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Posts Tagged ‘drought tolerant gardens’

Because life is more than just touring gardens, we had to get back to work.  We are indulging ourselves by only working four days a week.  We may financially regret this later. For now, it’s wonderful.

Monday, 27 July 2015

Long Beach

The first of two weekly waterings of the planters…and the once-weekly watering of the street trees.  Oh how I am thinking about Pam’s lushly irrigated Seaside gardens!  I wish our street tree gardens, small though they are, could be as lush.  The planters I don’t mind watering because I use the time for deadheading and other grooming tasks.  The street tree water hook ups are much harder to access and frustrate me so much that Allan waters them, and they only get done once a week.

Seventh and Pacific

Seventh and Pacific

Salvia viridis (painted sage)

Salvia viridis (painted sage)

Geranium 'Rozanne and a blue Agastache

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and  Agastache ‘Estella Indigo’

pink dahlia, pink painted sage

pink dahlia, pink painted sage

pink dahlia, pale pink California poppy

pink dahlia, pale pink California poppy

finger blight on the lavender!!!

finger blight on the lavender!!!  someone picked a nice big bouquet….grr.

Basket Case Greenhouse basket

Basket Case Greenhouse basket

hangs right over the planter

hangs right over the planter

If, as the sign says, no bicycles are allowed on sidewalks, why are we a couple of times a week almost collided into by a sidewalking bike!? I’m all for bicycling as an ecological form of transport, but not on the busy sidewalk. One cannot hear them coming till the whooooosh is almost next to one.  Skateboards are banned in LB town, and yet they are more audible and I think actually safer to work around.

Stormin' Norman's Kites and clothing

Stormin’ Norman’s Kites and clothing

Geranium 'Rozanne', Allan's photo. Our planters are hugely attractive to bees.

Geranium ‘Rozanne’, Allan’s photo. Our planters are hugely attractive to bees.

Geranium 'Rozanne' and golden oregano

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and golden oregano (Allan’s photo)

Allan was watering the trees and the two north blocks of planters so he got to admire my favourite one.

by Dennis Company

by Dennis Company (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

When I still had more planters to water, Allan got the horsetail off the pond garden by the stoplight.

before

before

after

after, de-fuzzed

After watering, we went out to weed on the beach approach.

the long narrow Bolstad garden

the long narrow Bolstad garden, that thin strip along the street

Out at the west end of the beach approach

Out at the west end of the beach approach

I have become so re-inspired by the beach approach since Andersen’s RV Park sold and I realized my dread of the beach approach garden was mostly because it had been years since we had enough time for it.  I felt so inspired that I thought we might even hook up a hose to the underground spigot and pour some water on the garden while we weeded it.  Allan found the hatch, swept the sand off, pried it off…

sand

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

He dug the sand off of the buried faucet....

He dug the sand off of the buried faucet….

And then he turned on the faucet…and there was no water.  We called the parks manager and it will be turned on later this week.  We have not watered out here for two years, which certainly says something about the drought tolerance of rugosa roses.  I am, however, thinking of finding ALL the buried hatches so that we can put some water on the poor dry planters along this street.  We quite simply stopped hauling buckets out to them when we both got to be 60!  The city water trailer guy (who diligently waters the hanging baskets every day, thus earning much praise from me) has been spraying them sometimes…but it is not enough.

so sad and thirsty. Heathers and rosemary left over from a volunteer planting.

so sad and thirsty. Heathers and rosemary left over from a volunteer planting.

Something must be done about this watering situation.  It is time consuming to hook up long hoses to water these planters.  OH how I envy Pam’s irrigation.

The rugosa roses are so tough. And that gallardia gets a gold star for still being alive out here.

The rugosa roses are so tough. And that gallardia gets a gold star for still being alive out here.

today's weeding job, before

today’s weeding job, before

My friend Lady B came by.

My friend Lady B came by.

Allan at work

Allan at work

I did not manage to take an after photo; Allan took this little sequence:

before

before

after

after

We had high hopes that the next day, we would finally finish this year’s first complete weeding of the beach approach garden.

Tuesday: 28 July 2015

Ilwaco Post Office: one flower left on the ridiculously giant lily, and someone keeps stripping off the flowers. It's a mystery.

Ilwaco Post Office: Someone keeps stripping off the flowers of the ridiculously giant lily. It’s a mystery.

The Red Barn and Diane’s Garden

The Red Barn garden from across the parking lot (looking north)

The Red Barn garden from across the parking lot (looking north)

I always feel I must be looking west here.  The map shows otherwise because of a deceptive curve in Sandridge Road.

Red Barn

Red Barn Arena

Red Barn Arena

the most wind-protected of four barrels at the Red Barn

the most wind-protected of four barrels at the Red Barn

my camera shy friend Misty at Diane's garden

my camera shy friend Misty at Diane’s garden

Diane's garden along the highway, with Stipa gigantea

Diane’s garden along the highway, with Stipa gigantea and cosmos

Diane's alliums

Diane’s alliums

perovskia

perovskia

Diane and Larry do a good job of keeping this garden watered.

