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Posts Tagged ‘Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’’

I tried to take a photo of the garden on the north side of the deck throughout the year, more or less from the same two angles.  Even though it’s on the north side, it seems to get enough sun to grow cosmos.  The backdrop, growing on the lattice, is Cascade hops. One of the cosmos cultivars turned out to be late blooming and therefore not much good.  I am going to have to try to figure out which one that was and avoid it this year.

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Wednesday, 18 June 2014

It is worrisome to leave the Long Beach and especially the smaller Ilwaco planters unwatered from Thursday to next Tuesday, a day longer than I have ever left the Long Beach ones (without rain). My original plan had been to water them tomorrow and then leave for the Hardy Plant Study Weekend hotel. That sounded more exhausting the more I thought about it, so we did a thorough watering today. Allan showed one of the Ilwaco crew how to use the water trailer if the weather is hot. Fingers crossed! I think the Long Beach planters can hold up better.

First the compost bucket switch at Olde Towne Café and a new photo for the Facebook page to show the exterior with all of Luanne’s potted plants.

Olde Towne Café

Olde Towne Café

with the garden tour poster in the front door window

with the garden tour poster in the front door window

As we were about to leave the Olde Towne and Ilwaco city hall parking lot, a powerful stench drew our attention, and there was the barnacle covered tsunami debris boat that had recently washed up on our beach.

It stank to high heaven!

It stank to high heaven!

boat2

We were told it was on its way to Peninsula Sanitation to be cleaned up and restored and will later be on display in Ocean Park.

We went to Diane’s garden to plant up the strawberry jar that we had forgotten:

with assorted hens and chicks and a diascia

with assorted hens and chicks and a diascia

And then over to Long Beach town to water and fertilize the planters. Rain, added to planters that had been well soaked, had saved us from watering them for over a week. Usually rain will not penetrate the foliage unless it happens at the perfect time, right after watering, as it did all last week.

There is a new shop in town, just opened, that looks intriguing.

Vintage Renew

Vintage Renew

I had time for a peek inside...

I had time for a peek inside…

and a peek to the right of the door, and then had to get back to work without actually walking further in.

and a peek to the right of the door, and then had to get back to work without actually walking further in.

On to the planter watering. Allan walked the south blocks and I walked the north ones.

Lewis and Clark Square planter

Lewis and Clark Square planter

Nigella in the big Lewis and Clark Square planter

Nigella in the big Lewis and Clark Square planter

and its intricate flower (reseeded from last year). Common name: Love in a Mist.

and its intricate flower (reseeded from last year). Common name: Love in a Mist.

I photographed the planter, below, to show how boring it is. It’s one I have not added anything special to, and it has a dull spring blooming perennial around the lamp post. Of all the planters, this one gets vandalized the most. And yet, it does not look too bad in the photo. All it needs is to have that dull matt of early spring bloomer removed and replaced with something tough, perhaps lavender.

the planter by Scoopers

the planter by Scoopers

Some of the Sedum 'Autumn Joy' that I cut back is making nice new growth.

Some of the Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ that I cut back to prevent floppiness is making nice new growth.

I had been walking along thinking thoughts other than gardening, as I sometimes do, this time about the Facebook memes that are cropping up lately about not wanting any drama or negativity in one’s life. I pondered about the friends I have who are, a few of them, going through hard times. One has told me that when friends post the “stay away from other people’s drama”, her friendships with those people must remain on a superficial level, not a real heart to heart friendship. Life is drama, or “What is drama but life with the dull bits cut out?”. (Alfred Hitchcock) While it can be difficult helping friends who are suffering, especially about issues that we might feel (sometimes correctly) are so much less important than our own, just listening without being dismissive is the key. I deeply value my particularly close friends who WILL share with me their true selves, negativity, fears, and all. My thoughts ran: Friends, when something, even something that might be called trivial, is bothering you, you can tell me about it and I won’t roll my eyes about drama, and I will carry your secrets to the grave (how’s that for drama?). And then I found, blowing down the street, this note.

thoughts

My heart ached for the writer of the note, and I would like to have had a nice long supportive talk with her. The last time someone pestered me about the way I look, I said something like “Don’t look at me, look at the beauty I create, just look at the planters, not me.” My thoughts digressed on how society’s emphasis on appearance has such an effect on self worth…and then a friend drove by and honked at me and (after my usual thought which is always “Don’t honk at me!” because it is so startling), I got back to just thinking about plants again.

Heart rocks last week, a poignant note this week…as surprising finds in Long Beach make the day more intriguing. (Recommended reading: The Obesity Myth by Paul Campos.

Reunited with Allan after all the main street planters were watered (glad that rain saved us from the much more difficult watering of the street trees), we groomed the Veterans Field garden and the Bolstadt beach approach.

The beach approach garden, narrow and several blocks long.

The beach approach garden, narrow and several blocks long.

We have not weeded it at all this year. Parts of it look good at a glance, but really all of it is quite weedy.

clover entwining a rugosa rose

clover entwining a rugosa rose

There is simply not enough time for all our jobs, and the beach approach, and having weekends off. It is not a skilled weeding job; a summer intern could do it.

The garden at Long Beach City Hall came next.

City Hall:  Echinops ritro (blue globe thistle)

City Hall: Echinops ritro (blue globe thistle)

Echinops macro

Echinops macro

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ at City Hall

In Fifth Street Park, we did the usual weeding.

The two year old E. 'Jade Frost' there is reverting to green, as it does.

The two year old E. ‘Jade Frost’ there is reverting to green, as it does.

I buy new ones every year because of its determination to revert.

I buy new ones every year because of its determination to revert.

I buy new ones every year because of its determination to revert.  The flowers will soon turn deep blue.

I buy new ones every year because of its determination to revert. The flowers will soon turn deep blue.

