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Posts Tagged ‘curbside gardens’

Wednesday, 12 July 2017

Before we got started, the mum of our friend Thandi came to visit the garden.  (As we have with many of our friends, we had told her to tour it anytime as long as she closes the deer gates.)

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alliums and santolina in the back garden

The Depot Restaurant…

…got the usual watering and grooming.

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Dierama (angel’s fishing rod) in bloom

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Allan’s photo

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Dierema

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assorted eryngiums

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Allan’s photo

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north side of dining deck

Red Barn Arena

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Allan’s photo

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Misty was at the barn today…

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…with Holly and Diane (Allan’s photo)

In the barrels, even the red diascia have almost dried up.

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sad diascias, a plant I usually think of as pretty tough

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I cut them way back.

Even though the red diascia were by request, I swear that next year I am going to go all ultra-drought tolerant in those barrels.  Small red sedums and sempervivums around the edges would be a good solution.

Diane’s garden

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between Diane’s and the Red Barn (Allan’s photo)

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Diane’s garden

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a belly rub was insisted upon

The Basket Case Greenhouse

We made a quick stop on the way north to pick up some blue “Korean agastache” that Roxanne had grown from seed (and a few other impulse buys, of course, including a gold leafed four o clock called ‘Limelight’).

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still lots of choices in the annuals house

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Look who stopped to say hi.  (Allan’s photo)

On the way further north to Klipsan Beach, we delivered a life jacket to J9, who is planning to go boating with a friend this weekend.

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J9’s place

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J9 made a planter out of this old crab pot.

Of course, we then had to drive by Ed Strange’s place on the way back to the highway and were fortunate to find him home.

touring Ed’s Garden

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Ed’s place

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He is slowly landscaping the neighbours’ front garden, as well.

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gold and more gold by the dog run

Awhile ago, Ed ran a culvert pipe along the road, thus being able to expand the front edge of the garden into what used to be a bank of salal and a ditch.  You can see the salal in this old photo:

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2014

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same area today

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My good friend Jackson Strange (He’s a Springer Spaniel.)

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Allan’s photo

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front porch

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fancy pelargoniums

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Ed’s east facing porch and deck

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I had delphinium envy.  Maybe I could grow them in a pot.

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On the deck; he’s had this cactus for 46 years.

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view east from the deck.  The old single wide next door is going to be demolished soon.

Ed waters his handsome clump of gunnera for an hour a day, he says, and mulches it heavily.

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Allan’s photo

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The round grey “pavers” are Sedum ‘Cape Blanco’

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by the garage

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Note the gunnera on this painting.

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hebe in the back garden

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Ed’s enviable hostas

Ed agreed to be the one who will dig up and take away my sad tattered hostas and give them a better life.

We had a tour of Ed’s home.  My home would never be tidy like this if someone dropped by.

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vintage light fixture and stained glass inset

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his grandma’s pug

Then we all had to get back to work.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We weeded and tidied.  The garden had held up well since last week.  In gardens like this one, where we can count on not having to water, we get a lot more actual gardening done.

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It suddenly felt quite hot out.  (About 70 F)

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Persicaria ‘Golden Arrow’

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One of Mary’s glorious rose bushes

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sit spot with Tetrapanax ‘Steroidal Giant’

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Allan’s photo

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Echinops (blue globe thistle)

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Allan noticed them, too.

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another healthy rose

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I wish I knew the names of all the roses Mary has.

Deadheading Rose ‘Bow Bells’ (Allan’s photos):

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before

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after

We headed all the way back to Ilwaco for our last job of a pleasantly easy day.

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Allan shopped at Sid’s Supermarket on the way (his photo)

Port of Ilwaco

We watered 9 of the curbside gardens, some long, and some just little pockets.

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Looking west on Howerton from the port office

I had an unnerving experience while watering the Time Enough Books garden.  A baby bird hopped out onto the street, followed by its anxious mother.

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The mother cheeped frantically.

