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Posts Tagged ‘Depot Restaurant’

Thursday, 18 July 2019

Our company arrived from Canada: Kilyn and Peter.  They came bearing gifts of books, a box of Builders Tea, some British throat lozenges for winter ills, some pastries from the local bakery and some British biscuits.

You may know Kilyn as the reader who comments as Steveston Gardener.  Her spouse, Peter, is a delightfully droll Australian.

We had our own garden as ready for touring as time and energy allowed—pretty good, if I dare say so, and the unweeded parts can be called “rewilded”.

Our Garden

We’d had this much rain in the past two days, giving us the gift of this day off.

In the back garden, I immediately realized the Cripps Pink apple tree was half its former height.  Rain, wind, and the weight of too many apples had snapped off the top.  Peter demonstrates how heavy with apples the snapped trunks are.  What a shame.

When Kilyn took a photo of the little pond, I saw that raccoons, or perhaps Skooter, had knocked several blue pottery pieces into the depths. Allan fixed it.  We were all excited to see the one fish. I had assumed it had been eaten weeks ago.

Those are the sort of things that would be a disaster on a garden tour day but are just fine with good friends.

By going garden touring in Ocean Shores this weekend, I will miss three days of lily-opening time.

That timing proves the wisdom of anyone setting a garden tour date for this weekend as peak lily time reliably begins now.

After touring into every corner and path of the garden…

followed by some sitting in the shade…

Peter (Allan’s photo)

…we needed to pass another hour or so before the main feature of the day and so we repaired to

The Boreas Inn.

After touring the entry garden and the west lawn beds…

…we had a tour of the inn…

(My favourite is the garden suite.)

…and a visit with Susie in the west-facing sunroom.

We then were off…

…for an afternoon at

The Bayside Garden.

Upon arrival, Peter said he almost cried on the way up the driveway “because it is so beautiful, and,” he added, “I’m not a gardener.”

Kilyn is the impassioned gardener and garden blog reader.  She faithfully reads (among others) my two favourites, The Tootlepedal blog and The Miserable Gardener.

We both best like blogs that show imperfections rather than, as she puts it, carefully curated photos.

Kilyn, Peter, and John with his garden notebook

A trio of Rhododendron pachysanthum was first to be thoroughly admired.

We viewed every part of the garden.

Kilyn’s photo

Kilyn’s photo

Kilyn’s photo

red stems of drimys picking up the color of Orange Rocket Barberry.

We all expected Orange Rocket to be columnar.  It is not.

Thuja ‘Forever Goldie’

Kilyn’s photo

“mosquito grass” (Allan’s photo)

Rhododendron ‘Sinogrande’

Allan’s photo

Steve, Kilyn, ‘Cryptomeria ‘Black Dragon’

in the Cryptomeria grove

blue-silver Rhododendron lepidostylum

Rhododendron edgeworthii

deer ferns on the move

Kilyn’s photo

Rhododendron quinquefolium

Rhododendron sinofalconeri

Rhododendron ‘Cherries and Merlot’

We visited my most special favourite pet of a rhododendron:

Rhododendron degronianum subsp. yakushimanum x R. pachysanthum

Hydrangea ‘Lemon Daddy’

Rhododendron makinoi

Rhododendron ‘Ever Red’

How to hide an ugly electric box:

Steve says he’d now choose something other than laurel, and the vine to the right is fatshedera.

Kilyn and the evergreen huckleberry glade

Kilyn’s photo

kayaks passing by on a high tide

We closed our tour in the kitchen with coffee and homemade muffins and some garden talk.

from inside the house (Allan’s photo)

John’s garden book (Allan’s photo)

Later in the evening, we met again with Kilyn and Peter for dinner at

The Depot Restaurant.

steak Killian

Prawns Bangkok

After feasting, we walked west one block to tour

The Sou’wester Lodge and trailer court.

 I do believe that the next time they visit, Kilyn and Peter will be parking their caravan here.

We suggested the Peter “place a call” at the phone booth and could hear his laughter.

Kilyn tried it next.

vintage trailers for rent by the night (known as “Trailer Classics Hodgepodge”)

Jessica Schlief is doing a spectacular job on the Sou’wester gardens.

