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Posts Tagged ‘Dranunculus vulgaris’

Sunday, 1 March 2020

Allan went off shopping across the river, partly for a new string trimmer and partly for pandemic supplies—in other words, enough canned goods, rice and beans and other staples to enable us to avoid shopping for a month if, heavens forfend, there is a coronavirus pandemic here. We should be able to go to work since our work can be pretty much non-peopling. I’m not scared, exactly, but I am depressed to have to think about all this, and worried for friends who are in fragile health, and sad because Seattle Carol (a Seattle metro bus driver) will probably cancel an early April visit during this uncertain time. Of course, I am made for being a recluse but would rather not have such a potentially dire reason.
Today I did a bit of propagating for my plant sale, wondering if fate will even allow The World’s Longest Garage Sale to take place as usual on Memorial Day weekend in late May.
The big plan was to prune all my roses that are not the old fashioned kind. The ramblers and shrubs I just let do what they will except for removing dead wood.
After the front garden roses, I got distracted with other projects….

Weeding a small front garden bed…

Yesterday ….

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Today….

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I removed yet another Ilex ‘Sky Pencil’ that had suddenly died, as they seem wont to do…

4B339961-5D3B-4C2C-AE12-77746D5BDBCCIn the background, behind the Melianthus, said ilex had been fine till it turned up its toes just last week. I probably won’t replace it with another shrub since the Melianthus would shade it out unless I put in something quite tall to begin with.  My budget doesn’t run to that.

I decided I must get the celandine out from the two beds by the front gate. Its pretty bright yellow daisy flowers set a bad example, making passersby think that it is a lovely winter bloomer that they should have.
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It has smothered out some choice small flowering bulbs that I used to have in that area. Because its root clumps leave tiny earth colored nodules behind, it will be back next year no matter how much sifting I do, thus the removal is not impressive as it might look.
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In the far back garden where I dug and sifted and fretted over every nodule last spring, the celandine now looks like this, stronger than ever.
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Utterly maddening.
In Modern Nature, Derek Jarman says this about a childhood memory of celandine.
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Instead of pruning all of the back garden roses as planned, I allowed myself to be distracted by the second pile of compost and leaves, this pile actually on the back corner of the Nora House driveway, which is a rather rude encroachment even though I know that her granddaughter, Alicia, does not mind.
Yesterday, before and after Allan dealt with the bamboo:

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My leaf bin contents had sunk during the winter and so, after moving the compost debris to the big bins, I was able to fill the leaf bins to the top with the tarped leaves. The rest were strewn onto the driveway garden bed and the final amount filled two oyster baskets.
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My audience:

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I had found it all so exhausting and so very cold that I almost quit several times. To finish the pile was revitalizing enough that I found the oomph to prune my mother’s two tea roses, but no more.
There is still much cutting back to do, including six Stipa giganteas….

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….and two more large roses. I would have done them a disservice to prune them at the end of the day when so very tired and cold.
The last thing I managed was a brief back garden appreciation walkabout.
Oh no, some stray celandine. Was too tired to get shovel…must remember before this makes a new big patch.
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We did not get cold enough weather to kill the Azolla that covers the ponds.

3FDE589F-018C-4169-B3A2-EB6C5FACB3F1In better news, I found….

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Pulmonaria

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Physocarpus ‘Dart’s Gold’

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Corylopsis pauciflora

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Crocuses

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Thick new shoots of Dranunculus vulgaris

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Yellow hellebore

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Narcissi in the Bogsy Wood

…and in the greenhouse…

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Echeverias flowering

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Salvia Africana-lutea

…and in Allan’s garden at dusk some crocuses toning well with a hebe.
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Tomorrow just had better be an all day Jarman reading day. I’m tired of waiting!

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Sunday, 3 September 2017

We left on our day trip before 10 AM, along with a bowl of tabouli and some chocolate cupcakes for a potluck and open garden over two hours inland.

My next door neighbour, Royal, saw us off.

Our route: We had another 15 minutes still to go when we got to Castle Rock.

The first part of our drive, east of the Astoria bridge: The Columbia River abounded with little boats fishing.  (Taken while on the move; we were on too much a mission to stop for better pics)

As we passed through Castle Rock, I glimpsed some enticing public gardens.  We will visit those in tomorrow’s post.

Our destination was the garden of Evan Bean, who has worked at Longwood Garden, Plant Delights (with our friend Todd), Cistus, and now works for Plantlust.com.  His garden, at his family home about 15 minutes east of Castle Rock, was open for garden bloggers and friends.