The baby went further out into the street.  The mother played “I have a broken wing!”  I tried to stop traffic but had to back up…in the street!…because a woman just would not stop.  Finally she did…on top of the baby bird, which I could no longer see.  When she finally asked what was wrong, and I said there was a baby bird under her car, she asked what to do, and I told her I really had no idea.  (I could not get down and crawl under the car plus I did not trust her not to move.)  Thank all creation that when she drove on, the bird was fine.  I gently boosted it back up into the garden while the mother made another dramatic broken wing pantomime.

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The parents continued to keep a close eye on me.

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There’s a baby bird somewhere in the garden.

Allan’s photos:

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Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

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parsley, poppy, toadflax

Tomorrow: Back to the watering rounds in Long Beach and Ilwaco.

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Tuesday, 7 June 2016

The Depot Restaurant

We began by watering and planting one plant (a Chelone ‘Hot Lips’, excellent fall bloomer) at the Depot.

Allan watering

Allan watering


plantings by Nancy of Basket Case Greenhouse

plantings by Nancy of Basket Case Greenhouse

This cat entertained me:

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

This well fed cat liked to be petted, so am fairly sure it is a neighbourhood resident and not a stray.

Long Beach

When we arrived in Fifth Street Park, we found Debbie Teashon there adding to her collection of Peninsula garden photos.

Rainyside Debbie

Our Debbie of Rainyside.com


Debbie and I deadheading a lavender prior to a photo

Debbie and I deadheading a lavender prior to a photo

After a brief visit and a farewell as she left to take more photos at city hall and then drive a few hours north to her home, Allan and I buckled down to watering and grooming the Long Beach planters.

Watering was preceded by some grooming in Fifth Street Park. Here, the northeast side with Brodiaea 'Queen Fabiola'.

Watering was preceded by some grooming in Fifth Street Park. Here, the northeast side with Brodiaea ‘Queen Fabiola’.


Allan watering and deadheading

Allan watering and deadheading


by Herb 'N' Legend Smoke Shop

by Herb ‘N’ Legend Smoke Shop

The planters are all of a sudden well filled in and looking fine.

Allan's photo: pink California poppy and Geranium 'Rozanne'

Allan’s photo: pink California poppy and Geranium ‘Rozanne’


California poppies, Allan's photo

California poppies, Allan’s photo


a small hardy gladiolus (Allan's photo)

a small hardy gladiolus (Allan’s photo)


planting a few new plants

planting a few new plants

To water, we use a bayonet fitting to hook up the hose.  We often find snails, baby slugs, or loads of earwigs under the plastic cap.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I kill the slugs, relocate the snails, but tend to give the earwigs a pass just because there are so MANY and I don’t want to use poisons.

Allan bucket watered the Fish Alley barrels, where I am replacing stolen edging plants with free Sedum 'Autumn Joy' divisions.

Allan bucket watered the Fish Alley barrels, where I am replacing stolen edging plants with free Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ divisions.


!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!&*#$@###!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The Crabby Gardener

an occasion feature when public gardening goes bad

The Crabby Gardener by Don Nisbett

The Crabby Gardener by Don Nisbett

Allan noticed a big hole when watering the northernmost planter by Dennis Company.  I went to have a look.

furious photography

furious photography

Someone had pulled out a full sized Agastache ‘Fragrant Delight’, left the hole, and had broken off at the base a Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’ (probably while trying to steal it, too).  The knautia was left behind, dead.  Neither of these plants are available on the Peninsula at this time and so I cannot fix this properly.

broken dead knautia and missing agastache

broken dead knautia and missing agastache


Here is the side that did not get vandalized and stolen.

Here is the side that did not get vandalized and stolen.


Here is the side that is empty now, by one of the busiest parking lots in town.

Here is the side that is empty now, by one of the busiest parking lots in town.

