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Posts Tagged ‘dianthus’

Today will be mostly befores and afters, due to lack of writing time.  The days are long, and we are often out in the garden till dusk.

So:  At Larry and Robert’s, the beginnings of a project and a tidying of the garden.

Allan digs out an azalea that Larry wanted transplanted...

Allan digs out an azalea that Larry wanted transplanted…

new area to be planted by back porch

new area to be planted by back porch

azalea installed

azalea installed

Allan gets the call from Box K Auto repair and runs for the bus which leaves the port in five minutes!

Meanwhile, I do the tidying on the existing garden, especially the removal of annoying Scilla foliage:

before, east side garden

before, east side garden

after

after

the garden boat

the garden boat

next door, Tom and Judy's lupines highlighted against purple foliage

next door, Tom and Judy’s lupines highlighted against purple foliage

The lupines were past their peak, but what a great effect!

Walking home to meet Allan and the car, I saw:

over the fence:  Judy's Eryngium 'Sapphire' Blue'

over the fence: Judy’s Eryngium ‘Sapphire’ Blue’

This plant is known as “LB” because I had intended it for there, but Judy wanted it so much.  (We got more for Long Beach later.)

Judy's Dianthus

Judy’s Dianthus

My garden looks pretty bright when you walk toward it from the west.  I planted that corner in the brightest colours so Nora could see it easily from her window.  Walking by the window where Nora often sat and waved and smiled at me is now a poignant moment.

a spot of colour from one lot away

a spot of colour from one lot away

With the car retrieved, we went to Olde Towne to celebrate getting it back;  the Peninsula Quilt Guild was there as well, including Ann for whom we were about to go garden.

Quilt Guild

Quilt Guild

Then on to Ann’s.  More befores and afters:

before

before

after

after

before

before

after

after

before

before

after!

after!

Ann has some new garden art from her friend in Spokane.

art

art

And gorgeous plants as always:

Siberian Iris

Siberian Iris

hostas

hostas, oxalis, and ferns

another must-have poppy

another must-have poppy

a peek into an enchanted garden

a peek into an enchanted garden

We then went to the port to finish the weeding where I left off yesterday.

Howerton Street garden outside Marie Powell Gallery

Howerton Street garden outside Marie Powell Gallery

I have totally gone off New Zealand flax (above) anywhere near a sidewalk (for one thing, it is too poky), so this is the only garden along Howerton that still has them.  I would imagine that Marie and Randy Powell are fond of them because they (the Powells) go the New Zealand in the winter!  So we try to keep these trimmed back rather than proposing their removal.

Howerton Street garden by Port Office

Howerton Street garden by Port Office

The gardens we have totally replanted at the port are more like the above:  small plants, clear sightlines for traffic, and no river rock to roll around while weeding. The plant that gets the most comments is Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’.

Sapphire Blue sea holly

Sapphire Blue sea holly

sea holly

evening light

evening light

On the other side of the Port buildings:

a boat called Summer Rose

a boat called Summer Rose

(left) the Rumrunner

(left) the Rumrunner

part of the charter fleet

part of the charter fleet

That view is a good one to end the workday with, as well as this one where we dump weeds down at the east end of the port.

nature

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I did take a break from weeding yesterday to visit my gardening friends four doors down, but only for a very few minutes to admire the improved mini-stream in their courtyard.  Tom cleaned the pump and the water runs more vigorously through the miniature landscape.

tiny

tiny stream

with tiny dog

with tiny dog head

Towbeh wanted her picture taken.

Towbeh wanted her picture taken.

Beep had to be asked to pose.

Beep had to be asked to pose.

Stymie was a bit of a curmudgeon.

Stymie was a bit of a curmudgeon.

Judy and Tom have been planting out some pretty new plants:

Dianthus

Dianthus

another Dianthus

another Dianthus

a row of Dianthus (Tom likes them)

a row of Dianthus (Tom likes them)

one of the three new maples recently acquired from The Planter Box

one of the three new maples recently acquired from The Planter Box

and another

and another

and the third

and the third

a salvia?

a salvia?

I have that same plant and it came thr0ugh the winter but is just barely budding.  Hm, three of those might be good in my Veterans Field garden…

daisy

I also visited Eryngium “LB”, so named because he was supposed to go to Long Beach but Judy snagged him first!

It turned out I did not need him..

It turned out I did not need him..

LB will be even more gorgeous when his flowers turn ‘Sapphire Blue’.

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Because my old friend Bryan lived two blocks from the Fauntleroy ferry, and because he sometimes had work for Robert, we traveled back and forth to Seattle a few times a year in 1996 and 1997.

Jane’s garden

In ’96, we made a garden for my accountant, Jane, at her home in Laurelhurst.

Below:  First we dug up a square of lawn atop a brick walled bed.

lawn dug up and boxwoods placed

March ’96:  lawn dug up and boxwoods placed

But, oops, we found a concrete lip just down a bit inside the edge, so we moved the boxwoods in a bit and planted Dianthus along the edge instead.

emergency redesign!