When we arrived, met by heat in the high 90s, a few other guests had already arrived, including Sean, owner of the fabulous Cistus Nursery and Jane of the Mulch Maid blog.

Allan’s photo, as we approach the kitchen door

Needing to adjust to the heat, we indulged in the delicious potluck offerings before touring the garden.  In conversation with Evan’s mum, Nancy, we learned that the two headed calf in Marsh’s Free Museum (Long Beach, home of Jake the Alligator Man), belonged to her grandfather’s side show. Her father, “Pony Bill” Giberson, had pony rides where the Long Beach carousel now sits.  (I thought I had this right, but Evan has clarified that “my mother’s father, Leonard, donated the two-headed calf. Her grandfather, Bill, had the pony rides.”)  Nancy herself has had a career in forestry, and encouraged Evan as a child to appreciate nature.

Fortified and refreshed, we plunged into the heat and a full tour of Evan’s garden.

the impressively small ladies in waiting collection

Garden writer Amy Campion in the greenhouse, with Evan reflected in the door

The greenhouse has a mister for the plants that Evan is propagating.  I am pleased and hopeful that Allan took an interest in how it works.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

plant babies

treasures

Near the greenhouse, Nancy showed us a stump that had resisted digging out, so they burnt it to represent nearby Mount St Helens and planted a Mt St Helens azalea in it.

burnt stump

Jane photographing the circular front garden bed.

Allan’s photo

The round bed was Evan’s high school senior project, on which he spent much more time than most seniors did on theirs.  He has enhanced and improved it since then.  (He’s now in his almost-late 20s.) It had much plant interest to offer us.  We walked around it admiring everything.

Sesli gummiferum (Moon Carrot), which I very much wish I had.

Notice all the pleasing rocks in the garden.

Jane noticing the details

continuing around

two kinds of ornamental oregano

Allan’s photo

The garden bed seems round but is actually more complex.

Allan’s photo

Having made it all the way around, I turned my attention to the bed by the house.

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some form of Melianthus next to the house (Later: Evan says it is Melianthus villosus.

easy access and I like the railings

The shade of the lower garden enticed me and others.  The rest of the garden that we will see is less than a year old, except, says Evan, “a section of the rhododendron border behind the hakonechloa bed, and a scattering of trees through the rest of the garden”.

the hakanechloa bed

By now, our friend Ann (the Amateur Bot-ann-ist) had arrived, with Paul Bonine, owner of the glorious Xera Plants, from whom I would buy one of every Xera plant if I lived in Portland.

Ann in the red checked shirt

The dry creek was installed to solve some drainage problems.

starry detail

sunny wall of house

In Evan’s words: “The annual wildflowers, and even some of the fast-growing perennials and subshrubs like Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’, Salvia officinalis ‘Purpurascens’, and similar plants, were mostly put in place to fill in space and cover the ground to help reduce weeds while longer-lived plants grow. They were plants I could obtain cheaply and easily propagate more of. In some cases, I’m not even sure yet what the longer-lived plants should be, so they obviously haven’t even been planted. In most of the garden, the longer-lived plants will have to be ones that can adapt to dappled shade as the cork oaks and other trees grow. I picture layers of relatively drought-tolerant evergreen shrubs like Elaeagnus, Choisya, Mahonia repens and nervosa, mixed with a few tough, easy-care evergreen herbaceous plants like various carex for textural contrast, and here and there some deciduous perennials or ephemeral plants for added seasonal variation. Some of those plants are already in place. Some have yet to be selected and planted.”

the path back to the shady patio

 

As I knew it would be, this was the sort of garden where I could not identify a fair number of the plants.  Any mistakes are mine from when I was too shy to ask.

Tricyrtis ‘Blue Wonder’ (I asked Evan for IDs on some of these plants.)

Allan’s photo

heading into the sunshine

looking back from whence I came

The fence encloses about two acres and keeps the deer out. Evan’s mom, a forester, says that our west coast deer are lazy and that a six foot fence is enough. She also said they have a fear of breaking their legs.  Other species of deer WILL jump a six foot fence.

A group of gardeners clustered around this plant pronounced it some sort of gentian.  Evan later IDed it for us: Gentiana asclepiadea, the willow gentian.

a young castor bean

seed heads of Dranunculus vulgaris

Dranunculus vulgaris

Mimulus cardinalis

Calceolaria arachnoidea

I am smitten with this plant.