It is so important to me to have symmetry in the planters that I almost wish people would just damn well steal BOTH sides so I could start over with new matching plants.  Why does symmetry matter to me when our business name is “Tangly”?  Because a little symmetry tames the wildness, just like the boxwoods in the Oysterville garden add a frame to an exuberant garden.  I spent the time while watering six more planters and weeding a park fretting over how I was going to fix that space when there are no Agastaches of that colour, and certainly not an exact match, available here.  I texted Melissa in my despair and she replied that she had a pink Agastache, so I planned to acquire it from her.  I have to keep trying even though the Finger Blighter strikes so frequently.  Debbie had even wondered earlier if it could be someone who reads this blog, and knows where the good plants are.  I assured her that because I like to have the blog running at least five days behind (takes the pressure off writing it), and the thefts often happen the day after a new plant goes in (although not in the case of this incident), I am pretty sure there is no connection.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!$#@*&^%#!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Cheeringly, when Allan and I reunited after watering, he gave me a present from the Kite Guy at Wind World Kites.

Wind World Kites

Wind World Kites


This purple whirly flower!

This purple whirly flower!  Thanks, Wind World Kite Guy!

We moved on after our watering to weed the Veterans Field garden beds because the Columbia Pacific Farmers Market is due to open on Friday afternoons there starting this week.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo


corner bed, Veterans Field

corner bed, Veterans Field

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Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

I asked Allan to take some photos of the narrow, arced garden that goes halfway around the flag pavilion, my version of a red white and blue theme:

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Salvias ‘May Night’ and ‘Hot Lips’ and Phygelius ‘Cherry Ripe’


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Salvia ‘May Night’ and ‘Crimson Pygmy’ barberry with Eryngiums


Salvia patens (sometimes tender) has come back strong (center, next to red flowers)

Salvia patens (sometimes tender) has come back strong (center, below red Phygelius flowers)


Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

Nearby, a silver, white, and pink streetside garden is one I often admire and is now at its peak.

rose campion, sea thrift, pink roses

rose campion, sea thrift, pink roses


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streetside garden, Long Beach

On the way south, we watered the edge plants at the Long Beach welcome sign.  The soaker hoses don’t help them enough till their roots are well established.  Allan feels the sign is getting battered by people standing in it, especially the back side.

welcome sign front

welcome sign front


back

back


Allan pulling the persistent horsetail.

Allan pulling the four horsetail of the apocalypse.

I had read somewhere that Geranium ‘Orion’ is even better than Geranium ‘Rozanne’, that its flower size is bigger and a deeper blue.  Based on growing both of them in the welcome sign bed, ‘Rozanne’ remains the strong winner.

Geranium 'Rozanne'

Geranium ‘Rozanne’


Geranium 'Orion'

Geranium ‘Orion’


Rozanne (right) is still the champ.

Rozanne (right) is still the champ.

Ilwaco

We planted a few new curbside plants in this bed that is now back in the fold of watering.  If you water it, the gardeners will come.  This garden might even get more watering than it needs, since we are not the ones watering, and we are the ones who know which plants are utterly drought tolerant and which are not.  (Most drought tolerant plants do need good watering until they get established.)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Then Allan went off to water the Ilwaco planters and street trees.

Ilwaco planter (Allan's photo)

Ilwaco planter (Allan’s photo)


traffic jam in town (Allan's photo)

traffic jam in town (Allan’s photo)

Meanwhile, I planted a few more plants and then started watering near the west end.  As I began, a couple of staff members at Salt said how much they appreciate the flowers and to use their hose anytime.  It was the first time this year that I had gotten out the Salt Hotel hose for their curbside garden.  It’s a long thin hose with a big leak patched with electric tape that spews water from the middle.

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I struggled to get it undone enough to get to the further west garden bed and I was eventually  in despair, thinking it would be embarrassing to go home and watch Deadliest Catch tonight after giving up in a hose.  I kept trying.  But I was stumped.  I have no sense of how to untangle knots, chains, and hoses.

I needed to get all the way down to that tree, by a building that is for sale and has no water, whose garden was parched and miserably dry.