Tomorrow, the four of us leave to take two different routes to meet again at Saturday’s garden tour in Ocean Shores.

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Sunday, 17 March 2019

I had a tiny bit of birthday in the morning when I opened two cards from two friends I’ve known since we were all age 12.

from Montana Mary and Roberta

Whenever I see that garden and library quotation, my literal mind says, “But we need food and drink, also.”  Mary’s card and gift addressed this:

A cozy cat mystery is something of a tradition….as long as the cats don’t talk!

Then there was no getting around going to work, because of nice weather and because of having missed a couple of days to the Shingrix vaccine.

Long Beach

The weather forecast called for big wind on Monday and Tuesday.  We drove out to the beach approach to see if it would be too busy and crowded to work there today; it is the worst place in the wind.  The whole stretch was bustling with cars and pedestrians so we returned to the parking lot berms on the east side of downtown.

I had thought it would be moderately easy to do the south berm, based on the north berm going quite swimmingly yesterday.  It turned out to be much thornier and more hard-packed with weeds than the north berm and was a fairly miserable work session in weather that felt uncomfortably warm.

We found all sorts of trash in the beds.

Getting the crocosmia out from the rugosa roses was most unpleasant.

Allan’s photo

Years ago, an alternative school had its student parking in this lot, and there was so much backing and forthing across the beds than anything delicate got crushed, leading to the decision to plant rugosa roses.  The school has moved but the thorns are still there.

using The Toy to trim the edges

before

after (Allan’s photo)

clamshells in the garden (Allan’s photo) from a parking lot feast, perhaps by a gull? or humans.

tight quarters

a fasciated stem of…something (Allan’s photo)

We acquired a full trailer load of thorny and otherwise debris (Allan’s photo)

before

We have not had any mulch left over for the berms for years, so not only is this not a raised berm, it is sunken down to pavement level and extremely hard to weed.  I finally decided we would just string trim the open areas and they can darn well just be lawn. These three beds get no supplemental water so in late spring and summer, the short grasses will stop growing anyway.

horrid

another walk through after the strimmer

after

When we left to dump our debris after four unpleasant hours, our van thermometer said the temperature was 76 degrees.  It felt like 76 to me.  No wonder I was so miserable.  I then looked at the weather apps and saw it was actually 62.

After a short turn around time at home, we drove back to

The Depot Restaurant

where we were joined by J9 and Our Kathleen for a birthday feast.

wilted spinach salad

Allan’s halibut special

the famous crab mac for J9

Cinghiale for me

birthday flan

I have now entered my 65th year (turning 64).

chocolate espresso pot de creme for Kathleen

salted caramel brownie

At home, I opened the rest of my presents.  I got a haul of wonderful gardening books from Allan, all ones I especially wanted, along with a book about punk rock in Eastern Germany from Kathleen and the cat mystery from Montana Mary, and an insulated lunch bag from Mary and Denny.  (They had found us in Long Beach on Friday and their other present, chocolate dipped shortbread cookies made by Mary, was already consumed!)

Allan might enjoy Alys Fowler’s book as it is about boating as well as her own life.

The Christine Walkden book has me burning for a rainy day.  Just opening it, I could see it is a wonderful diary of JUST the sort that I adore.  Fortunately, we are due for some rain by Friday…I hope.

Allan also found for me a proper English watering can (I had told him that the metal one was too expensive) and soil sifter for topping off seed flats. The can has a push on rose rather than screw on and a place to store the rose on the can. The flat end of the rose snaps off for cleaning. It is perfect. I’ve lost all the roses on my cheap watering cans years ago by removing them in annoyance when they get clogged.

Another special birthday treat was that so many of my friends on Facebook donated to my birthday fundraiser for Pacific County Immigrant Support that by today, the amount was $251 for this important local cause.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What have we done this year for the holidays?  Not much.  I did not decorate one little bit, because I did not want to give up reading and gardening time to put up a tree and then take it down again.

Oh, but wait.  I did put out one piece of Christmas decoration, something I have had since 1977:

We have had enough seasonal festivity to make this Season’s Greetings post.  (Soon, I will catch up on the reading and gardening news for December.)

