Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Dichroa febrifuga’

Wednesday, 16 August 2017

After a glorious garden tour day trip, we were back to our Wednesday work rounds.

at home, Dichroa febrifuga (right)

Davidia ‘Lady Sunshine’

at the post office

The Depot Restaurant

…the usual watering and weeding….

south and east of the dining deck

the view from inside (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

hops dangling from the lattice (Allan’s photo)

lattice wall of hops on north side of deck

Allan’s photo

north of the dining deck

lilies and persicaria

Once upon a time, when I first started buying lilies, I did not like the ones with polka dots.  Now I love them.

You can see I cut off the pollen on flowers that might brush and stain people’s clothing.

The barrels and window box flowers on the north side are planted by Roxanne from the Basket Case.

Diane’s garden

Holly arrives home and is happy to see me.

Misty relaxing

my dear old friend Misty

the roadside garden with Stipa gigantea and blue Perovskia

project for this fall: start planting up this septic tank box

The Red Barn

While I took care of Diane’s garden, Allan watered and deadheaded at the Red Barn.

oregano

I will replace this sad old Erysimum soon!

The Basket Case Greenhouse

I wanted to see what new perennials were available, and did find some, along with a chrysanthemum that will have “green” flowers.

lots of good new lavenders

zinnias

I found some Geranium ‘Rozanne’ which I will keep till later for replacing four of the ‘Orion’ geraniums in the Long Beach welcome sign.

me and Buddy

sweet Penny (Allan’s photo)

We stayed for a long time having a conversation about current events, which was so absorbing (described as a mental health break) that when I finally said we must get back to work, we almost drove off with the van tailgate open. A shout from Roxanne’s father saved the day.

Klipsan Beach Cottages 

looking in the east gate

blue berries on Billardia longiflora

honeysuckle berries

lilies

lilies and veronicastrum

in a container, white flowered little shrub that I cannot ID

hydrangea glowing blue in the shade

lilies and cosmos

hardy fuchsia

hummingbird on agapanthus (Allan’s photo)

We have started to pull some of the bloomed-out Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’.  It will always come back.

before and after (Allan’s photos)

The Anchorage Cottages

office courtyard (with a peculiar camera effect on the chimney)

sweet peas

center courtyard

center courtyard garden

I met this darling Cairn Terrier.

Port of Ilwaco

We watered the Howerton Avenue curbside gardens under our watering care, from the Ilwaco Pavilion to the west end.

It started as a warm evening.

gardens still looking fine

Miscanthus ‘Gold Bar’ (Allan’s photo)

Eryngium and yarrow (Allan’s photo)

Time Enough Books garden boat

I trimmed back the elderberry but my foot hurt too much to walk on the river rock to pick off the yellow leaves!

The next morning, I would be delivering some flowers to Nisbett Gallery and I’d ask Allan to pick off those yellow leaves.

Just as we were finishing the watering, the weather quite suddenly turned to this:

While the drizzle was enough to make us soaking wet, it was only enough to briefly refresh the gardens.  The watering had still been necessary.  Of course, Allan got asked by a passerby why he was watering while it was raining.

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Monday we were still somewhat in garden tour mode as we were picking up and delivering some of the Edible Tour canned food to the non-vehicular abode of Lisa, tour organizer.  The tickets were purchased with either money or cans of food, all to benefit our local food banks.

First, we stopped at The English Nursery, one of the four ticket sales points.  Owner Dirk had a bag of canned food for us and en envelope of ticket money.

English Nursery in Seaview

English Nursery in Seaview

birdhouses for sale

birdhouses for sale

open

Dirk Sweringen

Dirk Sweringen

One of the specialities of the English Nursery is a great collection of hostas.

also perennials and ornamental grasses

also perennials and ornamental grasses

plants

plants

Dirk is also a photographer and is working on developing the building on the property into a gallery (and once upon a time he said a teahouse, an idea we quite like).

Dirk's photos

Dirk’s photos

When I told him how few people had attended the tour, Dirk proposed what I think it an absolutely brilliant idea.  Why not have the edible tour be on the Sunday after the Saturday Music in the Gardens tour?    It could be advertised as “Garden Tour Weekend at the Beach.”  Hotels could offer special deals, like “book our garden tour weekend package and get tour tickets” sort of thing.  The edible tour would have to start earlier than noon, eleven at least, because visitors would be touring before returning home to the cities.  I think the gardens would look better on the third weekend in July (although fewer ripe tomatoes).  What do you think?  I have since run this idea past both tour organizers and it is being…thought about.