I needed to get all the way down to that tree and black light post, by a building that is for sale and has no water, whose garden was parched and miserably dry.

A kind middle aged man, a guest at Salt Hotel, quickly assessed the situation and in a trice had the hose untangled.  Otherwise, I might still be there.

The whole time I was struggling with hoses, I was aware on a level beyond exhaustion and frustration of how much I love these gardens.  Curbside gardens, parking strips, also known as “hellstrips“, are one of my favourite challenges and I think that these at the port are the only ones on the entire Peninsula, which is not known for parking strips along the streets.  My life is given meaning by these beds along the port and that is why I will work so hard at getting them watered.

After watering as far west as I could with the Salt hose, I switched to the one at the new Ilwaco Freedom Market.  The Port had permission to use it from the owner of the building.  The business whose manager would not permit us to water last year has gone!  The hose, though high quality, was still a struggle for me.

blargh!

blargh!

Between the two hoses, Salt’s and Freedom Market, there is still a section in the middle of that stretch of gardens that cannot be reached, whose plants remained dry and will be that way until the adjacent building that has sat vacant for two years (former home of Queen La De Da’s gallery) is in use again.  My plan is to just pull the most stressed plants out on Thursday.

Of course, I had to coil both hoses up again all nicey nice, not my favourite task.  The Salt one got stuck under a planter and I almost fell over tugging it out.  Some ladies of a clique of which I was formerly a member had gone up to the pub (without a word, of course…it’s a dangerous social choice to leave a clique).  I thought great, I’ll be all fallen over tangled in this hose and stuck when they come out.  Fortunately, I made my escape unscathed.

I then walked up to the port office gardens and hooked up our long hose, also an untangling nightmare.

It is to weep.

It is to weep.


I did it!

I did it!

I doubled up the hose and dragged it past four or five buildings to get to the next water hook up at the Ilwaco pavilion.

hose drag number one

hose drag number one, Ilwaco Pavilion has the blue roof


From there, I can even reach the tiny "drive over" garden between two big driveways.

From there, I can even reach the tiny “drive over” garden between two big driveways.


looking east

looking east


my favourite bed by the Pavilion

my favourite bed by the Pavilion


The wax myrtle we cut to the ground is coming back, as planned.

The wax myrtle we cut to the ground is coming back, as planned.


The Tall Ships were still in port.

The Tall Ships were still in port.


reaching as far west as I could in the Craft 3 bank garden bed (red and brown building)

reaching as far east as possible in the Craft 3 bank garden bed (red and brown building)

I watered as far east as I could reach in the Craft 3 bank beds.  They don’t thrill me because they are mostly kinnickinnick ground cover, pretty boring to me.  If there is no rain soon, I’ll try harder to get some water onto them.

old plantings in Craft 3 beds, from way back when it was Shorebank

old plantings in Craft 3 beds, from way back when it was Shorebank

I could see Allan way way down at the easternmost garden, watering with three hoses stretched from the docks.

Allan's photo at the east end. Butch of CoHo Charters says we could use his faucet, but I guess Allan thinks this is easier or quicker.

Allan’s photo at the east end. Butch of CoHo Charters (red building to the left) says we could use his faucet, but I guess Allan thinks this is easier or quicker.


Allan's photo: laying down a lot of water; this bed has not been hose watered for a couple of weeks or more.

Allan’s photo: laying down a lot of water; this bed has not been hose watered for a couple of weeks or more.


Allan's photo: a successfully pretty much drought tolerant bed still needs water to look tip top

Allan’s photo: This successfully pretty much drought tolerant bed still needs water to look tip top.

