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Posts Tagged ‘Davidia involucrata ‘Sonoma’’

loading the van

We started by planting cosmos at our volunteer garden at the Ilwaco post office and were pleased to have a visit from our good friend Mitzu.

She was shivering from the cold.  I had actually had to put on my raincoat.

Planting in the rain is so much easier than having to water everything in.

How we plant with the ho-mi:

Next, I planted cosmos at the fire station (another volunteer project) while Allan tackled this annoying weed along the west wall.

No, I don’t mean the Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’.

Ilwaco Fire Station, SW corner

We returned home for more cosmos (having already used more than I had planned) and planted some, along with tidying up, at the J’s across the street.

Allan pulled all the dead crocus foliage.

We like the flowers at the curb and hope that no one kills them.

Allan’s photo

A few blocks east, we did some planting and weeding at Mike’s garden, where the cherry blossoms are anointing a parked car….

Allan’s photos

and filling up the front garden.

Tulip going over:

Allan’s photo

Allan took on the raking of the front path.

I am thrilled that the boxwoods are finally growing into a proper hedge, which we will shear in June.

The north side of the house seems to have an afterthought of a garden when all the rest of it was so formally designed by Carol Jones (“The Elves Did It”, a former Peninsula business).

I planted some rosemary, thinking that it might make a low hedge.  It should get enough light because the house is a double wide, like ours, low to the ground.

We went on to the Howerton Avenue curbside beds at the port, planting a few extra clumps of plain old eryngiums with root balls too big to pot them up for my sale.

Allan’s photo

At the port office garden, which still looks terribly young, I planted some cosmos, even though I am concerned about a 30 mph wind predicted for tomorrow.

Allan’s photos

I can’t keep waiting for perfect weather.

Here is what it looked like in November 2017.

Allan’s photo

As an experiment, because Don Nisbett and Jenna give this little bed supplemental watering, we planted some cosmos in the bed east of their gallery.

We redid it last autumn and it looks rather bare.

Looking west, the mature beds are burgeoning.

At home, I worked for awhile on my plant sale plants.

The sarrecenia by the pond is blooming.

Allan’s photos

Frosty found a bed in the bags in which Rita Nicely had brought us some pots.

Allan’s photo

I will be so glad when the plant sale is over.  The garden is a right old mess.

Allan’s photo, drizzly rain

I remembered to go to the back corner of the garden and look at the little white flowered rhododendron.

My Davidia flowers are now falling.

The work board tonight:

I asked on the Rainyside Gardeners group for the ID of a weed that I find in many of our gardens.

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Wednesday, 29 April 2015

Our main mission of the day: to make the garden at Klipsan Beach Cottages as perfect as time allowed, for the Rhodie Tour on Saturday.  On the way, though, we had to make one brief stop.

The Red Barn Arena

Upon waking, the thought had swum to the forefront of my mind that the bulbs we’d transplanted into new containers at the Red Barn last week had probably totally gone over and looked terrible.  Since a drive up Sandridge Road is a good route to KBC, we were able to check and my thought had been correct.

It looked quite nice one the bulb foliage was cut back; I forgot to photograph the after.

It looked quite nice once the bulb foliage was cut back; I forgot to photograph the after.

I made a new friend, Isabella.

I made a new friend, Isabella.

We took a shine to each other.

We took a shine to each other.

She might have liked to go for a ride.

She might have liked to go for a ride.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

first task: Allan planted this Physocarpus. ‘Dart’s Gold’ in the A Frame garden.

 When we arrived, I left Todd, fellow CPN (Certified Plant Nut) a voicemail to tell him we were there, in case he wanted to come see the garden.  During the Rhodie Tour, he would be helping out at Steve and John’s garden and I knew he would not have much time for just touring.  Allan and I weeded and groomed for about an hour and had our heads well down into the garden when I heard Denny say something about our butts…and there was Todd!  I took him on a tour all around the gardens.  We pondered over a sad rhodo at the entrance to the next door cottage (part of the tour), returned to the main garden, and then he asked what he could do to help.  We had not expected that.  I was feeling sort of bad about having gotten Mary and Denny into opening the garden to the public on a busy weekend full of cottage guests, so Allan and I decided to go “off the clock” and, with Todd, volunteer some time to prune the sick looking rhodie next door.  It did not look good and was bringing down the tone of a long sweep of healthy rhododendrons.

It did not look good and was bringing down the tone of a long sweep of healthy rhododendrons.

Todd ready to wade in.

a tarp ready for the debris.  You can tell Todd is a cheerful (and very amusing) worker.

a tarp ready for the debris. You can tell Todd is a cheerful (and very amusing) worker.

before: a sad sack of a rhodie next to a happy one.

before: a sad sack of a rhodie next to a happy one.