The last task in Long Beach was the welcome sign. It plagues me this year. So much horsetail, and the Geranium ‘Rozanne’ is just sitting, not getting any bigger, despite fertilizing. Very frustrating indeed.

I suppose it looks moderately attractive.

I suppose it looks moderately attractive.

But the blue from Rozanne is just not there yet.

But the blue from Rozanne is just not there yet.

Then: the Ilwaco planters. I walked the planter blocks, checking on them all, while Allan filled the water trailer and drove his watering route.

After a slow start, they are looking not too bad!

After a slow start, they are looking not too bad!

I may have gone "off" trailing rosemary though...too big and lopsided??

I may have gone “off” trailing rosemary though…too big and lopsided??

the non draining planter with mimulus thriving in boggy conditions

the non draining planter with mimulus thriving in boggy conditions

and its close-up

and its close-up

Mimulus: monkey flower

Mimulus: monkey flower

My route took me past the boatyard garden where I pulled only one bucket of horsetail and creeping sorrel and regretted the loss of the rest of the workweek.

boatyard garden with daisies and toadflax

boatyard garden with daisies and toadflax

daisy

reseeded candytuft

reseeded candytuft

and its fancy flower

and its fancy flower

a new boat arrival

a new boat arrival

Around the corner and onto Howerton, I pulled a few weeds at the first curbside garden and saw that there is a new café in town!

Coastal Cones and Snacks

Coastal Cones and Snacks

The fellow painting the building (very nicely, and it needed a paint job) said the snack shop will have seating, be open into the early evening, and have wraps at a good price. He asked about a certain plant in the garden that had caught his and his girlfriend’s eye:

Well, of course it had!

Well, of course it had!

and another Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue', further down Howerton.

and another Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, further down Howerton.

While Allan finished watering, I weeded many annoying little grasses out of the Time Enough Books garden and as I did so, flung rocks over to the river rock-scape on the other side of the sidewalk.

My goal is mulch instead of river rock; easier to weed, room for poppies.

My goal is mulch instead of river rock; easier to weed, room for poppies.

How long will it take to fling all those rocks?

looking east over the port office gardens on Howerton

looking east over the port office gardens on Howerton

and the Port Office garden on the water side, overhung with hanging baskets

and the Port Office garden on the water side, overhung with hanging baskets

Agastache 'Apricot Sunrise'

Agastache ‘Apricot Sunrise’

port1

view to the west with the grass strimmed, must have been a hard job!

view to the west with the grass strimmed, must have been a hard job!

and to the east with the grass unstrimmed

and to the east with the grass unstrimmed

And then, home to pack for the Hardy Plant Society Study Weekend. I am so tired I can barely think about what to take. Main things: camera, batteries, notebook for taking notes, pens, reading glasses…phone charger…

By the time you read this, because I am so far behind, we will have returned…if all goes well! My concerns regarding sleep deprivation and city traffic will have been countered by excellent garden tours (much blog fodder coming up!) and lectures.

 

 

 

 

 

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Friday, 6 June 2014

To begin the work day, Allan watered Larry and Robert’s garden (five doors down) while I enjoyed a pleasant stroll around ours with visitor New Judy, from three doors down. Just before Allan and I left for work, I decided that the view in through Nora’s driveway does make the garden look enticing.

wish I could stay there all day

wish I could stay there all day

The Depot Restaurant

We checked on the Depot first for small weeds and slug damage to the cosmos.

The garden is just beginning to fill in.

The garden is just beginning to fill in.

Chef Michael was there and liked my idea to move the whiskey barrel in order to make room for the Clamshell Railroad history sign that will be installed soon.

I have left the area around the barrel unplanted till that sign is in!

I have left the area around the barrel unplanted till that sign is in!

Planting by Nancy of the Basket Case Greenhouse on north side of the restaurant.

Planting by Nancy of the Basket Case Greenhouse on north side of the restaurant.

Long Beach: Fish Alley

With the Depot’s few weeds pulled and some Sluggo applied, we went on to Long Beach and added some cosmos to the not very impressive welcome sign garden. The evil horsetail was already sprouting back. Then, due to a breakdown in morning communication, the bag of potting soil I had been counting on was not with us, necessitating a stop at Dennis Company. Because it’s at the northernmost block of planters, we took the opportunity while parked there to water two blocks worth of planters (8 in all) and two street trees. It was all worthwhile because I found some mimulus and a cute little calibrachoa in the Dennis Co garden department.

mimulus, exactly what I wanted for the one soggy, non draining planter in Ilwaco.

yellow mimulus, exactly what I wanted for the one soggy, non draining planter in Ilwaco.

We needed the soil to fluff up the four planters in Fish Alley. Maybe it was the mimulus; I all of a sudden felt one of those moments of supreme joy in our job. (I remember years ago as I walked to deadhead the roadside box of flowers at Andersen’s RV Park being overcome with delight that someone was actually paying me to plant and care for flowers.)

Fish Alley in Long Beach

Fish Alley in Long Beach

People seem to be using the planters as their own personal source for starts of sedum, so the soil is going away as well.

People seem to be using the planters as their own personal source for starts of sedum, so the soil is going away as well.

fixed

fixed

And then we were off to the Basket Case Greenhouse to get some more variegated lemon thyme to fill in where some in Fish Alley had died last winter.

