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Posts Tagged ‘Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’’

Thursday, 5 July 2018

at the post office

our post office garden

matchy matchy Asiatic lily (probably ‘Landini’) and a sanguisorba

Depot Restaurant

weeding and watering…

Dierama (Angels’ Fishing Rod) is blooming.

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’, Agastache (‘Blue Boa’, maybe) and Cornus ‘Hedgerows Gold’

Long Beach

Allan string trimming around the welcome sign

back side

We watered the Long Beach planters downtown.

busy tourist town (Allan’s photo)

Cosmos ‘Xanthos’


We will crisscross the street to do the other three planters in a group of four while waiting for a large crowd to move on.  Still, we do end up having to ask people to move so we can water.

Only once years ago did someone get angry and ask me to come back later; I said gently that we were on our way to water all the Ilwaco planters after Long Beach so no, we could not come back later—and she did move.

Sometimes, even though Long Beach is fun, I get tired of the noise and traffic in summer and end up counting off how many planters I have to do before I am done watering.

Sanguisorba ‘Pink Elephant’ persists in a planter even after I decided it was too tall and moved it to Fifth Street Park.

One of the shop workers arrives to work on this. (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

Fifth Street Park (Allan’s photo)

Allan’s photo

We tidied up the gardens in Veterans Field for the Friday farmers market.

Brodiaea ‘Queen Fabiola’…and a white one.

Due to sprinkler problems, the monarda looks stressed. I think I don’t want it in this bed anymore. (Sprinkler probably blocked by too many plants—typical of our gardens.)

Port of Ilwaco

We watered some, but not all, of the curbside gardens.

my one pitiful eremerus (Allan’s photo)

by Ilwaco pavilion

A pleasant fellow stopped to ask about santolinas; he liked them.

My favourite bed is still marred by finger blight.

The lavenders may not heal up. Certainly not by the big fireworks show on July 7th.

The santolina will heal…eventually.

Don Nisbett’s signs have been installed!

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ gets the most comments and queries nowadays.

We were tidying because of fireworks show crowds on Saturday and Art Walk on Friday.

This is what a properly pruned santolina looks like.  It will flower later.

This is the only one I forgot to clip!

We got the watering done from David Jensen’s architecture office all the way to Time Enough Books; then I did a walkabout of the Ilwaco planters while Allan watered them.

downtown window

before chickweed removal

after…it lurks beneath though

Diascia ‘Blackthorn Apricot’ (top) is my favourite. I was worried people would not find it bright enough.

matchy!

Good citizen Ethel was string trimming and then raking along the sidewalk for art walk night.

Ethel’s efforts to beautify the town were a perfect example of action instead of big talk and complaints.

While Allan continued watering the planters, which takes an hour and a half minimum, I watered the boatyard garden.  It used to take us half an hour or forty five minutes to water the planters back when we bucket watered them, before the water trailer.  But we are just no longer up to hauling what was literally 800 pounds of water twice a week.

view from behind the boatyard fence; the shadow is of a boat prow that was above me

While watering, I pulled some horsetail and grass away from the back of the fence.

I was daunted by huge slugs hiding down there.  I had not brought to the far end of the fence my slug disposal tools or a pair of gloves.  I was just pulling with bare hands.  I do hate touching a slug.

Afterwards, I looked at my particularly arthritic finger and for a creepy few moments I felt like it was just going to break right off at the joint.

horrific, depressing old age

I walked down to the other far end of the boatyard and the hose was not there.  (I use a series of hoses that lay around by the faucets…usually.)  I simply could not hobble all the way back to the middle of the other stretch of fence and drag a hose back.  Fortunately, Allan, who has no arthritis that we know of, showed up in the nick of time and watered the south end of the garden while I sat in the van in a state of collapse.  So glad to be home at dusk.

 

 

 

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Wednesday, 6 June 2018

We had an easy day planned, with a garden tour and a garden visit after work.

The Red Barn Arena

bees on California poppies (Allan’s photo)

I dug out some more wilted Helianthus, determined to grow only plants here that will look good without much watering.

This little patch of helianthus might get enough spill over water from the barrel, which gets watered more often than the garden does.

doesn’t make me happy to dig these out

in the barn (Allan’s photo)

horses going to pasture

Two coreopsis in a barrel also came out.  They have been wilted the last two times so they cannot live here anymore.

out they came

I need plants here that will thrive only on our once a week watering.  It is a windy area, which makes it even harder.