Next we stopped at The Planter Box to drop off ours and the Karnofskis’ garden tour signs.  (The signage is very good for the edible tour, nice big wooden signs…so we can’t blame that for the lack of visitors!)  The owners of the Planter Box are very involved with the local grange which provides the signs.  We picked up more canned food bags.  Now that the tour was over, I did not have to buy any more soil for all my edible garden containers!

soil and amendments at The Planter Box

soil and amendments at The Planter Box

Teresa, Ray Millner’s daughter, was pleased to hear that his garden talk had been a big hit with tour goers.

We had to dump some debris left over from our last week’s jobs, so a stop at Peninsula Landscape Supply (where Mike makes his own mulch from yard debris)  was in order.  Look at the beautiful colour of the hemlock bark:

hemlock to the right

hemlock to the right

It is completely beyond me why I see, on garden tours, gardens mulched with red bark.  WHY?  WHY? when this natural, dark colour that looks good with our beachscapes is so readily available.  WHY?  (I am still pained by red bark that I saw on recent tour gardens, but I am too kind to rant about it on an entry about any particular garden because I don’t want to hurt the owners’ feelings.)  Our business motto is “Just say no to barkscapes” but what I really object to is RED barkscaping.

In order to pick up one more tour sign, we stopped at the Patten garden.  Andrea was home and showed us the oven where she does her Wholesome Hearth baking (available at a booth on Fridays from 4-7 PM in Long Beach at the Farmers Market).

Nancy Allen tells me this is a most amazing oven.

Nancy Allen tells me this is a most amazing oven.

view from the bakery, looking east to veg garden

view from the bakery, looking east to veg garden

dahlias in front of the bakery

dahlias in front of the bakery

Andrea told me that she had had about 27 tour guests (4 more than us!!) and that one group had arrived on motorcycles.  They did not come to our place which is a shame as Allan would have enjoyed that.  Because the Patten garden is in mid Peninsula, their guests were staggered all day long, so she did not have the long empty-of-new-guests stretch in the middle of the tour that we had!

Finally, we got to Lisa’s Homewood garden.  It had been a favourite of mine on the previous year’s edible tour and once again I was very taken with it.

With the lot facing south and lots of sun, she has a beautiful group of sunflowers in bloom.

sun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sun

sun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Homewood

Homewood:  the garden shed 

compost

The house was built by Lisa and her husband and catches lots of solar heat.

lots of sun for asparagus

Asparagus thrives in the sunny south garden.

homewood

We piled up the food cans (5 cans bought a ticket to the edible tour) in the garden for a photo; there were still some more to collect from the ticket sales at Jimella’s Café but it would be closed til Thursday.  I suppose there would be none from Adelaide’s, the ticket sales place that was, for whatever reason, CLOSED on the Sunday of the tour!!  (See previous entry for how that inconvenienced would-be tour goers.)  I have ideas about that now…There could have been another store on the same block, say…Bay Avenue Gallery…that might have been asked to take over the ticket sales at the north end on that day!….or some plan other than people driving all the way up there and finding no tickets were available in Ocean Park!  I am all exclamation-pointy about this because it still really bothers me that this happened and that the northernmost garden, Lavender And, lost out on some tour goers…and maybe we all did!)

After a long visit with Lisa in her living room (procrastinating because the day was hot) and with Patty from Lavender And who dropped by for awhile, we went to work at Golden Sands.  Just as I was reaching in the back of the car for my hand tools, my hand hit upon another plastic bag…of food cans!  Argh!   Back to Homewood we went…and took another set of photos of a much more impressive stack on cans.

cans

cans

The heat was still not inspiring us to go to work (I suppose it might have been as high as 79 degrees!) but we had to…so, back to Golden Sands.  The sprinkler problem (lack thereof) continued there, so some of our time was devoted again to hand watering rather than weeding.    This time, though, I was determined to get the place looking better so we had not scheduled much other work for the day and took some extra time…

Allan weeded this horsetail and boring daylilies section

Allan weeded this horsetail and boring daylilies section

I had time for some cutting back in the NE quadrant (outside my mum's old room)

I had time for some cutting back in the NE quadrant (outside my mum’s old room)

Her dahlias are looking fine.

Her dahlias are looking fine.

some grooming accomplished on the SW quadrant

some grooming accomplished on the SW quadrant

although there is still so very much to do.

although there is still so very much to do.

I could almost visualize the pitiful Geranium ‘Rozanne’ river in the center filling out if the sprinkler system gets fixed.  It was actually showing some blue.  At over two years old, these poor plants are a good example of stress from lack of water…Hand watering once a week is not enough.

hope

We closed out the workday with watering the Ilwaco planters and weeding and watering at the boatyard.

boatyard garden, looking north about midway along it

boatyard garden, looking north about midway along it

further north

further north

love the name of this boat

love the name of this boat

And then…home for a bit of a beautiful evening in our garden.

screened south window view

screened south window view

Below:  I had painstakingly picked every dried leaf from the stems of the Eupatorium (Joe Pye weed) below, in the gloaming on the night before our edible garden tour day.

front garden

front garden

Echinacea 'Green Envy'

Echinacea ‘Green Envy’

Tetrapanax papyrifer 'Steroidal Giant' in front garden

Tetrapanax papyrifer ‘Steroidal Giant’ in front garden

Dichroa febrifuga

Dichroa febrifuga

I could now declare that Garden Tour Season 2013 officially over (until the Cannon Beach Cottage & Garden Tour on September 14th) and it was about time we started to seriously apply ourselves to make enough money to get through the winter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Back to work, and determined as ever to thoroughly document the work year, here is a run down of the first two days of the week.