The Red Barn Arena

On the way, we took care of The Red Barn and Diane’s containers.

at the Red Barn, one of three barrels in the cold north wind

at the Red Barn, one of three barrels in the cold north wind

and the one that is protected by the barn from the cold north wind

and the one that is protected by the barn from the cold north wind: same plants, much more lush

the mouthwatering Calibrachoa 'Lemon Slice'

the mouthwatering Calibrachoa ‘Lemon Slice’

the salubrious effect of being on a warm sheltered wall

the salubrious effect of being on a warm sheltered wall

On the east wall:  Erysimum 'Winter Orchid'

On the east wall: Erysimum ‘Winter Orchid’

Amy and friend

Amy and friend

taking a horse to the far pasture

taking a horse to the far pasture

horse2

one of the new perennial planters by the entrance

one of the new perennial planters by the entrance

Diane’s Garden

Just north of the Red Barn, I fertilized the pots in the back of Diane and Larry’s house and removed some dead bulb foliage.

Diane's potted garden

Diane’s potted garden

Allan used the strimmer along the highway; it would be better to weed there but we don’t have time.

That WOULD be a lot of weeding.  Strimming will make sure Larry won't get out there with Round Up!

That WOULD be a lot of weeding. Strimming will make sure Larry won’t get out there with Round Up!

a quick solution

a quick solution (although the rough ground was hard on the string trimmer)

Basket Case Greenhouse

Berlandiera lyrata...chocolate flower smells intensely of chocolate

Berlandiera lyrata…chocolate flower smells intensely of chocolate

I got three chocolate flowers for assorted clients and got the plants we needed to finish Fish Alley.

This selection of slightly tender dianthus in one of the annuals houses often comes back the next year.

This selection of slightly tender dianthus in one of the annuals houses often comes back the next year.

Fred and Nancy know that red geraniums and pink petunias are not my favourite annuals; remember this for later in the day!

Fred and Nancy know that red geraniums and pink petunias are not my favourite annuals; remember this for later in the day!

Long Beach planters

By four o clock we were back in Long Beach to water the Long Beach planters and the street trees. I knew the trees would be a struggle as it would be their first hose watering of the year so some of the in-ground spigots would need digging out. Allan took the trees, I took the planters, with gratitude that at least the north two blocks were already done.

Just as we were gathering together our hoses and buckets, I saw suspicious activity across the street. A woman with grey hair in a ponytail rode her bicycle purposefully up to the planter kitty corner from us, by the “World’s Largest Frying Pan” park, dismounted, and started messing around in the planter. After watching with suspicion, I walked across the street and said “Hi, whatcha doin’?” in a surprisingly jolly manner. She said “Oh, I am just deadheading the rose so it will keep blooming.” I said, “That’s my job and we are just about to check on all the planters.” As she held one hand behind her back, I said “Whatcha got there?” And here came the hand full of a bouquet of picked lavender. I sighed. “I really wish you would not do that; the city pays for the plants and upkeep and would rather people not pick out of the planters.” “Oh, I just picked the ones that were hanging over the edge.” (Here comes my age old lecture:) “But think about it, if everyone picked themselves a bouquet, there would be no flowers left.” I shook my head and added “Sorry, really, it is just your bad luck I happened to be here right now.” She bicycled off with the last words “Well, I did deadhead the rose so it will keep blooming.” (I might add it is a once blooming rose, but…oh well.) For some reason I felt like a meanie. She looked quite poor and like she could not even afford dental care. Later, when I described her extreme thinness and lack of teeth, a friend said “meth” but at the time I just thought terrible poverty. Then I remembered my years in my mid 20s of having so little spending money that my garden budget for the entire year was literally $20. I would go to Molbak’s in the Pike Place Market and carefully choose $20 worth of seeds. It would never have occurred to me to take plants (sedums from Fish Alley anyone?) or bouquets from public gardens. As I headed off to water (with the thyme plants for Fish Alley in my bucket) I felt torn about finger blight and wondered whether I should just let folks pick themselves bouquets of lavender. I am sure it happens often enough that I don’t see, and occasionally it must happen in a way that leaves to evidence for me to notice later.

And the cold north wind blew, as I walked through town and watered three out of four remaining blocks of planters, planted the thymes in Fish Alley and deadheaded the Veterans Field garden, while Allan struggled with the muddy street tree spigots that had filled with dirt over the winter.

On one planter bench, I found these, and moved them to a park bench.

On one planter bench, I found these, and moved them to a park bench.

I enjoyed the display in front of The Wooden Horse gift shop.

I enjoyed the display in front of The Wooden Horse gift shop.

woodenhorse

The Eryngiums were looking mighty fine in the frying pan park:

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

flowers start white and all turn to blue

flowers start white and all turn to blue…amazing

and Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue', my favourite perennial.

and Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, my favourite perennial.

all in a little strip of garden

all in a little strip of garden

When Allan finished the trees, he tidied the park in front of Captain Bob’s Chowder and then helped water the southernmost two blocks of planters.

I found another very obvious finger blight situation in the planter by the credit union.

one of the tall and quite hard to find forms of Ameria (sea thrift) knocked sideways and yanked partway out of the ground.

one of the tall and quite hard to find forms of Ameria (sea thrift) knocked sideways and yanked partway out of the soil.

next to it, all these little starts pulled off and abandoned.  Maybe some got yelled at by a passerby  for finger blighting.

next to it, all these little starts pulled off and abandoned. Maybe someone got yelled at by a passerby for finger blighting.

Just about then, fellow gardener Ed Strange pulled up in his truck to say hi. We commiserated about the icy cold wind and I gave him the little starts to try to grow, as I did not have time to deal with them.

With all the main street trees and planters watered, we dumped our buckets of debris. I so did not want to check the beach approach planters. We had to. The ones out on the west end of Bolstadt looked parched, and we did not have much bucket water with us so we gave them what we had. There is no water source inside those planters. I think the city crew is spraying them with water from their water trailer once a week. I hope so.

At the west end of Sid Snyder Drive, where the eight or so planters do have soaker hoses, I was in for a big surprise when we visited our new planting (having dug massive weeds out of there a couple of weeks ago and added drought tolerant perennials that we would have to check on only once a week or even less often).

It was full of pink petunias, red geranium, and red fluffly salvia!!!!

