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Posts Tagged ‘edible gardens’

Sunday, 9 August 2015

Long Beach Peninsula Edible Garden Tour

The annual edible garden tour, presented by the Long Beach Grange, is a benefit for local food banks.

edibleofficial

Homewood

“A young food forest on about ½ acre, with some big changes underway this season”

Homewood lives up to its name with such a feeling of hominess.  The house was designed to have windows on two sides of every room and has an entire wall of books, something I always like to see.  Lisa, the owner of this garden, is the organizer of the Edible Tour.  She and her late spouse designed and built the house together.  She is a fiber artist as well as a food forest gardener, and her creations can be found at the Bay Avenue Gallery.  While some of her creations are elegant fashion accessories like her beaded purses, you can see that others are inspired by her kitchen garden.

photos courtesy Bay Avenue Gallery

photos courtesy Bay Avenue Gallery

So what is a food forest?  “A food forest is a gardening technique or land management system, which mimics a woodland ecosystem by substituting edible trees, shrubs, perennials and annuals. Fruit and nut trees make up the upper level, while berry shrubs, edible perennials and annuals make up the lower levels.”

Lisa’s garden lives up to the description, with food at all levels of the garden.

arriving at the garden

arriving at the garden

entry, with climbing roses

entry, with climbing roses

Teresa and I enter the garden (Allan's photo)

Teresa and I enter the garden (Allan’s photo)

I love the blue trim on the house.

I love the blue trim on the house.  The white cages hold blueberries.

house

Lisa told us that she had at last successfully managed to make a deer-proof fence all around the perimeter of the property.  The smaller cages are to protect fruit from the birds; otherwise, there would be none left for Lisa of the special delicacies like blueberries.

looking south over the rain gauge: The summer has been exceptionally dry.

looking south over the rain gauge: The summer has been exceptionally dry.

I first took the path around the south side of the garden.

past the outdoor sink

past the outdoor sink

sink

sink

handy for washing soil off produce out in the garden

handy for washing soil off produce out in the garden

apples

apples (Allan’s photo)

Asian pear, Lisa's photo

Asian pear, Lisa’s photo

chairs

hydrangea

hydrangea

path

path2

Just this last month, Lisa laid this stone path instead of having grass paths.

Just this last month, Lisa laid this stone path instead of having grass paths.

nettle, a beneficial plant, caution-taped to avoid accidental contact

nettle, a beneficial plant, caution-taped to avoid accidental contact

aronia (chokecherry)

aronia (chokecherry)

path destination, a secret sit spot

path destination, a secret sit spot

bench2

around

path back to the house

path back to the house

house

Malva (mallow) flower

Malva (mallow) flower

Lisa and Teresa

Lisa and Teresa

The sunny center of the garden on the south side of the house is given to kitchen garden rows.

center

Lisa made numbered edging for the garden beds and told us that she is planning to do so for other beds, with tree names set into the concrete.

concrete mosaic row numbers

concrete mosaic row numbers

center

sun

beans

beans

beans

beans

I am sure that earlier in the year there were edible peas, as well.  By the almost mid-August date of this tour, the early season crops are done, especially in this hot dry year when the season for most flowers and fruits is earlier than usual.

sunflowers, turned away

sunflowers, turned away

sunflowers

sun

sun

cucumber tower, Lisa's photo

cucumber tower, Lisa’s photo

Bay Avenue Gallery art

Bay Avenue Gallery art (Allan’s photo)

cat from Bay Avenue Gallery

cat from Bay Avenue Gallery

IMG_9219

compost

east end of deck

east end of deck

refreshing herbal tea

refreshing herbal tea

edibles on display

edibles on display

cuke

Allan, Lisa, and Teresa look at the garden plan and plant lists.

Allan, Lisa, and Teresa look at the garden plan and plant lists.