Todd stuck well into the job.

Todd stuck well into the job.

pruning

after tracking the sickly branches back to the base

after tracking the sickly branches back to the base

leaves dying at the ends of the branches

leaves dying at the ends of the branches, next to healthy rhodo

The best thing to do would be to cut the whole thing down; we just did not want to leave a big hole before the tour.  Rhodies usually come back great from the base when cut back.  Once I dug out a yellow sick looking smallish one at a job and threw it behind the garage in the debris pile.  Sitting there completely out of the soil, it languished, ignored and dry, all summer.  In the fall, I noticed healthy new leaf buds at the base, cut the top off, stuck in back in the ground, and it came back all green and pretty the next year.

after

after

after; At last now it does not scream that it's dying.

after; At last now it does not scream that it’s dying.

We drug all the debris down a long drive to the burn pile and Allan chopped it into burnable lengths.

We drug all the debris down a long drive to the burn pile and Allan chopped it into burnable lengths.

With that done, I thought surely Todd would make his escape but instead he offered to help in the garden.  I showed him an area in the fenced garden that I knew we would not otherwise have time for today, roguing out some maddening Japanese anemones and Lysimachia punctata that were blurring the lines of a rose and a hardy fuchsia.  The area contained some special plants (a podophyllum, a Cardiocrinum giganteum, some good alliums) and I knew that, having been the curator of the display garden at the famous Plant Delights Nursery, Todd was the one gardener I’ve ever felt I could just say “Go for it and do whatever you want.”  Allan and I threw in some more volunteer time for KBC because getting a garden on a tour means the client has usually has to pay extra for perfection, and that does not seem quite fair when it wasn’t their idea.  One of these days we will go help Todd out with his weeding…somewhere nice and level…like our former job that he now does, the Wiegardt Gallery.  (Artist Eric Wiegardt is his brother.)

blurry area, before

blurry area, before

before

before

after

after

very nice!

superb!

We created some definition in this area, as well.

We created some definition in this area, as well.

  With Todd’s energy as impetus, we worked later than we had planned to such good results that Mary was thrilled when she came out from an afternoon of tedious paperwork to see what we had wrought.

Allan and I just had time before dusk to do one more short job.

Andersen’s RV Park

Now this is a job I would love Todd to take over so that we could cut back on our hours!  I’ve told Lorna, the owner, that if it sells we will not go on with the new owner.  We dote on her and are trying to stick it out as long as it’s for sale.  We’ve spent a lot of time there recently so today all we had to do is deadheading and some light weeding.

I took my weekly photo of the picket fence garden.

I took my weekly photo of the picket fence garden.

Something bad had happened with the mixing of some weed killer..not by us because we don’t use weedkiller and the only weeding we do of lawns is maybe a bit of dandelion removal by hand tool.

On the way home, we saw much evidence that the Rhodie Tour is in two days.  So is the double parade weekend…one in Long Beach, one in Ilwaco.  Usually we devote all week to getting the parade routes perfectly weeded; now we had just two more days to achieve as much perfection as possible in both towns.

rhodie

rhodie2

At home, all I had strength to admire was the Davidia involucrata ‘Sonoma’ planted next to our little driveway.

Davidia 'Sonoma' in flower

Davidia ‘Sonoma’ in flower, inside a deer cage

Davidia involucrata 'Sonoma'

Davidia involucrata ‘Sonoma’

a fallen flower...The tree's common name is "dove tree" or "pocket handkerchief tree".

a fallen flower…The tree’s common name is “dove tree” or “pocket handkerchief tree”.

the size of the flower compared to a couple of viola plants.

the size of the flower compared to a couple of viola plants.

I look forward to this tree getting tall enough so that the flowers are more visible to passersby.  In other tree news, this is the tree, at Nora’s next door, that inspired me to acquire four Japanese maples to my garden, especially a gold one which I feel with tie the two landscapes together.

maple

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Monday, 5 May, 2014

After a promising start of rain and wind that almost turned into a day at home recovering from the busy weekend, the weather improved at about noon and we were off to work.  Before we left the driveway, though, we had to lift the deer-protection cage off of the Davidia involucrata ‘Sonoma’ and get photos of the exciting first flowers.

two "pocket handkerchief" flowers

two “pocket handkerchief” flowers

sonoma

sonoma2

large and stunning flowers

large and stunning flowers

so beautiful! and this cultivar from Gossler Farms bloomed in just three years.

so beautiful! and this cultivar from Gossler Farms bloomed in just three years.

We had postponed planting at Jo’s (originally scheduled for Monday) because of the weather forecast, so we decided to do some of the north end jobs that we had had to skip due to lack of time last week.