Saturday, 15 December 2018

We had our holiday dinner at the Depot Restaurant early with Our Kathleen, because her schedule would not permit her to join us on Christmas eve.  Our repast was so delicious that I must show you. Even though some people make fun of pictures of dinner, I know for a fact that some of you like that sort of thing.

bubbly, cheesy, flavourful French onion soup

the winter’s best wilted spinach salad

delicately prepared fish for Allan, with a lemony sauce

Kathleen chose the Thai calamari appetizer for her entree.

My favourite winter menu dish, the Cingiale Brasato

flan

sorbet duo

tiramisu

The Depot tree, decorated in a foodie theme, and in the window box, African daisies are still blooming

We decided to forgo our traditional Christmas crackers and exchanged presents without opening them.

Tuesday, 18 December 2018

My own personal mission was to not leave my property.  However, we could not miss our holiday tradition of enjoying the Christmas Village display at the Hungry Harbor Grille in Long Beach.

a Christmas crab pot in our post office garden

On the way, we picked up more books from the library, where we found a Christmas carol gathering.

Allan’s photo

We drove to the end of the Bolstad beach approach to see how far up the massive, storm driven tide had come. Quite, far, with driftwood all the way to the picnic shelters.  Allan acquired a bundle of kelp for compost bins, stuffing it into the back of the van.

a feast day for some gulls

in the planter outside, flowers still blooming in our unusually mild winter

even bigger than usual

I imagine myself in the idyllic scene, where the snow is not slippery and where everyone likes each other.

Each building is so detailed, one could spend hours looking in the windows.  Pilgrim Pat, who first took us to see this village, used to take binoculars so that she could see the details of the far away buildings.

Below, I like the triangular building.  It reminds me of Seattle.  Behind it, by the window, it the apartment building with a roof garden which is my choice of where to live, on the top floor and with the garden as part of my domain.

Why I choose that instead of a house can only be explained by my fond memories of the year when I lived in the Gables apartments in Seattle.

The Gables would fit right into the village.  My apartment was on the second floor off the central courtyard.

Allan went outside the restaurant and, through the window, got two side views of my apartment building.

Looks like we somehow got our heavy cement curved bench up to the roof garden!

I now might rather choose to live in the new little float house:

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo; it is rather exciting that the TARDIS is there.

Allan’s photo

The village harbour has a multitude of lighthouses.

Allan’s photo

the ghost ship

Clang, clang, clang went the trolley,
Ding, ding, ding went the bell…as the trolley zoomed by the fish market…

…and the Long Beach Tavern.

The Clamshell Railroad was running, too.

As darkness fell, the carnival lights came on.

one of several lodgings to stay when you visit

If you would like to watch a video that shows the trains and the trolley, click here.  It is rather noisy from other diners; just imagine that you are sitting in a popular café with a view of the village.

We dined on the pasta special and a Reuben sandwich.

Night had come by the time we left the village.

the lights of Long Beach

Allan photographed the Shelburne Hotel on our way home (with our van whiffing of salty kelp):

And he walked to the next block to get a photo of the Christmas lights at Lucy Dagger’s house:

a piratical Christmas

In the evening, I read a book about another village where (despite an alarming number of murders) life is cozy and friends are friends for life.

After that excursion, I did not have to leave the property for five blissful days. Every day is a holiday of reading, gardening, puttering, and projects.  Skooter sleeps in even later than we do….

Monday, 24 December 2018

We had the pleasure of a visit from Mary and Denny, formerly of Klipsan Beach Cottage and now easing into their retirement in their new home in nearby Naselle.  After so many years of being constantly on call at the cottage resort, Mary says she is going to have to figure out what she likes to do in all her free time.  Mary and Denny were on their way to a late afternoon Christmas Eve dinner at the Depot, and our own Dickens Christmas Eve dinner came later at 7:30 PM.

The Depot Restaurant

Dickens dinner

The glory of Yorkshire pudding

Allan tried a new menu item of spice meat balls and hummus.

Window boxes still flowering

Egg nog flan

View from our table

On the tree




We opened our presents late in the evening and now, for us, the celebration is done and we will return to gardening, puttering, reading, and projects—one of which is to catch up with a few blog posts before going on another short blogging hiatus.