It was full of pink petunias, red geraniums, and red fluffy salvia!!!!

I was amused and delighted for a bit, and then worried about the perennials being smothered, and then thought whoever planted this had better not think I am going to do all that petunia deadheading…we Don’t Have Time.

I knew who it was, though.

Many of the old signs remain and give the impression the planters are  still done by volunteers.

Many of the old signs remain and give the impression the planters are still done by volunteers.

I pondered this lightly for a day and decided by the next day on a solution: we would move the perennials to another planter (the also newly planted one near the kite museum), thus making the other planter look better, and I would talk to Back Country (whose horse corral is just down the block on Sid Snyder) about the planter now being high maintenance and see if they are planning to deadhead. It sure does look cute right now though, and I have high hope it will remain that way because it will be a treat for the people who stay at the two hotels out there.

Ilwaco

By now it was 7 PM and despite being tired and cold (with flannel shirt, sweatshirt, jacket and winter scarf on!), we had to water the Ilwaco planters. Allan hooked up the water trailer from its parking spot at the city works yard, while I walked around and checked all the planters and added a few plants (the yellow spotted mimulus to the one by the yellow Portside Café!).

We had been promised that the city crew would always fill the water trailer with water, thus saving us 15 minutes of filling it. It was empty. Perhaps that is just as well, as we had realized that just the water full trailer weigh over 800 lbs and unless it is well balanced, how would Allan hook it up to the van? He filled it at the boatyard.

The planters had not been watered since Sunday. There had been much debate between us each day over whether they needed watering yet. I must confess that wanting to go to Taco Thursday at the Cove is one reason they did not get watered Thursday night. It had been a bit too long of a wait.

The Erysimum were slightly wilty.

The Erysimum were slightly wilty.

Above, you can see how the Nepeta (catmint), with its blue flowers, looks all yellowy at the base. The yellowing always comes on even when we water more often. This was bringing down the tone in all the planters and I had a revelation as I walked (hobbled) around clipping half or all of each one back despite the blue flowers. (New growth will come back and I hope make them look good again in a couple of weeks.) THE CATMINT ALL HAS TO GO!

It has been a problem with yellowing foliage, and then dead flowers that need to be clipped in midsummer, ever since I started doing the planters. The planters came to us with the catmint already planted, and since it’s a perennial that I like very much in gardens, I have just accepted it. But think how much nicer a couple of diascias would be with summer-long colour and no deadheading or yellowing lower leaves.

It is too late for this year as removing large plants would create too much planter ruction, but in the fall, OUT they come. What a thrilling thought. Why did it take me 9 years to figure it out?

And oh was it cold, and the wind blew at 26 mph. Just as I was finishing, Kathleen Shaw, who was down for the weekend called to arrange a Saturday meet up, and I am afraid I was rather grumpy. Something about the blankity blank planters and the blankity blank wind and some other blankity work thing. Finger blight, probably. We agreed to talk again when I woke up on Saturday!

The blankety blank water trailer is saving back strain from bucket watering but it does indeed take FORTY FIVE minutes longer per watering session, time we just have to pull out of…somewhere…time we get paid for and yet would rather have the free time than the money.

At dusk, we finished with a quick watering and deadheading of the garden boat at Time Enough Books where I bunged in six more cosmos because I am not at all satisfied with the floral display.

watering...thank all that is holy for GARDENS with HOSES.

watering…thank all that is holy for GARDENS with HOSES.

Tired and both of us very crabby, at least we knew we had earned a weekend off, although Allan did have an idea that he would do some more watering at the port on Sunday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Monday, 25 November, 2013

As the weather continues to be bright and warm, I am not envious of the sleeping cats when I leave the house for work.

Smokey and his mom Mary are awfully cute.

Smokey and his mom Mary are awfully cute.

I had looked hopefully on the porch for the delayed shipment of 200 tulips that had been supposed to arrive on Friday, and without which the three last bulb planting jobs and the happy end of bulb time was frustratingly delayed. No bulbs! My back up plan, to mulch instead, would depend on whether or not Raymond was available at the Planter Box to load us with cow manure. Yes, he was!

First we had to unload yesterday’s debris from the trailer. The clean debris went into one of the piles in the back garden, giving me a chance to check on it; I had not had much free daylight time lately.

back garden today

back garden today

The last glorious dahlia is done.

The last glorious dahlia is done.

All the hardy Fuchsias have their leaves crisped by frost. This makes me sad as they usually last much longer.

Fuchsias and Verbascum

Fuchsias and Verbascum

With an empty trailer, we went straight to The Planter Box. While getting ready to load the “Bovine Fiber Digest” (their official name for the processed dairy manure), Raymond told me that we are one of the two warmest spots in the country today: Florida at 70 something degrees and SW Washington Coast in the 60s. I had already changed to my summer shirt.

first load of cow fiber

11:30 AM: first load of cow fiber

Our first target: The Anchorage Cottages.

Anchorage, garden near office, before

Anchorage, garden near office, before

after

after

lovely cow poo

lovely cow poo

Courtyard garden, before, with more of the low glaring sun we are having daily.

Courtyard garden, before, with more of the low glaring sun we are having daily.

courtyard after

courtyard after

I kept the mulch a bit back from the edge so the little, well, turdlets, won’t roll out onto the nice clean courtyard. So the contrast between old sandy soil and the new rich look shows well here:

contrast

contrast

We had enough mulch to do part of the beds by the south end of the cottage complex, as well. Then, back to The Planter Box. I was determined to get as much mulching done as possible since Raymond was there all day long; when he is off on a landscaping job, there is no one to load the fiber.