By the front gate, drought tolerance is even more necessary as water has to be schlepped out there.

Delosperma ‘Fire Spinner’ (not invasive here)

Diane’s garden

We weeded and did not need to water.

allium going to seed (Allan’s photo)

our good friend Misty (Allan’s photo)

Diane’s roadside garden

The Planter Box

I found a few succulents for the planter we had taken the coreopsis out of.

dazzling pelargoniums at the Planter Box (did not buy these for the barrel)

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We weeded and tidied for an hour, and took photos for the KBC Facebook page.

a bud on Salvia ‘Black and Bloom’, an improvement on ‘Black and Blue’

This will be our last summer in this garden because managers/owners Denny and Mary are retiring.  It feels odd.  Can’t do planting for the future here.

Thalictrum ‘Elin’ and rugosa rose

Fuchsia

fern by the clam shed (Allan’s photo)

the pond (Allan’s photo)

Bella

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

Rose ‘Jude the Obscure’

Now that KBC is the only job we have north of Long Beach, we try to sometimes add a fun north end garden tour or some such thing to make the round trip (about forty minutes driving) worthwhile.  (Next year, not having KBC will probably give us an extra day off on some of the summer weeks.) This time, we visited the Oysterville garden (which will be tomorrow’s post).

This was at the Oysterville Church afterward.

Allan’s photo

Allan’s photo

behind the church

If you are ever taking a walking tour of Oysterville (a map is available inside the church), it is useful to know that there is a sani-can behind the church.

On the way back south, we stopped briefly in Ocean Park at

Mark and Brian’s garden.

You may remember our tour of their garden last summer.  Today, we were just picking up some Japanese anemone that they had potted up for us (to go in the bogsy wood).  Of course, we did have a good walk around the garden.

calendulas and marigolds

the front garden

The air immediately becomes cooler and fresher when one enters the back garden with its two waterfall pond.

Allan’s photo

a garden expansion in front of the pond

rock dragonfly

fancy pelargonium

succulent pot

hellebore foliage

Rhododendron ‘Pink Walloper’

Rhododendron ‘Pink Walloper’

Brian with maples from seedlings found in a parking lot planting

the deckside garden (The deck has an enviable view of the pond.)

a gift of Japanese anemones. I gave them a six pack of Cosmos ‘Cupcake’.

a bit more work

On the way home, we swung by the Red Barn again and bunged some succulents and gaillardia into the barrel.  I also put in a small, perhaps too small, sign that says “Water me!”  The poor erysimum got awfully dried up, but I left it in there for now because it is blooming so well.  The bulb foliage (in an awkward place) is tigridia.

Allan’s photos

After we got home, Allan watered at the J’s….

and the Norwoods….

The forecast still calls for rain on the weekend.  We hope so…as long as it does not fall on the Pride parade in Astoria.

 

 

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Wednesday, 12 July 2017

Before we got started, the mum of our friend Thandi came to visit the garden.  (As we have with many of our friends, we had told her to tour it anytime as long as she closes the deer gates.)

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alliums and santolina in the back garden

The Depot Restaurant…

…got the usual watering and grooming.

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Dierama (angel’s fishing rod) in bloom

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Allan’s photo

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Dierema

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assorted eryngiums

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Allan’s photo

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north side of dining deck

Red Barn Arena

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Allan’s photo

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Misty was at the barn today…

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…with Holly and Diane (Allan’s photo)

In the barrels, even the red diascia have almost dried up.

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sad diascias, a plant I usually think of as pretty tough

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I cut them way back.

Even though the red diascia were by request, I swear that next year I am going to go all ultra-drought tolerant in those barrels.  Small red sedums and sempervivums around the edges would be a good solution.

Diane’s garden

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between Diane’s and the Red Barn (Allan’s photo)

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Diane’s garden

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a belly rub was insisted upon

The Basket Case Greenhouse

We made a quick stop on the way north to pick up some blue “Korean agastache” that Roxanne had grown from seed (and a few other impulse buys, of course, including a gold leafed four o clock called ‘Limelight’).

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still lots of choices in the annuals house

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Look who stopped to say hi.  (Allan’s photo)

On the way further north to Klipsan Beach, we delivered a life jacket to J9, who is planning to go boating with a friend this weekend.

