he’s the one who noticed the clear channel.

garden reflected in windows under the fabulous gutters

That’s all I will show of the house, to respect the privacy of the friend of one of our group, who kindly allowed us to tour.  I simply had to show you those gutters.  They have been on my mind ever since. This is the first time I have ever wished it was pouring torrential rain when on a garden tour.  I would love to see these gutters in action.

And now for the glorious garden.

by the gate

passion flower clambering outside the gate

on the entryway fence between the east side garden and the south side

inside, a focal point and a wall covered with Muehlenbeckia axillaris (wire vine, yes, the same one I am battling in a Long Beach planter)

The garden is a showcase for plants to covet, from Cistus Nursery.

in the sheltered back garden

hydrangeas under trees on the east edge of the garden

Crinodendron hookerianum

Arisaema in bloom

Ketzel taking pics

This green stemmed sarcoccoca had a couple of us rapt in admiration.

Later, at home, I was watering my ladies in waiting and I realized I seem to have bought this one at the Hardy Plant weekend!  Pretty sure:

Cistus Nursery’s treasures in a carpet of wire vine

going through to the south side garden

and further along to the west side

south side lawn

west side, on a bluff over the beach

Allan’s photo

at the edge of the bluff

I stayed away from the edge, as the beach seemed very far below.  I asked Allan to “show” me (in photos) the path to the beach, as I could just see the beginning of it.

a classic beach path scene

I returned the way I had come.

returning to the south side garden

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo, ivy leaf Geranium, Pelargonium peltatum ‘Crocodile’

We rounded ourselves up from far flung corners of the garden and gathered in the driveway.

Prissy creates the container gardens for the house next door to the one we toured; we could see one overlooking the beach.

Prissy’s work next door

Now we were ready to drive to Manzanita to visit the Hardy Plant Society of Oregon open garden which had been the inspiration for this day.

 

 

 

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