12:44 PM:  second load

12:44 PM: second load

We had a problem when leaving the Planter Box: The speedometer, tachometer, and gas tank, er, thingie (how much gas is left) all went to zero. It was not the alternator, as the radio and the indicator that shows our miles per gallon still worked. It added considerable worry, in my mind at least. The day had been going so well and I hoped to get three loads of mulch distributed without mechanical problems bringing us to a halt. I especially dread a breakdown with a heavy trailer of mulch attached.

When we got to Long Beach, the second load (which I decided to not refer to as “load number two”) went here:

the newly redone bed in frying pan park, Fifth Street in Long Beach

the newly redone bed in frying pan park, Fifth Street in Long Beach

Hmm, I think that garbage can brings down the tone. It is a cute enough garbage can, but having the bag showing is not quite right. However, it is Not My Problem, and it will not show as much when a bench gets put back next to it. [Next day I learned that it is going to be removed.]

We also added a nice layer of cow poo to the small garden bed on the south side of Summer House, the yellow house you can see in the background of the above photo. And joy! When Allan turned the van back on, all the meters worked as they should. I had been hoping that turning if off and on again would do the trick.

Next we added a nice layer of Cow Fiber at the welcome sign. (Last week we had mulched all three of these areas with Soil Energy from Peninsula Landscape Supply.)

welcome sign with a double whammy of two kinds of mulch

welcome sign with a double whammy of two kinds of mulch

To my delight, the four scoops of cow fiber extended far enough to put a thick layer on the north and east side beds at the Depot Restaurant.

lusciousness at the Depot

lusciousness at the Depot (north side of deck)

east side of dining room

east side of dining room

Back to The Planter Box for load number three!

2:20 PM: Raymond tidies up the Cow Fiber pile after loading our trailer.

2:20 PM: Raymond tidies up the Cow Fiber pile after loading our trailer.

By the way, The Planter Box has a nice selection of bulbs for those who might still need some. It is not too late to plant; around here, you can plant bulbs well into December.

bulbs

bulbs

Just to keep the suspense strong about whether or not we would accomplish offloading three loads of mulch today, the engine light came on in the van. My heart sank when I came back outside from paying and saw Allan with his head under the hood. Whatever he did worked. The light went off and all was well as we drove to the Port of Ilwaco.

and at the Port of Ilwaco

at the Port of Ilwaco

We mulched the end of the bed where we had weeded and planted new plants last week.

bed, with empty wheelbarrow

bed, with empty wheelbarrow

And we mulched down at the Port Office on the new-this-past-year south side bed.

3:07 PM:  Oh, how I wanted the glaring blinding sun to go behind Cape Disappointment!

3:07 PM: Oh, how I wanted the glaring blinding sun to go behind Cape Disappointment!

Then we headed over to Mayor Mike’s garden at the south end of Lake Street. There, we used much less mulch than I had thought the garden would need. The beds are quite narrow. I forgot to take a picture, but I did take one of two of my canine friends walking by.

Dwight walking Larry and Big River.

Dwight walking Larry and Big River.

The dogs had had a great time at the riverside park on the east end of town.

With plenty of cow fiber left, we unexpectedly had enough to do more mulching down at the port along Howerton Street.

beds along Howerton north of the Port Office

beds along Howerton north of the Port Office

I do hope to find time Friday or even on Thanksgiving day to do some trimming of the plants here, as this weekend is the first day of the Saturday Christmas Market in a storefront just at the end of these beds (next to Time Enough Books, where the red Christmas Market sign is on the left).

More luscious mulch should help hold moisture next summer.

More luscious mulch should help hold moisture next summer.

We had just enough left to add a smattering of mulch by Queen La De Da’s Art Castle and The Imperial Schooner restaurant at the west end of Howerton.

a Jade Frost Eryngium still blooming, albeit sideways

a Jade Frost Eryngium still blooming, albeit sideways

looking east

looking east

and north

and north

more jet trails

pots ready for crabbing

On the drive down to Ilwaco, I had seen a disconcerting sight in the Fifth Street park’s waterfall quadrant: The Gunnera was DOWN. We did not stop for fear we would not have gotten the manure offloaded before dark, but now we went back to Long Beach to deal with the problem.

unsightly frosted Gunnera

unsightly frosted Gunnera by Benson’s By The Beach Restaurant

I saw a Little Brown Bird dining on the Gunnera seeds!

very busy

very busy

Little Brown Bird

Little Brown Bird

bird

At the back of the park, the lacecap Hydrangea had also been hit hard by unseasonal frost. It is a darn shame because the frost was followed by such summery weather and warmer nights.

a limp hydrangea

a limp hydrangea

We cut back the dead leaves of the Gunnera and tucked some of them over the crown in hope of protecting it from future frost. The seeds are still there for the Little Brown Bird.

Gunnera tucked in for winter

Gunnera tucked in for winter

Here’s something ever so satisfying: The white board in the kitchen tonight.

Today's accomplishment! before and after

Today’s accomplishment! before and after

Also satisfying: the last bulbs came and are now sorted and ready to plant tomorrow. We have one large and one medium bulb batch to plant and two little afterthought batches of fifteen each. When that is done, and The Boreas Inn and Andersen’s RV Park are mulched, one side of the project board will be blank. I am going to shift mulching Jo’s over to the planned work for next February! Then we just have to deal with the list of last clean ups (weeding and cutting plants back) for each garden:

here they all are

here they all are

Jo’s is a big one, as is Long Beach.

And then staycation will begin! Unless….unless….we decide to put in a big garden bed at Erin’s place before our winter break.

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I had planned another all Ilwaco day for Friday because our friend Patt was going to be passing through town. She’s a former resident who had to move away because of her spouse’s job, and she takes every chance to come back and visit.