On the way to Klipsan Beach Cottages, we stopped at the Planter Box to check out the crop of painted sage grown for us.

Ack!  There are not very many this year.  It is a difficult plant to grow from seed.

Ack! There are not very many this year. It is a difficult plant to grow from seed.

This will just barely get us through our various gardens that want painted sage.  But we will make it stretch far enough.

Theresa had gotten in some of the pretty little variegated Armeria (sea thrift) called, I think, Nifty Thrifty.

Theresa had gotten in some of the pretty little variegated Armeria (sea thrift) called, I think, Nifty Thrifty.

and if the poppy seeds have not germinated well at Erin's garden, I see that I have a back up plan.

and if the poppy seeds have not germinated well at Erin’s garden, I see that I have a back up plan.

Then we spent some time at Klipsan Beach Cottages, weeding, and planting just six painted sage (the first plants of Annuals Planting Time).  I have resolved to try calling it Annuals Planting TIME this year, with a positive attitude; we’ll see if it descends into hell even though we have a large vehicle now which should make it much easier to schlep the plants around.

KBC rhodo

KBC rhodo

Klipsan Beach Cottage, looking from the driveway to the deer fence garden

Klipsan Beach Cottages, looking from the driveway to the deer fence garden

ferns almost all unfurled by the pond

ferns almost all unfurled by the pond

the pond bed

the pond bed

One of the last of the narcissi, poeticus, my favourite kind

One of the last of the narcissi, poeticus, my favourite kind

I would never plant sweet woodruff, but someone did in the entry garden to the A Frame and it is doing that sweet woodruffian thing that I dislike so much.

woodruff on the run, what a muddle.

woodruff on the run, what a muddle.

Some people love it.  I once did.  The starry white blossoms are used to make May Wine, so I have heard.

I find that these days I am highly suspicious of any plant sold as a groundcover.

I felt much excitement over three plants in the garden:

Podophyllum came back!  I thought it was a goner.  It never does much but just sit there looking like an impressive leaf.

Podophyllum came back! I thought it was a goner. It never does much but just sit there looking like an impressive leaf.  There is another annoying ground cover, the little wild violet.

Cardiocrinum giganteum has a flower bud this year!

Cardiocrinum giganteum has a flower bud this year!

How I would love some of those.  Mary says her brother has many, and he gave her several, of which this is the sole survivor.  Every time I plant one, slugs get it.  It takes, I think, ten years from bulb to flower.

Behind the bench, the Tetrapanax papryifer 'Steroidal Giant' that has sat and sulked for three years has finally sized up!

Behind the bench, the Tetrapanax papryifer ‘Steroidal Giant’ that has sat and sulked for three years has finally sized up!  It COULD get much taller; at least it is visible now.

All the roses have buds...

All the roses have buds…

and the big rugosa rose is already blooming.

and the big rugosa rose is already blooming.

Some alliums are giving the garden a little colour.  Thalictrum 'Elin' is growing tall and will get much taller.

Some alliums are giving the garden a little colour. Thalictrum ‘Elin’ is growing tall and will get much taller.  (It’s behind the copper sprinkler.)

Dutch Iris are blooming here and there.

Dutch Iris are blooming here and there.

and a dark ruffly columbine

and a dark ruffly columbine

We next attended to the garden at Oman Builders Supply’s Ocean Park store; all it needed was a little bit of weeding.

obs

Oman Builders Supply with Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’

We did a quick weeding and deadheading of narcissi at the Wiegardt Gallery.  We’re just holding steady till Eric’s brother arrives and takes over the garden.

Wiegardt Gallery lilacs and three Miscanthus variegatus in the north garden beds

Wiegardt Gallery lilacs and three Miscanthus variegatus in the north garden beds

This garden will benefit from someone who has unlimited time to spend on it.

This garden will benefit from someone who has unlimited time to spend on it.

On the way home, we stopped at Andersen’s RV Park for some deadheading of the last of the narcissi and the planning of a project.  Allan is going to work on the day that I go pre-garden touring with Garden Tour Nancy.  I wanted to show him the project that I would love for him to do (and he agreed), which is digging out all the narcissi from the six whiskey barrels by the RV parking area.  The bulbs have become so thick that it would be hard to plant annuals.  We walked around to figure out where in the gardens the bulbs could go; next fall, I’ll replant the whiskey barrels with fresh bulbs.  That is IF the park has not sold; it is for sale. Owner Lorna would love to retire.  (Contact Andersen’s RV Park if owning a well loved oceanside RV Park is your dream).