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

looking southeast from the deck

looking southeast from the deck

Lisa and her garden, showing the south wall of the greenhouse

Lisa and her garden, showing the south wall of the greenhouse

figs against the south wall of the greenhouse

figs against the south wall of the greenhouse

fig, Lisa's photo

fig, Lisa’s photo

in the window

in the window

inside the lean-to greenhouse on the south wall of the garage

inside the lean-to greenhouse on the south wall of the garage

in the green house

in the green house

stacked rock art piece, a gift from a friend

stacked rock art piece, a gift from a friend

We walked between the house and garage to see the north side of the garden.

between house and garage, looking north

between house and garage, looking north

the between garden

the between garden

ladies in waiting against the east garage wall

ladies in waiting against the east garage wall

hydrangea and buddleia

hydrangea and buddleia

fire circle

fire circle

north side of house

north side of house

shed on north side, with a little sit spot

shed on north side, with a little sit spot

east side of house: A work area is always of interest to me.

east side of house: A work area is always of interest to me.

almonds, Lisa's photo

almonds, Lisa’s photo

We returned to the deck on the south side of the house and sat with Lisa for awhile as the tour drew to a close.

deck

view from the deck

view from the deck

south view from living room

south view from living room

in2

east windows over bookshelves

east windows over bookshelves

one of Lisa's many books

one of Lisa’s many books

At five o’clock, the official end of tour time, we departed and saw Lisa taking in the tour sign.

the end of garden tour season

the end of garden tour season

That’s the end of our local garden tour season!  There will be one more tour, the Cannon Beach Cottage Tour, in mid-September.  Meanwhile, it’s back to focusing on work and my own garden.

 

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Sunday, 9 August 2015

Long Beach Peninsula Edible Garden Tour

The annual edible garden tour, presented by the Long Beach Grange, is a benefit for local food banks.

 

Carol and Ed’s Concrete Container Garden

“Our garden is almost totally container; both concrete and black plastic, with home-made hand decorated pavers.”

The reason, Carol and Ed told me, for the garden being almost all in containers is that they are renting.  This way, they could move the whole garden with them, including the artful paths and patio.

I might as well reveal that because of its artistry and attention to detail, this is my favourite garden of the day.

Carol and Ed's place

Carol and Ed’s place

in front of the garage

in front of the garage

Carol is one of the artists who did a plein air painting for the Rhododendron Tour this spring.

Ed makes all the concrete planters (molded from black plastic pots) and smaller containers, birdbaths, and cool metal garden art on display here.

front

Teresa and Carol (Allan's photo)

Teresa and Carol (Allan’s photo)

sculpture

front2

critter

rake bird (pre-tour)

rake bird on tour day

rake bird on tour day

tour guests

tour guests

looking north

looking north

east side of house, looking toward the front (south side). Note the concrete orbs, made by Ed, used as edging.

east side of house, looking toward the front (south side). Note the concrete orbs, made by Ed, used as edging.

orb edging

orb edging

planters2

concrete

I love these small, flat planters made by Ed. More on this later.

I love these small, flat planters made by Ed. More on this later.

2

home made pavers

home made pavers

Ed, concrete genius (Allan's photo)

Ed, concrete genius (Allan’s photo)

patio with grape arbour, east side of house

patio with grape arbour, east side of house

handmade paver patio

handmade paver patio

artful swirlies on the grape arbour

artful swirlies on the grape arbour

another swirl created by Ed

another swirl created by Ed

behind the grape arbour

behind the grape arbour

bird bath with orbs

bird bath with orbs

concrete

trough

ed

This lovely little garden would have fit right in on the Music in the Gardens ornamental garden tour.

pavers2

Those paver paths were just as weed-free when Allan and I recently pre-toured this garden.

Looking north: Those paver paths and garden beds were just as weed-free when Allan and I recently pre-toured this garden.

I was warned to not back up into the monkey puzzle tree.