 

 

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Wednesday, 3 October 2018

One of my Eryngium giganteum (Miss Willmott’s Ghost) is going to bloom.  I wish it would have waited till next year.

Miss Willmott jumping the gun

The very big spider had a meal.

I had organized the day around being home to meet some out of town blog readers who were passing through in the afternoon.

Long Beach

We worked some more on straggly Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and other tired plants in the planters.

police station planter

Police Station last week

today

I hope I will be able to get my mitts on the six planters that remain hanging about town, two of them here on the police station, for my compost.

cosmos by the stoplight

santolina ready to be clipped…not today

The planter with wire vine (below) needs to be completely dug out.  I might not have enough mulch left in my Soil Energy pile to fill it back up again.  This time, ALL the soil must go.  Two years ago, we thought we could sift the roots out.  Nope.

Muehlenbeckia axillaris up in everthing

When I planted it, I thought it was a cute little house plant that would last one summer.

This is what it wants to do:

before, three years ago: a great splodge of Muehlenbeckia axillaris (wire vine)

Cosmos ‘Cupcake’ in Lewis and Clark Square

Pacific Tree Frog in Lewis and Clark Square planter

Some planters in sheltered spots still have excellent looking Geranium ‘Rozanne’

my favourite planter by Dennis Company

windier planter by Dennis Co parking lot, before

On the way through town to our next job, The Red Barn, we saw one of the Red Barn horses and rider and good dog heading for the beach.

Allan’s photo

Soon Amy and a friend from The Red Barn rode by.

Allan’s photo

We pretty much skipped the Red Barn garden today; rain had taken care of everything.

At the Red Barn

Still no Cosmo the barn cat to be seen on our short garden check up….

Diane’s garden

In Diane’s garden, we managed to get the deadheading done in 45 minutes.

roadside garden, a nerve-wracking deadheading job

a peaceful moment

Allan deadheaded the raised box garden.

The nasturtium is pale yellow ‘Moonlight’, because Diane likes soft colours.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

at home

We got home in time to offload the compost debris and then to spend some time with Debbie and Alan, who stopped by on their way to Cannon Beach.  Debbie and her sister Dawn read this blog daily, and are good commenters, which all bloggers much appreciate.

me and Debbie and a bouquet for their room in Cannon Beach

garden touring

We learned that before his career as a scientist, Alan had been a guitarist in a series of Northwest rock bands.

I found online an old photo of a band that predated one called Shiloh.

Debbie and Alan brought us a little birdbath for which Debbie had sought a good home.

(right) at home for now in the cat garden, destined for the fire circle area

Allan’s photo

Dawn sent this beautiful plate, based on the book The Country Diary of an Edwardian Lady, a book that I have and love.

The stanza around the edge is part of a long poem by Jean Ingelow.

An empty sky, a world of heather,
Purple of foxglove, yellow of broom;
We two among them wading together,
Shaking out honey, treading perfume.

Crowds of bees are giddy with clover,
Crowds of grasshoppers skip at our feet,
Crowds of larks at their matins hang over,
Thanking the Lord for a life so sweet.

Thank you!

I learned that Dawn was probably the mystery woman who had met our friend, gardener Prissy at The Waves in Cannon Beach after reading about her on this blog!

Alan and Debbie went on their way to a three day vacation.  Allan and I got back to work.

We had considered returning to the boatyard.  A chilly little wind had suddenly come up, and the shelter of the Shelburne Hotel seemed much more appealing.

The Depot Restaurant

I remembered that we needed to deadhead at the Depot (and water the window boxes).

north side of the dining deck

Coreopsis ‘Flower Tower’

in one of the window boxes

The Shelburne Hotel

Allan checked the pots on the second story decks.

the middle deck

We continued with some fall clean up cutting back and cosmos removal.  I made the big decision to remove all but one of the sweet pea tangles.

sweet pea on its way out

Three clumps of peonies in the garden had been planted too deeply sometime in the past.  Allan lifted them all and grouped them together.