March ’96:  emergency redesign!

May '96, filling in nicely

May ’96, filling in nicely

midsummer, poppies

midsummer, poppies

midsummer: Jane's with cosmos

midsummer: Jane’s with cosmos

late summer with a big white Cleome

late summer with a big white Cleome

autumn '96 with Lavatera and chrysanthemums

autumn ’96 with Lavatera and chrysanthemums

Jane's garden in autumn with a late blooming Salvia and mums

Jane’s garden in autumn with a late blooming Salvia and mums

Bryan’s garden

Bryan had a lot of money and liked our company, so he created a project for us at his house, simply making a flower garden in one corner of his lawn.

beginning to dig

beginning to dig

Bertie continued his escape artist ways. We tried tying him to a cement H block only to find him chasing a car down the street hauling it behind him. Bryan loved Bertie and put more fencing around the yard to keep him in since we were regular visitors. Once when the ferry traffic was going by, he said “Whose that stupid dog chasing cars?” Of course it was Bertie, who had somehow escaped the fence and had to be chased down with our truck.  He could not resist the truck so would jump in the passenger door as soon as one pulled up next to him.

Bryan's garden in late summer, with Cleome and Cosmos

Bryan’s garden in late summer, with Cleome and Cosmos

Mina lobata on Bryan's fence

Mina lobata on Bryan’s fence

And a disaster

In autumn of that year, Jane’s daughter and son in law hired us to build a wall for them out of a hollow cottage stone type of material at their suburban house.  We were not experienced, nor were they.   The wall was four or five courses tall at its highest point, only two at its lowest.  It did not seem terribly daunting because the tall corner did not have a very long run, and most of the wall was low.  They gave us the materials and a diagram of how the blocks fit together, and as each course of the wall went in, the idea was to fill the hollow centers of the blocks with gravel.  It was a hard job but got us a nice paycheck (much cheaper than hiring experienced hardscapers).  Then within the month came a “100 year flood” type of rainstorm.  The tallest portion of the wall bowed and began to collapse and it was ascertained that we had assembled it upside down…or was it backwards?   Either way, I felt we had to return part of the money we had earned, even though we had been clear that we were novices at wall building and that the diagrams were unclear.  (The owners had seen us build it and seemed to think we were doing it right.)  That was it for me with Seattle jobs.  The stress of having something go wrong so far away convinced me that we had to keep our successes …and possible failures….close to home so that we could fix anything that went rock.  Ironically, that was the only major failure we ever had in our gardening career.

Moral:  Be sure when hiring out the building of a wall to get someone experienced.   And as a worker, say no to hardscaping unless you are qualified to do it right.   I now specialize only in taking care of plants.

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We rushed about from job to job all week, spending as much time as possible (not enough) weeding the Long Beach beach approach garden because of an event (The Beach to Chowder Run) that would draw many pedestrians. I think perhaps the most tiring time of gardening is done. We have almost all of the cosmos planted. And as far as plants for jobs, we have only one small table (including some cosmos) waiting to go in at the Shelburne when the fence is painted. There were a couple of days of such busy-ness that I couldn’t see the flowers for the work…and took no photos to record those gardens.

Wiegardt Gallery garden

What I did notice: Again, I love the reseeded plants in the parking area at the Wiegardt Gallery and the Knautia macedonica in the front corner.

Stipa gigantea at Andersen’s RV Park

We worked for the second time this year at the always fun Anthony’s Home Court*.  I’d show you how cute the cottages are but am waiting for a day when the colourful rainbow banners are out, so instead here’s a leaky birdbath that I filled with sedums. (below left)

(Above right) The golden marjoram at the back of the pond by Pacific Realty in Long Beach gives the garden a lot of zip.  The Erysimum ‘Bowles’ Mauve’ was covered with stalks of purple flowers but I trimmed them back as they were almost spent, and got well stung by a bee that I accidentally grabbed.  Allan had his head next to the waterfall so missed out on my cries of woe at first, then got the bee sting gel which proved to be very effective.

On Saturday after a garden grooming session at the Shelburne, we spent the rest of the day working on all three gardens at Discovery Heights.

Top garden all nicely weeded along the road and middle garden with dianthus and sea thrift along the front edge

(above) Dianthus in middle garden, and lower garden with its waterfalls of Ceanothus ‘Point Reyes’ and Cotoneaster.  Much as I love their flowing effect, they are consuming some rather precious Helianthemums.  Some moving of the latter will be required in the fall.

And Sunday will be a day off.  I am hoping this will have been the last of the very hard weeks until fall clean up time so that we can enjoy gardening more and perhaps have more time at home.  I don’t particular relish working seven days a week, and yet am emotionally attached to all “my” gardens and cannot bear to let any of them go.

*2012 note: Anthony’s Home Court has new owners, does not seem to be open, but it looks like there is work being done on the rental cottages.

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