I was warned, while taking photos,  to not back up into the monkey puzzle tree.

looking back to the grape arbor

looking back to the grape arbor

the north end of the garden

the north end of the garden

back yard container garden

back yard container garden

Ed uses plastic pots like these as molds for his concrete pots.  It was a process to figure out how to make it work.

trees

north wall of house

north wall of house

tomatoes and one of Ed's small concrete planters on the back porch

tomatoes and one of Ed’s small concrete planters on the back porch

on the porch

on the porch

Allan's photo

Allan’s photo

another critter at the edge of the garden

another critter at the edge of the garden

north end of garden

north end of garden (Allan’s photo)

corn

corn

corn producing in a big container; Ed said he would harvest some for dinner, after the tour.

corn producing in a big container; Ed said he would harvest some for dinner, after the tour. (Allan’s photo)

corn ready to harvest (Allan's photo)

corn ready to harvest (Allan’s photo)

Farmer Ed

Farmer Ed

north fence

north fence

another bird bath with a resting place for bees

another bird bath with a resting place for bees

Ed said he does not sell his large concrete containers, because he does not know how sturdy they would be if moved around.  He does sell some of his smaller creations at the Bay Avenue Gallery in Ocean Park.

decorative flowers and orbs

decorative flowers and orbs

stackable flat planters

stackable flat planters

baths for birds and bees

baths for birds and bees

I do love Carol and Ed’s creative garden and think it is ingenious the way they have made it almost all portable.

Next: a lavender farm by the bay

 

 

 

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August 10, 2013

I needed photos for the edible garden tour Facebook page and would not be able to get them on the August 11th tour day because of hosting our garden as part of the event.  So even though I normally would have spent the day before a garden open obsessively tweaking the garden to complete perfection, Allan and I took the morning off to go to the other gardens with two of the other garden hosts.   (I do not understand why people whose gardens are on a tour are not ALL obsessed with seeing the other gardens…but not everyone loves garden touring the way I do.)

Lisa Mattfield, tour organizer (whose garden, Homewood, was my favourite on last year’s edible tour), and Patty from “Lavender And” and Deanette, another tour garden owner, and Allan and I met at the Planter Box at the very early (for us) hour of ten AM.  Ray Millner took us on a tour of his garden, the second favourite of mine on last year’s tour.  We began by the enviably big pond just north of the Millners’ Planter Box garden center.

The Millner pond

The Millner pond

Ray is in the process, since retiring from teaching and from running the garden center, of turning the back side of this small lake into a park.

First we all trooped to the beds behind the garden center where Ray uses old potting soil and compost to grow lettuces and Jerusalem artichokes.

Ray and Deanette

Ray and Deanette

Ray used to be a teacher and is good at imparting information.

Ray used to be a teacher and is good at imparting information.

lettuce and Jerusalem artichokes

lettuce and Jerusalem artichokes

lettuces and Jerusalem artichokes

lettuces and Jerusalem artichokes

Deanette, Ray, Lisa, Allan, Mary

Deanette, Ray, Lisa, Allan, Patty

pb7

Back to the pond, Ray describes his park in progress.

pb8

We then go to the garden behind the family homes.

plant starts with edible garden in background (looking NW)

plant starts with edible garden in background (looking NW)

the main part of the garden

the main part of the garden

the chickens come running

the chickens come running

Deanette takes notes

Deanette takes notes

chickens with a pond backdrop

chickens with a pond backdrop

pbroostereggs

corn and beans

corn and beans

big healthy plant

big healthy plant

I must confess that while I am pretty good at recognizing perennials and annuals, I am not so good at veg.  Kohlrabi? Brocolli? Kale?

handsome onions

handsome onions

a parade of gardeners

a parade of gardeners

berries

berries

raspberries

raspberries

The garden continues around the north side of the pond.

around the corner

around the corner

potato flower

potato flower

behind the chicken coop

behind the chicken coop

protected strawberries by the pond

protected strawberries by the pond

a harvested raised box planter

a harvested raised box planter

Ray said these tomatoes were much improved by the row cover protection.

Ray said these tomatoes were much improved by the row cover protection.

pbcover

raspberries by the pond

raspberries by the pond

squash

squash

Ray and Deanette

Ray and Deanette

Deanette is on her second year of veg gardening and took lots of notes.