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J9’s place

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J9 made a planter out of this old crab pot.

Of course, we then had to drive by Ed Strange’s place on the way back to the highway and were fortunate to find him home.

touring Ed’s Garden

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Ed’s place

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He is slowly landscaping the neighbours’ front garden, as well.

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gold and more gold by the dog run

Awhile ago, Ed ran a culvert pipe along the road, thus being able to expand the front edge of the garden into what used to be a bank of salal and a ditch.  You can see the salal in this old photo:

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2014

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same area today

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My good friend Jackson Strange (He’s a Springer Spaniel.)

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Allan’s photo

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front porch

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fancy pelargoniums

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Ed’s east facing porch and deck

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I had delphinium envy.  Maybe I could grow them in a pot.

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On the deck; he’s had this cactus for 46 years.

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view east from the deck.  The old single wide next door is going to be demolished soon.

Ed waters his handsome clump of gunnera for an hour a day, he says, and mulches it heavily.

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Allan’s photo

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The round grey “pavers” are Sedum ‘Cape Blanco’

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by the garage

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Note the gunnera on this painting.

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hebe in the back garden

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Ed’s enviable hostas

Ed agreed to be the one who will dig up and take away my sad tattered hostas and give them a better life.

We had a tour of Ed’s home.  My home would never be tidy like this if someone dropped by.

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vintage light fixture and stained glass inset

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his grandma’s pug

Then we all had to get back to work.

Klipsan Beach Cottages

We weeded and tidied.  The garden had held up well since last week.  In gardens like this one, where we can count on not having to water, we get a lot more actual gardening done.

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It suddenly felt quite hot out.  (About 70 F)

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Persicaria ‘Golden Arrow’

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One of Mary’s glorious rose bushes

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sit spot with Tetrapanax ‘Steroidal Giant’

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Allan’s photo

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Echinops (blue globe thistle)

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Allan noticed them, too.

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another healthy rose

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I wish I knew the names of all the roses Mary has.

Deadheading Rose ‘Bow Bells’ (Allan’s photos):

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before

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after

We headed all the way back to Ilwaco for our last job of a pleasantly easy day.

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Allan shopped at Sid’s Supermarket on the way (his photo)

Port of Ilwaco

We watered 9 of the curbside gardens, some long, and some just little pockets.

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Looking west on Howerton from the port office

I had an unnerving experience while watering the Time Enough Books garden.  A baby bird hopped out onto the street, followed by its anxious mother.

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The mother cheeped frantically.

The baby went further out into the street.  The mother played “I have a broken wing!”  I tried to stop traffic but had to back up…in the street!…because a woman just would not stop.  Finally she did…on top of the baby bird, which I could no longer see.  When she finally asked what was wrong, and I said there was a baby bird under her car, she asked what to do, and I told her I really had no idea.  (I could not get down and crawl under the car plus I did not trust her not to move.)  Thank all creation that when she drove on, the bird was fine.  I gently boosted it back up into the garden while the mother made another dramatic broken wing pantomime.

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The parents continued to keep a close eye on me.

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There’s a baby bird somewhere in the garden.

Allan’s photos:

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Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

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parsley, poppy, toadflax

Tomorrow: Back to the watering rounds in Long Beach and Ilwaco.

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Monday, 3 July, part two

Karen and Steve’s garden

On the way south from working in Long Beach, we took a side road so that I could sneak a peak at a project whose progress I’ve been watching on occasional drive-bys: the building of a rock wall and resulting raised front garden at the home of landscaper Steve Clarke.  As we tried to subtly drive past while craning our necks, we were spotted and hailed by Steve’s spouse, Karen, and were delighted to be invited to tour the inner sanctum of the garden.

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We’ve been watching this front garden appear.

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The distortions of  (cheap) digital photography make it hard to show that this wall is perfectly level.

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well cut and fitted rocks (Allan’s photo)

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Steve’s plush carpet of new lawn (Allan’s photo)

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established bed on south wall of the house

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south wall garden

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the joy of garden touring

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Acer palmatum ‘Shishigashira’

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south wall sit spot

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geranium (bee) and Erysimum ‘Wenlock Beauty’, we think

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One of Karen’s artful containers

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and another

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more container combos

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containers and ingredients (new plants)

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stacked blue pots

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Allan’s photo

We walked between garage and house to Karen’s floriferous back garden.