Allan’s photo

just one left now

looking north

Have I ever mentioned that the front garden is on the east side? So it does not get all day sunshine.

looking south

I dote on this garden.

one more sweet pea clump that can stay for now (lower right)

A huge job awaits Allan this winter: pruning the wisteria.  It is so overgrown you could hardly see the flowers.  He will have to do the pruning because I get dizzy looking up; I will do the hauling to the trailer.  Probably this will happen at the very beginning of next February, except for some clipping back this fall before we go on staycation.

The pub called to us, and so we had an early (for us) dinner at 7:15.

fish and chips

the view from our table

How about that, we had another very good day.

 

 

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Tuesday, 11 Sept 2018

It had rained some overnight.  If the Long Beach planters were damp enough to not need watering today, our schedule would change.

a different angle on the post office garden

We dropped off a composter at the Shelburne Hotel for Chef Casey to use.

behind the kitchen, not part of the garden!

Long Beach

We parked twice so I could poke at two planters.  Yay, we can skip watering till at least tomorrow. The planters mostly did not look terribly sat upon from Rod Run weekend, although I did see some that looked squashed along the edge.

We picked up our cheque at city hall and tidied the garden a bit.

north side: salmon pink hesperantha, undesirable volunteer orange montbretia is getting a temporary pass.

city hall, west side

looking west down the Bolstad approach

After a bank run to deposit cheques, we dumped debris—and picked up six of the innards (root ball and plants) of the hanging baskets at the city works dump.  I look forward each year to getting them for good compost makings.

Because of not having to water, we would do Wednesday’s route today, except for the Depot Restaurant.

Diane’s garden

After light deadheading at the Red Barn, we deadheaded at Diane’s. (No Cosmo the barn cat at the Red Barn today….I hope he is ok.)

I did the roadside garden:

Allan did the raised box garden.

Allan’s photo, pre deadheading

Allan’s photo

cosmos, allium seedhead

statice and cosmos

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We are doing KBC every other week now.  Thus we had an hour and forty five minutes of tidying to do, more worth the long drive than just an hour.  It is time to begin the very gradual cutting down of the garden.  (I’d leave mine totally wild all winter, except that I want room to mulch.  Tourist gardens get made tidy and rather sparse for winter.)

birdbath view

sanguisorba

Lonicera japonica ‘Aureo-reticulata’ and Hydrangea ‘Izu No Hana’

Tetrapanax papyrifer ‘Steroidal Giant’ and offspring

Although Allan disagreed, I insisted that the big lower leaf was yellowing and had to be clipped.

Hamamelis leaves are turning.

hamamelis and Miscanthus ‘Gold Bar’

black currants

rose, hesperantha, Japanese anemone

autumn crocus

before pulling aged Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

and after (Allan’s photo)

We finished the job in a drenching and welcome rain.

KBC guest on motorcycles glad to arrive (Allan’s photo)

As we drove home, it was only 4 PM and seemed to early to quit, so I suggested we check up on the

Shelburne Hotel.

I was glad we did because I found a bit of a cosmos catastrophe.  Since I was there for lunch yesterday with Our Kathleen, either from something romping through the garden or maybe some strong rain, several big stems of the tall cosmos that are just starting to bloom had snapped off and were lying all cattywampus.  I did considerable clipping.  As for photos, I have one looking north from last Friday:

looking north

and one from after I clipped and hauled today:

A big one to the right is totally gone because every stem was broken off at the base.

I must decide later this week whether or not to severely clip or pull this one that has flopped forward onto other plants:

Should it stay or should it go now?

Even though it’s blooming, I think it will be for the chop.

Allan, meanwhile, had dug out those Stella D’Oro daylilies in deep shade that had defeated me last week.

before

after

before

after (Allan’s photos)

We got done at 5:15.  Allan immediately agreed to my suggestion that we go to the Depot for an early dinner.

The Depot Restaurant

artichoke fritos and olives as an appetizer

My main motivation was to have two favourite dishes that would soon disappear when the fall menu is reinstated.

refreshing cold gazpacho

and Mediterranean salad

Allan had his favourites:

clam chowder

Parmesan chicken

At home, I got to pet the ever patient Rudder.

And before dark, we got all the compost debris unloaded and back to the bins.