Evan recommends orange Calceolaria ‘Kentish Hero’.

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castor bean with beautiful airy coreopsis

Brachyglottis greyi, or it might be Brachyglottis ‘Otari Cloud’, says Evan.

These beds which are full sun will eventually have a bit of shade.

Allan’s photo

more lovely free flowing coreopsis

Heptacodium miconioides, which I knew, because I have one, thanks to my friend Debbie Teashon of Rainyside Gardeners.

This little guy got lots of attention.


Evan says, “”The wildflower look is sort of nice, but really not my style. It’s a planned successional stage in the gardens development, filling in space while the real garden grows.””

I must have been mad during my phase of not liking rudbeckias.

This poppy got lots of attention.

Allan’s photo

new growth.  Later I got the ID from Evan: Glaucium flavum var. aurantiacum

The shady patio is where we would soon be sitting again.

Zauschneria

Allan’s photo

a hardy geranium of some sort

the path back to the shady patio

looking out from our shady chairs

Allan’s photo

patio corner

outside the kitchen window

When we walked down to our van to depart, Nancy walked with us and, because we showed interest, took us to the kitchen garden.  It is located below the garage because the rest of the property used to be so shady.

tomatoes

yacon

That was a fine day out, with more to come, as we will tour some Castle Rock gardens on the way home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday, 2 July 2014

Olde Towne

Olde Towne

After the usual every-other-day stop at Olde Towne Café to switch compost buckets, we went to Long Beach to water all the main street planters.  I had a fairly good day physically and walked around town without much leg pain.

Allan's photo: tents selling fireworks promised much noise and chaos on the weekend

Allan’s photo: tents selling fireworks promised much noise and chaos on the weekend

a charming display outside of the Wooden Horse gift shop

a charming display outside of the Wooden Horse gift shop

In a few planters and under a few trees, Crocosmia 'Lucifer' is looking all firework-y, in time for the fourth.

In a few planters and under a few trees, Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ is looking all firework-y, in time for the fourth.

I used to have more Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ in town till I began to find it sort of a thug.  It is spectacular in its flowering, although its season is only a few weeks long, if that much.

The Salvia viridis is starting to bloom and will be the star of the planter show for a couple of months.

The Salvia viridis is starting to bloom and will be the star of the planter show for a couple of months.

Salvia viridis

Salvia viridis

cupid's dart and blue hardy geranium; this geranium, not long blooming like 'Rozanne', has come back after its first bloom because I cut it back hard when it started forming seedpods.

cupid’s dart and blue hardy geranium; this geranium, not long blooming like ‘Rozanne’, has come back after its first bloom because I cut it back hard when it started forming seedpods.

The Long Beach gazebo with baskets by Nancy of the Basket Case Greenhouse

The Long Beach gazebo with baskets by Nancy of the Basket Case Greenhouse

The planter closest to the Long Beach Tavern had been sat upon or otherwise somehow thrashed.

The planter closest to the Long Beach Tavern had been sat upon or otherwise somehow thrashed.

I took a whole bouquet of yellow Agyranthemum 'Butterfly' to the LBT crowd, as it had been broken right off.

I took a whole bouquet of yellow Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ to the LBT crowd, as it had been broken right off.

They told me they had seen a woman “messing with the planter for about fifteen minutes” not long before.  Wish I had caught her in the act!

This much painted sage was broken off, to my deep disgust.

This much painted sage was broken off, to my deep disgust.

Awhile later, to cheer myself up, I popped into my favourite shop, NIVA green, to have a quick natter with Heather.

Heather Ramsay, artist, makes many creations, including lamps made of tins.

Heather Ramsay, artist, makes many creations, including lamps made of tins.

another piece of Ramsay art

another piece of Ramsay art

I just barely resisted this teapot.

I just barely resisted this teapot.

With Long Beach all watered, we went on to the Anchorage Cottages north of town.

Anchorage, where we cut the stinky viburnum back earlier in the year,

Anchorage, where we cut the stinky viburnum back earlier in the year,

This resort was the favourite spot of our friend Kathleen Shaw before she bought her own cottage near the beach.