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a mosaiced step up

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Allan’s photo

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the back garden….The house dates to the mid 1920s.

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Allan’s photo

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Allan’s photo

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I was commenting how Knautia ‘Thunder and Lightning’ tends to revert to green in one year.

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in the back garden

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detail

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These tall eryngiums in the foreground will soon be turning steely blue.

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Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ is already at is peak of blue.

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Allan’s photo

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detail and textures

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astilbes (love them)

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blue hydrangea

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Hedge is on the north side.

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Allan’s photo.  I think that’s ‘Orange Rocket’ barberry, which I am still trying (and failing) to successfully grow.

I briefly mistook these monkshood for delphiniums and had a pang of delphinium envy!

Colorful oxalis

Backlit continus (smokebush)

An agastache centerpiece

An exclamation point as you go from the back to the front garden.

Walking back around to the southwest side, we admired the kitchen garden.  I’d love to have something this organized.

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The lattice enclosure (right) hides the wheelie bin and so forth.

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on the lattice enclosure: a display of ‘Pretty Much Picasso’ petunias

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This kitty in the shop window was a guest for the day.

It was fortuitous to get invited into this garden created by true plantspeople.  Karen is good friends with Our Lorna, former owner of the site of our former longtime job, Andersen’s RV Park, and it may be that a campfire with Lorna and Karen at our garden just might be in the works.  I hope so!

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Friday, 30 June 2017

We had today to get the boatyard garden weeded for tomorrow’s Port of Ilwaco fireworks display crowd….and the beach approach, for the Fourth of July holiday weekend.  I did want very much want Saturday and Sunday off.

I began in my own garden by picking a bouquet for Salt Hotel’s holiday weekend.

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Astilbes are good in bouquets…

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…and I have lots of astilbes right now.

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‘Sugar Shack’ continues to come back after being given up for dead!

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Nicotiana ‘Fragrant Cloud’ lives up to its name.

I am going to plant MORE Nicotiana ‘Fragrant Cloud’ next year, and I would very much like to find Nicotiana sylvestris ‘Only the Lonely’, as well. (I’d rather be able to buy a flat of it than buy just one on mail order.)  Annie’s Annuals says this one self sows!

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yellow hearts of Lamprocapnos scandens

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Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’

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post office garden

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delivering bouquet to Salt (mostly astilbes and sanguisorba)

Ilwaco Boatyard garden

Our first project was to finish weeding the boatyard garden…not to absolute perfection, but as close to it as we could get.

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In three hours, we finished it!

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a boat on the move (Allan’s photos)

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Before moving on ourselves, I decided to walk the length of the garden, south to north, for a photographic record.

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Halmiocistus wintonensis

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Geranium ‘Rozanne’

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an unfortunately unclipped santolina (which is why we clip them)

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Catananche (Cupid’s Dart)

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mysteriously empty area (plant jacking?)

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Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

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finger blight

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Allan noticed it, too.

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sweet pea (Allan’s photo)

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clipped santolina

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past the gate

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Cistus (the one remaining of several)

 

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I love the way fallen ceanothus flowers look like a crushed glass mulch.

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Deer are not eating the lilies so will plant more.

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Echinops (blue globe thistle)

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A lot of the pink sidalcia clump had been broken or picked.

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Persicaria ‘Firetail’

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This spot was also mysteriously empty…filled in now with some cosmos and (disappointing) painted sage

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a daisy from a start from Jo’s garden

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Helenium ‘Sahin’s Early Flowerer’

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a running perennial sunflower from a start from Andersen’s RV Park

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calendula

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looking south from the north end

We took a short break at home…

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Skooter in the garden (Allan’s photo)

before heading to…

Long Beach

We had about five sections left to weed on the Bolstad beach approach.

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Allan manually jug watering one planter (the only way to water out here)

All but 6 of the remaining photos today are Allan’s.

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birds foot trefoil and vetch swamping the roses

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before

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before

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during

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after

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before (well, during)

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Rugosa rose and Sweet William

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filmy white vetch, not even pretty like the purple one

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happy tourists (telephoto) taking the obligatory arch photo

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coreopsis

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We got through all the remaining sections of the approach garden.