As we ended our walkabout at the garden shed garden, I was suddenly inspired to put an edge on even though it was already past five o clock.  It would just look so very much better.

before and after.

before and after, 2/3 of the garden (we did all of it)

I planted some Alyssum 'Easter Bonnet Peach' from The Planter Box; the colour is just so Lorna.

I planted some Alyssum ‘Easter Bonnet Peach’ from The Planter Box; the colour is just so Lorna.

The sky to the west promised a dramatic sunset.

The sky to the west promised a dramatic sunset.

I would not see the sunset as I had an extensive parade blog entry to create.  However, when we got home I did take a quick walk around the front garden.

looking east from our little driveway

looking east from our little driveway

In the east bed, the Ribes speciosum has been blooming spectacularly for weeks.

In the east bed, the Ribes speciosum has been blooming spectacularly for weeks.

Onyx from next door has his eyes on Mary....

Onyx from next door has his eyes on Mary….

But encounters Frosty instead.

But encounters Frosty instead.

The waterleaf, a pretty native plant that I thought had left behind at my old garden by the woods, popped up all over the front garden the first spring we lived here.  I like the spangly purple flowers, and since the foliage goes dormant in midsummer it seems to coexist all right with my other plants.

Hydrophyllum (waterleaf)

Hydrophyllum (waterleaf)

Tuesday will be all Jo all day as we plant her many, many annuals, officially kicking off annuals planting….time.

 

 

 

 

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Sunday, 4 May 2014

another social day

The parade did happen despite some WEATHER and I’ll get to that in the next entry; in the interest of not having an entry a mile long, I wish to share some of the social day (and food) that bracketed the parade attendance.

Garden Tour Nancy and Phil had invited us to a pre Cinco de Mayo brunch preceding the parade.

with delicious appetizers

with delicious appetizers on a stunningly gorgeous plate

Margaritas would have been on offer, as well, but I knew I could not drink one and then function to photograph the parade.

table with lilacs

table with lilacs

Nancy made enchiladas a la Martha Stewart

Nancy made enchiladas a la Martha Stewart

creamer: an estate sale find

creamer: an estate sale find

Nancy had gone to my beloved Pink Poppy Bakery to buy some of Madeline’s exquisite baked goods.

Pink Poppy delicacies

Pink Poppy delicacies

And then…the parade, which you can view in the next entry if you are so inclined.

Afterwards.we went back to Nancy and Phil’s as, being one block south of downtown Long Beach, it was an excellent place to leave our van. I gave myself a drizzly tour of Nancy’s garden.

the enviable veg patch

the enviable veg patch

part of the flower border we made in fall of 2012

part of the flower border we made in fall of 2012

tulips

I asked Nancy if she had Sensual Touch, and then qualified that with “Sensual Touch tulips, that is!” I think that might be the tulip, above. I planted some bulbs for her last fall and she also got some from Brent and Becky’s Bulbs. That looks like Sensual Touch to me.

tulips st

and some pink ones

and some pink ones

garlic

garlic

chives and veg

chives and veg

and spuds growing to break down the sod pile

and spuds growing to break down the sod pile

In the house, we had another long visit with Nancy; she described an estate sale full of books where she and Phil had found over 400 books to buy, and she showed me one from another sale that has the most lovely cover.

the paper jacket

the paper jacket

with a treasure underneath

with a treasure underneath

From outside the kitchen door, we were watched by Nancy’s almost tame feral cats.

Grey Kitty

Grey Kitty

orange kitty

orange kitty

columnar apple tree

columnar apple tree

Nancy's sunflower seedlings reminded me that I want to plant some at the Ilwaco post office.

Nancy’s sunflower seedlings reminded me that I want to plant some at the Ilwaco post office.

leaving Nancy's garden

leaving Nancy’s garden

And then, after an hour long interlude at home, we were back out the door to have dinner at The Depot Restaurant with Kathleen Shaw, a celebratory meal for her purchase of a cottage here.

some of our tasty food items

some of our tasty food items

Finally, when we got home (ready to process over 200 parade photos each), I gasped and exclaimed with the thrill that my Davidia involucrata is actually blooming. In spring of 2011, I planted ‘Sonoma’, a cultivar from Gossler Farms that is supposed to bloom in a couple of years instead of ten. Fourteen years after planting the one in my old garden, it still had not bloomed. So I am thrilled that, small though it is, and still behind a wire enclosure to protect it from nibbling deer, my baby tree is blooming.

Screen Shot 2014-05-04 at 8.45.03 PM

It’s in the front garden to someday, I hope, astound passersby. Tomorrow, we’ll take the cage off to get better pictures of this momentous event.

It has been a wonderfully social weekend. I now feel that I must have tomorrow off to not leave my own home and garden and recuperate, so I am actually fervently hoping for rain.

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