Meanwhile, I doubled up the hose again and did another drag with high hopes that the water at the old Wade Gallery, now owned by Fort George Brewery, would be turned on by now.  (Fort George has given us permission to water.)

hose drag number 2

hose drag number 2


nice view while testing the faucet at the Fort George building

nice view while testing the faucet at the Fort George building

I was tired and the water was not on at Fort George building and the garden was dry and Allan did not hear my four phone calls asking him to bring buckets and he didn’t have the work trailer anyway, as it turned out, and I sat on a utility box and felt exhausted and decided that TOMORROW we would bucket water that little garden.  By now it was 8:30 PM, we had been working for 9.5 hours, and I couldn’t face waiting for the trailer, driving to the boatyard, filling buckets, and coming back to dump them.

"Help! We are so thirsty!" "I just can't!!!"

“Help! We are so thirsty!”
“I just can’t!!!”

At home, I watered my own containers.

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back garden, 8:40 PM


Smokey glad I am home

Smokey glad I am home

Later, watching the hard and dangerous work on Deadliest Catch, I was glad I hadn’t given up on the tangled hoses.

Deadliest Catch: keeping ropes untangled is critical

Deadliest Catch: keeping ropes untangled is critical

Tomorrow: the north end rounds of gardeners where the garden owners do the watering…thank heavens.


Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s gardening diaries of two decades ago

1997 (age 73):

June 7:  Two years have gone by since Bruce died.

I picked the weeds I pulled using the garden cart from Don.  Then I weeded in front of compost box, next to raspberry row (both sides) and picked strawberries.  The Ft Laramie plants have huge berries like the ones from California but they are hollow in the inside.  I went to bed at 10:00.

1998 (age 74):

June 7: Al’s birthday [her older brother who lived in Seattle] and 3 years since Bruce died.  I still miss him so much.

The Jazz were getting blown out when Mary Anne came over.  She put on Tabby’s halter and we went out on the porch by the shop.  However, Erik and a friend came over and Tabby bolted.  I figured she was under the shop.  Mary Anne and I kept calling and she came out from under the shed.  I think she was glad to see us.  Mary Anne said I should get another halter with a wider strap.  I called Al to wish him happy birthday.


On the 21st anniversary of my dad’s death, mom and dad camping in the early 1950s:

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and at home in the 1950s:

bruceginger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Monday, 22 February 2016

Last night at 2 AM, I finished a novel that I’d been pecking away at for several bedtimes.

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I especially liked this description of what it feels like when rain comes after a long drought.

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That is very much how it was when rain finally came here after last summer’s drought.

Port of Ilwaco

We had time from midmorning till very early afternoon to weed a few more curbside beds at the port.

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Time Enough Books/Purly Shell curbside, before

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after clipping santolinas, grass combing, weeding

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Tulips and Narcissi foliage in the garden boat

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a big old santolina, before

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and after; could have been cut even harder

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Port Office garden, after some clipping and weeding

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Port Office, south side, before

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after clipping santolinas

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Narcissi, Lavender, and Lambs Ears

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across the lawn from the port office

Meanwhile, Allan weeded and clipped the Salt Hotel curbside garden.

Then off we went along the Columbia River and through the woods to see Dr Gwen at the Naselle Clinic.  I was pleased and surprised when all my blood tests came back good…good cholesterol, liver and kidney function, and no diabetes.  Perfect glucose.  I was surprised and pleased to learn that I don’t have to give up Pink Poppy Bakery cupcakes.  The astonishing thing was that I was quite low in Vitamin D.   How can this be for someone who is outside all day?  Our sunshine here is weak.  Dr Gwen says I will feel much better when I have boosted my D.

From the waiting room of the clinic, we saw this fellow getting into a vehicle:

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I am in love.  (Allan’s photo)

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All the good news was tempered with the unsolved mystery of problems not explained by perfect blood tests, thus the neurologist still looms in the near future.  As does a knee doctor, as the interpretation of my knee X rays says that my left knee has “mild degenerative changes” but my right knee has “severe degenerative changes…with complete loss of the normal joint space.”  Well, ow.  I share this not that the world should give a hoot about my knee, but because it is an interesting plot twist in a gardening blog.  By the way, I don’t kneel to garden…The way I bend over while working puts more weight on my left knee than my right, so it is mystifying to me that the right one went kaflooey first.