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rolling out the debris at city works

We just got done in time to have the weekend off and to meet Dave and Melissa and Todd for Friday night dinner at

The Cove Restaurant

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Sondra’s cat by the parking lot

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North Beach Garden Gang arrives

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in the foyer

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perusing the tempting menu

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Sondra’s dog Lacey out on the golf course

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clams for Melissa

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lemon caper pasta for me

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noodle bowl and harvest salad

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Todd and Dave tuck in

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a dessert shared by all

We stayed till we were by far the last table and the vacuum cleaner was about to come out, the hint that it is time for us to go home.

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Thursday, 29 June 2017

Our plan to finish the port on Friday suddenly got changed when I saw an ad in the paper last night that Ilwaco Freedom Market was holding a BBQ in their parking lot on Friday.  Their strip of bark/would-be garden would have to be done Thursday, along with the curbside garden in front of their store.  I wondered if this would change up our schedule so much that we’d have to work on Saturday…

Port of Ilwaco

In this infrequently watered garden, the recent hot day and the wind had crisped up some of the dog daisies.

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before

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after

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Some daisies were good enough to stay through the holiday weekend.

The curbside garden got a good watering, as did the garden next door at Salt.

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Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

Allan had the terribly boring part of the job (his photos follow): Running the string trimmer along the sidewalk to the marina:

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and the tedium of weeds in a barkscape with tatty landscape fabric (which we are slowly removing; obviously it does not prevent weeds).

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I hope that we can create more joy in this bed by next year.

On the way out of town, even though we were feeling time pressure, we circled round the block to deal with this in a tree garden (Allan’s photos):

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Fortunately, the sign-putter did not get mad about being told it just could not be in the tree bed, no matter how gently placed.

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It’s not even a great patch of garden….However, the sign sets a bad precedent for future damage.

Long Beach

We checked on and did not feel the need for any work at the welcome sign.

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The Fun Rides have now moved into a parking lot area near the center parking lot berm.  We felt the need to at least string trim said berm.  Allan dropped me off at Veterans Field to weed and took time for a bit of strimming there.

Before: a rough edge had been left.

after

meadowy look around the anchor

flag pavilion garden: am thrilled Salvia patens came back

Salvia ‘Hot Lips’ and Salvia patens

Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’

I think Sapphire Blue reseeded itself into plain old eryngium, left  ??maybe

Meanwhile, Allan faced the tedium of the boring and never watered center berm:

a string trimmer job, with some dandelion pulling

He found a dirty diaper as well as weeds. Unfortunately, used diapers are not an unusual find in the parking lot area.

I started the watering round earlier than Allan did so was able to do four blocks of planters to his two.  My walkaround:

I realized that the theme of most of my planters IS the meadow look.

cosmos and California poppies

Today, I had the hard task of carrying bucket water to the four Fish Alley planters…a long walk to the back end. I sometimes think this is the hill I will die on.

It was windy…again.

Basket Case basket

I am very disappointed in the Salvia viridis, painted sage, this year.  They are supposed to look like this:

pink dahlia, pink painted sage

But this year and last year they have been disappointing.  Everywhere I’ve planted them this year, they are just putting out one small disappointing bract on the top:

The bract (colored leaf) is the showy part and should be all down the stem! Why is this happening?

 

If these plants don’t shape up, I am going to go off them and not use them next year.  For so many years they have been the most asked about plant (many times per each summer watering session) in the planters.  Last year, when they were also dull, no one asked about them at all.

Allan’s watering walk around:

????? What have we here?

nice round lavender

a crab shell deposited in a planter

Cosmos and California poppies

So he saw this woman with a hat clearly decorated with planter flowers (Cosmos and Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and California poppy).  She told him her two year old had picked them, and she was perfectly happy to have her photo taken.

In other unrelated news, a local realtor told Allan that she had seen a woman picking a bouquet from under the trees.  When the realtor suggested the woman not do that, the woman (not the woman in the hat) kept picking, saying she “had permission”, which the realtor doubted.  Allan assured her that permission had not been given by us.

In better news, he saw someone taking photos of the flowers, as it should be.

We finished Long Beach by weeding in Fifth Street Park.  It is taking a long time to get interesting.

slow to be colorful; we are not allowed to let much of the garden be taller than the fence.

I cut off the spent stalks of Camassias.