We began at Larry and Robert’s, where I realized that their Escallonia is the wonderul white Escallonia ‘Iveyi’, old and large. I think of it is rare down here, so I wonder how that happened!

very big and white Escallonia

very big and white Escallonia

I watered while Allan dug the birdbath pedestal into the ground. The base was cracked, and we want to make sure it will not tip over onto one of their little dogs. Allan made it good and solid.

backyard birdbath

backyard birdbath

Then on to Mayor Mike’s; the rambling rose that is climbing into his tree needed a lot of dangling canes clipped with the long handled pruners.

Mike's rose

Mike’s rose

In Mike's garden:  Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

In Mike’s garden: Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

Kitty corner from Mike’s is Cheri’s garden where we weeded and deadheaded and pulled out a lot of spent Rose Campion.

Cheri's front garden

Cheri’s front garden

We timed it pretty well as when we stopped off at home, we were only running about fifteen minutes late for a coffee klatsch at Olde Towne. I tried to pick Luanne a nice bouquet. However, I was feeling exceedingly tired and could not seem to find enough flowers to make a lush arrangement.

This was the best I could do....

This was the best I could do….

I wish my sweet peas had done as well this year as last year. I suppose I can blame the weather. They are lacking in all “my” gardens compared to last year’s amazing bounty…except for Klipsan Beach Cottages where they are doing well.

Patt had arrived and was already enjoying her time at Olde Towne with Judy and Tom and Donna and MR. Luanne got to take a break and join us.

left to right...Donna, MR. Tom, Allan, Judy, Luanne and (just her shoulder), Patt

left to right…Donna, MR. Tom, Allan, Judy, Luanne and (just her shoulder), Patt

The delicious veggie sandwich on a croissant was mine.

Donna herself took some excellent photos. Here she is behind her big camera:

Donna

She edits her photos in Picasa with all sorts of delightful effects.

Patt and me, photo by Donna McKinley

Patt and me, photo by Donna McKinley

MR and Tom, photo by Donna McKinley

MR and Tom, photo by Donna McKinley

Olde Towne's darling Luanne, photo by Donna McKinley

Olde Towne’s darling Luanne, photo by Donna McKinley

Luanne kept visiting with us till about half an hour after closing time (which is 4 PM); then Allan and I went back to work in Ilwaco. He watered the planters while I weeded and watered at the boatyard.

the planter closest to the boatyard

the planter closest to the boatyard

As almost always, there was boat work going on while I watered from behind the fence.

Pacific Breeze

Pacific Breeze

I had an incident while watering. As I stood behind the chainlink fence, hidden by a tall bronze fennel, I saw a couple walk by. The man does not register with me in particular but the woman stands out because she has a large dog and tattoos and piercings. (All three of those things are shared by a number of my friends.) She walks around a lot with her dog. She has made comments to Allan while he waters that imply she knows something about gardening. This time, I saw she was picking a very LARGE bouquet. I stepped out into a view and said (not shouted) “Hey, no picking!” and added the usual: “If everyone did that, there would be no flowers left.” “Sorry”, she said, seeming sincere. I saw what was in her other hand from the one holding the LARGE bouquet: Professional looking red handled garden clippers. I said, “I am SHOCKED. You even brought clippers!” “Sorry,” she said again and she and her friend and dog walked on. I went out after a bit and thought I should take a photo from afar of finger blight in action (the bouquet in her hand as they walked away) but a car got between me and them. Maybe just as well.

As I went down the garden side of the fence pulling weeds, I saw some more finger blight. As always happens, someone had pulled the flowers off the Echinops (Blue Globe Thistle). It seems to be irresistible to finger blighters wherever I plant it. At least I know the attempt to twist off the flower stem was not from the woman with the red clippers.

finger blight

finger blight

I am amazed and pleased that the Alliums have for some reason been immune to picking, maybe because they are low to the ground. They are teetering due to our recent heavy wind but still there.

Allium albopilosum

Allium albopilosum

The big poppies are just going to seed…

red poppy

red poppy

big fluffy white peony poppy

big fluffy white peony poppy

Allan helped me finish weeding….

You can tell the gardening is entering the less flowery midsummer time...

You can tell the gardening is entering the less flowery midsummer time…

…and then we went to check on the Port Office gardens to make sure they looked excellent for the annual Tuna Classic event. Allan went up on the port office balcony to get some photos of the sporty tuna boats that come to town for the event.

marina overview

marina overview

And he snuck a photo of me working on the south side of the port office.

at work

at work

I was not feeling happy because both of my eyelids were stinging and burning, especially the right one. I thought (and still think) it might be because when I was weeding and clipping at the boatyard, I leaned into the Stipa gigantea ornamental grass to cut some broken stems, and the flower of the grass might have brushed against my eyelid when I closed my eyes to protect myself from the dreaded ornamental grass cut. (I should wear goggles when I do that.)

At home, I did the blog for the day while Allan made dinner and then we watched a show as we ate. The whole time, I fretted and fretted because of the burning eyelid syndrome. This had happened before, twice, in the previous two years, with unpleasant results. In a state of extreme anxiety I almost wept because the very next day was the Gearhart garden tour. I had been counting the days and had indeed been looking forward it it ever since last year’s wonderful Gearhart tour. What if I couldn’t see? What if I had to go to the hospital? Oh, the distress.

The horror!  Above, 6 AM.  Below: 9 AM

The horror! Above, 6 AM.
Below: 9 AM

And indeed, when I woke up at 6 AM my right eye was swollen almost shut, just as I feared.

I took photos to email to Judy to garner sympathy. I did not think I would get a wink more sleep after 6 AM, and fretted about how I could enjoy the tour on only four hours of sleep…but I did fall back asleep for two more hours. There was little pain involved, just some eyelid burning, and my eyes themselves were fine, or I might have had the sense to go to the emergency room (or, er, waited till after the tour and then gone immediately). Fortunately, I had a pair of dark glasses so that my still swollen eyelid and under-eye bag would not scare the other tour guests. So off we went across the bridge.