I used to run.  A lot.  For years. On concrete in the city.  I blame this for some of my knee problems, as the pain started back then and I “pushed through it”.  I think if I had not been obsessed with weightlifting, running, and aerobics for ten years, I would be a stronger gardener now.

running

me, 1987, age 32, running around Green Lake (about 3 miles), photo by Allan, who used to run with me on occasion. I was slow but determined.  Exercise addiction is not always good for the body, no matter how much praise one gets for the results.

To celebrate today’s good blood tests, we dined at…

The Depot Restaurant

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Depot Restaurant (Allan’s photo)

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wilted spinach salad and clam chowder (Allan’s photo)

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won the best chowder award at the 2015 Razor Clam Festival (Allan’s photo)

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char grilled Ling Cod with Tuscan bean and tomato stew and garlic parsley butter

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Allan’s photo

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chocolate espresso pot de creme to celebrate a good glucose test!

I am also celebrating that I have two weeks to catch up on all the spring clean up before more appointments.  I had been so afraid that something medical and scary and sudden would happen today that would interfere with the rest of the work week.  It was a nonsensical fear, but a strong one.

Ginger’s Garden Diaries

gdiaries

from my mother’s garden diaries of two decades ago:

1995 (age 70):

Feb 22:  Planted new Stark raspberries (10).  Heeled in new Stark strawberries (75) and put in greenhouse under lights.  Then I started sieving compost box.  I’m throwing all stuff not decomposed on garden area to be tilled in later.  A good day’s work!!

1997: age 72

Feb 22:  Worked about 1 1/2 hours bringing firewood up to porch.  Finished all wood from west side of shop.  I put the wet ones on pallet boards behind shop and covered them with the tarps.  Also covered were the huge pieces of that tree Mac sliced in half.

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Because life is more than just touring gardens, we had to get back to work.  We are indulging ourselves by only working four days a week.  We may financially regret this later. For now, it’s wonderful.

Monday, 27 July 2015

Long Beach

The first of two weekly waterings of the planters…and the once-weekly watering of the street trees.  Oh how I am thinking about Pam’s lushly irrigated Seaside gardens!  I wish our street tree gardens, small though they are, could be as lush.  The planters I don’t mind watering because I use the time for deadheading and other grooming tasks.  The street tree water hook ups are much harder to access and frustrate me so much that Allan waters them, and they only get done once a week.

Seventh and Pacific

Seventh and Pacific

Salvia viridis (painted sage)

Salvia viridis (painted sage)

Geranium 'Rozanne and a blue Agastache

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and  Agastache ‘Estella Indigo’

pink dahlia, pink painted sage

pink dahlia, pink painted sage

pink dahlia, pale pink California poppy

pink dahlia, pale pink California poppy

finger blight on the lavender!!!

finger blight on the lavender!!!  someone picked a nice big bouquet….grr.

Basket Case Greenhouse basket

Basket Case Greenhouse basket

hangs right over the planter

hangs right over the planter

If, as the sign says, no bicycles are allowed on sidewalks, why are we a couple of times a week almost collided into by a sidewalking bike!? I’m all for bicycling as an ecological form of transport, but not on the busy sidewalk. One cannot hear them coming till the whooooosh is almost next to one.  Skateboards are banned in LB town, and yet they are more audible and I think actually safer to work around.

Stormin' Norman's Kites and clothing

Stormin’ Norman’s Kites and clothing

Geranium 'Rozanne', Allan's photo. Our planters are hugely attractive to bees.

Geranium ‘Rozanne’, Allan’s photo. Our planters are hugely attractive to bees.