Deanette is on her second year of veg gardening and took lots of notes.

Ray in his element

Ray in his element

I happen to know from last year’s tour that Ray also has a big potato patch off in the woods down a green road.  He says checking on it makes him take a good long walk every day.  We did not have time to see it on our pre-tour because Patty and Deanette had other places to be, so we departed for a look at Pink Poppy Farm.

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I learned just in time to call it by the right name for this entry that this garden is known as Pink Poppy Farm!

from the program:   The Dickerson garden:  Allow yourself time to explore this expansive, one acre country garden where edibles and flowers grow in harmony, surrounded by mature conifers which provide privacy and some wind protection. As you enter the front gate, see swirls of lavender and rosemary filling deep perennial beds.  After circling a ring of dahlias,  head for the cutest chicken house ever, “The Imperial Chicken Palace,” which is filled with 13 gorgeous hens.  Meandering through the property you will see  2 poly tunnels which shelter tomatoes, cucumbers, basil, peppers and more.  Masters of edible landscapes, the owners have lived and worked on the grounds for 19 years.  The garden is full of clever ideas for watering, fencing, and decor.

Expansive indeed, this garden is going to make for a long entry!

Our friend Kathleen got this good shot of the entry gate:

photo by Kathleen Sayce

photo by Kathleen Sayce

Inside the gate, we saw to our right a lavender garden and ahead, a circle of dahlias and other flowers.

entry garden

entry garden

To our left is the front porch and behind us the bright red door of the garage.

photo by Kathleen Shaw, looking east

photo by Kathleen Shaw, looking east

north side of house

north side of house

After an amazing tour of this garden we will exit through that narrow passageway.

front porch

front porch

NW corner of house

NW corner of house

a detailed garden

So far, it seems like a normal, nice, restrained garden.  Then, coming around the west side of the house….

west lawn and garden bed...

west lawn and garden bed…

…we get the first indication of the special delights of this garden.  Below, Sheila sees the Imperial Chicken Palace!

just wow!

just wow!

ICP

Imperial Chicken Palace

Imperial Chicken Palace

ICP

side view

side view

chicken palace window box

chicken palace window box

There, I am back in love with Petunia ‘Phantom’!

the girls; top photo by Kathleen Shaw:  dust bath time

the girls; top photo by Kathleen Shaw: dust bath time

nesting boxes accessed by an exterior hatch

nesting boxes accessed by an exterior hatch

Although it was hard to leave “the girls”, we walk east along the south side of the house.

looking east

looking east

chairs and a photo album I wish I had taken time to look at

chairs and a photo album I wish I had taken time to look at

up a slope of lawn, looking back

up a slope of lawn, looking back

Below, Allan and Debbie from Rainyside Gardeners, who sets up for a photo while garden owner Mike Dickerson walks forward to greet them.

SE corner of house

SE corner of house

from further east

from further east

This garden had been on tour before, but on the same year that my old garden was on the tour, so we did not get to see it,  This time, Mike joked “You’ve finally paid to come see my garden!”

Mike demonstrates a simple clever fence to keep chickens out of the garden beds.

Garden owner Lynn demonstrates a simple clever fence to keep chickens out of the garden beds.

along the south side of the garden...In the background, you can see the compost bins

along the south side of the garden…In the background, you can see the compost bins

further east, hoop houses, "two and a fourth" (small one), Lynn said.

further east, hoop houses, “two and a fourth” (small one), Lynn said.

veg boxes (compost bins in background)

veg boxes (compost bins in background)

Sheila and I always enjoy the true working areas of the garden, like the compost bins.  Here, they are enviably large, running along the middle south side of the property and made of old pallets.

much compost

much compost

Speaking of working areas, we admire the watering system in this garden:

hose manifolds

hose manifolds

Hoses lead to oscillating sprinklers which are mounted on posts.  Each hose connects with a quick connect to the sprinkler which is permanently set for optimum watering pattern.