Eryngium ‘Jade Frost’ and cerinthe (Allan’s photo)

Port of Ilwaco again

More watering of the Howerton curbside gardens was essential.  Allan started east of the Pavilion while I watered and weeded by the Nisbett Gallery, port office, Time Enough Books…

Coast Guard helicopter overhead (Allan’s photo)

Someone had braided a grass by Loading Dock Village. Allan thought a clever student from the driving school did it while waiting.  (Allan’s photo)

Eryngium and santolina (Allan’s photo)

Eryngium and yarrow (Allan’s photo)

Port office south side…which the office staff waters.

the marina

In the curbside gardens, I have found eremerus (foxtail lily) to be a big disappointment.  They just mostly dry up like this one:

in the center, all dried up and no flower

And only one looks like it should, so I may have to give up on planting them:

beautiful tall spikes of the one happy Eremurus

port office curbside

Artist Don Nisbett told me he’d given this little bed 11 gallons of water on the recent 90 degree day.  Thank you, friend!

I spent a lot of time grooming the dead flowers off of the sea thrift.

example: before

after

Allan caught up to me and dropped off the trailer at the boatyard, went home and hooked up the water trailer, and came back to help me finish watering at Time Enough.

veronica at Time Enough

Time Enough garden boat

Purly Shell yarn shop shares the Time Enough building.

I felt a strong desire to have a nice dinner at Salt Pub.  Not tonight.

Allan still had to water the Ilwaco trees and planters.  At 7:30, he dropped me off at the boatyard to weed.

I walked down to the north end to begin.  There, the weeds were the worst with lots of tall velvet grass.

taken while Allan watered planters at the boatyard intersection

a trio on a walk (Allan’s photo shows two out of three dogs)

8:15 PM

I was thrilled to find some sweet peas, planted from seed, prevailing against the horsetail.

tree garden watering where the sign had been (Allan’s photo). I do not like that wild sweet pea in there. He does.

 

boatyard: I had got this far by 8:50 PM.

I was getting close to the stretch that had been partly weeded earlier this week.

I have planted a few lilies in the boatyard to test if deer will eat them. I think a human picked some of the flowers off this one.

I love heleniums.

8:55 PM

I started to wonder when Allan would show up, as the song lyrics “Gettin’ dark, too dark to see…” ran through my mind.  I pictured slowly pushing my wheelbarrow home in the dark.  The odd thing was I still had loads of energy and could have weeded for another two hours (by headlamp?), thanks in part to my Unloader knee brace.

At last Allan drove up to the trailer at the other end of the boatyard.

what I got done

The whole stretch has to be weeded reasonably well by Saturday.

It was 9:30 at home before the trailer was unhitched and parked.  Allan saw this disturbing sight on the roof next door:

Not good news. Raccoons severely damaged the shake roof on my old house…

They are bold and unafraid.

I didn’t know I still had it in me to do a ten hour day and was well chuffed.

 

 

 

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Thursday, 22 June 2017

I’ll get my initial 25 mph wind complaint out of the way right here at the beginning, and get back to more fervent complaining at the end.

First, a watering of all the container plants at home.  I still don’t have the patio area tidied and arranged and it is almost July!

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As we drove off to work, we saw that Dave and Melissa were working on a former garden we had created several years ago.  We quit because of…reasons.  I wouldn’t say it bothered me to see that garden fill with weeds; however, for the sake of the remaining good plants, I was glad to see them working on it.

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Sea Star Gardening doing a great job releasing plants from weedy smothering.

Long Beach

We weeded and tidied at the welcome sign and made sure the water was on, because the temperature for this weekend is predicted to be 90 degrees.  (I’m going to complain about that for sure.)

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Welcome sign…seems lacking without the high maintenance Agyranthemum ‘Butterfly’ that I decided to forgo this year. Also, no one had echibeckia available. Agastache ‘Summer Glow’ is not making a good background show at all.

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I hope the cosmos get taller soon.  Must remind self many plants have been slowed this year by cold weather.

Despite the wind, our next project was to start a methodical end to end weeding of the beach approach.  We’ve been jumping around to the sections that need mulch the most.  Today, I did not think we had time to get mulch from the works yard, so weeding took priority. (All Allan’s photos:)

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starting at the west end

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sand and clover

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These big flat yellow clovers are satisfying to pull because they come out easily on one main stems and clear a big area when gone.  (Allan’s photo)

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After: We got two out of 12.5  sections done, with probably another whole section or more done earlier this week in mulched areas further on.  Only took 1 1/2 of hours for two sections, compared to about 3 hours (meaning 6 with two people) per section on the initial spring weeding. (Allan’s photo)

My goal is to get through the whole garden by July 4th and then to do the complete mulching of all low and/or open areas by mid July’s Sandsations event.  The garden will be a little wild but will, I hope, not have tall weed grasses or vetch all through the roses.