Monday, July 22

While I keep saying we will not do on- off plain old hard slog weeding jobs, I cannot resist the yellow cottage on top of Ilwaco’s School Hill whose owner, Robin, asked us to weed last fall and then again about a month ago.  We finally got round to it.  This cottage used to be in the Ilwaco boatyard (before it was the boatyard) and along with two other cottages was moved.  One of those three cottages became the original Tangly Cottage, my residence from  1994 through fall of 2010.  Like this one, it was tiny.  Robin told me when the yellow cottage was moved, the old woman who lived in it was asked if she wanted to move to its new location.  She said “I’ve always wanted to live in the hill!”  Later, the cottage was dwelled in by a gardener who since had to go to assisted living, and there are just remnants of her garden left.  If I am remembering correctly what Robin told us last fall, the gardening tenant used to own Ilwaco’s Sunset Tavern (which is no more).   I heard from someone else that she was a kind woman who would feed meals to poor retired fisherman and let them take a shower in a bathroom above the tavern.

I just like to be around this yellow cottage on School Hill.

I just like to be around this yellow cottage on School Hill.

garden bed west of the cottage, noon

garden bed west of the cottage, noon

five forty PM

five forty PM

a little pond, at noon

a little pond, at noon

and at five forty PM

and at five forty PM

also weeded and excavated shells and rock in this area

also weeded and excavated shells and rock in this area

the west side of the cottage

the west side of the cottage

looking south from west side of cottage

looking south from west side of cottage

When we are in the yellow cottage garden, I feel that if I owned it and lived there, and also owned the enormous field to the west and the vintage Spartan trailer therein, my life would be perfection!

looking west...in my dreams...

looking west…in my dreams…and tsunami safe

former deer-proof garden

former deer-proof garden

still to do....

still to do….

By the south side of the cottage is another remnant of the former tenant’s garden:

lilies

lilies

I would like just a little start of this bulb...

I would like just a little start of this bulb…

As we drove away, we were amused by the deer-pruned trees just south down the hill…

deer topiary

deer topiary

Tuesday, July 23

Tuesday, we finally got back to Ann’s School Hill garden after sorely neglected it to get three other gardens ready for the Music in the Gardens tour.

Ann and her husband, whom she fondly called "The Finn", care for the veg garden.

Ann and her husband, whom she fondly called “The Finn”, care for the veg garden.

garden below the house, 12:15 PM

garden below the house, 12:15 PM

4:45 PM

4:45 PM

The creeping buttercup comes out of the clay soil like butter now that we have mulched with Soil Energy and Cow Fiber.  I hope to apply another layer this fall along with starts of some more deer resistant perennials.

The old windows around the veg garden are from the old high school, I believe.

The old windows around the veg garden are from the old high school, I believe.

the front garden, weeded

the front garden, weeded

Then, after spending the day on School Hill, we went home to our own garden.

At home, I am so pleased to finally have acquired and grown well a Dichora febrifuga!

soon to be a beautiful blue!

soon to be a beautiful blue!

lilies in front garden at home

lilies in front garden at home

lilies in back garden

lilies in back garden

east side bed, back garden

east side bed, back garden

Clematis 'Etoile Violette' still going strong

Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’ still going strong

I never could quite figure out what to do with the kale I grew (from the plants Nancy Allen kindly gave me), and the leaves got too big and bitter, so I chopped them.  Also, they had caterpillars, and I found that disturbing.  By the time I chopped them, the caterpillars seemed to have moved on.  It is working, getting new little leaves, which may make them last till the Edible Garden Tour on August 11!

kale experiment (and some cilantro in foreground pot)

kale experiment (and some cilantro in foreground pot)

Finally, look at the size of this lily!  I have several so they must be from a Costco bag.

enormous lily flower

enormous lily flower

just one petal next to a kitchen spoon!

just one petal next to a kitchen spoon!

There is great charm in spending two days gardening only in Ilwaco!

Read Full Post »

I confess: This is actually written on August 12th, because work has been all-consuming, and during days off I have been obsessed with a big pruning project at home.