The Music in the Gardens tour poster, posted in the office window

The Music in the Gardens tour poster, posted in the office window

Peruvian daffodil by the office bench

Hyemnocallis festalis (Peruvian daffodil) by the office bench

and a floppy Allium albopilosum

and a floppy Allium albopilosum

Rose 'New Dawn' by the center courtyard

Rose ‘New Dawn’ by the center courtyard

Allan did some pruning on an Escallonia that had been badly hacked at on the south side of the cottages.

during....he'd already cut some floppy sideways branches

during….he’d already cut some floppy sideways branches

after: pruned to where the trunks are showing new foliage buds

after: pruned to where the trunks are showing new foliage buds

We also went out to the Sid Snyder beach approach road to turn on the soaker houses in those street planters.

In the westernmost planter, Back Alley Horse Rides is doing a good job of taking care of the petunias that they planted. (Allan's photos)

In the westernmost planter, Back Alley Horse Rides is doing a good job of taking care of the petunias that they planted. (Allan’s photos)

In the westernmost planter, Back Alley Horse Rides is doing a good job of taking care of the petunias that they planted.  (Allan's photo)

blue globe thistle in one of the planters, an excellent plant from back in volunteer planter days

blue globe thistle in one of the planters, an excellent plant from back in volunteer planter days

At home, back under the former danger tree, the Dranunculus vulgaris had bloomed for the first time.

two flowers

two flowers

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Although it is supposed to smell of rotten meat, I could detect no foul odor.

Although it is supposed to smell of rotten meat, I could detect no foul odor.

My lovely purple podded peas, from seeds given me by Garden Tour Nancy, had turned out to be purely decorative; I had not had time to pick and eat them.

My lovely purple podded peas, from seeds given me by Garden Tour Nancy, had turned out to be purely decorative; I had not had time to pick and eat them.

too old now...but I have enjoyed looking at them.

too old now…but I have enjoyed looking at them.

Calvin is getting bolder about coming out to take the air.  He even followed me partway into the garden.

Calvin is getting bolder about coming out to take the air. He even followed me partway into the garden.

In the evening, I continued to blog about our recent garden tours.  I finished writing about the very last (and one of my favourites) of over twenty gardens!

Meanwhile, Allan watered the Ilwaco planters.

While filling the water tank in the boatyard, he notcied a woman with a bird enjoying the Clamshell Railroad history sign.

While filling the water tank in the boatyard, he noticed a woman with a bird enjoying the Clamshell Railroad history sign.

The hose had popped again and he repaired another two feet of it with electrical tape.

The hose had popped again and he repaired another section of it with electrical tape.

 

 

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Saturday, 28 June 2014

Rain in the morning caused me some emotional distress about the Doggie Olympic Games, which I so wanted to be fun. I felt compelled to post my concern on Facebook, and a friend informed me the games did not begin till 1. It looked like the sky would lighten by then. I removed my post so that no one would see it and feel discouraged about going!

The rain was a good excuse for me, though, to stay in and work on my garden tour blog entries.

And for Allan, it was an excuse to run errands, including a trip to Costco. On the way, he stopped at the Ilwaco Timberland Library and saw this cunning construction put together by one (or more) of the librarians.

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At Costco, he looked at larger cameras than the little pocket cams we both use….

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and concluded they would be much to hard to deal with during everyday work.

Meanwhile, I blogged, until my friend Ed Strange (Strange Landscaping) called and asked me to walk a few blocks to look at a house for sale in Ilwaco; an old friend of his was hoping to buy it, and he said he wondered if I had been the one to install the garden. That piqued my curiosity enough to stop blogging and walk over to lower School Hill. The rain had completely stopped…so nice for the Doggie Olympic Games!

On the way, I saw this.

On the way, I saw this.

and this charming entranceway

and this charming entryway

and these

and these

When I saw where Ed was parked, I realized the house in question was a dream house of mine, or at least a dream location. I had noticed a house hidden away on the very end of a dead end street, so secret that I felt I should not even walk to the front to look at it.

The roped off street makes me wonder if the end of the street is part of the property!

The roped off street makes me wonder if the end of the street is part of the property!

There it is!

There it is! So secret!

The very secret back yard on a hill; the lot is double, 50 by 200 feet, and goes down into the woods.

The very secret back yard on a hill; the lot is double, 50 by 200 feet, and goes down into the woods.

The back door of the house hung over the yard, up in the air, as although the house is one story, it is built on a sloping foundation.

back door

back door

I immediately thought of the grotto at the Vos garden on Whidbey Island.

Our friend and realtor Cheri Diehl had the listing. Strangely, just a couple of weeks ago I had idly thought to asking her to let me know if that secret house ever came up for sale. I had been missing the hideaway qualities of my old house (not for reasons of anyone who has dropped by to visit…for other reasons, I assure you!!)