There was the usual bridge work slowdown.

bridge work

bridge work

The usual complete halt, allowing for a photo through the bridge rails (for which I removed the cold washcloth that I had kept pressed to one stinging eyelid).

view

view

And the slowdown allowing a closer look at the bridge itself as we go nice and slowly up the highest spot.

bridge

And then, after all my suspense and fear of missing the tour, we were on to Gearhart for Gardens by the Sea!

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(While I try to catch up on the blog, writing this on August 3, I am also trying to catch up on sorely neglected billing.  Blogging is highly entertaining but has gotten in the way of some of the more practical details of running a business…)

July 24

I seem to have had a little walk through of the garden in the morning.  The lettuce bowl is evidence of trying to be adequate for the edible garden tour.

lettuce bowl

lettuce bowl

I have been picking leaves from it almost every night in order to keep it going till the tour on August 11.  Doing so is mildly enjoyable unless I see a slug or, as last time I brought in a bowl of assorted leaves, found a pretty yellow spider on one.  (Leaf and spider went back outside.)   I hope the flowers in the garden will distract tour guests from the paucity of edibles compared to other gardens.

Clematis 'Etoile Violette'

Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’

Then…work.  We began at the Red Barn tending to five container plantings and a small strip of garden.

looking northeast at the Red Barn

looking northeast at the Red Barn

My photos there rarely show the barn itself, so I got behind the garden and took this:

The Red Barn

The Red Barn

Next time I will try to get a horse emerging, although I can’t hang around and wait.  This time we’ll just see the pretty horse that lives next door to Diane’s place just north of the barn, our next little job.

Diane's sister's horse

Diane’s sister’s horse

The roadside garden at Diane’s is slowly filling in.  Here it is looking north…really shaking things up as I usually show it looking south.

Diane's roadside garden

Diane’s roadside garden

We stopped next at The Basket Case which has now closed for the season to get some of the very last sale plants to fill in a few places.

in an almost empty greenhouse

in an almost empty greenhouse

a wee tree frog in a water bucket

a wee tree frog in a water bucket

another on a greenhouse shelf

another on a greenhouse shelf

part of the crew watches us drive away

part of the crew watches us drive away

We were on our way to Andersen’s RV Park.  When we arrived, I realized I had forgotten the flat of trailing plants which I so wanted to fill in some of Lorna’s empty pots (left over from tulip time), so back we went to Basket Case.  This time, on the way back to Andersen’s, we made a quick stop to drop off a gift of a few extra annuals to our friend Vernice in her new spot in the RV park residence on Cranberry Road.  She was not home but we had no trouble recognizing her trailer with its lavish little garden.

Vernice's rig and garden

Vernice’s rig and garden

She should be on the edible tour; her vegetable patch is better than mine.

Vernice's veg

Vernice’s veg

I think the whole park could be on the edible tour because it sure looks like a lot of gardeners live there.

a good neighbourhood

a good neighbourhood

No wonder Vernice tells us she is happy living there.

Back at Andersen’s, we stuffed more plants along the edge of the Payson Hall planters to fill in a few gaps that had been bothering me.

The mural is by Susan Wallace of Painted Lady Lavender Farm

The mural is by Susan Wallace of Painted Lady Lavender Farm

One cosmos got freakishly large (above).  Fortunately that one happens to be right in the middle of the center planter so it does not throw off the balance.

The Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ in the containers in the west garden look bright even on a grey day.  Colour, colour, colour is what is sought at this job.

looking southwest

looking southwest

garden at Andersen's back office door

garden at Andersen’s back office door

More 'Butterfly' near the front of the office

More ‘Butterfly’ near the front of the office

Rudbeckia 'Tangerine Dream' by the picket fence

Rudbeckia ‘Tangerine Dream’ by the picket fence

After all the Andersen’s beds had had a going-over, we returned south to add some plants to the Long Beach planter by NIVA green.  I had not been happy with how it looked; it had some dull plants left over from its days as a volunteer garden.  I have been trying to make it better for my favourite shopkeeper, NIVA’s Heather Ramsay.

I like the lambs-ear but...maybe not colourfil enough...and a tatty old chrysanthemum will be pulled this fall.

I like the lambs-ear but…maybe not colourful enough…and a tatty old chrysanthemum will be pulled this fall.  

Maybe I should rip all of the old perennials out of that planter and start over!

While I stuffed six more annuals and two Geranium ‘Rozanne’ into the planter by NIVA, Allan got started on the planter watering and did the northern two blocks and we then went on to water the rest of the planters.  I found yummy white strawberries, left over from the days of volunteer planters,  in the one in front of Wind World Kites and made sure to show the nice man who owns that shop.

white strawberries

white strawberries

The Fish Alley whiskey barrels, replanted earlier this year to require less bucket watering, are not as showy as last year’s thirsty annuals,  but they will have a tapestry effect (I hope) as the sedums and herbs start to grow closer together.

one of four Fish Alley barrels

one of four Fish Alley barrels

Veterans Field garden is still red-white-and-bluing.

Veterans Field garden strip

Veterans Field garden strip

We ended the Long Beach session by a light weeding of the Fifth Street Parks.  Looks like I planted the lily below to match the Benson’s Restaurant sign but it is a happy coincidence.

colour echo

colour echo

That lily is so fragrant I could smell it twenty feet away.

On the other side of the street, in front of Captain Bob's Chowder

On the other side of the street, in front of Captain Bob’s Chowder

We still have not had time to eat at Captain Bob’s this summer because it always seems we have urgent watering to get to in Ilwaco at the end of a Long Beach day….