This isn’t the most suspenseful way of telling the tale, but on the morning of Saturday, August 4th, I read an article by Dan Hinkley in Garden Design magazine in which he mentioned Dichroa febrifuga, an Asian shrub with hydrangea-like flowers and cobalt blue berries.  It’s been a fixture on my must-have list for years, and I have indeed bought a couple of them by mail order but they were small and fizzled out.  Why, I thought to myself in frustration, do I STILL not have this excellent shrub?  It’s not one I see in nurseries.  And then, as kind fate would have it, by the end of the day I had a dichroa febrifuga of my very own!

We had been planning another garden tour day trip.  (If I lived in Seattle or Portland with their excellent weekly open gardens by members of the Northwest Perennial Alliance and the Hardy Plant Society of Oregon, I’d rarely spend a spring or summer Saturday gardening at home.)

Up the Columbia River we drove to a small riverside town, stopping on the way at Duffy’s Irish Pub in Gray’s River because Allan had discovered it on his latest motorcycle trip and wanted me to see the punk rock poster collection inside. Indeed, it took me back to happy days of the 80s in Seattle clubs.  Back in the 80s, my significant other, Bryan, had managed a delicously grotty punk club called the Gorilla Room, and our subsequent life together included many shows… and we stayed, when visiting Vancouver, B.C., at the D.O.A. house. So it certainly took me way way back to see a DOA poster on this wall in small town southwestern Washington.

Punk rock memories at Duffy’s Pub

The pub’s back deck overlooks a charming river and their garden features an interesting array of paths, convincing me all the more that I love walking a mysterious warren of paths between drastically raised beds and that I like to see a variety of materials used, and that I forgot to do a blog entry about our visit in Seattle to the Tilth garden with  its enjoyable paths.

paths and raised beds at Duffy’s Irish Pub

The paths at Duffy’s Pub.. Some garden designer’s articles say you must, to be tasteful, stick with the same material throughout a garden, but I find this much more fascinating.

Almost across the street from the pub sits one of my favourite tiny cottages or shacks. Further up river, we stopped at a nursery in Skamokawa.  Twas quiet and off-season but I enjoyed the view of plants for sale on a dock….Allan pointed out it’s a rare nursery where you can shop by boat.

adorable shack………………and the dock at Skamokawa Gardens Nursery

Eventually, after a detour down a scenic narrow road, we arrived at the small town upriver and bought tickets for the “home and garden” tour and read the descriptions of the four homes and gardens on offer.  A sense of doom settled over me, as the descriptions were all of the houses with no detailed mention of the gardens at all.  Any avid gardener would describe the gardens well.  The houses may have been historic, but that was not clear from the information sheet and I realized that while I very much enjoy a tour of, say, Cannon Beach cottages, I don’t like seeing houses whose owners just sound like they are proud of their possessions.  The closest thing to a garden description was someone waxing enthusiastic about their river view deck.  So, feeling rather mean but being as nice as could be, we got our money back from the ticket vendor and cancelled our tour mission!  And now…what to do!?

I remembered my recent email enquiry to owner Lisa Mahnke of Evergreen Terrace Garden this side of Longview, and that the nursery was open in August by appointment only, and called her…and she agreed to let us in!  So the afternoon was gloriously saved and after a drive up the amazingly steep gravel road to the almost-secret nursery we were rewarded with a personal tour of the woodland paths around the enviable lake…and there, among many very cool plants, I saw a Dichroa febrifuga…and indeed, she had one for sale in a pot!!  So from years of forgetting my desire for that shrub, to being reminded of it by Dan Hinkley that very morning, I suddenly had one of my very own!  (Not to mention, of course, several other choice plants…After all, I had to make it worth Lisa’s while to open the nursery for us.)

Dichroa febrifuga in the ground, and MINE in a pot

(Above) the gardens at Evergreen Terrace, including a so-desirable little lake. I think she said the tree in above right foliage close-up is a cutleaf Alder…very striking but it would never have fit into our car.

Evergreen Terrace is creating an amazing “henge” garden which we did not see because it’s at a lower level of the nursery, but I remember it from a visit years ago.  The nursery’s website has some good photos of it. [2012 note: The website seems to be gone, and I can’t find any information about or not this wonderful nursery even exists any more.  The henge garden was a Stonehenge like display of huge rocks enhanced with plants.]

Plants acquired from Evergeen Terrace: Morus ‘Nuclear Blast’, Azara microphylla (two, for clients), Gunnera prorepens (a tiny stoloniferous gunnera from New Zealand), Cryptomeria knaptonesis (white tipped, will grow in shade), 2 Athyrium filix-femina ‘Dre’s Dagger’ (a striking fern), and Dichroa febrifuga.

On the way back we stopped at a cafe/hotel/elderhostel kayak place in Skamokawa, where I’d eaten good sandwiches before and did again. For some reason I completely failed to photograph the picturesque network of boardwalks along the river behind the buildings.

Read Full Post »