Geranium 'Rozanne' and golden oregano

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and golden oregano (Allan’s photo)

Allan was watering the trees and the two north blocks of planters so he got to admire my favourite one.

by Dennis Company

by Dennis Company (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

When I still had more planters to water, Allan got the horsetail off the pond garden by the stoplight.

before

before

after

after, de-fuzzed

After watering, we went out to weed on the beach approach.

the long narrow Bolstad garden

the long narrow Bolstad garden, that thin strip along the street

Out at the west end of the beach approach

Out at the west end of the beach approach

I have become so re-inspired by the beach approach since Andersen’s RV Park sold and I realized my dread of the beach approach garden was mostly because it had been years since we had enough time for it.  I felt so inspired that I thought we might even hook up a hose to the underground spigot and pour some water on the garden while we weeded it.  Allan found the hatch, swept the sand off, pried it off…

sand

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

He dug the sand off of the buried faucet....

He dug the sand off of the buried faucet….

And then he turned on the faucet…and there was no water.  We called the parks manager and it will be turned on later this week.  We have not watered out here for two years, which certainly says something about the drought tolerance of rugosa roses.  I am, however, thinking of finding ALL the buried hatches so that we can put some water on the poor dry planters along this street.  We quite simply stopped hauling buckets out to them when we both got to be 60!  The city water trailer guy (who diligently waters the hanging baskets every day, thus earning much praise from me) has been spraying them sometimes…but it is not enough.

so sad and thirsty. Heathers and rosemary left over from a volunteer planting.

so sad and thirsty. Heathers and rosemary left over from a volunteer planting.

Something must be done about this watering situation.  It is time consuming to hook up long hoses to water these planters.  OH how I envy Pam’s irrigation.

The rugosa roses are so tough. And that gallardia gets a gold star for still being alive out here.

The rugosa roses are so tough. And that gallardia gets a gold star for still being alive out here.

today's weeding job, before

today’s weeding job, before

My friend Lady B came by.

My friend Lady B came by.

Allan at work

Allan at work

I did not manage to take an after photo; Allan took this little sequence:

before

before

after

after

We had high hopes that the next day, we would finally finish this year’s first complete weeding of the beach approach garden.

Tuesday: 28 July 2015

Ilwaco Post Office: one flower left on the ridiculously giant lily, and someone keeps stripping off the flowers. It's a mystery.

Ilwaco Post Office: Someone keeps stripping off the flowers of the ridiculously giant lily. It’s a mystery.

The Red Barn and Diane’s Garden

The Red Barn garden from across the parking lot (looking north)

The Red Barn garden from across the parking lot (looking north)

I always feel I must be looking west here.  The map shows otherwise because of a deceptive curve in Sandridge Road.

Red Barn

Red Barn Arena

Red Barn Arena

the most wind-protected of four barrels at the Red Barn

the most wind-protected of four barrels at the Red Barn

my camera shy friend Misty at Diane's garden

my camera shy friend Misty at Diane’s garden

Diane's garden along the highway, with Stipa gigantea

Diane’s garden along the highway, with Stipa gigantea and cosmos

Diane's alliums

Diane’s alliums

perovskia

perovskia

Diane and Larry do a good job of keeping this garden watered.

It's harder to water this end.

It’s harder to water this end.

Long Beach Bolstad Beach Approach

We have every intention of finishing the weeding of the beach approach garden today.

We have every intention of finishing the weeding of the beach approach garden today.

Allan's photo: This garden has not been watered all summer, and it has not rained appreciably for over two months.

Allan’s photo: This garden has not been watered all summer, and it has not rained appreciably for over two months.

Allan's photo: trimming the sidewalk side

Allan’s photo: trimming rugosa roses on the sidewalk side

Allan's photo: brave gaillardia

Allan’s photo: brave gaillardia and one last rose

The gardens seems dull to me, being almost all rugosa roses.  We used to have an assortment of gorgeous perennials until I realized this could never be because of the trampling it gets during kite festival.  Only rugosa roses and other small, tough shrubs can hold their own during that.