sprinkler

sprinkler

and another view of the chicken fence

and another view of the chicken fence

We intend to adopt this watering system for our garden as soon as we have time.  It will save lots of fiddling with the sprinklers.

a tour guest walking east

a tour guest walking east

poppies

pre-tour photo showing two hoop houses (looking east)

pre-tour photo showing two hoop houses (looking east)

on tour day

on tour day

The first and smaller hoophouse:

house

one of the the hoop houses

 north door

inside

inside

south door

south door

looking east

looking east

The big hoop house and raised beds:

approaching a big hoop house

approaching  big hoop house

I loved the raised box of nasturtiums (photo taken while pre-touring in June)

I loved the raised box of nasturtiums (photo taken while pre-touring in June)

hoop

inside the hoop house

inside the hoop house

a prolific crop

a prolific crop

tomatoes

tomatoes

Allan was interested in the details of how it was constructed, and you might be, too:

how to

how to

how to

how the windows open

how the windows open

Way up at the top of garden by a house (which is also part of the property but lacks amenities) is another, smaller hoophouse where Madeline and Jacob grow their produce for the Saturday Market.  The garden also provides food for a few CSA boxes.

the littlest hoophouse

the littlest hoophouse

garden tour guests

garden tour guests
friends

guests

boy

Donna and M.R.

Donna and M.R.

Because this was the most central garden of the tour, we ran into some of our touring friends there.  We found our friends Donna and M.R. photographing flowers on the route from the hoophouses to the north side of the garden.

bachelor buttons

bachelor buttons

Set in a fenced garden of its own, the garden shed charmed everyone with its old windows and shingled sides, and windowboxes.

taken on pre-tour day, late June

taken on pre-tour day, late June

shed windowboxes

shed windowboxes

neatly cut edges in the  shed garden

neatly cut edges in the shed garden

an old swingset used as trellising near the garden shed

an old swingset used as trellising near the garden shed, in late June

on tour day

My, how the flowers had grown since June 24th when I first visited the garden!

right...the smaller hoophouse...left...the garden shed

right…the smaller hoophouse…left…the garden shed

cornflowers and just a glimpse of the "stage" area

cornflowers and just a glimpse of the “stage” area

Coming around a grass path from the garden shed, we followed the beautiful music to the green stage setting for the Mozart Chicks.

The Mozart Chicks

The Mozart Chicks

classical quintet

classical quintet

music appreciator

music appreciator

I took an iPhone video walking from the musicians’ area around the garden which you may be able to view here.

One garden bed after another abounded with food and flowers mixed together.

produce

photo by Kathleen Shaw

photo by Kathleen Shaw

sunflowers against the "extra house"

sunflowers against the “extra house”

mix

dahlias

dahlias

The Pink Poppy Bakery booth at the Ilwaco Saturday Market offers bouquets of flowers from this garden.

After going round and round the garden, we came to the patio on the east side of the house where delicious treats awaited.

handsome steps down to the patio area

handsome steps down to the patio area

treats

treats

You can see in the background, above, how popular the Pink Poppy Bakery treats were!

treats

 

This garden will also be on the Peninsula Edible Garden Tour...

This garden will also be on the Peninsula Edible Garden Tour…

patio detail

patio detail

The patio wraps around the corner of the house.

The patio wraps around the corner of the house.

view from just inside the house

Around the patio, many tour guests converged and lingered and chatted, even though we all had more gardens to see.

M.R. photographing flowers

M.R. photographing a birdhouse

house

We photographed it, too.

(right) garden owner Mike Dickerson

(right) garden owner Mike Dickerson

Mike and Sheila

Mike and Sheila

Mike and M.R.

Mike and M.R.

Finally, we did have to tear ourselves away because we had three more gardens to see…

walkway between garage and house

walkway between garage and house

back to the entry garden

back to the entry garden

back

And with wistful looks back, we departed for the rest of our tour.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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