I am most pleased that dusk comes at 7:30 now, because I WILL keep going until dark. Earlier darkness is the only way that our workdays begin to get shorter. I am longing for staycation to come, with darkness at 4:30, rain, and time to catch up on books and my favourite blogs.

 

 

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Wednesday, 30 May 2018

The Depot Restaurant

We checked on the watering, although not the window boxes because we were in a hurry with much planned for today.

camassia and rodgersia (Allan’s photo)

The Red Barn Arena

This little pot by the barn door looked good.

The first section of garden looked good.

But further on, Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ was drooping from lack of watering.  The same thing happened last year, and I this year I decided it had to go.

I give up on the idea of yellow sunflowers by a red barn.  I have to rethink and plant only the most drought tolerant plants here.

I left a little bit of it by a barrel.  They get watered a bit more regularly and so some water might spill over.

Cosmo the barn cat

Allan’s photo

in the barn (Allan’s photo)

thirsty coreopsis by the barn

I need to remove that coreopsis and replace with something that needs minimal water.  This particular barrel used to get watered more regularly…

We then went next door to…

Diane’s garden

Allan’s photo

our good friend Misty

back yard containers

talking with client and friend Diane by the septic box garden (which still needs more!)

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

Allan potted up a new calla lily that Diane had brought home.

the roadside garden

verbascum

valerian and catmint against the house (Allan’s photo)

 

Basket Case Greenhouse

It’s hard to drive by without stopping.

Penny  (Allan’s photo)

Deb’s garden

We took a break to tour two gardens: Steve and John’s bayside garden and the work going on at Deb’s garden (formerly the Barclay garden), where Dave and Melissa (Sea Star Gardening) have been working hard for the new owner.

future farmers’ market produce garden

planting trees in new berms along the driveway

North Beach Garden Gang

the way to Willapa Bay

Next door is Steve and John’s Bayside Garden.  We walked through it before returning to work.  That self guided tour will be our next post; their garden always deserves its own space.

Steve and John’s garden from Deb’s (Allan’s photo)

Klipsan Beach Cottages

This year, we did not get around to cutting back a native grass on the edge of the woodsy swale.  I asked Allan to just dig it out, which I have thought of doing every year.

before

It was big.

after (Allan’s photos)

elephant garlic (Allan’s photo)

Sarah (Allan’s photo)

There is some talk that if Mary and Denny move away after retiring, we might take Sarah and her brother Timmy.

After grooming the garden, I took some photos for the Klipsan Beach Cottages Facebook page.

Tetrapanax

bearded iris

Allium bulgaricum

also known as Nectaroscordum

Agastache ‘Acapulco Salmon and Pink’

birdbath view

Tiger Eyes sumac

corokia cotoneaster

On the way south, we stopped at…

The Planter Box

I sought and acquired a pineapple sage.

And a couple more tomatoes and some cukes.

Shelburne Hotel

Allan screwed some wire between trellis and big flower pots to help mitigate the windsail effect on the trellises.

Allan’s photos

I trimmed back the big sanguisorba that I had transplanted from KBC last week; it had just kept on looking a bit wilty around the edges.

Allan’s photo

Port of Ilwaco

We watered several of the gardens along Howerton Avenue.

on Waterfront Way (Allan’s photo)

in a curbside garden (Allan’s photo)

Montana Mary had asked why we call one little garden “the driveover garden”.  Here it is, a tiny bed between big parking lots and driveways.  Big trucks drive over it sometimes.

Another tiny bed by the port office:

Linaria purpurea (toadflax) seeds itself around but is not really up to the harsh conditons:

The Depot Restaurant

We had our North Beach Garden Gang dinner tonight.  On the way in to the restaurant, I saw that the window boxes were not getting watered.  (Roxanne from The Basket Case plants them up and we care for them, relying on the sprinkler system to water them.)  This led to a flurry to Allan watering them with a jug of water that we carry for emergencies, me fretting over them, and texts to various people.

Finally, dinner.  It was burger night.  We are thankful at this time of year for restaurants that let us dine at eight.  Restaurants that close at eight are no good to us now.

Allan’s photo

chocolate pot du creme

Annuals planting time is over except for at home, where I soon have to plant in my garden two six packs of painted sage and tomatoes and cukes from the Planter Box.