Detail with Eryngium 'Jade Frost/

Detail with Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’, cosmos, and catmint

the north end of that border with Marsh's Free Museum

the north end of that border with Marsh’s Free Museum

Then, off to Ilwaco.  Allan had bucket watered the Ilwaco planters two days before so (after we weeded at the yellow cottage; that part of the workday gets neglected in the blog if I go home to water the tomatoes and veg!)  That’s a job for every third day except in very warm weather.

Larry and Robert’s garden (a half block from our home) definitely needed watering and I had some more end-of-season annuals from The Basket Case to stuff into the garden boat.  It has rather suffered in our unseasonably strong cold winds lately and the cosmos is not putting on as good a show as I wanted.

boat stuffed with more annuals

boat stuffed with more annuals (pink agyranthemum, Salvia ‘Victoria Blue’

We have to be sure to give plenty of water regularly to the new tree we planted in the corner garden so that it thrives.

in the corner:  Robinia Pseudoacacia 'Frisia'

in the corner: Robinia Pseudoacacia ‘Frisia’

There’s something to be said for the Hornbuckle style of gardening with space between the plants!  It bothered me while I was there, but looking at the photo the effect is rather nice.  And it is what Judy can see from her window, so it is appropriate the way that each plant stands out in its own glory.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 10:  It is easier to go to work while the cats snooze than it was during wild late winter weather.  They seem to pick such uncomfortable places…

Mary and Smokey

Mary and Smokey

We began with a check up on Diane’s Sandridge garden.  I am happy with the way the roadside bed is filling in (thanks in part of Larry’s good watering).

It looks even better if (right) I use a slight telephoto effect and squeeze the plants closer together.

It looks even better if (right) I use a slight telephoto effect and squeeze the plants closer together.

Next door, the garden by the Red Barn is looking better…

Red Barn garden

Red Barn garden

And in the barn, I could not resist going to look at a burro (or donkey?)

donkey

And a horse, maybe named Peace or maybe that is the sentiment of the horse’s person.

peace

peace

From there, we stopped at The Basket Case so I could get myself one of those Banana Cream daisies, and I also picked up some Geranium ‘Rozanne’ to add to the Long Beach planters.  I will probably hold them till better planting weather in fall.

Lobelia tupa is coming into bud!

Lobelia tupa is coming into bud!

Echinacea looking fabulous

Echinacea looking fabulous

Then on to Peninsula Landscape Supply to dump debris and get half a yard of Soil Energy to add to Marilyn’s.  We arrived at an exciting time when a big delivery of stone arrived.

much activity

much activity

Garden tour poster in the window

Garden tour poster in the window

Peninsula Landscape Supply will be one of the ticket sales points for the July 20th tour.

In the midst of all the action, Colleen loaded us up…

Colleen

and off we went to Marilyn’s.  The garden is looking pretty tour worthy!

tour ready

shasta daisies and painted sage and more

shasta daisies and painted sage and more

I took lots of photos so that I could get the deer page ready by Friday when tickets (with the link) were to go on sale.  We had the strimmer and used it along the backside of the garden so it now looks good from all angles.

behind the garden

behind the garden

The two Rozannes ended up at Marilyn’s along the driveway after we had added the mulch to that area and to another path spot behind the back porch…and then we were off back south to the Wiegardt Gallery in Ocean Park.

Wiegardt Gallery front garden

Wiegardt Gallery front garden

Eryngium 'Jade Frost'

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’

Gallery manager Christl expressed amazement that the Eryngium just keeps getting more intensely blue.

Eric Wiegardt himself showed up with a new painting, and lots of cars arrived for a workshop he was about to teach.

The Artist

The Artist

We left for Klipsan Beach Cottages to do weeding and deadheading.  Two slightly different views than the usual:

the garden view people get when they check in

the garden view people get when they check in

a view from inside a garden bed while weeding

a view from inside a garden bed while weeding

I am not just weeding out weeds but trying to get rid of damnable Japanese anemone, a plant I once liked till I found how invasively it runs through a garden.

The sweet peas at KBC are doing better than mine.  So are the ones at Andersen’s…I think because they got more care than mine at home!

sweet peas and Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

sweet peas and Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

sweet pea and Eryngium 'Sapphire Blue'

sweet pea and Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

We then went to Golden Sands Assisted Living, where I took the usual pictures of the four quadrants.  We had to water around the edges again but this time I had a great talk with the maintenance man who is going to address the powers that be about getting some better sprinklers set up.  The ones they have a pretty twirly things that get baffled by plants growing in to them and that do not reach the edges of the gardens.  We discussed how I could get the courtyard looking good enough to be on the garden tour if the water situation got resolved and if we had some help cleaning up the pitifully weedy and drab areas outside the quadrants, where I actually think bark mulch (NOT RED) would help.

outside the quadrant

outside the quadrants

southwest  quadrant

southwest quadrant

detail: Sanguisorba

detail: Sanguisorba

NW quadrant...still needs mulch!

NW quadrant…still needs mulch!

NE quadrant

NE quadrant

SE quadrant

SE quadrant

SE quadrant detail

SE quadrant detail

By the time we were almost ready to leave, some of the residents were taking an after dinner walk through the courtyard and we were most pleased to hear their happy words about the flowers.

Not done yet, we spent an hour or so at Andersen’s RV Park.  The main show of poppies in the west garden is declining but some of the newly planted areas are coming on with poppies sown this year rather than reseeded ones.

west garden at Andersen's

west garden at Andersen’s: middle section is petering out

but the south side has new poppies

but the south side has new poppies

and so does the west end.

and so does the west end.

Here’s a different view than the usual one of the picket fence garden on the east side of Lorna’s house.

Usually I take a photo looking south over the fence.  This is looking north.

Usually I take a photo looking south over the fence. This is looking north.

For your amusement: a cute staff dog!

For your amusement: a cute staff dog!  What a face!

and the garden tour poster in the window!

and the garden tour poster in the window!

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