I do wonder though, if it had irrigation and could be as lush as Pam’s Seaside gardens, would it be so garden-y that people would not trample it?  I suppose I will never know.  We do get many compliments on the garden and many questions about the rose hips.  Are they tomatoes? Persimmons? Edible? And then we talk about rose hip tea and rose hip jelly.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

During the approach weeding, I had a revelation that we needed to quit one more job, and that we COULD because Dave and Melissa, Sea Star Landscape Maintenance, are so good that I can turn over any garden to them and they can dive right into it with no coaching; they know ALL the plants.  Over the following couple of days, we arranged to pass on the Boreas Inn garden to them, one that we never have enough time for.  They now have several pretty big former jobs of ours,  with happy and satisfied clients.  I am hoping this translates next year into getting the first complete beach approach weeding done by April or May instead of August.

I felt so inspired that we went back to the beach approach section that I had given up and just string-trimmed earlier this summer and actually weeded it properly.

weeding with the pick (Allan's photo)

weeding with the pick (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

before (Allan's photo)

before (Allan’s photo)

almost done (Allan's photo)

almost done (Allan’s photo)

We have prevailed! (Allan's photo)

We have prevailed! (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo, as we checked on the garden at city hall

Allan’s photo, as we checked on the garden at city hall

The Port of Ilwaco

The watering of the Port of Ilwaco went more smoothly than last week.  It is still frustrating having to wrestle with 300 feet of hose when there are spigots so much nearer the gardens.  However, this fall I will be moving all but the most drought tolerant plants out of the westernmost section that is hardest to water.  It won’t hurt if some sections of the gardens are better than others.  Salt Hotel, Time Enough Books, The Port Office, Don Nisbett Gallery, the Ilwaco Pavilion and Peterson Gallery will have the show-off garden beds.

Port Office curbside garden with Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Port Office curbside garden with Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ (I don’t know what that white triangle is, some sort of oops!)

Lavender and Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies, port office curbside

Lavender and Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies, port office curbside

looking east over the port office curbside garden

looking east over the port office curbside garden

The Port Office garden, south wall

The Port Office garden, south wall

looking south from the port office garden

looking southwest from the port office garden

looking southeast

looking southeast

The east end garden can now have hose watering because Allan has enough hose to drag across the parking lot from a dockside spigot.  This is not annoying like the other long drag, as there is no business owner’s spigot next to that garden.  I do, wish, though, that years ago, under a previous port administration, some thought had been given to exactly how the gardens were going to be watered. Why was irrigation not installed during the time that the street was torn up to make these beds?  I asked a local pro gardener ‘Why???” and she said wisely “Because people always think, ‘You don’t need to water around here because it rains!'”  She is so right, and people are so wrong, because even in a normal year we have dry weather for at least two months in summer.

Allan's photo: Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies' at the east end

Allan’s photo: Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’ at the east end

Allan's photo: Catananche (Cupid's Dart)

Allan’s photo: Catananche (Cupid’s Dart)

Allan's photo: a happy dog at the port

Allan’s photo: a happy dog at the port

Allan worked east to west, just for variety. West end: Salt Hotel is open for business, and we highly recommend them.

Allan worked east to west, just for variety. West end: Salt Hotel is open for business, and we highly recommend them.

I got done earlier than Allan and walked home.  At the Lost Garden on the corner, I had a look at the pond and found it completely dry.  I’ve never seen it this dry even at the end of August.

That is disturbing. (The pallets are from a children's fort that blew apart in a storm.)

That is disturbing. (The pallets are from a children’s fort that blew apart in a storm.)

at home

in my garden: Billardia longiflora in evening light.

in my front garden: Billardia longiflora in evening light.

Further sign of drought: Some of the salmonberry shrubs in the bogsy woods have dried up.  A friend who has lived here for 40 years says she has never seen this happen til autumn, if then.

It's a spooky sight.

It’s a spooky sight.

The work board finally had beach approach weeding, all 13 sections, erased!  I immediately replaced it with the Long Beach parking lot (not really) berms…three sections that have been sadly neglected due to lack of time.

Job Satisfaction!

Job Satisfaction!

 

 

 

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