 

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Saturday, 17 March 2018

Just walking around the quilt show in the late morning made my legs hurt (not my knee) to the point where I wondered if I would get any at home gardening done today.  But I must try!  I do not know why I was so sore at the show….maybe too much standing in one place while gazing admiringly at the quilts.

When we got home, Skooter was on my go bag again….

Calvin and Skooter

Allan had agreed to help me with two difficult digging tasks, part of making room for two of my four new roses.

First was to move a Miscanthus ‘Variegatus’ that was blocking a view into one of the garden beds in summer.  Moving it further back will also give room for a new rose.

chopping into sections with an axe before digging

after with smaller piece of the grass further back

Meanwhile, I dug out a tatty columnar evergreen (some sort of Juniper, which eventually was given another chance near the fence in Allan’s garden.  He said it looked like a “Grandma tree”, as in a boring arborvitae.  I said it had been a special tree, once.  I think it might green up again.  Or not.

before

a pitiful specimen

In the same large bed, both of my apple trees and a Calycanthus are leaning dramatically because of wind.

Calycanthus ‘Hartlage Wine’; I later put some more soil on there.

Two apple trees leaning at the same angle, from the winter wind off the port.

Allan also got a side runner piece pried off of my Lonicera fragrantissima.  I would like the whole thing out of the spot it’s in but that is just sooooo difficult.  (If someone wants it enough to dig it out, please…it is yours!)  I love it, just not in that spot, and I have been starting others in better places.  I want that garden bed opened up.

fragrant winter Lonicera (honeysuckle) in bloom in the winter…The hummingbirds were feasting from this.

It is this big now and I want it gone.

I admired a late winter bloomer:

pulmonaria

and another pulmonaria

We had a visitor, Judy of Ocean Park, with a birthday gift! (And Larry, who stayed in their vehicle because he had the sniffles and knows I am a hypochondriac.)

I just had to finish planting a second start of silver santolina in my cat memoiral garden to be.

Judy made me a beautiful birthday corsage, as she had done for Allan on his birthday.

and cute socks from my favourite shop, NIVA green!

Allan remembered one other plant I had asked him to remove, a big tatty libertia in the front garden.  It was starting to put out all sorts of side plants, including on the other side of the entry sidewalk, so I decided it must all go.  It did not look right in this spot:

Allan’s photo, before

during

after I dug out all the small pieces and transplanted a Pacific coast iris there.

Some of the small pieces will be planted in the port curbside gardens.  It is beautiful in bloom.

Libertia grandiflora in my garden, 5-14-13, back when it was well behaved

It had been given me by someone who likes to plant salal in gardens, so perhaps I should not have been surprised when it turned out to be a runner.

I cannot put a rose there because deer tend to work their way into the front garden over the low fence and through my bamboo and wire barrier.

As we were finishing up that project, we had a visit from our new neighbour….

and Yarrow

Allan went away to buy a piece of iron to mend the work trailer.  Before dinner, I opened some birthday presents.

3-D kitty card from Allan

yummies and a promising looking book from Montana Mary

a garden fairy from Shaz

Birthday dinner had started out as a tiny plan when it looked like Melissa was going to be out of town for family reasons.  I had made a small reservation for four at the Depot (not a place I would think of trying to have a big DO on a Saturday St Patrick’s Day).  Then Melissa and Dave were available so we upped it to six and then to seven with Ed.  The Depot was patient and accommodating with all the changes.  I brought some libertia starts and was able to give some away to Ed.

The Depot Restaurant

Corsage going back on for dinnertime.

J9’s artichoke fritos

wilted spinach salad

surveying the first course

Southern Comfort Pork for Our Kathleen

Chef Michael’s delicious shepherd’s pie

flourless chocolate torte

apple cobbler dessert (Allan’s photo)

Nancy presented me with a birthday candle in my vanilla bean flan, and I got my wish that no one sang happy birthday.

I look forward to reading this book from Melissa and Dave (and to planting the Sanguisorba ‘Lilac Squirrel that Mel found for me at Plant Nerd Night in Portland!):

….And to trying out this mason bee home from Our Kathleen.

As part of a birthday celebration, and because rain is expected, we will take tomorrow off, as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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