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after

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passersby

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We usually eat lunch by holding a peanut butter sandwich with one hand and taking bites while weeding with another hand.  Often I forget to eat lunch at all. Today we rewarded ourselves for our good work with a Pink Poppy Bakery treat and coffee at Abbracci Coffee Bar by Fifth Street Park (east side).

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In the words of Madeline of Pink Poppy Bakery: “It may look plain but don’t judge a bundt by it’s cover! Pecan brown sugar pound cake will remind you of Grandma’s kitchen.”

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In Abbracci Coffee Bar

Next, we weeded in Fifth Street Park.

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I had petted this friendly little doggie named Woo Woo.

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Allan weeded an annoying scrim of horsetail.

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Allan used the string trimmer to clear this area that goes behind the restroom.

Someone years ago planted “dwarf” pampas grass on the L shaped “behind the restroom” area.  It is infested with weeds. I made it clear a few years back that it was no longer our problem.  In my opinion, it needs to be totally removed…by someone younger and stronger.

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Woo Woo and her guy having lunch from Captain Bob’s Chowder. (Allan’s photo)

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Northwest corner before weeding horsetail and trimming stems that had gone cattywampus in the wind. Forgot to take an after.

With the park pretty thoroughly weeded, we set out on our watering walkabout.  I went north and Allan went south on Pacific Way (the main street).

Allan’s photos:

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starting at the carousel

I’m amazed that allium has not been bothered.  If they would remain unbothered, I would plant a lot more of them in the planters.  In previous years, they did not last more than a few days before being plucked.

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yellow bidens

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the recently re-done southernmost planter

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ending across the street from the carousel

my photos:

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In Fifth Street park, east side: Eryngium and starry Brodiaea ‘Queen Fabiola’.  The latter is starting to make up for its rampant, floppy foliage.

A young woman tourist stood by this Basket Case Greenhouse basket….

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and said “This is just what my baskets look like at home…” and then laughed and added, “Not so much!”  I could have said “You can get one just like that at the Basket Case on Sandridge for $29.99!”

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Looking across the street, I thought the Stormin’ Norman planter looked great…..

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…with lots of red to tone with the building.

When I got there at the end of my rounds, I found it full of chickweed and fireweed and the dangnable ornamental wire plant that we have tried to eliminate.

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Agastache ‘Cotton Candy’

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Dianthus ‘Charles Musgrave’

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Dianthus ‘Charles Musgrave’

Because I was all out of photos for the NIVA green Facebook page, I stopped in there to take some.

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NIVA green

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I peeked into the plant section at Dennis Company and saw this list of deer resistant plants.

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I have found they do eat Astilbe and Gaura, and I am sorry, but this needs a spell check.

Ilwaco

I walked around all the planters and street tree gardens and groomed them (especially the deadheading of the older and larger Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’, most of which are rocking back and forth a bit after the recent windstorm).  The wind was horrible…so cold, and so strong it was like a bully almost knocking me over at times.

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a business’s planter on First Avenue

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First Avenue window

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Allan watered and fertilized all the planters with the water trailer.

Since the last thorough go-round, a lot of big weeds had appeared.

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under one of the street trees! (Allan’s photo)

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the orange lilies someone planted in one of our planters. (Allan’s photo)

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one of my favourite tree beds blowing in the wind

A friend drove by on the way to birdwatch at the port and said “It’s late, you have to go home! I saw you can hardly walk across the street!”  I said, “I can’t; this has to be done!” And it did have to be done; we could not quit with only two thirds of the planters watered and cared for.

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old Erysimum, before

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after

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boatyard

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boatyard garden (will get plenty of weeding next week)

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picotee poppy at the end of the boatyard garden (Allan’s photo)

We finished by watering and some weeding at our post office garden, by which time we were both cold and wet and miserable and windblown and squabbling after a 9.5 hour day.

Tomorrow, I have some local weeding to do and Allan has some volunteering at the playground build project. That will make for a short work week.  We will be making up for that with many hours next week.

 

 

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