Ed admiring a tree on the property; you can see the rather tricky terrain, and storage underneath the house.

Ed admiring a tree on the property; you can see the rather tricky terrain, and storage underneath the house, probably even smaller (although probably dryer) than the basement at our old cottage.

the front porch

the front porch

photo swiped from Discovery Coast Real Estate

photo swiped from Discovery Coast Real Estate

Inside (I learned later online), there was no room for my wall of books, two small bedrooms, and a bathroom with no room for a bathtub. And yet…oh, the location!

I walked back home and got drenched in a sudden rain squall, feeling pensive. I knew the lot was too steep for me, and that the house was too small for me and Allan, and the yard was smaller than ours (which is 79 by maybe 250!) and yet…what a little dream. Someone other than me is going to have a fairy tale life there.

I went back to blogging, then at about three in the afternoon took an obligatory walk down to the Saturday Market to take some photos for Discover Ilwaco.

Walking past the lost garden around the corner from our house, where the roses are getting truly lost.

Walking past the lost garden around the corner from our house, where the roses are getting truly lost.

redtwig dogwood in front of the bank...looks like deer nibblings

redtwig dogwood in front of the bank…looks like deer nibblings

I found that during the squall, the vendors had been given permission to start packing up to go home, so the market was small compared to the usual. The others news I heard was that the Beachfront Bargain Hunt show had not been seen filming at the market that day. Too bad that they missed our perfectly weeded gardens.

De Asis Produce

De Asis Produce

rain rill in the center of Waterfront Way

rain rill in the center of Waterfront Way

On the way home, a puddle by the Don Nisbett Art Gallery

On the way home, a puddle by the Don Nisbett Art Gallery

garden by the port office

garden by the port office

I came in the back garden gate and enjoyed the garden ever so briefly (but garden tour blogging was calling to me.)

bogsy wood bridge

bogsy wood bridge

soggy Japanese iris

soggy Japanese iris

the "stop the eye" project that I still have not gotten to.

the “stop the eye” project that I still have not gotten to.

Uh oh, Geranium 'Rozanne' is swallowing Rosa glauca.

Uh oh, Geranium ‘Rozanne’ is swallowing Rosa glauca.

rain measuring device

rain measuring device

At home, the cats told me it was fine to stay indoors and blog some more.

cats

cats2

cats3

Awhile later, Luanne from Olde Towne came over and the weather allowed us to tour the garden and then sit outside and visit for over an hour.

Smokey joined us.

Smokey joined us.

The garden showed well.

The garden showed well.

Luanne picking strawberries.

Luanne picking strawberries.

I was able to tell her all about the dream of the hidden house, and how enticing it was but that it could not be. And then…more garden tour blogging.

Sunday, 29 June 2014

Because we were expecting garden guests, we were most pleased when the lawn dried off enough to mow it first. During our time off garden touring, and then all the rain, it had gotten long enough for uncomfortable walking.

Later, Debbie came over with her husband and her brother Jay, who was visiting all the way from Florida, and we had a garden tour. Allan got some photos, discreetly from afar. Jay was a delight; When he learned that that my grandmother had been my gardening mentor, he asked insightful and moving questions about her, including, quite simply, her name (Gladys Walker) and he said he thought it important to say people’s names.

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me and Jay as he asks insightful questions

me and Jay as he asks insightful questions

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Danish flag poppy

Danish flag poppy

hips of Rosa ...gosh I forget its name.

hips of Rosa …gosh I forget its name. Special. Once blooming. From Joy Creek. Was able to spout off its name to Debbie! OH! Rosa moyesii!

the bud of Dranunculus vulgaris

the bud of Dranunculus vulgaris

and another

and another

Egyptian walking onion, Allan's photo

Egyptian walking onion, Allan’s photo

Clematis 'Etoile Violette'

Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’

our new birdbath

our new birdbath

best friends having a natter

best friends having a natter

Delicious food is one thing that can draw me out of the garden and even away from the blog. On Sunday night, the Depot Restaurant was having its twice yearly paella special, and so (having been reminded by Susie of the Boreas, who had been the night before) we went out.

evening light at The Depot

evening light at The Depot

borscht and Pinot Noir

borscht and Pinot Noir

the view from our favourite table at the end of the bar

the view from our favourite table at the end of the bar

and the paella

and the paella

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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