It's harder to water this end.

It’s harder to water this end.

Long Beach Bolstad Beach Approach

We have every intention of finishing the weeding of the beach approach garden today.

We have every intention of finishing the weeding of the beach approach garden today.

Allan's photo: This garden has not been watered all summer, and it has not rained appreciably for over two months.

Allan’s photo: This garden has not been watered all summer, and it has not rained appreciably for over two months.

Allan's photo: trimming the sidewalk side

Allan’s photo: trimming rugosa roses on the sidewalk side

Allan's photo: brave gaillardia

Allan’s photo: brave gaillardia and one last rose

The gardens seems dull to me, being almost all rugosa roses.  We used to have an assortment of gorgeous perennials until I realized this could never be because of the trampling it gets during kite festival.  Only rugosa roses and other small, tough shrubs can hold their own during that.

I do wonder though, if it had irrigation and could be as lush as Pam’s Seaside gardens, would it be so garden-y that people would not trample it?  I suppose I will never know.  We do get many compliments on the garden and many questions about the rose hips.  Are they tomatoes? Persimmons? Edible? And then we talk about rose hip tea and rose hip jelly.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

During the approach weeding, I had a revelation that we needed to quit one more job, and that we COULD because Dave and Melissa, Sea Star Landscape Maintenance, are so good that I can turn over any garden to them and they can dive right into it with no coaching; they know ALL the plants.  Over the following couple of days, we arranged to pass on the Boreas Inn garden to them, one that we never have enough time for.  They now have several pretty big former jobs of ours,  with happy and satisfied clients.  I am hoping this translates next year into getting the first complete beach approach weeding done by April or May instead of August.

I felt so inspired that we went back to the beach approach section that I had given up and just string-trimmed earlier this summer and actually weeded it properly.

weeding with the pick (Allan's photo)

weeding with the pick (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

before (Allan's photo)

before (Allan’s photo)

almost done (Allan's photo)

almost done (Allan’s photo)

We have prevailed! (Allan's photo)

We have prevailed! (Allan’s photo)

Allan's photo, as we checked on the garden at city hall

Allan’s photo, as we checked on the garden at city hall

The Port of Ilwaco

The watering of the Port of Ilwaco went more smoothly than last week.  It is still frustrating having to wrestle with 300 feet of hose when there are spigots so much nearer the gardens.  However, this fall I will be moving all but the most drought tolerant plants out of the westernmost section that is hardest to water.  It won’t hurt if some sections of the gardens are better than others.  Salt Hotel, Time Enough Books, The Port Office, Don Nisbett Gallery, the Ilwaco Pavilion and Peterson Gallery will have the show-off garden beds.

Port Office curbside garden with Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

Port Office curbside garden with Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ (I don’t know what that white triangle is, some sort of oops!)

Lavender and Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies, port office curbside

Lavender and Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies, port office curbside

looking east over the port office curbside garden

looking east over the port office curbside garden

The Port Office garden, south wall

The Port Office garden, south wall

looking south from the port office garden

looking southwest from the port office garden

looking southeast

looking southeast

The east end garden can now have hose watering because Allan has enough hose to drag across the parking lot from a dockside spigot.  This is not annoying like the other long drag, as there is no business owner’s spigot next to that garden.  I do, wish, though, that years ago, under a previous port administration, some thought had been given to exactly how the gardens were going to be watered. Why was irrigation not installed during the time that the street was torn up to make these beds?  I asked a local pro gardener ‘Why???” and she said wisely “Because people always think, ‘You don’t need to water around here because it rains!'”  She is so right, and people are so wrong, because even in a normal year we have dry weather for at least two months in summer.

Allan's photo: Gaura 'Whirling Butterflies' at the east end

Allan’s photo: Gaura ‘Whirling Butterflies’ at the east end

Allan's photo: Catananche (Cupid's Dart)

Allan’s photo: Catananche (Cupid’s Dart)

Allan's photo: a happy dog at the port

Allan’s photo: a happy dog at the port

Allan worked east to west, just for variety. West end: Salt Hotel is open for business, and we highly recommend them.

Allan worked east to west, just for variety. West end: Salt Hotel is open for business, and we highly recommend them.

I got done earlier than Allan and walked home.  At the Lost Garden on the corner, I had a look at the pond and found it completely dry.  I’ve never seen it this dry even at the end of August.

That is disturbing. (The pallets are from a children's fort that blew apart in a storm.)

That is disturbing. (The pallets are from a children’s fort that blew apart in a storm.)

at home

in my garden: Billardia longiflora in evening light.

in my front garden: Billardia longiflora in evening light.

Further sign of drought: Some of the salmonberry shrubs in the bogsy woods have dried up.  A friend who has lived here for 40 years says she has never seen this happen til autumn, if then.

It's a spooky sight.

It’s a spooky sight.

The work board finally had beach approach weeding, all 13 sections, erased!  I immediately replaced it with the Long Beach parking lot (not really) berms…three sections that have been sadly neglected due to lack of time.

Job Satisfaction!

Job Satisfaction!

 

 

 

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